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Speights Coast to Coast Official Results

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NORTH SHORE

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Issue 29 Speights Coast to Coast Rob Howarth of Canoe & Kayak North Shore gives a first hand report on New Zealand’s premier multisport race.

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Modest Fisherman 17 Check out what some people think is average!

Rocks and Reflections 10 Taranaki Yakity Yak club paddle the Dam lakes. Jenny Harper shares the scenery and moments of pleasure and apprehension. Photo Essay 18 The Bay of Plenty Yakity Yak club show that “A picture is indeed worth a thousand words”.

Speights Coast to Coast results

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Press Release

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What’s On

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Emergency Outdoors -First Aid training

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Book Review “Hell or High Water” an action packed white water saga is worth a read according to Ruth Henderson

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Campsite Hopping 38 Mike Scanlon and friend explore from Whitianga to Opotiki and discover some choice spots to pitch a tent.

Seasons Pass 12 Ruth Henderson’s secret receipe on how to have guilt free time on the water. White water camping 20 AUT’s Matt Barker gives tips on what to take and how to stow it.

Thrills and Spills 14 Daryl Gibb has his share of excitement on a journey from Clifton to Ocean Beach, Cape Kidnappers. Hop, Skip and Jump 22 Neil Watson has another long weekend, this time travelling on land and sea from Tuakau to Takapuna.

Product Focus

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Buyers Guide

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Kayak tuition available

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Directory - Things to do 49 Want to hire a kayak or fancy a guided tour or trip?

Multisport Training package

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Front cover: Ben Fouhy Photo by: Pauls Camera Centre

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Wow it is hot

EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: [09] 473 0036 Fax [09] 473 0794 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz SUBEDITOR: Ruth E. Henderson Ph: 021 298 8120 Email: ruth@canoeandkayak.co.nz DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Breakthrough Communications PO Box 108050 Symonds St, Auckland Ph: [09] 303 3536 • Fax [09] 303 0086 Email: kayak@graphics.co.nz Website: www.graphics.co.nz PUBLISHER: Kayak NZ Magazine is published six times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. 7/28 Anvil Road, Silverdale, Auckland PRINTING: Brebner Print DISTRIBUTION: IMD SUBSCRIPTIONS: New Zealand – 1 year 6 Issues = $30 Overseas – 1 year 6 Issues = $50 Payment to: Canoe and Kayak Ltd, 7/28 Anvil Road, Silverdale, Auckland Ph [09] 421 0662 • Fax [09] 421 0663

9.30pm the doors and windows are wide open and still I feel like I need an ice pack, the new dog has been fed and the kids are asleep. Treffery is working on the computer down stairs and I’m in my office doing the editorial and a budget for one of the shops. The scene is set...

Act One What makes me happy?

For each of the elements in Act One our friend compares them to a stream flowing into her life, represented by a pond. For a stream to continue to flow the bed and sides require maintenance or it will become blocked and slow down. The light went on in my masculine, practical but rather slow brain. Obviously you have to work at the important things in your life and put continued effort, time and resources into what makes you happy.

Act Three Have you heard it before?

The key elements are Treffery, kids, work and the new dog. Added to this are my father and mother, my brother and sisters and their kids, my aunts and uncles and their kids, mates and work colleagues, kayaking, cooking, fishing, camping, the night sky. I agree with the saying “a rich man is one who is happy with what he has and a poor man always wants more.” How blessed we are having such a great sport to share with our kids, parents and friends in a great and beautiful country where dreams are free and realizable.

Act Two How do we keep happy? A friend who has left the light side and moved over to the dark side (she has stopped kayaking and taken up deep sea diving “ Ha Ha”) was telling Treffery how she looks at life. This was then passed on to me and I think it is enlightening.

Yeah so had I, but this example sticks in my head and gives me a renewed focus and a huge degree of happiness.

The final Act I am sure that many people are very rich through the appreciation of what they have and of how blessed they are, to enjoy this great sport in this great country with their families and friends. So #@%* the weather as it is always too hot, too cold, too windy or too wet! Get out there and be very rich.

