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Issue 69

Sophie Hart on her Speight’s Coast to Coast win.

Canoeing for beginners Part two Rigging your Fishing Kayak You won’t starve in the bush Proudly supported by:


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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Contents Multisport

6

The Proof is in the Paddle - NZ Kayak talks

to Sophie Hart.

Sea Kayaking

9 13 30 31

32 Tying a double fishermans knot.

Annual KASK Forum 2013

33 Sudoku

Trip Card - Tawhitokino

- Kayakers with Sore Feet 34 Health and Ankles…

Emma paddle the length of the Waikato River.

Trip Card - Somme Island.

28

Bullerfest 2013

46

Cameras of the future - Josh looks at cameras for those real action shots.

Fishing

20 23 4

5 Editorial

Keep Calm and Kayak On! - Sarah and

White Water Kayaking

15

Regulars

Kayak Fishing Rigs

35 Quick Crossword 36 First Aid - Severe allergic reactions. Craft - Hungry? - There’s plenty to 38 Bush eat in the bush.

39 Leader Profiles 40 Product Focus

41 Sudoku Solution & Crossword answers

- Jason Walker covers more kayak rigging, so you’ll be ready to hit the water!

42 Products - Warm wear

Technical

43 Products - Jackets, Dry bags & Light.

in the series on how to get the most out of your camera.

44 Kayaks - Over 90 kayaks listed.

Photography tips – Story Telling - The final

Open Canoeing For Beginners

- Estelle Leyshon looks at paddle techniques.

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Editorial Who owns what? When running a recent school group kayaking to Dacre Cottage, we arranged for the students to help clear weeds from the thousands of trees, shrubs and flax which earlier working bees had planted. It was to be a community service component of the day. Before we started work I asked, “Do you know who owns Dacre Cottage and the land along the beach?” A few hands went up and they answered “You do!” or “The Government” or “The Council”. I asked the question again and, much to their surprise added, “Please put your hands up,” and then “You see, all of you own this! And do you know you also own the bus stop outside your school, the museum and the hospital.” Talking about ownership, leads to us all becoming more involved in keeping it healthy and safe for family and friends. I felt everyone’s increased connection with Dacre Cottage’s land and the sense of ‘I’m important and needed here. They left more aware of responsible ownership and with another area that they can relate to and a anchorage for life. After the kayaking trip one of the students asked my wife Treffery, “Who owns the kayaks?” She smiled and replied, “The Company owns them”. The little one was thinking! This summer, while the weather has been hard on the land, it has been great for kayaking trips. My latest was with daughter Rowan Rose (10). Late evening we paddled, camped out and early morning returned for school. I’ll long remember sitting under the stars drinking hot chocolates and marsh mallows with a little hand

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lifting my arm over her shoulders for a cuddle. On the return a large stingray leapt from under my bow and in a huge splash knocked into Rowan’s kayak. The yehaing was impressive! It was a short but memorable trip, It doesn’t take long to reconnect with loved ones in the outdoors. Cheers and get out there, perhaps in a working bee to improve your kayaking environment. It’s way too good to miss and it needs you. Peter

Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time. EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 / (09) 476 7066 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 41) New Zealand – 6 Issues = $40 Overseas – 6 Issues = $60

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CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos. Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine Front Cover by Estelle Leyshon Contents page: - Ian decided to let pass before crossing. Photo by: Uta Machold

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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The Proof is in the Paddle NZ Kayak talks to Sophie Hart, Speight’s Coast to Coast One Day Women’s Winner and Women’s One Day Kayak record holder.

Photo coutesy of Paul’s Camera Shop On the second Saturday of February every year, for the past few decades at least, hundreds of people make their way down a 67km section of the Waimakariri River, commonly referred to by those ‘in the know’, simply as ‘the Waimak’. If you were to stand on the riverbank and watch the paddlers go by, some fast, some slow, the rest in between, you’ll see a huge variety of kayaks, both sea and river. You’ll also see a lot of different paddles, mainly wing blades using many techniques too. With the myriad of colours, options, designs and boat builds to choose from, it’s no surprise that some people find it terribly confusing to know what gear to buy or use, who to listen to for advice and what is the best way to learn. In 1997 Kathy Lynch set a paddle record for the Speight’s Coast to Coast in a time of 4:46:26, on what is recorded as a moderate to high flow. What some people don’t know is that the paddle time in the Speight’s Coast to Coast actually includes a 15 km cycle and a 1200 m run. Five months earlier during August 1996, Lynch represented New Zealand at the Olympic games for cycling and mountain biking. With this in mind; it is safe to say that she covered the 15 km cycle stage in a blistering time. In 2011 Sophie Hart shaved nearly five minutes off Lynch’s long standing record with a time of 4:41:31, which set her up to win the Longest Day event and get within 65 seconds of the course record set by Andrea Murray also in the favourable conditions of 1997. Hart’s paddle time of 2011 measured against Lynch’s paddle time of 1997, suggests that it was in the boat with paddle in hand where Hart was able to break the record. Hart didn’t compete in the 2012 race opting instead to take part in an adventure race in Patagonia, but in 2013 she returned and clearly ruled the women’s field, winning the race by a whopping 35 minutes, nearly half that time gained on the river paddle alone. NZ Kayak magazine spoke with Sophie Hart, the 29-year old Doctor who is based in Nelson, to hear her views on the C2C paddle.

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NZK: Firstly, congratulations, how does it feel to be twotime winner of the race and what was different winning the second time compared to the first? SH: Thanks. It’s great to be able to get another win. It was very different for me this time around, as I couldn’t fly under the radar quite so much as I’d done in 2011. I don’t think I wasn’t in quite so much disbelief in the days following the race this time around, it was more a sense of satisfaction to have had a solid day.

NZK: It’s obvious you are a very accomplished kayaker. How long has it taken and what do you think the key steps have been in your pathway to the paddler you are today? SH: It’s ongoing. I still don’t’ consider myself that accomplished or skilled. There’s lots of work to be done yet! There’s two main reasons I reckon for my improvement to date. Firstly, I did an introductory course to white water in Murchison. I learnt to roll, learnt to play in eddies and muck around in the river. Then, I put these skills to use and made the effort to paddle lots of other rivers. The Buller, the Wairau, the Motueka, and of course the Waimak. Secondly, the addition of a surf-ski to the gear shed has meant that I’ve become rather hooked on paddling downwind surf sessions in rough, messy conditions. In the past, my kayak training has always taken priority in the mornings, to get on the water and get it done before the water chops up and there’s the risk of tipping out. Now, I intentionally wait until the sea-breeze kicks up a few waves. This has seen me become a lot more comfortable in rough waters.

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NZK: Boat selection as you know is a hotly debated topic in the paddling world. What’s your view or advice to people in terms of making sure they are in the boat most suited to them? SH: I have always been quite conservative about boat selection. I want to be getting on the river excited, I don’t want to have any reservations about the boat I’m in. Particularly in the One Day race, where fatigue is such a massive factor, I think there’s very few situations where you’ll regret opting for the more stable kayak. Some people think that to paddle an advanced boat, you just need to practice in one; Paddle it often enough and you’ll get the hang of it eventually. I personally don’t agree with this model, as it’s not the one I’ve followed, and I’ve watched others do it. They end up paddling flat waters, avoiding rough stuff and swim much more often than can be enjoyable and I don’t think the learning curve is any faster.

NZK: Can you describe your paddle training for the Speight’s Coast to Coast. How much each week and for how many weeks? SH: In the six weeks leading up to the race, I aim for about eight hours a week in the boat over four sessions.

NZK: How important is it to paddle the river prior to the race and how many trips do you suggest people do, and when? SH: For me, it’s very important to get down the river before race day. It would depend on peoples comfort levels as to how many trips they do, but usually one or two trips are enough and if possible one only a few weeks out from race day. It can be just as beneficial to paddle other rivers to get a bit of variation and challenge.

Photo courtesy of sportzhub.co.nz

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I S S U E S I X T Y N i n e • A u t u 25/07/2011 m n 2 010:23:11 1 3 a.m. 7


NZK: Nutrition: what do you eat and drink on the river and how do you carry it? SH: I eat bars and Gu energy gels. I carry them in a little lunch box that is velcroed to the spray deck. I try to eat every 45 mins to an hour, and will have a bar and a Gu. I drink electrolyte which is in a bladder secured behind the seat. I also have a pick up line into the river, so I can have access to unlimited water. Both these tubings are fastened to a foam block that is attached to the front of my lifejacket with Velcro.

NZK: Having confidence in the river is a large part of paddling, what do you say to people working towards this? (the people that find the kayak a bit scary) SH: It wasn’t that long ago that I found the Waimak terrifying. The noise of the approaching rapids would trigger some unwanted reflex reaction in my legs to turn them to wobbling jelly and I’d feel sick with anticipation. Only through spending time on rivers has this feeling

started occurring less frequently. Having confidence in rivers does not come from paddling in flat, sheltered waters. It comes from making the effort to get on rivers and paddle in rough waters. Do a course, and join a club!

NZK: Thinking back to the paddle in the 2013 Speight’s Coast to Coast, can you describe how it went for you, how you felt, what you thought about, how you actually do it? SH: I was genuinely excited to be getting on the river. One of my goals of the day was to try and get the fastest womens paddle time overall, so I was pretty motivated to paddle hard. The top section had a couple of tight braids and shallow sections, so for the first hour I just concentrated hard on picking good lines and settling into a rhythm. I tried to drink as much water as I could, as it was a hot day and I regularly took in food. I tried to concentrate on lines and fastest water through the gorge, paddling at a consistent steady pace. I think about all sorts of random things when I’m paddling, although I try to stay focussed, I inevitably end up daydreaming.

