a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

Issue 70

Mellow Yellow

The 3D Rotorua was a real family event

Fishing Away From Home It’s all in the preparation

Fiordland & Beyond Max Grant’s book reviewed

San Joaquin North Fork

Extreme white water

Proudly supported by:


For all your Sports Transportation Solutions

Proud Sponsors of the

www.thule.co.nz


www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 3


Contents Multisport

Technical

Mellow Yellow

6

Sea Kayaking Abel Tasman - Unbeaten Beauty A Coast to Coast of the South Island Trip Card - Cockle Bay to Whitford Trip Card - Pauatahanui Inlet

8 12 30 31

Fishing Fishing Away From Home

16

White Water The Hawea Wave - Manmade and Free North Fork of the San Joaquin

PAGE 4

Issue 70

Spring 2013

22 46

The Dog and Didymo Book Review - Fiordland and Beyond

28 40

Regulars Health Winter Excersize

34

Puzzles Sudoku Quick Crossword Puzzle Solutions

33 35 41

First Aid Hypothermia

36

Test your Knowledge

37

Bush Craft Fire

38

Leader Profiles

21

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Editorial Issue 70! Can you believe that? 70 issues! Nearly two decades of publishing and sharing kayaking tales with you the readers. Along with this over a thousand current Yakity Yak Kayak Members, thousands of readers and most important, many people enjoying amazing kayaking trips. What a huge effort from the New Zealand Kayak Magazine writers and production team along with the Canoe & Kayak crew and the Yakity Yak Club Leaders. Well done team. I’ve been thinking about what brings people towards us. A key thing is adventure. I looked up adventure on Wikipedia and got: an adventure is an exciting or unusual experience; it may also be a bold, usually risky undertaking, with an uncertain outcome. Well ‘exciting or unusual experience’ is spot on. Any one you talk to about our sport is always keen to hear more and amazed at our Adventures. The ‘risky undertaking and uncertain outcome’ part got me thinking that no wonder the media of late has been talking about wrapping kids up in cotton wool. Who wants to go on an adventure which is a ‘risky undertaking’ with an ‘uncertain outcome’? Well,I suppose that comes down to what these words mean to us. A risky undertaking is getting up in the morning and facing the toaster. (My favorite ad out of South Africa talks about six people killed by sharks each year in the world’s oceans and 442 killed by toasters in kitchens.) This to me puts ‘risky undertaking’ in the appropriate box. Apply the five ‘P’ rule (prior preparation prevents poor performance) and the risk is minimized to such an extent that you can have a safe, fun, ‘risky undertaking’ because you know your limits.

Issue 70 For me an ‘uncertain outcome’ is doing something which ends with new experiences. I have been stuck on a beach for several days because wind and waves made paddling unsafe. So we waited, played cards, talked to locals and ate too much until the conditions improved. In my book this was a positive experience. Is an ‘uncertain outcome’ something to fear or to look forward to? I believe the latter. As long as you have applied the five P’s an uncertain outcome can be dealt with. The experience brings increased ability to enjoy further adventures. What have we been doing for decades? We’ve been taking people into the outdoors well trained, enhancing their abilities to be safe, knowledgeable and bold risk takers. We all look forward to ‘uncertain outcomes’ as opportunities to practise what we have learnt and how to avoid ‘risky undertakings’ which could get out of control. Spring is coming and ‘the team’ is gearing up for a busy year exploring in our kayaks. Come along and join us. We guarantee an ‘Adventure’ or two to spice up your life. Do remember to photograph/report so your magazine can help you, as an author inspire thousands! Cheers Peter Townend

Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time. EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 / (09) 476 7066 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 41) New Zealand – 4 Issues = $25 Overseas – 4 Issues = $40

CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos. Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine Front Cover - Max & Melanie Grant complete their circumnavigation of the South Island. Photo by: Belinda Mulvany Contents Page Photo by: Tim Muhundan

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 5


Mellow Yellow The Howarth family and team from Canoe & Kayak North Shore take on the 3D Rotorua. This year Canoe & Kayak North Shore (CKNS) gave the ThermaTech 3D Rotorua Multisport Festival an extra hand! We teamed up with our friends in the industry; Q-Kayaks and Flow, to enhance the prize pool, increase participation and talk about it - just like we are doing right now. CKNS owner and all round kayak extraordinaire Rob Howarth says “This race is what multisport is all about, fun, challenging and mixing first timers, weekend warriors and elite athletes together across multi disciplines.” The 3D Rotorua is commonly known as the Australasian Multisport Championship and New Zealand Secondary Schools Multisport Championship. It has been in full swing since 2011 and this year on Queen’s Birthday Weekend Rob Howarth and the team rocked the race in full fashion at all levels streaming in yellow.

By Chris Stagg

CKNS was represented at almost every event in the festival starting with The Howarth Boys – Rob (age__ nevermind), Sam (11) and Hamish (9), and with supporting mum, Brenda, it really was a family event. Alongside them were family friends, staff and clients with just as many kids in yellow as adults. The Howarth Boys, competed for the second year in the parent/child pairing over the 25 km kayak/mountain bike/run course.

“It was tough, especially at the start of the mountain bike after a great paddle, but I loved every minute of it and can’t wait till next year, I just want to do it again!” “The boys were stoked to chase Dougal Allen and Richard Ussher over the last km or so of the race! Dougal clapped us over the finish line Nice!” says Rob, excited as usual. This is just one of the reasons that when race organiser, Neil Gellatly, asked if CKNS would like to sponsor the event this year Rob jumped at the opportunity. “The event offers a great forum for sponsors with plenty of opportunity to meet, mingle and get the brand out there. Of course having a Dad

Over 800 competitors will vie for places in the the world’s premier multi-sport event, the Speight’s Coast to Coast race on February 14th and 15th 2014.

Grade Two certification and brush up courses run through out the year. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details.

Will you be there? - 2014 entries now open.

P ACoast G E to6Coast 2014 I s s v1.indd u e 7 01

Spring 2013

w w w . 19/03/2013 k a y a k n9:29:35 z . c oa.m. .nz


and his two boys cross the finish line in company colours is pretty good marketing too. And we had plenty of other friends competing, many sporting the Canoe & Kayak Team stripe. Thanks guys!” Two other familiar faces competing were CKNS Multisport Kayak Coach

“The paddle started with a large amount of swash off the big guns. Once it all settled down I sat comfortably in a small pod with three other Rockstars all surfing off each other’s wakes coming out of the boat feeling fresh.” explained Nich. Goes to show that with a Flow kayak it’s a whole new band of Rockstars.

“The paddle started with a large amount of swash off the big guns. Once it all settled down I sat comfortably in a small pod with three other Rockstars all surfing off each other’s wakes coming out of the boat feeling fresh.”

Nich goes onto describe hooking into some of the best single track mountain biking trails he has ever ridden in a multisport event.

Chris Stagg and CKNS Sponsored Athlete Nich Bunting. It was Chris’ first race back after an eventful Speight’s Coast to Coast race earlier in the year.

Congratualtions to all those who took part, finished, and even placed. The 50 km Premier Multisport Individual race results: Mens - Dougal Allen (1st), Richard Ussher of Flow Kayaks (2nd), Trevor Voyce (3rd).

“It was tough, especially at the start of the mountain bike after a great paddle, but I loved every minute of it and can’t wait till next year, I just want to do it again!” said Chris on the finish line. “With so many of us in yellow it feels like you’re really a part of something”. Nich did exceptionally well finishing 2nd in his category in the 50 km individual.

“Overall I’m pleased with my placing but feel if I had been smarter about the race and my tactics I could have been close to 10 minutes faster in the run alone.” But life goes on Nich and we’re proud of you.

Womens - Simone Maier (1st), Sophie Hart (2nd) Elina Ussher (3rd). This event is an awesome introduction to multisport with a variety of options. You can enter as an individual or as a team over multiple distances and disciplines to cater for your level of competence. But if you are looking for a social family weekend away with adventure - lock this in your diaries for next year (Sunday June 1st 2014). We’ll see you there.

COMPETITIVE / COMFORTABLE / A TRUE CONTENDER

Ruahine Kayaks Designers and Manufacturers of Multisport & Adventure Racing Kayaks Phone: 021 273 0550

kevin@ruahinekayaks.co.nz www.ruahinekayaks.co.nz Ruahine ww w . k a11-07 y a V1.indd k n z . c1o . n z

Issue 70

S p r i n g 2 25/07/2011 013

10:23:11 P A Ga.m. E

7


Abel Tasman

Sunny days, cute wildlife, un-shaven faces and un-beaten South Island beauty. By Bridgette Strid

The Wellington Yakity-Yak Kayak Club ventured south over Easter; to explore the Abel Tasman once again. Picture sunny days, cute wildlife, un-shaven faces and un-beaten South Island beauty. The Abel Tasman offers all this and more! Add to that 13 people, and the Easter bunny, and the adventures are endless! This time the trip consisted of both new and returning club members, 13 people and 12 kayaks. We started off with an eventful ferry ride over to Picton, and things progressed from there!