Happy New Year and get those streams cleared. Peter Townend Editor

Subscribe a friend to the Kayak NZ Magazine

Overseas subscribers can make payment via credit card number on subscription form. CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributor’s articles and photos. • Deadline for issue 31: 10 April 2005 • Deadline for issue 32: 10 June 2005 • Text should be submitted on disk or emailed as a Word text file. • Photos should be emailed or put on CD as a high resolution (300 dpi) jpg at full size accompanied by captions. Prints should be captioned on the reverse and numbered and listed in text. • All care will be taken to safeguard and return material. • No responsibility is accepted for submitted material. • Material published in the magazine must not be reproduced without permission. COPYRIGHT: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: Ruth E. Henderson ruth@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine

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M U LT I S P O R T

K AYA K I N G

Speights Coast to Coast 2005 - the toughest yet? by Rob Howarth

The 23rd anniversary of The Speights Coast to Coast was a memorable one; the cloudless skies displayed the Southern Alps in all their glory. But for many the heat in the mountain made this year’s event the toughest yet. In 2004 the majority of one-day competitors were air lifted off the mountain section due to adverse weather conditions. River levels were rising rapidly making river crossings extremely dangerous, it was even snowing at Goat Pass. This year couldn’t have been more different, river levels were low and the sun was shining, temperatures leading up to Goat Pass were at least 35 degrees C - It was HOT damn HOT! Of course that kind of extreme heat takes its toll on the body and with the exception of perhaps the top athletes who cover the mountain stage in approx. 3 hrs, most competitors were slower than expected and were suffering at the end of the day! Race Director Robin Judkins had worked hard during the year to attract a top field from around the world and the inaugural ‘World Teams Challenge’ saw competitors from seven countries pit their wits against each other in the one day event. In the two-day teams Ben Fouhy and Jonathon Wyatt (world kayaking & mountain running champions respectively) teamed

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together to take on the mighty Causer brothers. Fouhy & Wyatt running out winners by 18 mins. We all expected Fouhy to be quick on the river but it was a sight to see him sprinting along the stony bank of the Waimakarere, at Mount White Bridge, at the tail end of the field (due to a staggered cycle start) only to pass all but Luke Vaughn on the river! Luke Vaughn won the individual two day event with an impressive performance. He is a 20 year old student with many years racing ahead of him and will no doubt be a force to be reckoned with in the one day race in years to come. In The Longest Day Richard Usher out smarted the field to claim first place whilst Kristina Anglem (nee Strode Penney) claimed the women’s title for the second year running with a blistering time of 12:23 finishing in 6th place overall (in other words there were only 5 blokes in front of her!!). But this event is not just about the supermen and women of the multisport world, The Speights Coast to Coast attracts competitors of all shapes, sizes and ages. The youngest competitor this year was 17 while the oldest 67. As a first timer myself this year (in the 2- day team event with Gordon Daglish) I was in awe of the fitness and dedication of competitors, many of whom we have taught to kayak over the past few years. For those of you who have secretly desired to compete but thought you were not fit enough, think again. The results section contains nearly 900 names most of whom

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had little or no kayaking or multisport experience prior to entering The Speights Coast to Coast. The event is a personal challenge which drives you in the months leading in, the atmosphere is infectious during the race, the camaraderie uplifting. It truly is New Zealand’s premier multisport race. Finally a special mention goes to Mark Pollock from Ireland who entered the 2-day individual event. Mark has been blind since the age of 19 and was the first blind competitor to take on the Southern Alps. The plan was to tandem cycle & kayak and to be led up the mountain. Now, to those of you who are not familiar with the mountain stage let me tell you that it is tough enough with both eyes open! Mark made it to Goat Pass but had run out of time and had to be airlifted off the mountain. Although disappointed not to finish he was philosophical after the race ‘If it wasn’t for those bloody boulders’. My sentiments exactly Mark! If Mark can give it a go so can YOU see you there in 2006. For more information on The Speights Coast to Coast and kayak training packages contact your local branch of Canoe & Kayak or log on to www.coasttocoast.co.nz


Rob Howarth Photo by: Pauls Image Centre

Designers & Constructors of Multisport & Adventure Racing Kayaks Phone/Fax 06 374 6222 E-mail:- mike@ruahinekayaks.co.nz Website:-www.ruahinekayaks.co.nz

Rebel New, fast, funky kayak for the smaller paddler in the 50 to 70kg range.