NZK: Another technical question, what sort of paddle do you use, blade size, length etc? SH: I use a wing paddle, length 206cm. I wouldn’t use anything longer than that on a river.

NZK: You obviously love paddling, can you share with the readers what drives your passion for paddling? SH: Haha, I really don’t know. I guess it stems from growing up on Ohope Beach (Home of Lisa Carrington!) and spending my childhood splashing around in the waves. I just love the feeling of being out on the ocean with salt water in the face and getting free rides on the waves.

NZK:

Finally, any kayaking secrets to give away?

SH: Learn to love it, embrace the swimming and getting wet. It’s all part of the process.

Sophie’s Paddling Resume

(achievements, accomplishments) • 1st Waimak Classic River Race 2012. • 2nd Waimak Classic River Race 2011 • 1st Speight’s Coast to Coast Women’s One • Day Event 2013 • Speight’s Coast to Coast Women’s One Day kayak record holder. • Fastest Women’s paddle time C2C 2013 • 3rd King of the Harbour Surf Ski Race 2012.

Over 800 competitors will vie for places in the the world’s premier multi-sport event, the Speight’s Coast to Coast race on February 14th and 15th 2014.

Grade Two certification and brush up courses run through out the year. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details.

Will you be there? - 2014 entries now open.

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Coast to Coast 2014 v1.indd 1

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Keep Calm and Kayak On! Sarah Holmes and Emma Millen started at Lake Taupo and paddled to the very end of the Waikato River at Port Waikato.

“They said it couldn’t be done, but we knew we could do it. We knew we had the fitness, skills and above all determination on our side to make it happen, but more than that we chose to do it as we couldn’t find any record of anyone completing the challenge – let alone two females - in six days.” These are the motivational words of two Auckland women who had originally made a pledge to kayak the mighty Waikato, New Zealand’s longest river, in ten days. Sarah Holmes and Emma Millen would start as close to the source as possible at Lake Taupo and paddle to the very end, where crystal-clear, fresh water becomes the salty expanse of the Tasman Sea at Port Waikato. Why? Why not? The 22-year old fitness fanatics, who have been firm friends since childhood, are very much of the ‘life is for living’ brigade, in their case the seed was sown back in 2011 when Sarah tragically lost her mum Michelle after a lengthy battle against depression. Emma had also seen her own mother suffering with different medical battles and so the planning phase commenced, with the theme ‘Doing it for the Mums’ at the forefront of their minds. Unlike most challenges of this nature sponsorship was never an issue. “It wasn’t about raising money” said Sarah, a Personal Trainer, “It was all about raising the profile of depression in New Zealand and about how important our mums are.” The planning phase was completed quickly by Emma, a professional kayaker. Mapping out the journey, calculating the daily route down to the minute and giving consideration to logistics, nutrition and above all safety was paramount for Emma, “We knew that we had to average seven kilometres an hour, ten hours a day or we wouldn’t do it. We wanted to be the first and fastest, however my goal was to do it safely or not at all”. Even as they made their way to Taupo with their Support Team there

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were those that doubted it could be done (including the author of this article!) At approximately 425 kilometres this was certainly a challenge, but mid morning on Boxing Day 2012, as most people were recovering from Christmas Day and wondering how many alternative meals they could make out of a turkey, the girls slipped quietly onto the lake and paddled to the centre in their white water boats . Avoiding a Cessna 206 float plane as it skimmed across the water on landing was to set the scene in an unexpected fashion, typically the duo saw the funny side and ploughed on regardless – Keep Calm and Kayak On! The first stage to conquer was the initial rapids section to Reid’s Farm and then sensibly abandon all hope of cascading over the Huka Falls. Emma took the rapids in her stride whilst Sarah, a comparative novice battled through until she came to grief near the world-famous Huka Lodge Hotel. A brief portage to the safer side of the daunting falls saw some deft abseiling as the girls lowered themselves and their equipment

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down to the river. With the enormous power of the river on their side they made quick time to the Aratiatia Dam. Met by the Support Team they quickly ate lunch and before you could say splash deck were leaving the crew behind to get back into the water the other side of the Aratiatia Rapids – a Grade six and beyond the ability of even the most hardened kayaker. From here the river drops 28 metres in a kilometre: this is what endears the area to the hearts and minds of international kayaker’s. The girls lowered themselves back to the water and drifted off into the mist mindful that the next phase, ‘Full James’ the site of the 1999 World Whitewater Championships, would be a challenge, and if nothing else it would certainly put a smile on Sarah’s face. By now the weather had worsened, a constant drizzle fell from the skies leading to the Support Team getting lost in unfamiliar territory. Soon however all were reunited alongside the stunning, and now somewhat calmer river, it’s deeply mesmerizing turquoise waters swirling to the surface, inviting and enticing, allowing the girls for a moment to take a breath and consider what lay ahead of them. At this stage good humour still prevailed and despite the now torrential rain they were desperate to get back onto the water, the words ‘they say it can’t be done’ echoing in their collective minds. But time and tide waits for no woman: Day One was over. Much-needed rest followed; mind and bodies soon replenished, Day Two and the start of the more arduous aspect of the trip would follow before you could say “Are there really two four o’clock’s in one day?” Crack of dawn the following morning saw the pair sliding their way down a wet and treacherous footpath to the waters edge, they had now changed vessels, the early stages had demanded short kayaks but from here onwards a two-man would be their companion as they made their way North West to the ocean. Their trusty steed was to be a much-loved red Contour 490 Tandem, complete with adequate storage (they were carrying around 200 kg of equipment) and most importantly their lucky mascot trailing behind on

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a rope, a plastic duck called Edna. As they set off, pausing only for a photograph and a brief word of encouragement they knew now that a combination of their personal goals and fighting spirit would be essential to get them home. As they wound their way up river they looked for places to stay each night, their outdoor education experience to the fore during one overnighter when they created a home-from-home under an old disused concrete roof. Other river users shouted encouragement and disbelieving looks when informed of the journey, “It can’t be done!” they shouted, foolishly. Despite taking precautions they were sunburnt and raw. Sleep became a luxury, tired beyond their wildest imagination, over the next few days they had navigated through the lakes of the central North Island, paddled their way to Mangakino, Arapuni, Karapiro, Cambridge,

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Hamilton and Huntly and on Day Five they reached Mercer. It was New Year’s Eve 2012. As revellers danced the night away oblivious of the massive effort, the girls grabbed some brief sleep; they knew that the following day, in order to beat the tide, they would have to start early. “We were exhausted and the pressure we had put ourselves under was starting to show – I knew how close we were, we had reduced the journey from ten to six days and we were in striking range. For the first time I felt we might have set the benchmark,” said Emma. At 2.30am New years Day 2013, surrounded by mist they set off, Emma’s father acting as a guide in the family boat, torches lighting the way. Emotions were high as the pair dug deep and paddled against the flow, passing old training grounds in Franklin; near now, near to the finish. White caps were whipped up by the 20 knot wind as they finally saw the sand bar that crosses the river and announces the end of the journey. They had made such good time that they had to paddle around

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the river mouth until the immensely-proud welcoming committee arrived. Reunited with their families, the girls collapsed onto the beach, shook hands, hugged and then nodded to one another before sprinting to the sea. “We were shattered but we had made a pact to leap into the ocean – we knew that our mums would be incredibly proud of what we had achieved. It was at this stage when someone shouted ‘you never know girls, you might have set a record…’” Words and images: Mark Bond 2013 ©

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Annual Kask Forum 2013 By Shawn Walsh

On a hot and dusty Waikato summers afternoon in March this year, the little coastal town of Raglan was abuzz with the sound of new and old friends meeting for the first time. The Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers (KASK) were having their annual forum and as it was on my doorstep I had decided that I would finally make the effort to attend. The forum is an annual get together of kayakers from far and wide, including some who had journeyed across the Tasman to take part and is a great opportunity to swap tales, learn new skills and just paddle a new area. The weather was predictably hot and sticky as the drought continued but the lack of winds and beautiful blue skies made for a perfect weekend for paddling and socialising. The program was a mixture of speaker sessions and on the water sessions, with groups of paddlers splintering off to paddle by themselves or with others at various times. Friday night began with the obligatory welcome and housekeeping items before the local Harbour Master talked about all things nautical safety and entertained us with his dry wit and laconic style before we all headed out to the beach for a flare demonstration in the fading evenings light. Unfortunately the strong winds and tinder dry countryside meant that the parachute flares were not able to be let off, but the smoke and pinpoint flares were great and lent the beach the air of burning man as the sun set and the smoke filled the air. After the flares had been released, a tally was taken of which ones had not gone off (they were all expired) and worryingly, there was no pattern to flare failure, with those only a year out of date failing as well as those much, much older. Saturday started with a hearty breakfast and bright sunshine. The 80 or so participants were split into seven ‘pods’ and then each tasked with building a cardboard kayak with minimal equipment and limited time. With much skulduggery and furtive spying, the teams set to and produced seven completely different takes on the cardboard canoe,