PAGE 8

Issue 70

Spring 2013

Not long after boarding the ferry, we heard an announcement paging the driver of the Canoe & Kayak van. As much as we imagined kayaks riding waves of cars down in the vehicle docks, or sheep running amok in the van, it turned out that Andy just knew people in high places! Andy and a team of three or four were then invited out onto ‘The Bridge’ – a place that most passengers never get to see. After perfecting their many Titanic poses, Marty decided to add even more excitement to the night, by shouting the marine life to a shopping spree. Who needs a credit card on a kayak trip anyway! After a night in Picton, in relative civility, it was time for the last food stop or two; pies for breakfast, and a mad dash through the supermarket; before getting our kayaks ready for launching www.kayaknz.co.nz


in Marahau. Packing the kayaks may sound easy, especially for those who have done this many times before. However, from a new member’s perspective, shoving every manner of thing into a kayak isn’t that easy when you’re packing for a week! (Note to self, I probably don’t need to take my deck chair next time... although I still made it fit!). Our first day on the water consisted of a leisurely paddle over to Fisherman’s Island for lunch and a game of frisbee. We finally ended up at Apple Tree Bay, where we spent our first night camping. After some healthy debate, we’d decided that camping nearest the toilet and water source was the best idea, as we discovered that you can always move a picnic table half-way along the beach! I also learnt that it’s a good idea to practise using a flint before the trip, but fortunately plenty

www.kayaknz.co.nz

of others had used them before, and I didn’t have to go hungry after all. Andy’s bags were invaded by a rat or two in the night, although I guess there were no signs saying “Don’t feed the wildlife”! On Good Friday the Easter bunny met us in Te Pukatea Bay, and we had an Easter egg hunt in the sand. Needless to say, the rest of the trip involved a fair amount of chocolate! Then, after continuing to Falls Beach for lunch, Ket gave us a yoga lesson in our kayaks – I guess that’s one way to work off the calories from Easter! Whilst spotting a few seals along the way, we paddled towards Bark Bay, where we set up for our second night of camping. Most of us had a dip in the refreshing water

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 9


before dinner, and then we set up teams for a quiz night. With Chris at the helm as quiz mistress, we split into teams, and then fought for the title. Each person had to come up with a couple of odd questions (with answers), and a tune to whistle. It soon became clear that some were history buffs and some people needed to practise their whistling! The following morning gave us an even greater chance of seeing seals,

Awaroa Lodge offered us a brief respite, as we tasted true civilisation again. Coffees and cakes were on high order, and Rob even had his razor with him! as we paddled around Tonga Island to where the divers hung out. We had a bit of a chat with them before heading off to Shag Harbour; where a couple of seal pups decided to play in the water near our kayaks, and Andy and Pete even jumped into the water for a bit of snorkelling. Following that, we reached Onetahuti early enough for both lunch and setting up our tents. Six of us then walked towards Awaroa Lodge (until we reached a river crossing... and then there were five!). Awaroa Lodge offered us a brief respite, as we tasted true civilisation again. Coffees and cakes were on high order, and Rob even had his razor with him! One clean-

shaven man later, we traipsed back along the path, enjoying a botany lesson before returning to Onetahuti. We rounded off the evening with a game of charades; much of which involved challenging the other team with difficult movie titles for them to impersonate! Other highlights of the day included learning about Salp, thanks to numerous sightings and Chris’ knowledge of jellyfish. Ket was also unlucky enough to discover a hole in her kayak, but nothing a bit of duct-tape can’t fix (as we discovered later!). Easter Sunday was another good excuse to pig out on Easter eggs. I’m sure I must’ve eaten one at every meal-break! The morning was fairly eventful: even before we left the campsite! While everyone else was packing up tents in the pouring rain, Rob was busy draining wine from one of the hatches of his kayak. Rob’s sleeping bag was fortunate to escape dry and sober, whilst Ket was more concerned about whether it was the Shiraz or Merlot that had almost been lost. She then held onto the leaking cask, and offered it to everyone at lunch time! Fast forward into 30 minutes of paddling, when Andy decided that it was a good time to practise his John Wayne in choppy seas, and also to ensure that his bilge pump worked! One swim done... The rest of the morning involved a long break at Frenchman’s Bay, then a paddle to Torrent Bay and Torrent River, before having fun at Cleopatra’s Pool. We then made our way to Anchorage, amongst bouts of torrential rain for lunch and our final night of roughing it. We had another session of yoga on the beach, then after dinner Cathy led us all to some amazing caves not far away. The glow worms were breathtaking, and would’ve been heaven to an astronomer. Don’t turn on your torches if you’re not a weta fan though, as the caves were full of them! After a decadent sleep-in, Monday was our final day on the water. We paddled straight to Jewel Point on Adele Island, to see more baby seals,

PAGE 10

Issue 70

Spring 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


then continued around to the west side of the island where we could go ashore. Whilst here, we had a wonderful opportunity to see and hear some of New Zealand’s native birds in a predator-free environment. It was particularly special having confident robins walk right up to you; something that you’d be hard-pressed to experience anywhere else. A short time later, the last of us were scrambling over rocks to get back to our kayaks before the high tide cut us off! We then had a final paddle back to Marahau, to unload our gear and stash the kayaks. Just before this part was over, however, I took the risk of challenging Marty to a water fight. It was super-soaker vs bilge pump, youth against age.... but yet I still came off worst. Hmm lesson learned!

We had a wonderful opportunity to see and hear some of New Zealand’s native birds in a predator-free environment.

That night we were back in civilisation once again. We checked into Tahuna Holiday Park in Nelson and freshened up before dinner. A few more clean-shaven faces later (except for Andy and Pete who preferred the rugged Bear Grylls look), then we were off to the Smuggler’s Bar and Inn for good food and a chance to compare injuries! Finally it was time for the trip to come to an end. We farewelled Cathy in Picton on Tuesday afternoon, then jumped on the ferry for our cruise back to Wellington. The trip had been both eventful and fun and, to top it all off, a very large pod of dolphins decided to entertain the passengers just as we passed Pencarrow Head.

Thank you Andy for being our trip leader, and to the rest of the group for some fun times had. Adiós and bring on the next trip!

Tui Excel A versatile, go anywhere kayak

Penguin A tried and true winner that delivers affordable excellence

Shearwater A proven design that just got better

Skua An exceptional performance sea kayak

Southern Endeavour

For all the kayak specs. and stockists, visit www.q-kayaks.co.nz or phone 06 326 8667 Skua - 1st Plastic Sea Kayak -Trans Taupo Race 2011 - Circumnavigation around the South Island. www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

P A G E 11


A Coast to Coast of the South Island by paddle, pedal and foot... the

long way

Ginney Deavoll and her partner Tyrell were in no hurry and had no records to beat. Their purpose was to be immersed in the environment and experience. To learn a little more about our greatest treasure and themselves.

It’s amazing how something can begin as an innocent idea, a stray thought, a dream that somehow germinates in your mind. You wonder if it’s possible, do a bit of casual research, mention it every once in a while. Then before you know it you’re printing out maps, buying gear and standing on a deserted south coast beach surrounded by the tools to make that idea a reality. All it needed was for us to have the courage to begin. As we stood there contemplating where we were, the raging surf and what we intended to achieve a local fisherman pulled up on his quad bike. “What are you two doing?” “Going sea kayaking.” “Not around here. Where ya going?” “We’re going to paddle from here around Fiordland to Jackson Bay.” “You gotta be kidding. Bloody crazy fools. You’ll just get yourself into trouble or killed.” “Well, hopefully you don’t hear about us again.” “No doubt I’ll hear about you on the six o’clock news.”

With that he tore off down the beach. I think we might have just stood there a while hugging each other for moral support. That was the beginning of our 2000 km coast to coast of the South Island by paddle, pedal and on foot. We paddled around the great monolith of mountains and ferocious coastline that is Fiordland, a coast of mystery, danger and unbelievable beauty that occupies the south western corner of the island. Upon reaching Jackson Bay we traded our kayaks for bikes and continued north along the west coast, turning east after Hokitika and heading for the mountains. From Otira our pace slowed as we left the roads for the deserted trails that would lead us over mountain passes through streams and alpine tussock to the sandy shore of Wharariki Beach and Cape Farewell. Fiordland exposed many of its moods to us. Overall she was kind. One night she boasted the glassiest water I’ve ever seen with mirror perfect reflections. Less than twelve hours later we were belted with rain flying at us horizontally and tearing at our exposed skin, the wind threatening to rip the paddles from our grip as the clouds obscured our view hiding our destination. In contrast, Puysegur Point, the windiest place in New Zealand allowed us to see its tamer side. We even snorkelled in the clear water near the old oil shed, darting amongst the rocks and seaweed to find an unsuspecting paua.


A Comfortable Entry Level Sea Kayak • • • • • • • • •

Two Large Storage Compartments Two Large Hatches Comfortable Foam Padded Seat Easy to use Rudder System Stable and Comfortable to Paddle New Zealand Made with Top Quality UV Stabilized Plastic Orange Fade - A Stunning and Safe Colour Two Year Warranty Exclusive to Canoe & Kayak

All this at an affordable price

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 13


I’m glad that I paddled the coast north of Milford and especially thankful that Tyrell was there with me. I turned a deaf ear to the warnings of surf and river bars and denied what I really did know. If I were honest with myself I don’t think I would have had the courage to do it by myself. Leaving Barn Bay, side by side with Tyrell through two storey high, breaking barrels was the most terrifying moment of my life. I felt sick to the stomach and in fear of my life. I feel extremely privileged to have visited the hidden corner of our country. It is truly remarkable, an incredible mix of ferocity and fragile vulnerability. Although we encountered a lot of wildlife (including getting followed by a great white and untangling a gigantic male elephant seal from the bush), and spent seven weeks on that coast the weather dictated where we could go and what would be left for our imaginations or another journey… We soon learnt that we were not natural cyclers. I forgot padded pants which was a bad start and of course only got worse, to the point where I couldn’t sit down. It was a relief when we turned east for the mountains

PAGE 14

Issue 70

Spring 2013

and their trails. I was by no means an expert tramper, however I found that we soon fell into a routine and relished the challenge of the steep climbs and long days. There was something so satisfying about the simplicity of walking and watching the contour lines of the map come to life before us, revealing their secrets. The slower pace encouraged us to really see the country, to notice the minor details and become immersed in the experience. Although the way had long ago been mapped I hadn’t seen over that next pass or the cascading waterfall whose roar was growing to a deafening crescendo so it felt as though we were the first. Tyrell and I completed the journey together as a team. To complete this journey we had to trust each other with our lives. We had the odd disagreement, but for the vast majority of the time we took pleasure in each other’s company. Our daily roles as far as cooking, packing, navigating and setting up the tent or radio weren’t set in stone and varied depending how we felt on the day apart from fishing. Tyrell caught, gutted, filleted and cooked all the fish. I helped with eating them!

www.kayaknz.co.nz


A Coast to Coast of the South Island by paddle, pedal and foot... the

long way

A two thousand kilometre, three month long, self-propelled journey by paddle, pedal and foot from Te Waewae Bay to Cape Farewell. Ultimately this is a journey of friendship and adventure while discovering some of the secrets of our greatest treasure. The book contains paintings by the author, who is also an accomplished artist, that are a visual representation of the journey. There are also numerous photographs that give a pictorial record. The maps show clearly the extent of the journey and put the effort into context. Available at Canoe & Kayak Centres and on-line at canoeandkayak.co.nz $49.95

HELP! NEW AGENCIES & EXISTING TERRITORIES AVAILABLE THROUGH OUT NEW ZEALAND

When disaster strikes who are you going to call when you are out of Cell Phone range?