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S E A K AYA K I N G

Rocks and Reflections - Paddling those Dam Lakes. by Jenny Harper Labour weekend saw five Taranaki YYK clubbies (Bronnie, Karen, Ruth, Walter and Jenny) converge on Mangakino with a plan to paddle Lakes Maraetai, Whakamaru and Waipapa, the middle three of the eight Waikato dam lakes. Saturday was perfect, overcast and calm, as we paddled up Lake Maraetai, under the HWY 30 road bridge and into the Mangakino Stream. Local residents had previously told us about this magical ‘Lost World’. We were not disappointed. We paddled up a drowned river canyon hemmed in between spectacular cliffs of grey rock tinged with pink and white, clothed with regenerating native trees and ferns. The cliffs resulted from volcanic eruption 300,000 years ago in the Taupo North West Bays area. Vast amounts of superheated ash, gas and pumice swept across the land at great speed, cooling to form the distinctive, vertically jointed rock known as Whakamaru ignimbrite, visible today. For an hour we paddled quietly upstream, entranced by the cliffs, the unexpectedly prolific birdlife and stunning reflections in the dark still water. At one point we had to paddle through a ‘Sargasso Sea’ of floating lake weed, pumice stones and discarded plastic rubbish back-eddied from the lake, a sad reminder of human impact on our natural environment. Three kilometres upstream from the bridge the cliffs blend into open farmland and the river narrows into a gut leading to a rapid. We turned and drifted downstream exploring two hidden sidestream ravines on our paddle home to the lodge. On Sunday we paddled the lower half of Lake Whakamaru, past rolling hills, farmland and pine forest, pockets of pungas and kowhai, under towering volcanic cliffs. We spent this very rainy day paddling close to the shoreline identifying native trees and plants, looking at waterfalls and searching without success for a little lake-edge hot water spring we’d been told about. On Monday, we drove to Lake Waipapa to paddle the Waipapa River. It enters the lake half a kilometre upstream of the dam. From our Topo map it seemed we could paddle quite a long way up. We launched at the lake edge, and paddled up to and under the road bridge into the river. Bronnie gave us a quick lesson on handling water hydraulics, and then one by one we followed as she led the way through the fast running shallows under the bridge. Regrouping in the still water, we paddled upstream

Dwarfed by the cliffs, Mangakino stream

alongside pine forest and native scrub enjoying the calm sunny morning, the reflections in the water and the sight and sound of kingfishers, fantails, grey warblers and tuis. We had barely paddled a kilometre when the river narrowed. Eddies and foam spirals formed in the quickening current, and we could hear a lot of rushing water around the next bend. This turned out to be a very extensive rapid suitable only for experienced white water kayakers. We pulled into a little silt beach and explored alongside the rapid on foot, Bronnie and Karen discussed ways it could be run. Not for us sea kayakers though! We returned to the lake for a short paddle upstream past the uninspiring bare hillsides and debris of harvested trees. We returned to the lodge, packed up and headed for home, content with a weekend of relaxed paddling and small group camaraderie on and off the water. Our base for the weekend was a 40 bed lodge at the Lake Maraetai Rowing Club complex on the lake edge at Mangakino. It offers superb, secure accommodation for groups at $10 pp per night, with excellent kitchen, dining, bathroom and bunkroom facilities above boat storage and gear drying facilities. Custodian contact is Peter Thomas, Korari Crescent, Mangakino 2391 ph 07 8828809. I am still pondering the volcanic forces that created this landscape, and speculating on what the cliffs and gorges looked like before the dams flooded and drowned the river valleys of the Waikato, Mangakino and Waipapa. The Waikato dams and lakes are managed by Mighty River Power, their website www.mightyriverpower.co.nz includes the construction history of the dams as well as info on lake levels, hydro spills and recreational access. For further info on the Taupo eruptions and North Island geology, recommended books are:“New Zealand from the road, landforms of the North Island” by R.H. Clark, and “Field guide to New Zealand Geology” by Jocelyn Thornton.