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with designs varying from river barge to white water canoe. Once they were built, the final test was the kayak race; chosen paddlers donned PFD grabbed paddles and with a Nascar style start, the race was on. Amazingly all seven craft floated and some were surprisingly swift and the first race was won in quick time, only to have the lead boat sabotaged by an act of piracy as it crossed the finish line. Protest flags were instantly raised and two more races were then held with boats slowly disintegrating with each race. That afternoon, a number of paddlers headed out for various paddles, while others listened to some excellent talks: ‘The Roll’ by Mike Scanlan and ‘Kayaking in the Whitsunday Islands’ by Paul Hayward and Natasha Romoff. Unfortunately I chose to get onto the water and missed both of the afternoon speakers but I did spend an awesome afternoon playing in the surf with a small group of paddlers before heading back into the harbour and catching up with the rescue practice with Evan Pugh. Sean Smith aka The Fat Paddler (www.fatpaddler. com) was the night’s

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keynote speaker and he regaled us with his inspirational story of how he began paddling and some of his exploits with kayaks, canoes and surf skis, showing his great sense of humour and tenacity. He also managed to put together a great presentation of the previous nights and that days exploits from the forum. (See http://fatpaddler.com/2013/03/ sea-kayaking-in-new-zealand-with-kask) Sunday dawned with more blue skies and no wind and the focus of the day was on the water. There were coaching opportunities in the morning for rolling and boat handling skills as well as some fine paddling around the Raglan harbour at high tide. The coaching sessions with John Kirk-Anderson and Dave Winkworth were enjoyed by all those who participated and everyone felt they came away a better paddler than they arrived after the session. After lunch on the Sunday Bevan Grant showed us the basics of using nautical charts and Tim Taylor talked about his solo circumnavigation of

Raglan Lime stone Rocks Photo by Ruth E. Henderson

New Zealand, the people he met and the things he discovered along the way. Finally the afternoon drew to a close and it was time to say goodbye to new friends and old, as people loaded up kayaks and prepared to head home after a great weekend’s paddling and socialising. Although it was my first KASK forum, I was made to feel welcome and part of the family, much like any other meeting of paddlers I have ever been to. I’ll definitely be going back soon.

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Kayak Fishing Rigs

Jason Walker covers more kayak rigging, so you’ll be ready to hit the water!

Leashes

We start by looking at leashes as these are an integral part of retaining your items on your boat. When you are fishing from such a small craft, so close to the water, it is very easy to lose something over the side; that something could be your $2 bait knife or your flash brand new $1000 rod and reel combo. If it’s not attached to the kayak you can kiss it goodbye! It has happened to us all at some stage. We can be really careful putting our GPS in its secure little holder on the deck every time, but when you get that grumpy big snapper flapping around in your lap, its flailing tail hits your GPS and knocks it over the side; that GPS is long gone. Not only does it leave you with the pain of having to explain to the bank manager (or your other half!) why you need to buy a new one, it’s also the gut wrenching feeling when you realise it’s taken with it all those secret fishing marks you’ve been collecting for the last two years... So, there is a simple rule to remember - Leash it or Lose it! There are many leashes on the market but they all serve the same simple purpose – to attach stuff to your kayak. The designs are varied but all follow a simple make-up. A leash to your item on one end (often a length of Spectra cord), with a length of 4 mm bungy - approximately 500 mm to 1000 mm long, and on the other end of the bungy add a method of attaching the leash to your kayak (normally a carabineer, spring clip or dog clip). Here is an example of a rod leash I use.

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Also make sure you leash your paddle too. You need to be aware though that as much as we want to keep all our gear on board there are a couple of really important rules to follow with leashes. The first is never cross your body with leashes. You do not want your rod in the left rod holder leashed to the right side of your kayak, with the opposite rod in the right rod holder so you have now crossed your body with two leashes. If you now find yourself in the unfortunate situation of rolling your kayak you will find it more difficult to untangle yourself underwater. The worse case is finding yourself unable to get to the surface without cutting the leashes and losing the rods - although donating a $1000 combo to Davey Jones’s locker is far better than losing your life! The second rule is never leash your gaff to your kayak. If you end up in the water, your kayak is upside down with all your lovely tackle hanging in the water attached, except when one of those items is your gaff with it’s six inch stainless steel and a really sharp hook waiting to embed itself into your leg or other appendage as you tread water. This scenario gets even worse in a surf landing that goes wrong as your kayak is swept towards the beach dragging you behind it by the gaff!  

Tackle Storage

So we’ve got the rods and reels leashed to the kayak now where do we put all our tackle? For the kayak fisher who likes to take everything there are now solutions available allowing you to take all that tackle with you. For many years kayaks the world over had very little or no dry storage

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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areas to keep any tackle aboard. Thankfully the kayak manufacturers in New Zealand have listened to us and delivered places for us to store vast amounts of tackle so we can swap the latest bling out on the water. Even though we now have lots of space available it still pays to think about how you package your tackle. We are still out on the water and leaving hooks and jig heads open to the elements will shorten their lives quite quickly, so you should look at storage solutions that will help keep your individual pieces of tackle away from the salt spray etc. Sealable boxes from the likes of Systema and other brands are the commonly used solutions to this problem. It’s also worth dividing up your tackle into various fishing methods and then putting these into separate boxes so you are in effect making up mini tackle boxes for each discipline. This enables you to quickly grab the relevant box(es) based on the type of fishing you intend to be doing on the day. For example you grab your soft bait rod and reel and your soft bait tackle box that has your jig heads, worm hooks, deepwater rigs, fluorocarbon leaders, etc in it. If your intention today is jigging then you can grab your jigging tackle box with your jigs and assist hooks in it. By doing this you can leave behind what you do not need. There is a danger that we try to take everything with us on the water and can end up overwhelmed and overloaded with gear. We do not have unlimited space on our kayaks so the more stuff we can leave behind the better sometimes. I went through a phase of taking four rods out with me and enough gear to run a small tackle shop but I often found that I only used one or two rods and opened only one tackle box in six hours. Then when I got home I still have to go through the process of cleaning down all four rods and unloading all the unused gear.

Transport

Now that we have covered getting the kayak rigged and ready to go we have one more step to get on the water … getting the kayak from the

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garage to the waters edge! Unless you are lucky enough to be living on the beach you are going to have to transport your kayak by vehicle. This presents two choices: the more common method of carrying your kayak on top of your vehicle using roof racks or the other option of towing it behind you on a trailer. The roof rack option is the most popular due to its simplicity, cost, and no need for a tow bar. With roof racks you also have two further choices; to just tie the kayak to the roof rack bars or opt for specialist kayak cradles? Securing your kayak hull side up to the roof bars is by far the most simple and cost effective solution, it is also a good way to carry your kayak as your kayak is resting on it’s gunnels which are very solid and therefore will not distort. Cradles enable you to carry your kayak with the hull down, this can be useful if you have attached appendages to the top side of your kayak that cannot be removed such at fish finder mounts that would hit the vehicle roof when upside down on the roof rack bars. The alternative option is to use a trailer to get your kayak and gear to the launch point. You could use a standard 6x4 trailer or opt for something like the trailer shown here which provides not only a way to

carry your kayak to the beach but also somewhere to securely carry all your gear too, meaning none of your fishy stuff has to go in the family car.

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Whichever method you choose be careful not to clamp your kayak down too hard to your rack / trailer, your kayak is made of plastic and in the height of summer that kayak plastic will soften slightly. A kayak that is tied down too tight will distort and your kayak can be damaged. You only need to apply enough pressure on your kayak with the tie downs to keep your kayak in place and to stop it moving around.

HELP!

Trolleys

We have now made it to the beach, the kayak is off the vehicle or trailer all rigged up, and gear loaded but how do you get it from the car park to the waters edge? Don’t fret a solution has already been thought of for you - the kayak trolley! As with everything there are several options available with options to suit all budgets and preferences, here are a couple of examples of trolleys that I personally own. One of the most popular kayak trolleys is the C-Tug trolley, this trolley has been designed and made here in NZ for our kayaks. It is constructed from plastic and stainless steel, and has been designed in such a way that the trolley will break down into several pieces so it can easily be stored in the front hatch of your kayak, saving you a trip back to your vehicle to drop the trolley off. The C-Tug trolley first came out with pneumatic tires but these have recently been replaced with new hard wheels which help when you are crossing soft sand. The Canoe & Kayak Stainless steel trollies are robust and will last in the harsh marine environment. For the more budget concious, there are aluminium framed trollies wih pheumatic tyres to get your trolley to the waters edge. Even if you don’t have a trolley do not despair, all you need to do is find a friend! Even a fully laden kayak is easily carried to the shore line by two people, another good excuse to paddle with a group!

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Fixings

If you want to attach items to you kayak such a rod holders, Railblaza mounts, fish finder mounts etc. then there are several options available to you, here is a quick run down of each type. Rivets These are an easy to use solution where you do not have access to the inside of the kayak at the attachment point but rivets are hard to get a good waterproof seal with.

Self Tapping Screws

Another easy to use fixing that can also be used where you do not have access to the inside of the kayak. With screws you do need to be careful you do not over tighten them as you can very easily strip the thread in the soft plastic. Well Nuts A very easy to use and very waterproof fastening, the nut is captive inside a rubber sleeve and as you tighten the screw the rubber will expand and form the seal.

Screw and Nut

A good solution where you need a strong fixing, you must, of course have access to both sides so you can put a spanner on the nut. You will need to use some form of sealant to make it waterproof.

Inserts

Many kayaks now make use of moulded-in brass inserts, these are added to the kayak during the manufacturing process and as such they are 100% waterproof.  In the next article we’ll get out on the water and do some fishing, I’ll also look at some electronics options for your kayak.

Screw

Rivet

Fittings from the underside.

Well nut Fastenings from the topside.