Call Pete Townend pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz or phone 09 476 7066

*36 )ORDWV 7RXJK 5HOLDEOH :DWHUSURRI

)DVWĂ€QG3/% IURP\RXU&DQRH .D\DN&HQWUH

Your position is transmitted to the Rescue Co-ordination Centre within a few minutes and the search area is narrowed down to a few square metres. Peace of mind for loved ones and so small it fits in a pocket! Distributed by Bright Ideas ELB Ltd Ph: 0800 713 656 www.brightideas.co.nz

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 15


Fishing Away From Home Ensuring you are prepared, prevents the frustration of not having gear with you. Jason Walker leads us through the planning.

Not quite the same as playing away from home, what I’m talking about is fishing away from your normal home base. In this article I’m going to cover the hows and whys of what makes fishing away fun and productive. Like a lot of things a change can be as good as a rest. Whilst you might have that spot x at home that always produces the goods for you and puts a feed on the table, heading somewhere different or somewhere you haven’t been before for a fishing session can be just as successful and even if not successful, it will be fun to try something new! I’m not so much talking about heading a couple of kilometres down the road for a fishing session, I’m talking about a road trip or even taking your kayak away on a boat (referred to as mothershipping), getting out there in some far off place that you and/or others haven’t fished that much or ever before to hunt down those big fish. Road Trips and Motherships A road trip is where you load everything up in the car and drive to your fishing spot, unload and paddle off to chase the fish. Motherships are what you use to get further offshore, you load your kayak and all your gear on to the boat and steam off to some different spot. Once there you’ll rig your kayak and paddle away from the boat to go hunting fish. I’ve done lots of away trips over the last few years, these include road trips both north and south, and mothership trips to the likes of Great Barrier Island, White Island, and the Alderman Islands so here are a few tips from my own experiences which will hopefully be of help to you when you decided to fish away from home.

PAGE 16

Issue 70

Spring 2013

Pre Trip Planning Away trips are often the easiest sounding of trips to do, pick your spot, find some where to stay, load up the car, and hit the road. Sounds simple doesn’t it? Well it is but it does take some planning. As with any trip regardless of whether it’s a fishing trip or not there is plenty to think about before hand, there’s things like where are you going to go remembering that not all spots fish all year round nor do species stay in one place. So if you are heading out to target a particular species then the time of year will have a huge influence as to where you head to make sure you aren’t fishing for something that simply isn’t there.

I’ve seen guys break rods on away trips and if they hadn’t had a spare with them it would have been a very short and miserable fishing trip. So that’s set your spot for you, now the next question is when do you want to hit the spot and drop a line. If it’s first light when you want to be dropping the bait down to the fish then you’ll need to be launching very early so arriving there the night before will be the plan. That means you will have to find somewhere to sleep the night before. Then you’ve got the question of what to take with you.  This of course will depend on what style or styles of fishing you plan on doing for the target species, plus of course you need to factor in the overnight stuff too. Packing Packing your gear for an away trip can be very stressful or overwhelming if you haven’t done it before so I’ll share a few tips that I’ve learnt over the trips I’ve done. There are a few things to keep in mind

www.kayaknz.co.nz


when you pack your tackle, regardless of the style of fishing you are planning to do, keep in mind the terrain and the potential size of fish you may encounter. On my first trip to Great Barrier Island I got caught out on two counts the depth and fish size. When I started kayak fishing I only ever fished in and around Auckland so most of my fishing was done in under 20 metres for small pannie Snapper weighing only a few kilo. When I got to the Barrier I’m all of a sudden chasing 5 kg+ Snapper in 50 metres of water with half ounce jig heads and 6 lb braid, so lets just say it was a bit of a shock and a lot of good fish were lost as well as quite a bit of tackle. Do a bit of research of your planned fishing spot and check you have the correct tackle to be fishing that terrain? Are you targeting some big old moocher Snapper? If so make sure your line/braid, rod and reel are all up to the task. Mothershipping (and remote road trips to an extent) also adds in another factor, if you are sitting on a kayak in the middle of the ocean out from White Island chasing big kingfish and you lose your fifth and final jig or you get spooled by that unstoppable monster then you are now in need of a quick visit to the local tackle shop to re-stock supplies. One very big problem if you are about five hours from the nearest tackle shop... Backup tackle, line, rigs, or even a whole new rod and reel combo is a wise thing to take with you. I’ve seen guys break rods on away trips and if they hadn’t had a spare with them it would have been a very short and miserable fishing trip. On a road trip space isn’t too much of a factor other than the room in your vehicle but on mothership trips you do need to be sensible if you are sharing the vessel with several other fisherman. I’ve taken trips on Red Quarters to Barrier Island were we have tried to limit ourselves to a 60 litre plastic box per fisherman. Each mothership will have it’s storage limits so be sure to ask before you start packing. This will limit

e m ty ti n fe ra Li ar W

everyone

Kayaks for all activities

Family & Kids

Diving

Coromandel Kayak Adventures

Coromandel Kayak Adventures

PROUDLY MADE IN NZ - SOLD AROUND THE WORLD

Fishing

Surfing

Touring & Fitness

Double

AWESOME FUN - PRICELESS MEMORIES For more information and to find your local dealer visit: Facebook: Ocean Kayak NZ www.kayaknz.co.nz

www.oceankayak.co.nz Head Office (09) 427 5234

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 17


how much stuff you can take with you so even though I’ve just said you need to take backup gear you do have to be sensible. One problem some people have, and I’ve done it myself, is you think I need to take my softbait, jigging, live bait, straylineing, slowjigs gear with me and this is way more than will fit in a 60L box. You need to step back and think I’m heading to spot x for two days how many types of fishing can I really do? Even if you are on the water for ten hours each day the majority of your fishing will be only one type, if you are like me and spend the majority of your time softbaiting from your kayak then that’s what you’ll be spending most of the time doing. You may put a live bait out the back or drop a Bottom Ship to the bottom and let Mr Rod Holder fish it for you but that’s going to be about it so don’t go mad trying to pack everything. Alternatively look at you tackle and see if there is anywhere you can crossover your tackle. For example I use one set up for both my jigging and my live baiting, I carry two softbait setups, one light/medium and one heavy set, the heavy set can also be used for deep water softbaits, Lucanus slow jigs and the Bottom Ships too. As a rule I don’t do any real bait fishing anymore so on a trip to the Barrier these days I just take three combos with me to cover most bases.

you though, the kind of food you can quickly re-heat and eat. Everyone has their own tastes but I’ve started taking fried rice from the local Chinese takeaway with me, these are normally big enough for a couple of meals and can be easily and safely be reheated in a microwave. On top of this take a couple of pre-cooked pies, and a couple of large bags of chips to keep me going. I’ll also make sure I’ve got enough on-water

A quick tip for the mothership trips is to make use of most of the available space and think outside of the 60L box, for example I take my Prowler Ultra to the Barrier which means I’ll also be taking my insulated ice box to keep my catch in prime condition during a fishing session but on the way out there I put all my paddle clothing in there, my booties, SharkSkins, paddle pants, splash top, and PFD, it all scrunches up nice and small and is nice and light so it’s easy to get away with it. Plus I fillet my catch on board and store it in the ships fridge so my ice box is available to transport my wet clothing home. Another tip is to use a rod tube for your rods, you can buy commercial rod tubes or make your own out of a length of 100 mm PVC storm pipe, an end cap and a screw inspection cap on the other. Your rods wont get stood on or snapped as they are loaded and unloaded on the boat. The night before you can rig up the rods you want to use as you head out to your spots. Lots of the mothership boats like Red Quarters have rod racks where you can safely stow your set up rods so they are ready to go when you need them. One final thing to keep in mind, if you are heading away on a multi day trip, think about what battery chargers you may need. Fishfinder, GPS, camera, VHF, and phone are all things that may need to be charged during the trip. Food Keeping up your energy is vital to a good day on the water, so keep this in mind on an away trip, as you may not have access to a local dairy or service station for a quick pie.  You need to think about this when packing food to take with you. Most campgrounds will have kitchens you can use and most motherships will have a galley with the basic food storage and cooking facilities. It’s a good idea to take prepared food with PAGE 18

Issue 70

Spring 2013

protect yourself from the elements For the full range go to

www.sharkskin.co.nz

ÉÉÉ¢n8ObF‘‘†¢O‘¢Îº+}8²†µ†€¢ noO€8‡

www.kayaknz.co.nz


supplies for the number of days I’m away. This will include muesli bars, small chocolate bars and plenty of fluids. And there may be a bottle of beer or two packed away for a drink in the evening to share the days stories with others I’m fishing with. Also be absolutely sure to pack any medicines you need or the correct food if you have any special dietary requirements. Accommodation If you are mothershipping and sleeping on the boat then accommodation isn’t an issue (don’t forget to pack your sleeping bag). But for those that are taking the over night road trip then you’ll need a bed for the night.  There are various options: campgrounds, motels, baches. Campgrounds are great as they are quite common along the New Zealand coastline and you should be able to find one close to your preferred launch spot, the

good old kiwi campground isn’t so old these days and most now offer many luxuries including serviced cabins, shower blocks and plentiful

Whizz

Fun in the sun and surf for the whole family

Escapee Versatile - go anywhere, do anything

Escapade Multipurpose - suitable for fishing, touring and fun in the waves

Escapade II

User friendly double for the whole family

w wSitwon. ktopa 11-11.indd y a k n z . 1c o . n z

Issue 70

12:06:33 S p r i n g 2 28/11/2012 013 P A G Ep.m.1 9


amenities. Most of them I’ve used recently also have great fish cleaning facilities where you can fillet your fish at the end of the day and the camp ground takes care of disposing of the frames and any waste for you. Tenting is an option for the solo fisher or couple, or why not upgrade to a cabin especially if there are a few of you going and then you can split the cabin costs between you (don’t forget to pack the ear plugs as there is always a snorer). Motels are also another option. Their fisherman facilities may be lacking though, and some don’t really want a bunch of smelly anglers wandering around their rooms so it’s always a good idea to give them the heads up to your plans before you book. Motel costs do favor a group so you can share the room costs between you and when you do this the cost per bed per night can be reasonable.

and gear then pile everyone into a couple of cars and just share the fuel costs between us, plus it gives you someone to talk to - a great idea when driving five hours to a fishing spot. Hopefully this has given you something to think about and might just get you out to a new fishing spot or two. There are always people organising away trips on the kayak fishing forums and in the local kayak fishing clubs so if you keep an eye out I’m sure you’ll find one you can join.