Stopped by white water, Waipapa Stream

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Regrouping in the Waipapa Stream.

Fused by fire, volcanic rock, Mangakino Stream

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K AYA K L E A D E R S T R A I N I N G

Seasons Pass by Ruth E. Henderson Have you ever wracked your brains as how to extend your occasional Day or Weekend Paddling Pass?

the one club trip a year has steadily escalated to three, then six, and last season leapt to eighteen. All without a word of complaint from the nonkayaking household member.

Wrack no longer. Here is the perfect solution. Become a leader and get a Seasons Pass. Since kayaking is a year round sport in New Zealand, this is in effect a yearlong ticket.

Part of this acceptance is due to:

It works for me. In the four years since I went on my first trip with the Northshore Yakity Yak Club,

Firstly as a leader you get to TAILOR-MAKE your days or weekends on the water. This means that you can pander to your family sometimes, and design days in which they can participate or in turn you can support such trips. A few classic cases last year were: Tawharanui Open Sanctuary base camp - some joined in on the tree planting; Wenderholm to Warkworth - some met for lunch in a Café; Otamure and Mimiwhangata base camps some participants spent their days walking and swimming, never touching a paddle; Raglan Harbour - my beloved surprised me and met us for dinner in a local restaurant; Rangitoto summit for morning tea - meant we

with other folk who all know how to do a self rescue and an assisted rescue; that amongst the group there is a heap of safety gear - split paddles, tow ropes, VHF’s, high visibility hats and flags, first aid kits...

As the club - yours or mine gets more leaders, other advantages occur:

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A customised trip: Steph and Chris get the royal welcome at Bon Accord Harbour, Kawau Island.

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You ‘push the envelope’ and extend yourself, secure in the knowledge that competent people surround you. The safety ratio of 1 leader: 6 followers is exceeded. On the Devonshire morning tea trip to Rangitoto we had 44 people on the water. This could have been a nightmare - but with ample leaders we had 6 pods with two leaders each. That’s 1 : 3.6. That’s magnificant. Several trips can be run concurrently. Last Queens Birthday weekend, we had treble billing with three trips on, stretched between the Waikato and Northland with between 9 and 19 people each. A plethora of leaders on any organised outing also means different variations on a theme can occur on any day. The weather, surf or swell, paddler’s ability or inclination on the day can all be taken into account with cruisers to racers and the bods in between all catered for. Great friendships develop. After spending several days a year practising rescuing each other in often inhospitable and cold surroundings and conditions, you get to know each other well. Spontaneous teaching sessions or practices happen. This occurred over Waitangi weekend at Mimiwhangata when we had 33 people on the water. Clusters of paddlers voluntarily practised rescues and rolling every day and on the last day, those skilled at surfing taught and supervised the rest of us.

were home for a late lunch; Kawau Island - we invited the troops to stay the night and watch the rugby.

As Christine Watson said after the Mimiwhangata weekend which she and husband Neil organised, “this was the club, operating at its best.” And my club, your club will continue to do so, as long as we continue to train new leaders. Hey, if someone suggests that you come on board, DO IT, and have a ripper of a year.

Secondly PEACE OF MIND. It is reassuring for land lubbers to know that you are paddling

Contact your nearest Canoe and Kayak shop for information on their Leaders training courses.

Tailor-make your trip. This winter one to Lake Tarawera included steamed pudding and hard brandy sauce, hot ‘pools’, and a covered kitchen.

With enough leaders, the hare and the tortoise, the young and the not so young are all catered for. Here Alistair checks that Margaret is ready to rock.

Thirdly there is acceptance that you NEED TO PRACTISE, keep on top of your sport, need to show the flag and support other leaders, especially on their first master-minded trip.

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Three blind mice. Actually, three highly visible, safety conscious leaders.