Self tapping screw

Screw & nut

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Go there gear

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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19


Photography Tips – Story Telling By Ruth E. Henderson If the saying – that every picture is worth a thousand words is true, then does it stand to reason that lots must be better? Perhaps. It does depend on the photos and on their purpose or use. In photo journalism, a single excellent picture that shows the action, the vibrancy, the heat or the mood of the moment – can be better than a thousand written words, but in most cases it accompanies them.

A Puff Piece A photostory is a noun meaning a photo essay. Although it sounds like a modern digital thing this term originated about 1935 -1940. It consists of a collection of pictures, put together in an order that tells a story. I like the discipline seen in photo competitions such as the NZ Geographic Photographer of the Year. In the photostory category, the allowance is one main picture, surrounded on two sides with another half dozen, with a limited narrative or explanation. At the recent exhibition held at the Auckland War Memorial Museum, this art form was described as “the art for telling a story through pictures. A good photostory takes the viewer on an emotional or intellectual journey that reveals its subject matter in a way that words cannot. Photojournalists are professional storytellers with cameras. They must think on their feet, often in difficult circumstances to show a range of images that collectively weave a coherent story.” Another interpretation of “photostory” is a computer application that allows you to create a visual story which can include narration, special effects, and music. A mini PowerPoint presentation. Whether you want to simply show your mother or Facebook friends what you were up to at the weekend or do a fancy ‘show and tell’ presentation at club night, or write and illustrate an article for this magazine – first you have to take the pictures with this in mind. Right from the start of your trip – think story telling – a beginning, a middle, an end. Ok, we don’t necessarily need photos of loading the roof rack… But like the plot of a movie, you should introduce the setting, and then take enough photos to show the sequence of events – to provide detail, allow you to elaborate to develop a theme (which may change). Lots of photos may end up on the ‘cutting floor’ - either deleted or not used for the theme or story

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

angle you have chosen this time. It is very hard to restrict yourself to only seven photos! Disciplining myself, from my last Yakity Yak club trip…I gave it a try. “Weekend on the Waikato River” The Waikato offers variety. A highlight of the Saturday’s paddle on Lake Atiamuri once the mist lifted was feasting on plump blackberries. Sunday’s was the magic of a dawn paddle on Lake Arapuni: the quietness, the solitude and reflections were worth the 6 am start. To savour it all again we walked or cycled the river trail to the famous swing bridge at Arapuni village. Ok, that was hard, but good practice at elimination! Selecting your photos first also helps to concentrate the mind on your words, if writing a story. You try it. It is easier if you don’t have ‘variety’ as a theme! You don’t always have to restrict yourself to seven pictures! For an ordinary club night ‘slide show’ of a weekend without any dramas I allow myself up to 20 – 24 photos, the equivalent of an old roll of film, as anymore just bores people, and may limit the time for other people’s show and tells.

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Charlie in ‘hot’ water

The Tutorial

Photo by Shelley Stuart

When an extraordinary event occurs, any ’rules’ evaporate. For instance if an accident occurs and you don’t actually have your hands full plucking someone out of the water, hopefully you’ll register quickly that photos may be important, and start clicking. You (or someone else) may want to use your photos to illustrate what went wrong, how the recue was performed or how the situation was resolved. Paul Hayward gathered together some of his and Natasha’s photos, mine and Shelley Stuart’s to do just that when Charlie did a KASK “Buggar file” award winning performance at the Cavalli Islands. Paul could only make this informative presentation because he had the material to work with. So, when something happens before your very eyes – don’t hold back: snap. To tell a complete story, you need a range of pictures: photos that set the scene, that show how it unfolds, and how it ends.

Re-grouped and towing broken boat.

Duct taped kayak is relaunched.

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I S S U E S I X T Y N i n e • A u t u m28/11/2012 n 2 0 112:06:33 3 p.m. 21


The Boy Scout (or kea) As we end this series, a final note - six year old Kawau Islander, Lexi asked “how do you get so many good photos?” Thinking of a simple explanation a child could understand I replied “You must carry your camera, in your pocket, or backpack – so when you see a good picture you take a photo. If you come back tomorrow something will have changed”. I meant of course the way the light caught the ripples of water, the wind moved the leaves, the placement of the people… Judge of NZ Geographic Wildlife 2009 exhibition, Tui de Roy, put my sentiment more eloquently. The brackets are mine as we are not all wildlife photographers. “Ideally a perfect picture (in nature) should capture a combination of at least a few of these contradictory elements:

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

great subject, subtle light, startling action, (a sense of wilderness), a spirit of adventure or discovery, a touch of mystery, all balanced in one fleeting millisecond”. Nature photographers spend days in hides waiting for that moment of perfection. Kayakers are often more concerned about staying upright. However, photography, especially photo journalism does all come down to being prepared, having your camera WITH you. Accessible. Don’t leave your camera in your buoyancy aid, back at your boat while you have lunch, nor put it in your front hatch whilst on the water. Have it in your BA pocket or in a dry bag between your legs. Have it to hand! And as the sun sets…take it for a walk!

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Open Canoeing For Beginners - Part two of the canoeing series with Estelle Leyshon.

In the last issue we looked at the forward stroke and steering strokes allowing you to get out on the water while having some degree of control. We now need to look at a few more strokes so that we can gain full control and more confidence to paddle further.

The paddle shaft should be as near horizontal as possible whilst still keeping the whole blade area in the water. Twist and untwist the body whilst performing this stroke Don’t sweep the paddle round more than 90 degrees since this will end up moving the boat backwards and forwards at the same time, which is

Stopping the canoe – two people:

Trapper

To stop the boat moving forwards it’s simply a matter of paddling backwards. From a good forward paddling position, twist your body round and place the paddle blade in the water level with your hips, Push the blade forward in the water by untwisting your body. Keep the paddle vertical and your top hand immediately above your bottom hand. Recover the blade - slice it out at the end of the stroke. Things to note: Make sure the boat is travelling at normal speed before practicing this. Using shorter strokes in quick succession works well. The boat should be travelling in the opposite direction within two boat lengths.

Turning the canoe on the spot

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– two people.

We can do this by what is known as a “sweep stroke”. It is called a sweep stroke because, instead of following the centre line of the boat, it sweeps out on an arc. The bow paddler places the paddle at the front of the canoe and “sweeps” the paddle through a 90 degree arc and recovers the paddle level with the hips. The stern paddler places the paddle at the back of the canoe on the opposite side and using the back of the paddle, (i.e. the non drive face), simultaneously “sweeps” the paddle through a 90 degree arc and recovers the paddle level with the hips. The boat can then be spun round on the spot by applying several strokes with the stern paddler following the timing of the bow paddler. Things to note:

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Supernova, 14ft,10”, 22kgs, Spectra

Rob Special, 15ft, 26Kg, Royalex Lite

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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just a waste of energy! The strokes can be reversed so the bow paddler sweeps from the hips to the front of the boat and the stern paddler sweeps from the hips to the stern of the boat.

Trimming the canoe:

This sounds complicated but in fact it’s very simple. All it means is that the bow should be slightly raised above the water line when paddling forwards and the stern should be raised slightly above the water line when paddling backwards. So how do we achieve this? Well unlike a kayak we can move our weight forward on the seat or if necessary kneel in front of the seat to achieve this. We can also move any gear we have in the canoe back forwards or backwards to achieve the right trim. Things to note: Because of their size, as open canoes are affected by wind more than kayaks it is good idea to trim for wind conditions as well. We do this by moving weight forward if we are paddling into a head wind and moving weight back if the wind is behind us.

Moving the boat sideways – two people:

The easiest way of moving the boat sideways is for both paddlers to do a “draw stroke” on the same side. Twist round on the seat to face the side of the canoe. Place the blade in the water at right angles to the canoe. Make sure the drive face of the blade is facing towards you. Your top arm should be almost straight and the blade submerged. Keeping the top hand in the same position, pull the blade in towards the boat. Recover the blade by rolling your top wrist away from you through 90

degrees whilst allowing the paddle shaft to rotate through your bottom hand, and then slice the blade back through the water to where you started the stroke. Rotate your wrist again and repeat the stroke. Things to note. Don’t rush this stroke, technique is much more important than speed or power here. Keep in time with the other paddler. The paddles should always be pulled in at right angles to the canoe. If the bow or stern starts swinging round, just adjust the power you are putting into the stroke accordingly.

Reversing the canoe – two people:

Twist your body round and place the paddle blade in the water level with your hips. Push the blade forward in the water by untwisting your body. Keep the paddle vertical and your top hand immediately above your bottom hand. To recover the blade, slice it out at the end of the stroke. Look over your shoulders to check where the boat is going. Things to note: Remember to “trim” the boat by adjusting your seating positions or kit so the stern of the boat is now a little higher in the water than the bow. When reversing, the stern and bow paddlers’ roles are “reversed” and it is the bow paddler’s responsibility to keep the boat straight. The bow paddler can then adjust the steering by using a “reverse J stroke”.

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Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $70. Phone: 06 769 5506

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Reverse J stroke:

Do a normal reverse stroke followed by: Pushing the blade forward in the water and keep the blade fully submerged. At the same time, roll your top hand over so your thumb is pointing downwards and your hand is touching or almost touching your shoulder. Steer the boat by levering off the edge and moving your top hand away from or towards the edge of the boat. Lean forward if needed.