The third option is a bach. There are many places you can book a bach these days from websites like Book a Bach and Holiday Homes. You are of course booking a whole house so you’ll have to find a way to share the costs with some others but the benefit of using a bach is that you often find properties for rent that are right on the water, some so close you can launch directly off the back of the property. Do note though that some bach owners will insist on a minimum number of nights so you may be forced to take a longer fishing trip - not that that could be a bad thing sometimes. Groups As with most things it’s more fun to do it with others, and away trips are no different. There is a huge social side to these trips where we all hang out in the evening and share stories over a beer or two.There is also the advantage of many hands make light work when loading all the gear on a mothership or the financial advantage of car pooling on road trips.  I have done many trips where we all load a trailer with many boats

PAGE 20

Issue 70

Spring 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Leader Profiles

Leader Profiles Meet some of our awesome leaders. Without their support the club wouldn’t be what it is today.

AL Rose (Bay of Plenty) A skilled sea kayaker, Al is always there to show you how things should be done but with an amazing sense of humour. This intrepid paddler has taken on many multi-day trips others would just not consider and has a wealth of local knowledge. A true gentleman, Al is always a pleasure to be around on the water.

Wendy & Stan Lemmon [hamilton] Wendy & Stan come from a tramping background with involvement within The Mountain Safety Council with bushcraft and First Aid. Having kayaked for many years, they joined the Club in 2006 and both moved quickly into training as Leaders, obtaining their NZKI 1 Star and Leaders qualifications in 2007. Stan went on to obtain his NZKI 2 Star Instructors qualification and has been an Instructor with Canoe & Kayak Waikato since early 2009. Wendy & Stan are currently acting as co-ordinators for the Waikato Yakity Yak Club and thoroughly believe that as Ratty said to Mole in Wind In The Willows “There is nothing – absolutely nothing – half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats”.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 21


The Hawea Wave Manmade and Free On Boxing Day 2012 I moved to Queenstown with my family, just for a year, change of scenery so to speak. As we passed through Wanaka we bumped into a few friends who asked us if we had heard about ‘the wave’. We hadn’t until that point and we were soon asked many times over the New Year period more questions about this fast growing legendary wave. Intrigued. Before I got to the Hawea Wave in the first week of January I’d learned that two artificial play waves had been built as river enhancement, somewhere near Hawea Flat. The word on the water was ‘it’s golden’. My first impressions of the wave were as powerful as the hundred cumecs flowing through. The whole site at Camphill Bridge was tastefully developed and the waves screamed surf park. I’d estimate I’ve paddled at the Hawea Wave (aka Camphill Surf Park) for about 50-hours, which is a mere drop in the lake compared to what some of the local boaters have clocked up. I’m in no way an expert play

By Nathan Fa’avae

boater or have any significant knowledge of the waves, I just happen to be someone who has gained a whole lot of enjoyment from the facility, which is free to use. The park has two drop features. The top wave (hole) is smaller and allows for easy side surfing, spins and other tricks. In general, it’s bouncy and soft, although at some flows has a few sticky bits that longer kayaks can have trouble breaking free from. In the shorter play boats, it’s all pretty much fun and games from my experience. The bottom wave (hole) is bigger and steeper which means more power. I have found that everything on the bottom wave is faster and bigger giving quite a bouncy ride. The elite boaters tend to go nuts in the bottom wave. I’ve enjoyed some sensational boating on this wave, but it can get tiring and a tad scary, so walking back up to the smaller wave is a nice relief. Both features are designed to be retentive, so they can hold you in a bit longer than you’d probably like at times, but they really are safe (still need to be treated with respect all the same).

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - River Tours

River Tours

Mokau River

White Water Paddling

Waitara River Tours

Exploring beautiful estuaries. Enjoy a scenic trip with wildlife and wonderful views.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealand’s lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealand’s pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Need some excitement? Take a kayak down a wicked Grade Two river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down some of New Zealand’s best rivers.

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Phone Canoe & Kayak 06 769 5506

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $70. Phone: 06 769 5506

PAGE 22

Issue 70

Spring 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


I started asking around as to how this fantastic feature came to be because I reckon we need more of these in New Zealand. Most of the roads led to Roy Bailey, who himself is a highly accomplished and richly experienced white water kayaker. I managed to chat with Roy about the history of the project. It all began about 10 -11 years ago and was wrapped up in Contact Energy’s resource management and water rights negotiations. Mixed in was a mitigation package and a few [hundred] documents and discussions later, the water started to flow. Before the site was even selected, an artificial whitewater feature was considered. Research suggested a river enhancement project would be better so a number of sites in Central Otago were surveyed, before the current location was chosen. Roy describes it as a ‘Big Process’, juggling many different groups, consultations and entities to make it all happen, but thankfully he and his team did see it through for our river pleasure. A USA company with expertise in such engineering was employed and in 2012 the building began. Given that the green light was turned on in 2005 it was a solid seven years of commitment and hard work to reach the day when Contact Energy reduced the Hawea River flow to 3-cumecs for 3-months so construction could happen. Since the wave opened in 2013 it can only be said that it is hugely successful. The flow varies almost daily as Contact Energy control lake levels and electricity generation but when it’s on, it’s on! I have paddled there happily between 30 and 200-cumecs. I heard some people have been on it at 300 and it was still working great. Personally for me, anywhere in the 100’s and I’m a happy paddler. It’s extremely rare to be the only one there. Over summer hundreds www.kayaknz.co.nz

Trapper

All models of Novacraft Canoes Now available by special order

Choose the model and length, with the hull shape to suit your needs. Choose the construction material - SP3 plastic, Arimid, Spectra, Blue Steel, Royalex Royalex Lite or Fiberglass. View all possible combinations and specifications on www.novacraft.com. Below a selection of the models available though Novacraft’s Canadian factory.

Trapper, 12ft, 18kgs, Royalex Lite

Teddy, 12ft, 13kgs, Aramid Lite

Supernova, 14ft,10”, 22kgs, Spectra

Rob Special, 15ft, 26Kg, Royalex Lite

Pal, 16ft, 26Kg, Royalex Lite

Muskoka 15ft10”, 21Kg, Blue Steel

Tripper, 16ft, 27Kg, Royalex Lite

Cronje, 17ft, 27Kg, Royalex Lite

Prospector, 15, 16, 17, and 18ft

Outfitter, 15, 16 & 17, SP3 Plastic only

Talk to your nearsest kayak retailer about your options For more specifications: www.novacraft.com Allow 3 months for delivery Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

- NOVACRAFTAD-Jan13

PAGE 23


of people enjoy the waves: kayaks, surf boards, boogie boards and sledges, a whole raft of water craft, even rafts. I have noticed on a hot summer afternoon around 3:30pm, the school kids swarm there, it is so vibrant and energetic. The Hawea and Clutha cycle way goes directly past the site so it’s very common to have tourists and cyclists stopped up on the river bank enjoying the show. It’s a huge community asset and we can be sure the region is going to produce some exceptionally talented paddlers in years to come.

PAGE 24

Issue 70

Spring 2013

The NZ Freestyle Champs were held there in February and there are other plans in progress for more events. Pete Simpson, the NZ Pyranha importer is based at Hawea Flat and only to happy to meet folks at the wave and trial a boat, I bought one this summer and are considering another for next summer! I did a lot of whitewater paddling in my 20’s, couldn’t find or make time

www.kayaknz.co.nz


in my 30’s but the Hawea Wave has got me back into the boat and really great times on the river, in my 40’s. Roy couldn’t say how much the wave actually cost to build. The Otago Daily Times reported it at over $500,000 and I have a friend in the US who also designs surf parks who said to do a grand job 1-million is a nicer budget to work with. That may sound like a lot but I know for sure anyone who has been on the wave for a few minutes will say it’s worth every dollar. Certainly for what it offers it’s a valuable investment into NZ and our way of life. I’m really glad the wave is not near a major population, the traffic (kayak) congestion would be immense. On behalf of the paddlers who have got wet in the wave, thanks to all those who made it happen.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 25


North Shore Auckland Manukau Waikato

Spring Enrolments Open Now. Discover Another World. We’ll show you how!

Call into your local Canoe & Kayak Centre or have a look on-line. Find out more at canoeandkayak.co.nz, phone 0508 529256, or see the back page for a Canoe & Kayak Centre near you.


Bay of Plenty Taupo Taranaki Wellington

Join Join the the Yakity Yakity Yak Yak Kayak Kayak Club Club now, now, and and let let the the adventures adventures begin. begin. Haruru Falls - Northland Photo supplied by: Estelle Leyshon

Proudly supported by:


The Dog and Didymo Check, clean, dry

By Ruth E. Henderson

As the source of the contaminated Buller River, Lake Rotoiti could easily be infected.