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S E A K AYA K I N G

Thrills and Spills - Clifton to Ocean Beach by Darryl Gibb

Clifton

Sunday morning arrived warm and sunny with a soft breeze. Eleven clubbies, three generations in all shapes and sizes keenly anticipated a second chance to kayak from Clifton round Cape Kidnappers to Ocean Beach, after bad weather prevented our first attempt. Excitement was high. Gear was stashed, hatches secured and equipment checked. The surf looked civilized enough to guarantee most would stay dry when launching. “Yeah, bring it on, we love it” summed up the mood of the group. No doubt everybody had their own agenda as to what they would get out of the trip: White water and open sea kayaking are adventure activities, hazards and dangers are part of the attraction for those that undertake them. For me ‘Pushing the boundaries’ is part of the appeal, for others it is about increasing or maintaining their skill levels and fitness or just ‘being there.’ Eighteen kms separated Ocean Beach from our starting point. Paddling that distance would be an achievement in itself for most in our party.

and paddled through the reef. I watched his manoeuvre, good judgement and timing. I made the decision and judged it right as did most of the others. A little bit of excitement goes a long way. Later on someone who will remain nameless, told me laughingly how he almost lost the plot going through Black Reef. Steve, our respected trip leader made a snap decision to bypass landing at the Cape Kidnappers rest hut a kilometre further up the beach and get past the Cape before the wind built up. I didn’t hear him or he didn’t see me not hearing him, or my bladder makes me go deaf. Nature’s demands don’t always fit in with kayaking.

Steve’s Bit We assumed Darryl was busting for some relief, but was not into relieving himself in his kayak. He paddled ashore to the beach. We waited bobbing about in the swells watching the waves smash up against the Panicle, a large rock, about 200 metres off the coast. A reef runs between it and the cliffs on the shore.

Meanwhile back to Darryl

We took the first leg, six kms to Black Reef and the famous Gannet Sanctuary at a leisurely pace. The huge cliffs 1-2kms away watched over our progress. At Black Reef, we were met by the strong smell of guano (bird stuff!) Colonies of gannets nested at the bottom of the cliffs and on rocks barely above high tide. Gannets swooped and soared, preparing for their nesting season. To me this is one of the wonders of kayaking - being able to visit our recreational wild lands in an unobtrusive way, having experiences not open to others.

I ended doing the perfect imitation of a Paul Caffyn landing and was readying myself for the others to get washed up when I saw a vertical paddle dancing up and down between the swells. I was beckoned to the fold. Mmmm, that’s strange, wonder what they want? Paul Caffyn would have been so proud to see my seamanship as I thrust through the waves on my way out to the motley crew waiting patiently for me in the swell.

Black Reef reaches out to sea more than a kilometre off shore, with interesting swells racing through gaps. Without hesitation, Gerald, otherwise known as a powerhouse, a man who can paddle all day, and his co-pilot picked a gap

Once Darryl was back with us, Gerald and Robert in the Tandem went through the reef while I took the others out to sea and around the Panicle. It was a spectacular sight, the waves crashing against this huge rock. Definitely not

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Steve’s Bit


Darryl

Clifton

Had a fabulous trip? Captured it on camera? Do you fancy seeing your story in print? Check out www.canoeandkayak.co.nz for our “Contributors’ Guidelines”.

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the sort of place you would wish to come out of your kayak. Back near the cliff face people thought about their stomachs. Philip suggested a likely sandy beach just down the coast about one kilometre, so on we paddled.

Back with Darryl Beneath papa cliffs a small flat sandy beach with grassy sand dunes at one end was the chosen lunch spot. We had one casualty during the beachings or should I say one beaching during the landings. During lunch the wind was noticeably stronger... With appetites appeased we launched for the last leg to Ocean Beach seven kms to the south. The wind rose some more... I was last off the beach after helping two members get out on their second attempts. Both were driven sideways by the wind and rolled by the waves. The wind rose some more! My first attempt failed miserably, coinciding with a wave combo trickier than a big Mac! Created by an extremely strong gust of wind the combo bowled me. Fate for once spared me embarrassment because everybody had gone out beyond the breakers, even Paul Caffyn.