Swimming to shore with an open canoe:

Sometimes it is quicker to swim to the shore with the canoe rather than be rescued. This would usually be the case where the shore is close at hand and the river depth near the banks is shallow enough to stand up in, making emptying the boat easy. Tandem paddlers: Once in the water, take a few seconds to get orientated, then, whilst hanging onto your paddles, swim to each end of the canoe and hang onto the boat. DO NOT attempt to right the boat. Use one hand to hold onto the canoe, and the other to hold on to your paddle. Make sure you communicate with the other paddler so you both know which point of the bank you are aiming for. Holding onto the canoe at the bow and stern, swim to the bank with the boat.

Things to note: Timing and communication with your paddling partner are critical when emptying a canoe. Remember to apply the principles of good lifting technique; Open Canoes full of water are heavy!

Emptying open canoes:

Once you have reached the shallow water near the bank, (the water should ideally be knee to waist depth), both paddlers should gently lift the gunwales on one side of the boat up about six inches to break the “air lock” under the boat. Then lift the opposite gunwales up six inches above the water so the boat is level - and still upside down. The boat will now quickly drain of water. Lift the boat up to waist/chest height. Now quickly flip the boat over and place it back in the water.

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TAHEAD-Nov12

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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North Shore Auckland Manukau Waikato

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Call into your local Canoe & Kayak Centre or have a look on-line. Find out more at canoeandkayak.co.nz, phone 0508 529256, or see the back page for a Canoe & Kayak Centre near you.


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Buller Festival was a great success, everything ran really smoothly and a lot of fun was had by all. The rivers were low, which some people were happy about for the Commercial Hotel Boater X on the Friday on the Matakitaki River; some of the more junior and less experienced paddlers were able to get involved. The more competitive paddlers were racing each other by the finals, and pushing each other for the title of Champ. Saturday on the Buller river at the O’Sullivans rapid was great too, not quite as hot as the Friday, so more pleasant for the spectators. A great Slalom course was run, and the Ultimate Descents Rafter X was a huge success, with another fun course set up.

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

Sunday saw a few more entries this year for the Cardboard Cup, and as a fun event it was just the thing for the competitors before the prize giving. All in all our numbers for competitors was down a little, with around 200 people signing up, but we were expecting this after having not run last year. Preparations are already underway for next year’s event, and we are all keen to make it bigger, and better each year with some new ideas coming out from this years event.

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Trip Card # 013 Tawhitokino

metres. Copyright © Crown Copyright Reserved. Sourced from Land Information New Zealand data. NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION (Maritime Rules, Part 25)

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Tawhitokino Beach

Tawhitokino Route card No. 013 Skill level: Beginners Distance: 4 Km

Chart no: NZ532 Tidal Port: Auckland

Start point: Finish Point: HW/ LW: Tidal times/ notes:

Kawakawa Bay boat ramp Tawhitokino

Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Auckland (09) 303 4303 Mobile:*555 VHF Channel 80/ 82 Good cellphone coverage from the campsite.

Not an issue for this paddle although tide verus wind should be considered. A kayak trolley is useful for low water portage.

Introduction: A beautiful area to paddle. Heading towards the Firth of Thames along a piece of coast that is protected from south and south west winds. Views of Ponui Island and Coromandel. Description: After launching follow the coastline to the ARC campsite at Tawhitokino. This camp has a nice isolated sand beach that can be only reached by foot via the beaches at low tide or by boat. Keep an eye out for jumping fish and there has been the odd seal sighting as well. The camp site has very basic facilities which include a food prep area and a long drop toilet. There is some water for washing dishes (very limited supply over summer ). It is recommended you bring in your own drinking water. There are more than a few options for exploratory paddles such as heading over to Ponui Island or cruising down the coast to Orere Point. There are a few reefs and rocky outcrops for rock gardening adventures but these can also be considered a hazard when the tide’s low. There’s plenty of

good fishing to be had too. A great getaway in an isolated location. Hazards: • Caution is required around the Kawakawa Bay boat ramp, as it can be fairly busy. • Once around the point following the coast is fairly safe but a lookout needs to be kept for set nets and surf caster lines. • The beach at the boat ramp is stoney. • If conditions are not great at Kawakawa Bay, follow the road to the end where there is parking and a very sheltered bay. This cuts the trip to Tawhitokino to about 2 km. • Good cellphone coverage from the campsite but remember that there is no road access. Additional information: http://regionalparks.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/ tawhitokino

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: March 2013


Trip Card # 007 Petone Wharf to Somme Island

Somme Island

Petone Wharf to Somme Island Route card No. 007 Skill level: Beginners Distance: 8 Km

Chart no: NZ4633 Tidal Port: Wellington

Start/ Finish point:

Petone Wharf

Tidal times/ notes: Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

There are no issues with tides in this area. VHF Channels: 14, 16, 62 Good cellphone and VHF coverage.

Introduction: A day, or half day paddle Somes Island in Wellington Harbour is well worth the trip. Somes Island has a very interesting history and is a great place to stop and have a picnic. DOC staff on the Island can give you an informative talk on this. DO NOT carry any unwanted pests onto the island as it is a sanctuary for many native species. Landing on the island is prohibited apart from the wharf area on the north end of the island. Take your lunch and allow at least an hour to have a look around the island. If you are luck you may see Tuatara. Please stay on the paths and take all of your rubbish when you leave. DOC have houses on the island that can be booked for an overnight stay as well as some camping space, you must pre book on the DOC website. Description: Leave from the car park at the Petone wharf and paddle south to the island. Keep about 100 m off the wharf as it is popular for people casting fishing lines. A trip around the island is worth while and you will quite often see seals along the way.

Hazards: • Boating traffic. Yacht races are common in this area. • Be wary of northerly winds as this can make your trip back a lot more testing. Accommodation: DOC Education House Somes Island (04) 384 7770 wellingtonvc@doc.govt.nz

Water Toilets Showers Cabins

Attractions: Bird and wildlife watching Diving and snorkelling Fishing

h

Historic sites

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: March 2013


Tying a Double Fishermans Knot You’d use this knot to make a strop, prusik loop or to join two fishing lines. So quite a

1.

2.

1.Lie the ends of the ropes next to each other.

4.

3.

2.Cross the first end over the second line and then pass under it.

3 - 6. Wind the end over and under both lines twice. 6.

5.

7 & 8. Pass the end through the twists.

7.

9. Pull the bitter end while sliding the twists to tighten on itself.

9.

10.

8.

White Water Courses

10. Repeat steps 1 - 9 on the second rope then pull the tails in opposite directions to tighten. 11.

Want to learn, or brush up your skills? Give us a call. 0508 529 256

11. When finished it will look like this. 32

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013 White Water bw.indd 1

www.kayaknz.co.nz 26/11/2012 8:26:19 a.m.


Sudoku The objective is to fill the 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. Solution on page 41

7 2 5 8 8

9 7 5

2 6 4

1

2

4

5 7

4 9 8 5 7

1 8 7 5

6 9 3

adventure equipment

8

1

Aura Touring Cag Xipe Touring PFD

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Outdoors New Zealand has a FREE gift pack for the first 5 people who purchase a copy of KI WAHO Issue 7. Ki Waho - ‘Into The Outdoors’ is the magazine for professionals working in the outdoors. The free gift pack contains a bag, two back issues of Ki Waho, a compactable drink bottle, sunscreen and lip balm. To buy the latest issue or find out more about KI WAHO visit: www.ki-waho.co.nz or call Outdoors NZ: 04 385 7287

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Health

Kayakers with Sore Feet and Ankles… Stand your ground!

I literally mean that. Posture is everything, how you stand, each step you take effects every joint in your body from the top of your head to the tip of your toes, here’s why: Gravity rules: the minute we became bi-ped gravity began to push and pull down every joint in your body. Your platform for balance is your feet; they have the task of balancing your whole body against gravity keeping you from toppling over. This alone seems an amazing feat, not to mention the demands that occur when you engage in multiple movements that kayaking, other sport and life require. Your body has built in mechanisms via the nervous system and joint system to accommodate your multi-directional demands, quite gracefully if your posture is intact. When your posture breaks down, uneven loading on your joints and spine occur and it all ends up in your ankles and feet – the last point of contact to Planet Earth! “The World is Flat” at least that is how your feet would interpret the western world of today “A Flat Concrete Jungle! The amazing blueprint of your feet is designed for the ability to traverse uneven terrain, stones, boulders and steep hills, whilst keeping you stable and mobile. Today’s flat shoes and the flat concrete jungle offer no challenge to the unique abilities of the feet and their intricate design. The once “happy to meet a challenge” feet have now become lazy collapsed sore feet. When you take them for a kayak, walk, run or sporting event that slightly veers from flat you quickly find yourself with an injury. Ground Control: Years of experience and 1000’s of postural assessments lead me to your feet, they reveal the secrets to how you stack up! Posture begins from the ground up, but can confront major challenges in today’s lifestyle which continually contract you down and forward. Computers, driving, cell phones, reading etc... These all force you into a forward contracted “gorilla” posture giving gravity momentum and creating excessive loading all the way down to your toes. Dropped arches, sore ankles and bunion’s are signs your posture is collapsing! Get Help Most jobs and sports require imbalanced loading

to one side of your body making proper posture complicated and stressful to your whole system. Kayaking in calm water is balanced, however, often we encounter wind, waves and climb out of our kayaks into mysterious waters and rocks – this is where injuries often occur. Fact: The foot has 26 bones, 33 joints, 107 ligaments and 19 muscles. WOW that is impressive! The toughest strongest and largest tendon in the foot is the Achilles, making it the longest and toughest to heal after an injury. Those who have experienced this know it’s a big Boo Hoo! There are 125,000 sweat glands in each foot so let those puppies breath - yikes! Feet (Ankle included) are the most frequently injured joint from sport. Reoccurrence of foot and ankle injury is very high! Your feet must be managed properly to prevent this.

y o u r feet are happy to carry you through it, if you take care of them. Yours in Health n Happiness, Dr. Theresa Dobson Active Care Clinic 415 9399 I’m here to help you as your back pain, joint pain, postural, nutrition and lifestyle coach as well as public speaking. Join my blogs below for short smart weekly tips on living a vital fun life. www.activecare.co.nz and www.drtheresadobson.com

Self Help Create happy feet and prevent injury by training and stretching your feet in multiple directions and movement patterns. Yoga is great for this also tramping if you pick tramps with undulating terrain which challenge you in three dimensions. The beach is ideal, kick off those boring shoes and do the alphabet in the sand with your feet (alternating heels and toes). Twirl and twist them in the sand, a natural foot massage! So be kind to your feet, be playful with your feet, they have a big task ahead called “Your Life”,

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) Annual subscription is $35.00.