When the Bio-Security man at the Inter-Islander Picton ferry terminal bounded up and asked if I had kayaked on fresh water and knew about didymo, my answer was a confident yes, followed by a parrot like “Check, Clean, Dry”. But then a shadow of doubt must have visibly crossed my mind as he then said, “You did, didn’t you?” Did I? Sure, thanks to tripping over my big feet and kayak, I’d fallen into Nelson’s Lake Rotoiti after my last morning paddle, so I’d had to clean and dry everything. But had I washed my boat? Not exactly, not with a detergent solution, lamely adding that it was dry… I was only let on the ferry when I told the man that my next port of paddling was to be Napier, in the sea. On the ferry, I berated myself and thought, If I’d got it wrong, been slack, complacent, stuffed up…how many others were acting likewise…how easy it would be to be responsible for spreading weed or disease! That night, we stayed with friends in Wellington who, although not kayakers are very knowledgeable about didymo. The man of the house harrumphed a bit… “We spent millions of dollars on educating you lot!” Stopping off at Ashhurst to see Max Grant at Q-Kayaks and knowing that he and Melz are avid white water paddlers, I raised the didymo issue. He advised that when they are travelling between the South and North Islands or between fresh-waterways, they make sure they do a sea water paddle and rinse before the ferry crossing, or before switching rivers. Still worried, on the way out the door I collected a

PAGE 28

Issue 70

Spring 2013

couple of Bio-Security brochures. Reading and pondering on didymo as we headed north I was plagued with niggles and guilt. My boat might have been dry to the touch, and then had 48 hours of further drying, but what about my sponge that I keep in my day-hatch, and my back-hatch neoprene cover? The snow and wintery blast chased us up the North Island and no, I did not paddle at Napier. Next stop was Lake Taupo. Fearful that I, (now, not unwittingly) could be the one to carry didymo north, we stopped off to buy some bio-degradable detergent. At Jude’s house I found a bucket and brush, and made up the recommended mix, a 5% solution: 500 mls of detergent (or 2 cups) in a 10 litre bucket of water made lots of bubbles. The boat was unloaded onto the lawn ready for a very thorough scrub inside the cockpit and all three hatches. But first, with the bucket in the cockpit I immersed everything that conceivably was still damp and therefore a potential carrier of didymo: my booties, sprayskirt, neoprene hatch cover, and my sponges all got a one minute soak. My kayak looking spick and span was soon rinsed off, back on the roof rack, adorned with dripping, drying neoprene: Safe for a weekend on the Waikato River. Back home, I looked up www.biosecurity.govt.nz and found via a rather circuitous route specifics under “Methodology, including cleaning instructions”. The seven minute video is worth watching and there is some interesting reading, especially when you consider that most of us don’t just kayak. We tramp or mountain bike across freshwater streams and riverbeds, we go swimming with our dog... We enjoy playing in our clean rivers and lakes. Let’s keep it that way.

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Remember after a day out on the lake or river to Check and remove any visible weed or debris, Clean with a 5% detergent solution everything that came in contact with the lake or river for as long as it takes the solution to penetrate absorbent material, and where not practical to clean, then Dry to touch before leaving for 48 hours before entering another fresh waterway. Another trick is to put stuff in the freezer. No, not the dog! Give your mutt a shampoo and blow-wave.

You need to clean all your gear.

Check, Clean, Dry Other watercraft: Kayaks, canoes, dinghies and associated equipment and gear should be cleaned thoroughly both inside and out with a decontamination solution. Scrub or spray all exterior parts of the craft with a decontamination solution, ensuring surface contact for at least one minute. Then fill the interior of the craft with the decontamination solution, place all associated equipment, gear and clothing used in the boating activity into the craft, immerse completely and soak for as long as needed to thoroughly penetrate all absorbent items.

Scrub your kayak inside and out.

The equipment may then be rinsed using water that has come from a town water supply. Drying is an acceptable alternative method, provided that all components are completely dry to the touch, inside and out, and then left dry for at least another 48 hours before entering a different waterway. Freezing small items is another option. If you do not want to decontaminate your gear, you should restrict use to a single waterway

Clothing, Shoes and Toys: All wet equipment, toys, clothing and footwear, such as swim wear, beach balls and tramping shoes and socks, should be checked for clumps of algae and other debris, then cleaned with a decontamination solution. Allow longer time for absorbent items, such as clothing, towels and boots. Pay particular attention to the soles of tramping boots and other footwear with a deep tread. Laundry detergent is an effective option for towels and clothing. After treatment, items may then be rinsed with water that has come from a town water supply. Drying is an acceptable alternative method, provided that all components are completely dry to the touch, inside and out, and then left dry for at least another 48 hours before entering a different waterway. Alternatively, freeze items until solid.

Pets: Pets should be soaked, and then washed for not less than one minute with a suitable animal disinfectant or shampoo. They may then be rinsed using water that has come from a town water supply. Alternatively, thoroughly dry your pets then contain for not less than 48 hours before they are allowed into another waterway. Reference: http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests/didymo/cleaning

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 29


Trip Card # 010 Cockle Bay to Whitford

Cockle Bay to Whitford - Return Route card No. 010 Skill level: Beginners Distance: 6 - 7 Km

Map no: BA32 Tidal Port: Auckland

Start/ Finish point: Tidal times/ notes:

Cockle Bay, Auckland Whitford creek/Estuary, best paddled 1 hour each side high tide and with the tidal flow

Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Auckland (09) 303 4303 Mobile:*555 VHF Channel 80 VHF coverage is limited as the repeater stations are out of sight once in the estuary. Cell phones work well.

Introduction: A Great casual paddle with a café stop at the end. Description: Putting in at Cockle Bay follow the coast into the Estuary ending up at Whitford. Put in at the ramp at Whitford and head across the road to the local eateries/cafes.Enjoy a good lunch or tea break before heading back to Cockle Bay.This is a nice short paddle where you can take your time and have a great break in the middle.

Hazards: • Low tide in the Estuary/Creek • Boat traffic in the Creek

Local eateries: Brickworks Café www.brickworkscafe.co.nz Amy’s Kitchen Café www.facebook.comAmysKitchenWhitford 09 530 8308

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: August 2013


ap.co.nz Images Sour ced fr om LINZ Topogr aphic Maps. Cr own Copyr ight Reser ved.

Trip Card # 012 Pauatahanui Inlet

Pauatahanui Inlet Route card No. 012 Skill level: Beginners Distance: 14 Km

Map no: BP32 Tidal Port: Taranaki

Start/ Finish point: HW/ LW:

Grays Rd, Pauatahanui Inlet. Water ski club car park Porirua Harbour- 00 min HW, 16min before Low water Port Taranaki

Tidal times/ notes:

The inlet is very tidal and unless you know where the channels are it is best paddled 2 hrs either side of high tide. VHF Channels: 16, 63. Callsign: Mana Coastguard, 027 530 3368 Good cell phone and VHF coverage.

Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Introduction: If you want to get on the water and the wind is blowing in Wellington then this is the place to go. A very sheltered and safe area that can be paddled in most conditions. At the eastern end of the inlet is a wildlife sanctuary. The 50-hectare Pauatahanui Wildlife Management Reserve lies at the head of the Inlet. Four hectares are owned by the Royal New Zealand Forest and Bird Protection Society and protected under a covenant with the Queen Elizabeth II Trust. The rest of the reserve is owned by the Department of Conservation (DOC). A great place to spot all kinds of bird life. Description: After putting in at the car park head south east along the shoreline toward the bridges at Paramata. Once under the bridges go past the marina and then head north out of Porirua harbour keeping to the left hand shoreline until you reach Onehunga Bay. This is a good place to stop for a break and it has public toilets there. On the return trip, once back under the bridges, carry on around the inlet keeping to the right hand side of the inlet and do a full circuit around the inlet and back to the car park.

Parts of the inlet can only be paddled 2 hrs either side of high tide so watch out for sand bars. The length of the trip can be shortened at any stage by cutting back across the inlet to the car park. Hazards: • Strong currents run through the area at the bridges so it pays to stay to the edge of the channel. • Do not paddle down the centre of the channel under the bridges as this area is used by larger boats. • A large number of small yachts and water skiers use the inlet so make sure you are visable and keep a good lookout. Tourist Attractions: Pataka Arts and Museum Useful Links: www.metservice.com Gaurdians Of Pauatahanui Inlet www.coastguardmana.org.nz

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: August 2013


Knots

Using a Prusik Loop Having made your Prussik Loop using a Double Fishermans Knot, this is how it can be used. You can use it to take pressure off another line, add a line to another to form a fork or even to climb a rope.

1.

2.

3.

2.Bring the knot under the bar and up through the loop. 1. Lie the loop over the bar or rope.

4.

3 - 6. Repeat this at least twice.

5.

7.

6.

7. Pulling on the knotted end, slide the two coils into the centre.

White Water Courses

8.

8. Without weight on the loop, it will slide easily up or down. Put pressure on and it will lock tight.

Want to learn, or brush up your skills? Give us a call. 0508 529 256 White Water bw.indd 1

26/11/2012 8:26:19 a.m.


Sudoku

Sudoku The objective is to fill the 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. Solution on page 41

9

4

6 2

1 1

7 1

3

2

8 6 2

8 9 7 9 8 6

2 9 7 3

5

adventure equipment

Adventure Touring Cag Kurve Touring PFD

RFD New Zealand Limited 0800 777 009 Auckland Wellington Nelson Christchurch Filename: SURVITECpos_PMS.eps Colourway:

&

100% Pantone PMS 158c

&

100% Process Black

Outdoors New Zealand has a FREE gift pack for the first 5 people who purchase a copy of KI WAHO Issue 8. Ki Waho - ‘Into The Outdoors’ is the magazine for professionals working in the outdoors. The free gift pack contains a bag, two back issues of Ki Waho, a compactable drink bottle, sunscreen and lip balm. To buy the latest issue or find out more about KI WAHO visit: www.ki-waho.co.nz or call Outdoors NZ: 04 385 7287 www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 33


Health

Winter Exercise – It’s a great way to shake off your winter blues

It's the time of year when you'll start to hibernate like a bear. Mornings and nights are cold, days are short so you'll tend to want to curl up in a ball to stay warm and cosy in your cave. Your favourite activities will become watching movies

all the conditions lined up and I seized the moment by jumping into my kayak, all bundled up in my winter gear and paddled into the big blue. Yours in Health n Happiness,

and sports drinking lots of wine, beer, hot chocolate, smiling

Dr. Theresa Dobson

over that hot beef stew, yes these are all the luxuries of winter

Active Care Clinic 415 9399 - www.activecare.co.nz

and kept in balance can make the long New Zealand winters a bit more bearable! Beware don't let the indoor comfort of