My second attempt succeeded. A solid twenty to twenty five kph norwesterly gusting regularly made things interesting. The chop could be sudden and a metre swell was running. I was thirty metres in front of a senior club member when I heard a shout and turned to see him capsize. Instantly I too was capsized by a gust, which stunned me with its ferocity. To be honest I didn’t think about executing an Eskimo Roll even though I had attended two courses not long ago. The extra work entailed by a wet exit soon bought home how important an Eskimo Roll technique is, especially when soloing. The wind

was blowing strongly off shore. Because I was on the leeward side, every time I held the cockpit combing, my boat capsized. Hanging on, I ducked under my kayak to get to the windward side so I could secure the cockpit with my feet while I blew up my paddle float. Meanwhile Philip was warming up the sea with his bare legs while hanging on to the back of his kayak. On my second re-entry attempt I lost my paddle float because I hadn’t secured it to my kayak nor paddle correctly. Mmmmm, naughty indeed. If anybody in America sees a yellow....... This was my most serious lesson to date and emphasised how serious the situation was. I yelled to Phillip, 30 m away to close the gap and raft up with me. The wind had blown us far from the shore. Ironically it was probably because we were too close to the shore that we had copped that freak gust. (Having hammered through the narrows of Lake Waikaremoana last summer in winds much stronger without tipping I tried analysing why it happened to me. Unfathomable.) At one stage, I can’t remember when, I signalled with my paddle and luckily it was sighted, just...! I got Phillip into his kayak, and then three of the more experienced clubbies arrived.

Steve’s Bit I saw two kayaks upside down, and called the group to a halt. I told the others to carry on while Dean, Jason, and I went to help. It was a hard battle against the wind to get back to them. When we reached them, Philip was already in his kayak. Jason helped Darryl back into his. By the time everyone was ready to paddle again the wind had blown us well out, and down the beach. We battled back to our get out point.

Cape Kidnappers

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Darryl again The experience was nasty and showed how easily the outcome could have been different. If Phillip and I not been able to join and dock and if we hadn’t been seen, the question would have been how long can one last in a mid winter sea. The other pertinent fact is kayaking’s greatest danger is the offshore wind. All’s well that ends well. Ocean Beach is a classic long flat sandy beach, good as anywhere to walk my kayak in.... bugger it. Paul Caffyn would pretend not to know me I’m sure. I’ll get it right one day. Meanwhile, I had better enrol with Steve, my respected instructor, for some surf skills. What did others get from this trip? Well, most stayed comfortable and dry; but I bet some of them thought their arms were going to drop off and they didn’t know they could paddle so long when feeling so stuffed; some would have been relieved to reach the shore. No matter what, all must have felt a good sense of satisfaction with the day’s achievement, and I congratulate them, especially those in their sixties, for they all finished strongly. We were challenged. We were rewarded.


K AYA K F I S H I N G

A Modest Fisherman When Pablo Campano sent in a photo of what I considered a great day’s catch I contacted him for a possible story or further comment. He modestly said, “It was just an average day’s fishing. I’m still trying to get one of the big ones aboard. That would be a 40kg kingfish. When I manage to spear one of those giants I’ll send you the photo.” He then added a word of warning for wannabe kayak spearfishermen “It is a dangerous activity to practise with care, respect and loads of self control.” Meanwhile, let this photo wet your appetite -

MULTI SPORT • RECREATION • SEA KAYAK • WHITE WATER • POLO Day Two Riot Hydraulics

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7 Pilgrim Place, Christchurch. Ph.03 366 9305 www.canoeworld.co.nz * Stockists of New Zealands top-rated kayaks & kayaking gear * ISSUE TWENTYnine • 2005

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P H O TO E S S AY

Yakity Yak by Karen Knowles We started off fairly small in 2003

But soon the Yakity Yak BOP club was in full swing

People came from everywhere.... overland

Across the sea and even from under the sea

We are made up of the usual suspects

The racer...