Kask PO Box 23, Runanga 7841, West Coast

www.kask.co.nz

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KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand KASK publishes a 200 page sea kayaking handbook which is just $15 to new members; the handbook contains all you need to know about sea kayaking: techniques and skills, resources, equipment, places to go etc. KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums.

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety.

Across 5. 6. 7. 8. 10. 11. 15. 17. 20. 21. 22. 26. 27. 30. 31.

Method of increasing the effect pull on a rescue line.(6,4) The cardinal mark indicated by two upward facing black triangles indicate which direction? A waterproof jacket with rubber neck and wrist seals is a_________ _______ (3,3) Recirculating water behind a submerged rock is known as a _____. Chart Datum is measured at the ________ possible tide mark. If you end up side on to a rock you should _____ your upstream rail. With asymmetrical blades which of the radius’s should enter the water first? Magnetic _________ is described as Magnetic forces within your particular boat causing compass inaccuracies. While reverse paddling the top hand should pull back at _________ level. When surfing and your kayak broaches, you should Low brace and ________ into the wave. A person has their foot caught in a underwater obstacle is known as a foot ______. A _______ is any obstacle that will potentially catch hold of a person in a river. When should you wear a helmet while kayak surfing? Incorrect elbow position while Low Bracing may cause Paddle blade slicing, Sore wrists, a Weak Brace or ________. When purchasing a new Paddle, what should you take into consideration?______ and __________. (4,4)

Down 1. 2. 3.

The VHF safety signal to alert mariners of an important navigational or meteorological warning is called __________. A short kayak with lots of rocker and a flat hull is good for ______. The conventional buoyage direction in N.Z excluding the Cook Strait is…

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4. 6. 9. 12. 13. 14. 16. 18. 19. 23. 24. 25. 28. 29.

A long kayak with little rocker is good for paddling ________ on ____________ water. (4,4) It takes 30 minutes for you to acquire your ___________? (5,6) The recirculating water behind an exposed rock is known as an __________. When a ‘Mayday’ call is not warranted, you can use _________? A light marked Fl.10s79m19M is what colour? During the sweep stroke the trunk or torso of the paddler should rotate following direction of the ______. Magenta coloured diamond symbols with a letter inside would indicate what information is available? (5,6) _________ rotation with regards to forward power stroke is very important. During the forward power stroke the Kayak rocking from side to side ______ speed. What is used in White water & multisport boats to improve bouyancy when swamped? The letter M that is printed on a chart on an open stretch of water indicates? It is recommended by physios to include 5-10 minutes reverse paddling in your days paddling to ________ your shoulder muscles & tendons. How many days are between a spring and a neap tide is approximately? The speed limit in knots when up to 200 metres offshore and within 50 metres of a swimmer or dive.

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

35


First Aid

Severe Allergic Reactions By Johanna Verheijen

At the beginning of February I was paddling with friends in the Marlborough Sounds and saw a bee floating on the water flapping its wings madly trying to fly away. I was really tempted to flick it out of the water and set it free until I realised one of the group was allergic to bees, so I left the little bee alone franticly fighting to get away. Why? Anaphylaxis is a potentially fatal allergic reaction caused by the release of histamines with the body as a reaction to an allergen. Allergens’ are most commonly exposure to stings, eg bees, wasps, blue bottles, foods, eg peanuts, seafood, and some medications especially antibiotics. Once the body has been previously sensitised to an allergic substance and they are exposed again, the person usually develops an allergic reaction every time they are re-exposed. Histamines can cause the following: • Difficulty breathing, caused by the narrowing of the airways. • Shock, caused by the dilation of the blood vessels • Swelling in the skin, caused by the blood vessel becoming leaky.

position with legs elevated. If they have medication (epipen or anapen) advise them to use it or consider assisting them to use it. If the person is an asthmatic and they have their blue reliever available advise them to use this. Continue to monitor vital signs and monitor DRSABC’s until medical help has arrived.

Johanna Verheijen First Training Ltd 0800 1st AID www.first-training.co.nz

The sign and symptoms to watch out for are; • Shock • Wheezy and difficulty breathing • Swelling of the face and neck and around the site of the sting. • Swelling around the eyes • Flushing and or hives • Itching • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea How do we treat someone that is having a severe reaction? Use DRSABCD and call for help as quickly as possible. Dial 111 Identify that the person has a severe allergic reaction and will need more adrenalin. If the patient is conscious lay the person on the ground with knees elevated in the shock position. If they are having breathing difficulties place them in a semi-sitting

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Questions: 1. What can identify a person that has a severe allergic reaction? Medical alert. Can be a bracelet or a necklace, or a sports band. 2. What information is on a medic alert? What the person’s medical condition is and their medic alert member number. 3. What should you do with this information on the medic alert if you find it on the patient and you’ve already called 111? Call 111 back and give the patients details to the operator. 4. Before setting out on a trip what questions should I ask the group of clients or friends? Any medical conditions? If so where is your medication? What triggers your medical condition? And when for that person is it a medical emergency? These issues can be discussed away from the rest of the group in privacy. 5. If a person starts having a severe allergic reaction what’s one of the first things you should do? DRSABCD then lie them down with feet or knees elevated. Find the medication and get them to use it. 6. What do you do if the allergic reaction is so severe that the person stops breathing? DRSABCD. Start CPR and get a defibrillator on to them as quickly

Danger

Response

Send for Help

as possible. 7. If the person becomes unresponsive what position should they be placed in? Stable side position or recovery position. Monitor their airway. 8. Where should the epipen or anapen be administered? Into the patients leg muscle on the outer thigh. 9. How long should you hold the ana or epipen in the thigh for? Ten seconds. The Take 5 Kayaking Check list reminds you to ask the appropriate questions. Get one from your local Canoe & Kayak Centre.

Airways

Breathing

CPR

Defibrilation

D R S A B C D

Check for Danger

Check for Response

Call 111 or May Day

Check for foreign matter

Check for Breathing

Danger to yourself, bystanders and patient

Talk and touch the patient. Any response?

Dial 111, send a May Day call by VHF or set off your PLB

Clear and open the airway. Adult/ Child full tilt of the head. Infant neutral head position

Look, listen and feel for breathing. If breathing normally, place patient in recovery position. and monitor. If not breathing, start CPR.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Start CPR

Apply Defibrillator

30 Compressions 2 breaths

- if available.

Continue until help arrives

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

37


Bush Craft

Hungry? - There’s plenty to find in the bush! By Andy Blake

New Zealanders are not, intentionally anyway, big insect eaters and it would not be in your best interest to mention to your future life partner that you have or would consider tucking into a big fat huhu grub or something similar if push came to shove. Needless to say that many cultures around the world do just that and seem to get by okay. Many insects are tasty, nutritious and often found in great numbers. They also come in many forms and are not usually too difficult to catch. The five important rules to consider are: 1. Only collect fresh live specimens. 2. Keep away from furry caterpillars and spiders. 3. Don’t eat pupae found in the soil. 4. If unsure about a particular insect, apply the plant edibility test. This test takes in excess of 16 hours, so you need to be sure there is enough of a food supply to make it worth testing. You’ll find more info on the internet. 5. Always cook them by roasting over a fire. If by chance, you find it impossible to swallow that 6 legged Big Mac, then these points may help, 1. After roasting, pound up the insect and place it in the stew. 2. Eat after dark and try not to think about it. 3. Discard the wings and large sharp legs. Remember that insects are pure protein so always drink plenty of water. Insects also make excellent lures or live baits for animals, fish and birds which you may find more acceptable to consume. Did you realise that we ALL already eat insects, probably on a daily basis and are usually totally unaware. Slugs and snails can be found in surprising numbers in foods like lettuce, watercress and other green salad items, caterpillars or maggots in our tinned tomatoes and brasicas, wasps in fresh fruit and also in preserves. The law requires producers to minimise the quantity of insects in our food, but cannot guarantee excluding all insects. Perfectly edible - but according to Bear Grylls tastes AWFUL! Beware! Many weta are endangered and protected.

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

Photo by Charlotte Simmonds of huhu grubs in a rotten pine wood. They are the larvae of the huhu beetle, Prionoplus reticularis, the largest endemic beetle of New Zealand, a member of the longhorn beetle family Cerambycidae. The whitish larvae are up to 70 millimetres long. They are edible and are said by some to taste like buttery chicken.