My Body’s GPS – Your wellness program - www.drtheresadobson.com

winter consume you or you will find that excuses cling like

I’m here to help you as your back pain, joint pain, postural, nutrition and fat burning specialist as well as public speaking. Join my blogs for “30 Second WOW tips” on living a vital fun life at www.drtheresadobson.com

magnets to you as you find reasons not to exercise. If you let your ‘winter mind’ dominate you, you will look like that rolypoly bear at the end of winter rolling out if its cave! Those of you that like outdoor sport will find it challenging in winter due to weather and conditions, especially us kayakers. So winter calls for a backup plan like joining a gym with, indoor facilities that have basketball, volleyball, squash or indoor tennis. Swimming is a great option too. Winter is also a great time for indoor exercise like Yoga and Pilates which is great for core strength that kayakers need as so often you find yourself lifting and twisting with uneven weight load which primes your back for an injury. I personally do a lot of Yoga and Pilates in the winter and have even managed to drag a few male mates along to find them sweating and gasping realizing Yoga and Pilates are a lot harder than they thought. Yoga and Pilates work a lot on core strength which is essential for kayakers as well as the flexibility and strength aspect, so jump into a few of these classes and get bendy and strong as you patiently await the upcoming summer and the many kayaks adventures that it will bring! Exercising through winter has other advantages as well. When you exercise your body temperature rises and helps you fend off many of those lingering viruses and bacteria that can make you sick and low in energy during the winter months. Exercise also helps boost your immune system, brain function, muscle and joint stability and you will usually sleep really well after a good dose of exercise. Not to mention it will knock off a few of those extra kg’s that haunt you in the winter! Now you have to admit winters in New Zealand are really not that bad; there are many days when the wind calms down and the sun shines bright. If you have your paddle and gear ready, you can quickly jump out for a quick escape in your kayak and get your "fix"! Some of my most memorable kayak adventures were on “capture the moment” days when

PAGE 34

Issue 70

Spring 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Crossword

Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety.

Across

Down

1 2 7 8 11 13 15 16 17 18 21 24 26 27 28 29 30

1 2 3 4 5 6 9 10 12 14 19 20 22 23 25

This helps keep a kayak tracking through crosswinds? A racing paddle. To drain water from a sit-on-top, you remove the... This will save your Fishing rod. A knot to use to secure loads on trailers. (8,5) Manufacturers of the Aura jacket & Xipe Pfd A great game that’ll improve your paddling skills. (5,4) You would you feather a paddle to ...? (6,4) All good service providers should have this.(3,5,4) A very easy and waterproof fastening/ screw.(4,3) Check, Clean, Dry. This will prevent the spread of this pest. Archeology has evidence of ancient kayaking. Who built them? New Zealand’s sea kayaking association. While paddling in flat or fairly calm water, where does a person’s primary power comes from? (4,3,8) Used to assist floatation in kayaks.(3,4) Adjust this every time you use your VHF. A whitewater kayak has a turned up bow to allow it to lift over rough water. This is called the what?

A proven design of kayak from Q-Kayaks. Besides a life jacket or PFD, what other piece of equipment should you carry in navigable waters? A modern’plastic’ kayak is made out of which material? An iconic multisport race (7,5,2,5) A kayak you may use to travel. Someone may be wearing one or even have it tattooed on.(5,5) A handy check list before you hit the water. (4,4) To connect a towline to your Pfd, you use a ... (3,4) Our favourite club. (6,3) Something worn by the kayaker that attaches to the cockpit(5,4) A piece of rescue equipment. (4,3) A great bush tea. Keeps your lunch dry. (3,3) In first aid, you use this anagram in almost every situation. A sit-on-top has drain holes built into the hull. These are called?

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) Annual subscription is $35.00.

Kask PO Box 23, Runanga 7841, West Coast

www.kask.co.nz

www.kayaknz.co.nz

KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand KASK publishes a 200 page sea kayaking handbook which is just $15 to new members; the handbook contains all you need to know about sea kayaking: techniques and skills, resources, equipment, places to go etc. KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums. Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 35


First Aid

Hypothermia – abnormally low body temperature. By Johanna Verheijen

Heat loss from the body occurs in various forms. Conduction: Heat loss through direct contact with the cold ground or water. Radiation: Heat loss from infrared heat from the body. Convection: Heat loss caused by cold air currents over the body. Evaporation: Heat loss occurring from moisture on the body evaporating carrying heat away from the person.

o As body temperature falls shivering may cease, at which point the body temperature falls rapidly. o As the body temperature falls there is a greater lack of response, the person is going into shock. o

Leads to cardiac arrest or breathing just stops.

Management: Seek shelter, reduce heat loss and provide warmth. o

Seek urgent help. Call 111, send a May Day call or

call the Coastguard.

o

Remove wet clothing and replace it with dry clothing.

o

Wrap person in blankets or sleeping bag.

o

Gently move the person to a warm environment

o

Place a hat on their head to reduce heat loss.

o

Move the person very carefully as sudden movements can cause cardiac arrest.

Signs and Symptoms:

o

Insulate the person from cold ground by placing an insulated sleeping mat or blanket underneath them.

o Person starts to stumble, fumble and mumble. Uncoordinated movement and shivering.

o

Slow rewarming is essential.

Conduction and convection are much greater if the person is immersed in water! I.e. A person has come out of a kayak and is in need of rescuing. When we become hypothermic our body tries to tell us to maintain normal temperature by three ways: 1.

Our brain tells us to put on more clothing and seek shelter.

2.

Shivering increases heat generation within the body.

3. Blood vessels in the extremities and skin constrict, reducing blood flow to these areas and reduces heat loss.

If the person can drink, give them a sweet lukewarm drink. Do not give alcohol, it promotes heat loss.

Between 39o 37

o

37.5 36

Feel Cold – seek shelter, dry clothing, head and hands.

35

Shivering – warm sweet drinks and food.

34

37o Below

Clumsy, Irrational, Confused – no exercise, slow re-warming.

33

Muscle Stiffness.

32

Shivering Stops, Collapse – Evacuate!

31

Semi-conscious – nothing by mouth, monitor airway.

30

Unconscious – recovery position.

29

Unconscious – slow pulse and breathing.

28

PAGE 36

Issue 70

Normal.

Spring 2013

Cardiac Arrest – Check airway, if no breathing after 45 seconds then start CPR.

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Alcohol is only for the first aiders when the emergency is over. Look for a medic alert. Has this condition been confused with low blood sugar levels in a diabetic or is there another contributing factor? Continue to monitor DRSABC’s and vital signs until emergency help arrives.

KEEP CALM

Do not allow the victim to exercise again until adequately re-warmed with a return to normal mental status (at least 24 hours)

AND

REMEMBER

DRSABCD Test your knowledge.

1.

How do we measure accurately the core body temperature?

5.

Will the person displaying signs of hypothermia know they are in trouble?

With a low reading thermometer either under the tongue, or by rectal insertion.

No. They have no idea and need your help to manage the condition.

2.

What is the difference between hypothermia and hyperthermia?

Hypo = low. Hypothermia is an abnormally low body temperature.

6.

If you have one person in your group hypothermic, what are the chances of another person being close to or hypothermic themselves?

Hyper = high. Hyperthermia is an abnormally high body temperature.

Very high. Seek shelter for the whole group. Warm drinks and food will help prevent hypothermia.

7.

Can hypothermia be prevented?

3. a

What are the 3 key management points for dealing with

Yes there are several ways.

hypothermia person?

b Check the weather forecast before commencing trip.

b Seek shelter.

b Be prepared for the weather conditions.

b Remove wet clothing replace with dry clothing.

b Wear appropriate layered clothing and take spares.

b Rewarm slowly.

b Stay hydrated. (water)

4.

Do you reheat the person by sitting them in a spa pool?

b Don’t be afraid to stop your trip and find shelter if conditions deteriorate.

No.

b Wrap up: hat and gloves and warm jacket.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 37


Bush Craft

Light My Fire Andy Blake talks us through preparing a great camp fire. For thousands of years, primitive people have feared, worshipped and have been amazed by fire. The importance of fire cannot be over-stressed. It keeps us warm, it lifts moral, it brings people together, it makes certain foods more palatable by killing harmful bacteria, it provides light and can be used for signalling, it dries our wet clothing, purifies water and even scares away the “boogy man”. Fire is the combination of three elements, heat, oxygen and fuel. The important thing to understand is the importance of the ratios of these elements. If there is not enough heat the fire will not light. If there is too much fuel then the fire will be smothered. If there is not enough fuel then the fire will not expand. If there is not enough oxygen then the fire will simply go out. If there is too much oxygen then the fire will burn too quickly. All of the needs of a fire are continuously changing and must be constantly monitored and attended to. Incomplete combustion produces smoke and carbon monoxide. CO is a colourless, odourless, tasteless gas which can lead to headaches, nausea and vomiting. Extreme cases may lead to unconsciousness and even heart failure. Be very wary when in a cave or in an enclosed space and never leave a fire unattended.

The more time spent in preparation will pay dividends in getting a fire going. Although most people believe they could easily light a fire on a good day, a surprisingly few people practice lighting a fire on a wet windy day with only one match. Skilled POW’s in WW2 could split a match, with a razor blade, into six thin slivers and be able to get six fires going. How many matches, or attempts with a lighter do you sometimes use to get a home fire going, or to light a cigarette? Practise until you can confidently light a fire with just one attempt. Start by collecting a “greater than expected” supply of dry flammable material. This is sorted into three groups. Tinder - this will easily catch a light with a spark or flame, thin twigs and thicker dry pieces of wood.

Tinder This is extremely important part of the fire if you are looking for success. Tinder must be very fine in thickness which will make it easier to start the fire. Preferably dry and fluffy in nature, dry dead grass, birds’ nests and lichen found above the ground. The dead and dry leaves of a cabbage tree are great to use as tinder, just tease the fibres to form a stringy mess. The fluff which is found in the corner of your pockets or socks is excellent (ever heard of clothes dryers catching fire?). When

Tinder must be very fine in thickness which will make it easier to start the fire.