Those who keep us laughing...

n i W

an ESCAPADE Kayak valued at $910

Want to know more? Want to join the Yakity Yak Club? Fill in the form and receive an information pack and Go in the Draw to WIN....

Prize drawn on 31 March 2005 18

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Name: Email: Address: Phone: Please send me information on: Send form to: WIN A KAYAK; New Zealand Kayak Magazine, 7/28 Anvil Rd, Silverdale or phone (09) 421 0662.


Well, there’s a few of those

We love our lakes...

Our rivers...

Our coastline

And of course our food

Wherever we eat it.

Our surf is always pumping, we love our thrills

and we don’t mind the spills

So if you are ever down in the Bay of Plenty come and join us. Wherever we are, we’ll be having loads of fun!

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OUTDOORS WITH

White Water Kayak Camping the Modern Way

by Matt Barker

Some of my favourite and most memorable paddling trips have involved packing my camping gear into my kayak and heading off for a selfcontained overnight adventure. I can remember doing this as a teenager and still enjoy it over twenty years later. I prefer to not use raft support as the whole party can move at the same pace, you have all your gear with you in case of emergencies, and you do not need to get to a pre-determined drop off before dark. I also relish the self-sufficiency and freedom to explore that the ability to spend an extended period of time on the river allows.

Boat choice Historically kayaks were longer and had higher volume meaning you could take more equipment on kayak camping trips, however this space was long and thin making it hard to pack many items and even harder to access. Modern kayaks actually have a lot of usable space, as they are deeper with a lot of volume immediately accessible just behind the cockpit. Modern creek and river runner designs are very usable for kayak camping, particularly with some modern innovations in compact camping gear.

obviously there are limits and you probably do not want to drink olive oil neat. You will use up lots of energy on a multi-day white water trip so things that have high energy value, for low volume are good to take. Choose oily or fatty foods, sweet foods and for carbohydrates, rice rather than pasta. Modern packaging is a real boost to kayak camping as lots of foods can be squeezed into odd corners of the kayak, without additional waterproofing. A few items that immediately spring to mind are the tuna (in oil) sachets, muesli bars and salami sticks. I usually fit into odd corners a few items of robust fresh fruit and veg, as these are waterproof and add variety to your food. I tend to not take a water bottle in order to save space, as there is plenty of water all around. I try to find the smallest side stream to collect water from, as this is least likely to be contaminated, and enjoy a free supply of sweet, fresh, spring water. In heavy rain conditions when all the streams are running brown collect rainwater off your tarp or shelter. Using fine riversand and water to do the dishes and using natural materials for toiletry needs, all add to the sense of connectedness to the land and save valuable

What to take It is important to go compact rather than lightweight, you really will not notice another kilo or two in weight, but you will notice when you can’t fit everything in. Try to make your gear as versatile as possible; making things have more than one use saves space and weight. Food also needs to be compact rather than lightweight but

space in your boat. My parties usually take two large tent fly/tarps between us, one to sleep under and one to use as a groundsheet, with paddles tied into A-frames, throwbags used as guylines and kayaks as tent pegs, we can sleep groups of 8 easily even on wet nights. Some of my groups have cooked solely on open fires to save carrying a stove and fuel, as driftwood is very plentiful on these wild rivers and a fire in the evening is good for the soul.

Packing gear You need to decide which things you really want

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to stay dry and pack these in good quality drybags. On my must keep dry list are sleeping bag, beanie, fleece top and pants and a few items of food. I don’t take a lot of spare clothes, as I don’t tend to use them. Packing things in dry bags wastes a lot of space so anything that does not need to stay dry I just pack into the boat; I include shelters, cookers and lots of food items in this list. You can usually fit things down the side of the dry-

bags and in odd places like down the side of and under the seat. You need to make sure random items are not floating around in the kayak as these can get lost and it’s important that nothing hinders your exit from the kayak in an emergency. An often-overlooked storage area in a kayak is the space in front of the footrest especially with kayaks fitted with full plate. Remove the footrest, stand the kayak on its bow and pour in your gear, re-fit the footrest and your gear is held in place until you take the footrest out. I tend to put heavy items at the front as this helps to maintain the balance of the boat as you have greater capacity at the rear. I try to arrange my gear so that I end up with a conical sausage of gear that resembles the shape of the stern end of the boat, then put an oversize dry bag in the boat and shove the gear in one item at a time. Don’t forget to use the pockets of your buoyancy aid for a few items you want to keep handy, like snacks.