In the U.S, curry powder must contain less than100 insect fragments per 100 grams, peanut butter should contain less than 50 insect fragments per 100 grams and tomato sauce should contain less than 30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams to qualify as a No. 1 Grade product Television loves to shock us by getting its contestants to chomp away at such delicacies like maggots, large cooked spiders and grasshoppers. This may be considered as entertainment but it has been estimated that over 1600 species of bugs in at least 100 countries around the world are eaten today. Bon appetite ! Photo by Gaelic Kiwi of The New Zealand Cicada. Kikihia Genus. There are 28 species in this genus, so identification is very difficult. The body on this one measured 3.5cms. They are said by some to taste like potato chips when fried in a little butter.

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Diana and Luke Austin [Auckland].

Leader Profiles

Diana started paddling as a teenager in homemade boats and later introduced Luke to the great sport. Their two daughters first experienced kayaking at nine months (yes, you can get lifejackets that small) and have remained keen throughout their many family kayaking adventures. In 2009 they rejoined Yakity Yak and have enjoyed finding new and interesting paddling locations to take fellow clubbies on. You will rarely find the Austins cancelling a trip as they always have a plan B (or C) up their sleeve or paddle jacket.  

Irene Wallmannsberger (Bay of Plenty) – voted BOP Club Leader of the Year 2012 by our BOP clubbies. Irene has been kayaking for too many years than she’d like to mention and as result there are very few places in New Zealand she hasn’t paddled. Her endless enthusiasm, knowledge and willingness to keep learning are an inspiration to us all.

Joya Todd (Manukau) Joya is extremely passionate about kayaking. Having been paddling for six years and leading for four, she is a well organised and enthusiastic leader. One of her favourite paddling areas is the Manukau Harbour. “The paddling can be beautifully calm and then very challenging – sometimes on the same day”. Joya loves encouraging new paddlers to improve their kayaking and helping to develop the next generation of leaders. Joya is the new manager at Canoe & Kayak Manukau.

Jim Walker (Wellington) Jim’s enthusiasm and huge smile is infectious. A lover of coffee run paddles, he enjoys a brew and a yarn. He runs an efficient, well organised trip that comes from his many years kayaking experience. Jim has circumnavigated Kapiti Island, Mana Island, Stewart Island and Great Barrier Island. Our man is keen for a swim, regardless of the temperature, even when there is snow on the ground. He’s always ready to take on any challenge. A “Great guy” that you’ll be sure to have a fun paddle with.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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RAILBLAZA Acquires C-TUG kayak and canoe trolleys Recently established, New Zealand based manufacturer of mounting systems, RAILBLAZA, has just completed the purchase of New Zealand’s C-TUG kayak and canoe trolleys. This acquisition expands an already well-established product line, providing greater value to RAILBLAZA’s dealer network internationally. With all products designed and made in New Zealand, quality is strictly controlled. “This is a really exciting step for RAILBLAZA. We want our customers to see a great product at a reasonable price, making their buying decision an easy one. To achieve this we’ll be reducing the price of C-TUG trolleys where possible. This supports our dealers, delivers better value to consumers, and helps us gain market share” says RAILBLAZA’s founder Ross Pratt. C-TUG has been exporting to Australia, North America and Europe for six years, and is considered the premier kayak and canoe trolley on the market. RAILBLAZA is only three years old and already exports to over 30 countries. Both RAILBLAZA and C-TUG have experienced doubledigit growth over the past few years, and this is set to accelerate in the future, assisted by the synergies created by the acquisition. The C-TUG team have listened to market feedback, and improved the design over the years, to the point where no other trolley on the market offers the same reliability and features. RAILBLAZA will continue to offer the latest model which comes with puncture-free, hi-grip wheels. Other models will be run out over the coming months. Also available is the optional Sidewinder sand wheel attachment for improved performance on soft sand. Available at all Canoe & Kayak Centres.

C-TUG, Original - Unrivalled – Envied

www.railblaza.com www.c-tug.com

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - Specialty Tours

Taupo Maori Carvings Half day guided trip to the rock carvings, Lake Taupo... only accessible by boat. A leisurely paddle of about 3 km to the rock carvings. The largest is over 10 m high and from below in a kayak it is imposing.

$85 per person (bookings essential). Phone 0800 KAYAKN for details.

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Waikato River Discovery Glow Worm Kayak Tour

2 hour guided kayak trip. Experience the magnificent upper reaches of the mighty Waikato River - Soak in the geothermal hot springs - Take in the stunning environment... a perfect trip for all the family...

Adult $45, Children $25 Special group and family rates. Call 0800 KAYAKN for details.

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

Join us for a picturesque paddle on Lake McLaren to view glow worms by night or beautiful waterfalls by day. This trip takes about 1.5-2hours and is suitable for paddlers with no experience. All gear, hot drinks and nibbles are supplied. Price $75 per person.

Phone Canoe & Kayak BOP for bookings 07 574 7415

Sugar Loaf Island From Ngamutu Beach harbour we head out on the open sea to Sugar Loaf Island Marine Reserve. View the scenic & rugged Taranaki coastline as we draw closer to the Islands. Enjoy the seal colony and experience the thrill of close up views of these fascinating marine mammals. Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $70.00 per person. Phone 06 769 5506

www.kayaknz.co.nz


o

Sudoku Answers

t e b i r c s Sub

From page 33

7 2 6 5 8 3 1 4 9

3 9 4 7 6 1 5 2 8

5 1 8 2 9 4 7 6 3

8 5 1 6 3 7 2 9 4

6 7 3 2 4 9 8 1 5

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6 issues for $40, saving $5.00 off the news-stand price, delivered free in NZ. Overseas subscription $NZ60 including postage.

Send form to: New Zealand Kayak Magazine. P.O. Box 35123, Browns Bay, Auckland, 0753. Or phone 0508 529 2569 Or email: info@canoeandkayak.co.nz Or buy on-line at canoeandkayak.co.nz/subscribe

Payment Details Cheque (payable to Canoe & Kayak.) Visa/ Mastercard Signature: Name on Card:

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Crossword Answers From page 35

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Products

Stay Warm & Safe on the Water Sharkskin Climate Control Long Sleeve - $315.00 This top is made from Chillproof material with an inbuilt radiator function. It provides the ultimate versatility by being able to zip up for 100% warmth and protection, or zip down when the sun comes out or your work rate goes up. It also has a high collar to keep your neck warm.

Performance Wear Paddling Long Pants - $249.00 These pants use a Chillproof/Neoprene hybrid design to provide maximum fit and mobility for watersports. Neoprene panels are used in the seat area to provide more comfort for extended periods of sitting. Similar panels are used over the front of the thigh and knee area to provide comfort and fit.

Chillproof Long Sleeve Top $249.00

Chillproof Pogies - $79.95

By itself or underneath a paddle jacket this top provides the ultimate protection from cold and wind. It has a soft neoprene neck seal to help keep wind, water, spray and waves from entering. The long sleeves offer additional protection from the cold and sun and the thumb tabs assist when pulling a wetsuit on over the top.

Keep the windchill from freezing your hands while paddling in cold conditions.

Chillproof Socks - $60.00 The secret is out! From kayakers, jetskiers and multisporters, to Drysuit wearers and spearfishermen using full foot fins, the Chillproof socks keep your feet dry by wicking the moisture away. 100% warm and super toasty, use under boots or by themselves.

Long Sleeve Inferno Top - $145.00

Fleecy Multisport Paddle Shorts $104.00

Another New Zealand made garment from Kayaka. Simple yet so effective, the copper lined titanium neoprene will cut out wind chill, stop the splashes and keep you warm all day. Even if you decide to go swimming. Thickness: 1 mm Neoprene: Seamate’s titanium inside finished cell with copper coating for extra heat retention.

Lavacore Long Sleeve Shirt $199.00

Lavacore Long Pants - $179.00

Adrenalin Super Stretch Thermo Top $99.00 4 way super stretch brushed inner fabric. Warm, light, wind proof and splash proof.

Paddle Longs - $149.00 3/2mm neoprene longs, perfect for sit-on-top kayak fishing. Keep your vitals warm, snug and comfortable.

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ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Available at Canoe & Kayak: canoeandkayak.co.nz Vapour Multi-sport Top $239.00

Light Breeze - $195.00 A lightweight, comfortable, packable multisport jacket with front cargo pocket.

The perfect medium weight jacket for coast to coast racers or Sunday cruisers. Velcro adjustable neck, sleeves and drawcord waist make this a cost effective waterproof breathable jacket

Tropos Delux Boater Pants - $239.00

Wa t e r p r o o f and breathable these are perfect for sit-on-top fishermen and anyone need a little extra leg warmth.

Surge Dry Top $468.95 Aura - $199.95

The Surge is a hard working dry jacket suitable for a huge range of paddlers and conditions. Midweight XP 2.5-layer fabric and natural latex gaskets create a versatile jacket which will perform wherever you use it.

The Aura is lightweight and waterproof with fully taped and breathable ripstop fabric. It has a large chest front pocket and elasticated Neoprene waist band.

Bute Dry Bags 5 Litre - $24.95 10 Litre - $29.95 20 Litre - $29.95 40 Litre - $44.95 55 Litre - $45.95 80 Litre - $64.95 100 Litre - $96.95

Latitude Stuff Sacks 10 Litre - $59.90 21 Litre - $91.90 51 Litre - $112.90

Railblaza Telepole - $49.95

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Pre-bent sleeves, seamless underarms & fully adjustable neck, wrist & waist seals guarantee user comfort.