Find out more and organise a demo paddle: Phone Great Stuff on 022 049 5434 or Canoe & Kayak on 09 476 7066 during business hours and discuss Tahe’s kayak range or your personalised demo. Model specifications: www.tahemarine.com Small Twigs are the next stage in the build. PAGE 38

Issue 70

Spring 2013

Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. For additional information, www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

TAHEAD-Nov12

www.kayaknz.co.nz


you are exploring your environment collect and dry tinder that you find and store it in a dry pocket or plastic bag if you are lucky enough to have one. It is possible to use your knife to shred tinder. It is possible to use a semi-split stick to grasp the end of your knife so you can easily shave thin strips of wood; this also reduces the chances of cutting yourself or breaking your knife blade. Manuka and kanuka bark, dry gorse or pieces of dead rimu are amongst my favourites. Small Twigs The careful placement of thin twigs will transfer the flame from the tinder to these twigs. You can make this process more successful by using a variety of materials to increase your chances of using utilising good flammable wood. These twigs stacked into a pyramid formation will catch alight and then heat and dry the larger sticks above. Ensure that there is a gap between each other and that they are not placed so close that the fire is smothered. A smokey fire means wet wood or incomplete combustion. This is why a fire which is covered with dry or wet/green vegetation produces smokey fires – good for signalling during the day. The surface area of these sticks can be increased by using a knife or blade to form fuzz sticks. Sticks that have been split in half have more surface area and expose potentially dryer wood. Also an edge surface will catch alight more easily than a round surface. If the wood is wet then you can shave off the wet outer wood. Larger sticks

reasonable rainfall so wood that is found on the ground is often wetter (and possibly rotten) than wood found off the ground suspended in trees. The wet exterior of a length of wood can be shaved off with the use of a knife, if you have one. Alternatively you can easily split a piece of wood by placing a knife on top of the stick and by hitting the knife blade with a stout stick. Take care not to injure yourself or to break your knife. Consider saving your energy by just placing the ends of the larger pieces of wood into the fire and slowly push the burning ends into the centre of the fire. Alternatively just place a long length of wood across your fire and allow the fire to burn the long log in half – no chopping required.

Still larger material can be added once the fire is going well. Never be in too much of a hurry to add these larger pieces of wood. Wet wood can be placed around a fire to dry out. Most parts of New Zealand have a

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 39


      

Book Review

  

This is a great read about stunning locations, amazing paddling and people met along the way. I loved Max’s thoughts while in rough conditions “At this point, I started seriously asking myself what the hell I’d been thinking to bring my daughter out here.” Paddling with friends, family or customers such thoughts can trouble all of us. It’s great to read that we are not alone. Max goes on to tell us that he and Melz have trained hard and are well prepared to be in these conditions. However this does not diminish a feeling that many of us can relate to in rough conditions, as Max puts it ‘a strong feeling of guilt and concern’. Throughout this book you will envy such fine sea kayakers. He has got me thinking about my next adventure. What more could you ask from an author when every page gives you a big kick up the backside to get off the couch and explore?

Photo by Paul Caffyn

A great read and 5 Stars from me Peter Townend Available at Canoe & Kayak Centres and on-line at canoeandkayak.co.nz in paper back and hard back copies. Paper back: $35.00 Hard back: $58.00

PAGE 40

Issue 70

Spring 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


o

Sudoku Answers

t e b i r c s Sub

From page 33

9 1 4 8 3 6 2 7 5

7 6 5 2 4 9 3 1 8

8 2 3 7 1 5 4 6 9

4 9 8 1 5 7 3 6 2

1 5 2 6 3 4 8 9 7

6 3 7 2 9 8 1 5 4

7 4 3 5 2 9 6 8 1

5 2 6 4 8 1 9 7 3

9 8 1 3 7 6 5 4 2

&

have it

to your d e r e v i l de

door

4 issues for $25, saving $5.00 off the news-stand price, delivered free in NZ. Overseas subscription $NZ40 including postage.

Send form to: New Zealand Kayak Magazine. PO Box 35123, Browns Bay, Auckland, 0753. Or phone 0508 529 2569 Or email: info@canoeandkayak.co.nz Or buy on-line at canoeandkayak.co.nz/subscribe

Payment Details Visa/ Mastercard Name on Card:

Cheque (payable to Canoe & Kayak.)

Signature:

Expiry date:

Card No:

Verification Code:

Yes - I’d like to subscribe to New Zealand Kayak Magazine at the addres below. Gift Subscription - Please send New Zealand Kayak Magazine as a gift to the person below.

OR:

First Name: Surname: Email: Address: Post Code: Phone:

Crossword Answers From page 35

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 41


Products

Ultimate Fishing Packages Mission Catch 390 Ultimate Fishing Bundle Aluminium Shaft Paddle

Canvas Sea Anchor

Fully Insulated Catch Bag

Anchor Running Rig

Safety Flag

Yak Xipe Pfd

Cobra Marauder Ultimate Fishing Bundle

Delux Seat

Fiberglass Shaft Paddle

Canvas Sea Anchor

Fully Insulated Catch Bag

Anchor Running Rig

Safety Flag

Yak Xipe Pfd

Prowler Ultra 4.1 Ultimate Fishing Bundle

Comfort Seat

Aluminium Shaft Paddle

Canvas Sea Anchor

Ocean Kayak Ice Box

Anchor Running Rig

Safety Flag

Yak Xipe Pfd

Prowler 4.3 Ultimate Fishing Bundle

Zone Seat

Fiberglass Shaft Paddle

Canvas Sea Anchor

Ocean Kayak Ice Box

Anchor Running Rig

Safety Flag

Yak Xipe Pfd

Barracuda SOT Ultimate Fishing Bundle

PAGE 42

Issue 70

Spring 2013

Fisherman Seat

Fiberglass Shaft Paddle

Canvas Sea Anchor

Fully Insulated Catch Bag

Anchor Running Rig

Safety Flag

Yak Xipe Pfd

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Available at Canoe & Kayak: canoeandkayak.co.nz Womens Wear Kurve Ladies $159.95

Thermatech Ultra Sport $59.99 Whether you're new to whitewater, or looking for a minimal play vest, the Kurve has the answer. Wider shoulder webbing for improved comfort. Neoprene chest panels for enhanced fit.

Strobe Ladies $219.95

ThermaTech Ultrasport Baselayer Long Sleeve offers management and regulation of body temperature, keeping you warm in cold weather and cool in warm weather. SpeedDriTM helps expel moisture, keeping you light and dry in your activities. Buy this garment to recieve maximum comfort so you can maximise your performance.

Palm FX - $185.00 The Low profile shape offers great freedom of movement, the soft foam is super comfortable, the front pocket is big enough for a knife, sling and chocolate, yet small enough to be unobtrusive. The Shoulder straps are Palms 'Fail safe' system that makes them super strong, yet easily adjustable.

Hot Products Yak Open Palm Mits - $44.95 Yak gloves offer the best combination of durability and protection whilst enabling you to keep the strength and sensitivity required for active paddling, rowing and rope handling.

Crewsaver Igneous Boot - $79.95 • • • • • •

Glideskin Neoprene top for easy donning 5mm Neoprene construction for warmth Velcro front strap for a secure fit Heel, arch and toe support Reinforced front hiking support Moulded high grip sole

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Palm Vertigo Semi-Dry $274.95

The Palm Vertigo is a fantastic value entry level paddling jacket. Made from XP 2-layer fabric with a neoprene neck and adjustable waistband, this versatile jacket fits a whole range of needs. Check out the new colours for this season.

Pinnacle Ultra - $199.90 Packed full of features like a specially designed EPIRB/GPS pocket and expanding cargo pockets. The rear hydration pocket is also an expanding zipperless design. The shoulder design is adjustable with neoprene allowing the whole unit to flex and move with you.

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 43


Kayaks

Sea Kayaks Double

Sea Kayaks Single

Paddling Perfection

Weight (kg)

Price

Matariki

4.50

620

26

$1699

Greenland T Wind Solo Reval Wind 585 Reval Midi Sea Spirit Reval Mini

5.45 5.05 5.50 5.85 5.20 5.20 5.20

530 540 540 540 540 560 540

23-24 23-25 24-26 25-27 24-26 26-28 24-26

$4590 $3490 $4400 $4570 $4050 $3290 $4150

Kiwi Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Shearwater Lite Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

3.75 3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 740 600 600 610 610 620 620 600 600 600

20 23 18 27 24 26.5 23 29 25 22 19 22

$1365 $1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2900 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2499 $2779 $2999

Manitou 13 Looksha 14 Eskia

3.90 4.30 4.90

630 625 635

20.5 26 27

$1299 $2199 $2499

Kekeno SeaBear Waitoa SeaBear Waitoa Kevlar BreakSea BreakSea Kevlar

4.00 5.50 5.50 5.20 5.20

630 600 600 540 540

21.5 26 24 22.5 21

$3595 $4545 $5195 $4495 $4995

4.90

600

17

$3100

Barracuda Beachcomber

Great Advice Great Brands Great Service

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 45

$3499 $4569

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.90

850

40

$5995

28

$4300

Necky Amaruk Paddling SeaBear II Packhorse Perfection Barracuda Beachcomber Duo

5.80 700

White Water

Riot

Width (mm)

Liquid Logic

Necky Mission

Q-Kayaks

Tahe

Canoe & Kayak

Length (m)

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Astro 58 Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

1.93 2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

650 660 254 650 660

15.5 18 67 18.5 29.5

$1725 $1599 $1599 $2095 $2095

Remix 47 Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Freeride 57 Freeride 67 Stomper 80 Stomper 90

2.21 2.57 2.64 2.72 1.98 2.06 2.49 2.57

530 640 650 670 650 660 650 680

13 19 20 21 14.5 15 21 22

$1399 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199


Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Play

3.10

710

18

$499

Escape

3.20

790

17

$649

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$749

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$799

Squirt

2.70

760

17

$499

Flow

2.95

750

19

$899

Glide 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1199

Xstream 420 inc rudder

4.20

730

28

$1299

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$699

Mysto inc seat

2.95

790

21

$799

Venus 11 inc seat

3.30

725

21

$999

Scrambler 11 inc seat

3.60

750

23

$999

Tetra 12 inc seat

3.70

710

24

$1299

4.20

680

18

$2800

Fishing Singles

Mission Barracuda

Weight (kg)