Opti Dry Bags 10 Litre - $31.95 21 Litre - $33.95 41 Litre - $44.95

Railblaza 3600 White Navilight - $94.55

Railblaza Navilight is a super bright LED light, integrated into a compact waterproof casing that fits easily in your pocket and is the first battery operated navigation light to be approved by US Coastguard to 2 NM. An extension pole (pictured right) can also be attached to the light for increased visibility. When not in use, the mounting point can be re-tasked to hold one of Railblaza’s extensive range of accessories.

Strobe Ladies & Mens -$219.95

Omni Dry Bags 10 Litre - $31.95 21 Litre - $33.95 41 Litre - $44.95

Omni Dry Pack 140 Litre - $99.90

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

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Kayaks Huge Range of the Best Paddling Gear

Sea Kayaks Double

Paddling Perfection

Width

Weight

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Greenland T Wind Solo Reval Wind 585 Reval Midi Sea Spirit Reval Mini

5.45 5.05 5.50 5.85 5.20 5.20 5.20

Kiwi Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

Price

530 540 540 540 540 560 540

23-24 23-25 24-26 25-27 24-26 26-28 24-26

$4590 $3490 $4400 $4570 $4050 $3290 $4150

3.75 3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 740 600 600 610 620 620 600 600 600

20 23 18 27 24 26.5 29 25 22 19 22

$1365 $1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2499 $2779 $2999

Manitou 13 Looksha 14 Eskia

3.90 4.30 4.90

630 625 635

20.5 26 27

$1199 $2199 $2499

Kekeno SeaBear Waitoa SeaBear Waitoa Kevlar BreakSea BreakSea Kevlar

4.00 5.50 5.50 5.20 5.20

630 600 600 540 540

21.5 26 24 22.5 21

$3595 $4545 $5195 $4495 $4995

4.90

600

17

$3100

Barracuda Beachcomber

Great Advice Great Brands Great Service

Length

Width

Weight

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 45

$3499 $4569

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.90

850

40

$5995

28

$4300

Price

Necky Amaruk Paddling SeaBear II Packhorse Perfection Barracuda Beachcomber Duo

5.80 700

White Water

Riot

Length

Liquid Logic

Necky Mission

Q-Kayaks

Tahe

Sea Kayaks Single

Length

Width

Weight

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Astro 58 Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

1.93 2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

650 660 254 650 660

15.5 18 67 18.5 29.5

$1725 $1599 $1599 $2095 $2095

Remix 47 Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Freeride 57 Freeride 67 Stomper 80 Stomper 90

2.21 2.57 2.64 2.72 1.98 2.06 2.49 2.57

530 640 650 670 650 660 650 680

13 19 20 21 14.5 15 21 22

$1399 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2199


Available at Canoe & Kayak:

canoeandkayak.co.nz

Length

Width

Weight

Starting

Length

Width

Weight

Starting

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Price

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Price

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Q- Kayaks

Escapade II

3.50

750

26

$900

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Cobra

Tandem

3.80

915

26

$995

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Double +1

4.40

910

36

$1195

Play

3.10

710

18

$545

Mission

Surge

3.90

850

28

$1099

Escape

3.20

790

17

$795

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$895

Malibu 2

3.65

870

27

$999

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$995

Ocean Kayak

Sit-on-Top Double

Malibu 2 XL

4.10

86

33

$1449

4.97

76.5

33

$1699

Length

Width

Weight

Starting

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$3680

Length

Width

Weight

Starting

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Price

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

$3170

Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Intrigue (kevlar)

4.95

540

12

$2900

Squirt

2.70

760

17

$499

Flow

2.95

750

19

$899

Xstream

4.20

730

28

$1429

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$699

Mysto

2.95

790

21

$799

3.30

725

21

$1099

inc seat Venus 11 inc seat Scrambler 11

3.60

750

23

$999

4.20

680

18

$2800

Incept

inc seat

Barracuda SoT Tourer

inc 2 x seats Cabo

Inflatables

Gumotex

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Cobra

Q-Kayaks

Sit-on-Top Single

Multisport

Fishing Singles Weight

(mm)

(kg)

Escapade F

3.50

750

32

$875

Marauder

4.30

780

28

$1345

Fish n’ Dive

3.80

915

28

$1145

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1295

Prowler 13

Price

4.10

710

28

$1399

4.10

710

28.5

$1699

inc seat

Ocean Kayak

Prowler Ultra 4.1 inc seat Prowler Ultra 4.3

4.30

740

32.5

$1999

4.50

710

31

$1799

4.70

740

35

$2249

inc seat Prowler Elite 4.5 inc seat Prowler Ultra 4.7

Mission

inc seat

Barracuda

Q- Kayaks

Ruahine

Width

(m)

Torque

4.20

735

32.2

$3499

Line 280

2.80

730

18

$1229

Catch 290

2.95

750

19

$999

Catch 390

3.90

850

28

$1779

Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

Catch 420

4.20

730

28

$1879

Kotare

3.90

850

28

$1349

SoT Fish Pro

4.20

680

18

$3500

Paddling Perfection

Cobra

Q- Kayaks

Length

Swallow (kevlar)

5.40

480

12

$3000

Firebolt (kevlar)

5.90

450

12.5

$3250

Rebel (kevlar)

5.65

450

11

$3210

Gladiator (kevlar)

5.90

530

13.5

$3210

F1 (kevlar)

6.20

350

13.5

$3350

Ocean X (kevlar)

6.40

500

16.5

$3750

Duet (kevlar)

7.00

550

26

$5760

Excalibur (kevlar)

5.70

550

15

$2945

Saracen

5.2

520

13

$3150

Saracen X

6.0

600

15

$3195

Length

Width

Weight

Starting

(m)

(mm)

(kg)

Price

Sprite 1

3.00

700

19

$850

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1410

Access 280

2.80

730

18

$989

Access 400

4.00

840

32

$1399

Manitou 13

3.90

630

20.5

$1199

Recreational

Q- Kayaks

Mission

Ocean Kayak


Cameras of the future Josh Neilson looks at the different ways you can use them.

I remember when the first affordable waterproof cameras came out on the market and I knew I had to have one. While they were kind of bulky with cords and things everywhere, they were still quite a novelty. Back then the quality was far from what you could achieve with the land based cameras, but still cool to give the films a little perspective. Since then, the race has been on to bring the quality up to speed with other cameras and we now have an abundance of films specifically shot off these little devices. I have been using the GoPro cameras since the beginning and have been amazed at each new addition. You can mount them anywhere and the results speak for themselves. I live on the Kaituna River and have seen and taken shots from almost every access point along the river of every drop, yet the potential to share its unique beauty is far from over. The camera mounts stick on anywhere and can produce amazing results, some from luck of the photo timer and others from still frames out of the video. My advice is to be creative and break away from the ever popular helmet mount and see where it takes you.

the river runer

My personal favourites are; The Paddle Blade Mount - Stick a flat or curved mount on the paddle blade facing back towards you. While half the shots will be under water you will get some really cool framed shots. I like to put 2 sticky pads down and use one as a safety attachment with a string in case you hit a rock etc. The Nose and Tail Mounts - You can get great shots down low facing you from both directions. When the water splashes over the camera, on the front

STOMPER

the creek boat For more info visit: www.kayaksnz.co.nz 46

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


the screen is often clear and produces awesome images. On the back facing forward is great for going off waterfalls as you get a great perspective of going over the lip. The Helmet Mount - Be creative here if you have too many standard head cam shots. Use the add on bars to point the camera in different directions. The Egg Timer Mount - By getting really crafty you can make time-lapse videos on your camera by attaching it to an egg timer and filming as the camera spins around. Once you speed it up in an editing program you will see the great results. The Extender Bar Mount - This is my personal favourite. It takes a little work to find the best design for your boat but it’s worth it. Like the Nose and Tail Mount you can see front and back but with this you have the added extra of height. This gives you the feeling while watching the footage of actually being there. Something that can be easily taken off is ideal for harder rivers and care is needed while paddling with the add on but you will see some cool shots from it. The Suction Cup Mount - This is a mount that can stick on any flat surface. It pays to tie a safety strap on just in case but it’s pretty secure. This can be great for all the extra shots you need for your weekend film like sticking it to your car, boat, paddle etc.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Some of these mounts take a little extra work but being creative with it will set your images apart from the huge number out there already. We are always looking for cool new ways to film so if you have any ideas

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

47


let me know! I hope to see you all out on the river with the little red light flashing someday soon!

all be done with the remote. Great slow motion frame rates. Low light capabilities for when you are deep in a gorge! GoPro is now available from some Canoe & Kayak Centres.

What I use - GoPro Hero HD 3 Black Edition Why - It shoots at a variety of frame rates great for photos and video. Other awesome features - Wireless remote is the best so you never have to look at the camera to see if its on or change the mode as it can

50

ISSUE SIXTY Nine • Autumn 2013

www.kayaknz.co.nz


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73-B Duke St Hamilton, 3204 07 847 5565 waikato@canoeandkayak.co.nz

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Canoe & Kayak Wellington

2/20 Constellation Drive Mairangi Bay, Auckland, 0632 09 479 1002 northshore@canoeandkayak.co.nz

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Canoe & Kayak Taupo

605A Great South Road Manukau, 2104 09 262 0209 manukau@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Discover Another World New & existing territories available throughout New Zealand Call Peter Townend pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz or phone 09 476 7066

Canoe & Kayak Waikato

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Unit F 2 Centennial Highway Ngauranga, Wellington, 6035 04 477 6911 wellington@canoeandkayak.co.nz

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Issue 69  

Issue 69 New Zealand Kayak Magazine

Issue 69  

Issue 69 New Zealand Kayak Magazine