Sprite 1

3.00

700

19

$850

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1410

Access 280

2.80

730

18

$989

Access 400

4.00

840

32

$1399

Manitou 13

3.90

630

20.5

$1299

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Escapade II

3.50

750

26

$900

Tandem

3.80

799

26

$795

Long Reach

4.40

910

36

$999

Mission

Surge

3.90

850

28

$1099

Malibu 2

3.65

870

27

$999

Malibu 2 XL inc 2 x seats

4.10

86

33

$1449

Cabo

4.97

76.5

33

$1699

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

$3170

Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Q- Kayaks

Mission

Ocean Kayak

Q- Kayaks Cobra

Multisport

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Escapade F

3.50

750

32

$875

Marauder

4.30

780

28

$1599

Fish n’ Dive

3.80

915

28

$899

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1699

Prowler 13 inc seat

4.10

710

28

$1399

Tetra 12 Angler inc seat

3.70

710

24.5

$1499

Prowler Ultra 4.1 inc seat

4.10

710

28.5

$1699

Prowler Ultra 4.3 inc seat

4.30

740

32.5

$2149

Prowler Elite 4.5 inc seat

4.50

710

31

$1599

Prowler Ultra 4.7 inc seat

4.70

740

35

$2249

Torque

4.20

735

32.2

$3499

Line 280

2.80

730

18

$1229

Catch 290

2.95

750

19

$999

Catch 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1599

Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

Catch 420 EXP

4.20

730

28

$1999

SoT Fi sh Pro

4.20

680

18

$3500

Ruahine

Q- Kayaks

Length (m)

Starting Price

Sit-on-Top Double

Paddling Perfection

Ocean Kayak

Cobra

Q- Kayaks

Width (mm)

Intrigue (kevlar)

4.95

540

12

$2900

Swallow (kevlar)

5.40

480

12

$3000

Firebolt (kevlar)

5.90

450

12.5

$3250

Rebel (kevlar)

5.65

450

11

$3210

Gladiator (kevlar)

5.90

530

13.5

$3210

F1 (kevlar)

6.20

350

13.5

$3350

Ocean X (kevlar)

6.40

500

16.5

$3750

Duet (kevlar)

7.00

550

26

$5760

Excalibur (kevlar)

5.70

550

15

$2945

Saracen

5.2

520

13

$3150

Saracen X

6.0

600

15

$3195

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$3680

Inflatables

Gumotex

Barracuda SoT Tourer

Length (m)

Incept

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Cobra

Q-Kayaks

Length (m)

Recreational

Ocean Kayak

Sit-on-Top Single


North Fork of the San Joaquin

PAGE 46

Issue 70

Spring 2013

By Josh Neilson

www.kayaknz.co.nz


The California season was well underway when I heard of the North Fork in the San Joaquin river in California, and to be honest the beta on the run passed in one ear and out the other for some reason. Possibly because of the 16 km hike in, or maybe it was the only rapid I heard about with a 20 metre plus waterfall situated in about as remote as California wilderness gets. Now I love running big rapids, but when you mix big rapids with remote areas, it’s a totally different story, hence this run never gained much of my attention.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

I was sitting at Sacramento Airport waiting to pick up Tyler Fox when my interest was sparked. I was checking my emails on the free wireless and there was a message from the Aussie crew, Adrian and Riley, saying “Check this link and come down and meet us right away.” With some time to kill, I clicked the link to a trip report on the run and was blown away. Issue 70 Spring 2013 PAGE 47


Yes there was a big hike, but there was also a few days’ worth of quality white water and of course the big waterfall in there to keep the mind racing. Tyler arrived and was ready to go so I showed him the link.

As we headed back into the forest, over the last pass, the snow slowed our progress so we camped for the night and continued in the morning. Dinner was promptly consumed and we all passed out for the night.

Within a few hours the car was packed and we were on the road to the drainage just South of Yosemite National Park. We made it to the camp at about midnight and crashed for the night. As with many runs in California, there is a lot of guess work and this run was no exception. The flow was estimated by the flow of a run in a totally different drainage and this run had only been done twice before, so this information could be totally wrong.

Early the next morning we loaded our kayaks on our well-worn shoulders and carried on to the put in. This has to be one of the best feelings in high sierra kayaking, when you make it to the put in by foot! And it’s even better when the first drop is a clean fun one into a nice pool.

With the flow of the other drainage a bunch higher than ideal, we moved a little slow getting ready in the morning. We were going, then not. While having lunch and a few beers the decision was made to at least get the hike done and come back later if it was too high. So we were off, and I must say it was not easy going. Was it the lunchtime beers that was making it hard or the 30+ kilograms on our backs? After about an hour, the hike seemed to get a little easier, but we were not making much ground. By mid-afternoon the crew were in varied states of pain and frustration, but everyone knew what was ahead, and kept putting one foot in front of the other. The views were stunning as the sun started to drop and illuminated the Minarets. But there was no time to rest, as we still had about five kilometres to go.

the river runer

After some lunch we loaded the kayaks up and started to make our way down stream. The river was steep but very clean and we were not walking around anything. We had to get out and scout a lot, because of the big horizon lines, but often only for a second, to pass on the line to the crew and we were off. We were not moving down river fast but we were paddling some of the best white water in California. The intensity picked up when we made it to the triple drop. This consisted of a slide into a boof and finished with another slide. It took some scouting to piece this line together but eventually we decided on the line and although tight, we knew we could make it. After many more big rapids the crew were all feeling pretty tired and we looked for a camp. It was not long till we found the perfect spot. A side creek tumbled down into the river above a mini gorge and we set up camp on a grassy platform right below the Minarets.

STOMPER

the creek boat For more info visit: www.kayaksnz.co.nz


Even though the emphasis on these runs is challenging white water, some of the best times are sitting round the camp fire in places like this. No walking tracks or roads for miles, good friends and dehydrated meals in a bag. The meals leave a lot to be desired but after a long day they actually taste pretty good. We made a water marker in the river below the camp to show if the river rose or fell and by morning it had dropped a few inches so running the big waterfall downstream was now a possibility. This did not do the nerves any good, but it did make for some interesting thoughts throughout the morning. The steepness let up a bit on this day, which was a nice change and we made our way through some sweet gorges and out of this world scenery. We knew we were getting close to the big one and every horizon line we got to, the heart raced and then subsided as it was just another sweet clean drop. Finally we were there, and even though no one had committed to running it, we set up ropes in the caves either side of the drop for safety. Beta was, you could run it with low water flow but with more water the caves made it too dangerous and we could see why. Although we had a lot of water, it still looked like the line was there. The left cave that would cause all the problems was out of play so I decided to go. We had safety on river left plus one rope in the cave, Riley was on the lip on river right with the rope in that cave, Tyler was on a shelf just downstream on river right where he could access both caves with a good throw bag and then Jamie at the end of the pool.

With one last look over the line I got in my boat and eddied out just above the lip. Thumbs up. Good to go. I lined up the wave above and rolled off the lip. A few moments of clarity before disappearing into the curtain, waiting for impact. The impact was soft, but my paddle was forced up and into the top of my nose causing a little cut. Nothing serious. I surfaced in the pool and all was well! Tyler, now fired up, headed to the top. His line was super clean and we were both stoked to have run this one! Lunch below the falls was a nice change of pace before finishing off the last few kilometres to the take out. I mentioned at the start that the big hike in was something that may not have inspired me much about this run, but I didn’t mention the real killer‌ To run this river you must also hike out. Once at the bridge you have to pack the kayak again and walk about five kilometres straight up out of the canyon back to the car. Needless to say by the time we made it to the car, we were finished. Blisters, scraped knuckles and face, mental and physical fatigue but so much stoke after what I would describe as my favourite multi day kayak run in California. If you get the flows right and you are feeling fired up then this is the run for you. I will be back here again someday for sure! Cheers to Tyler Fox, Riley Best, Adrien Kiernan, and Dave Farkas for such an awesome adventure!

Photo by Jamie Garrod


Photo by Tyler Fox PAGE 50

Issue 70

Spring 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


We can ямБt a rack to almost anything!

Ski Racks Hitch Mount Carriers Third Bar Options Roof Boxes

Bike Racks Boat Loaders Professional Racks & Accessories

0508 529 256

roofrackcentre.co.nz

BAY OF PLENTY [ TAUPO [ WELLINGTON [ TARANAKI [ MANUKAU [ WAIKATO [ AUCKLAND [ NORTH SHORE


Canoe & Kayak Auckland

502 Sandringham Rd, Sandringham, Auckland 1025 09 815 2073 auckland@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Canoe & Kayak North Shore

Canoe & Kayak Bay of Plenty

545 Te Rapa Road Hamilton, 3200 07 850 1002 waikato@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Canoe & Kayak Taranaki

Canoe & Kayak Wellington

2/20 Constellation Drive Mairangi Bay, Auckland, 0632 09 479 1002 northshore@canoeandkayak.co.nz

6/ 631 Devon Road Waiwhakaiho, New Plymouth, 4312 06 769 5506 taranaki@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Canoe & Kayak Manukau

Canoe & Kayak Taupo

605A Great South Road Manukau, 2104 09 262 0209 manukau@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Discover Another World New & existing territories available throughout New Zealand Call Peter Townend pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz or phone 09 476 7066

Canoe & Kayak Waikato

3/5 MacDonald St, Mount Maunganui, Tauranga, 3116 07 574 7415 bop@canoeandkayak.co.nz

54 Spa Road Taupo, 3330 07 378 1003 taupo@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Unit F 2 Centennial Highway Ngauranga, Wellington, 6035 04 477 6911 wellington@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Canoe & Kayak Christchurch

(Agency) 03 377 6161 027 376 6161 chch@canoeandkayak.co.nz

canoeandkayak.co.nz roofrackcentre.co.nz yakityyak.co.nz kayaknz.co.nz

Profile for Canoe & Kayak

Issue 70 final web  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine Issue 70

Issue 70 final web  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine Issue 70