Before you go Make sure all your gear is in good working order, do any repairs or maintenance or treat yourself with a new one. If your current item of kit is on its last legs, the middle of a 3 or 4 day trip is no time to find out it will not last the distance. If you do treat yourself, test your shiny new item out, to make sure it works in the way you imagined. Also get together with your party and decide what


items you need individually and what you can share between you. There is little point in everybody taking a cooking pot or can opener.

Motu grade 4, 3-4 days, lots of rapids to keep the interest up and great to paddle right out to the ocean.

Where to go

Being able to kayak camp allows you the freedom to adventure, to see what is in this section with no road access, to explore and extend your boundaries of the known.

The North Island has some great rivers that can only be paddled with an overnight stop, when the distance between road ends is longer than a day’s paddle. This isn’t a complete list but gives something for every grade of paddler. Whakatane river grade 2, access off the Waikaremoana road. Upper Mohaka, grade 2+/3-, 2-3 days depending on exactly where you start, down to the take out above the state highway 5 bridge. This trip has the added incentive of hot pools complete with spa pool and plumbing to relax in. Ngarororo grade 3, two sections Boyd Hut to Napier Taihape road bridge 2-3 days and a 2-day section below the Napier Taihape road.

Camping out of your modern white water kayak is possible and will open up a whole new selection of rivers. New Zealand’s temperate climate allows you to pack lightly and still stay warm and comfortable. If you enjoy the simple life and are willing to get close to nature there is no reason why you cannot be perfectly comfortable and want for nothing other than to hear the roar of the next set of rapids. Give it a try; you will be rewarded with paddling new rivers and having unique experiences that the day-trip paddler will never see. Before you go however, a word of warning. Do not pare-down or skimp on your safety and rescue gear as an extended wilderness kayaking trip is where you are most likely to have to be selfsufficient and sort out your own problems. Help will be many hours or days away. These factors add greatly to the sense of personal responsibility, teamwork and adventure during, and achievement and satisfaction on successful completion of the journey. HAPPY CAMPING!

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21


S E A K AYA K I N G

A Hop, Skip and Jump Tuakau to Takapuna The Waikato River was barely visible through the winter fog when the car stopped at the top of the boat ramp. The temperature plummeted inside the cabin and sideways glances exchanged. Suddenly the two paddlers leapt out stripped off and pulled on their gear while the support crew stayed warm, emerging only for a photo opportunity. Numb fingers struggled with zips and hat straps. We finally pushed off from the Tuakau Bridge boat ramp at 7.10am. Visibility was less than 50m but quickly improved as the sun rose to a cloudy day without a hint of wind and even less moisture. The river surface mirrored the clouds and trees lining the banks. Conscious that we had to cover over 60km that day, including a 10km portage, we took the main channel around Namuheiriro, Te Wheranga Okapu and Kaiwaka No.2 Islands. The pump station passed and we soon closed on the water-

skiing club and sand depot at the ‘Elbow’. Downstream of the Elbow, whitebait stands dotted the right bank. They varied from bare table sized pontoons to large platforms with storage sheds. The day’s catch so far was nothing to talk about, but just being away from it all on a beautiful morning with the dog and a few stubbies had a universal appeal among the whitebaiters. Further downstream the stands gave way to baches. The standard of real estate varied enormously; from one room shacks to more palatial permanent affairs displaying a selection of road signs. The boats swung around the downstream end of the main Motutieke Island and between Puehunui and Motukakaho Islands. Roger made a short cut via a narrow shallow channel through Kaiwaka Island No.1 that took us past the Awaroa River mouth to the get out at Hoods Landing. This saved a kilometre and an upstream paddle of about 0.5km. At 10am we arrived at the concrete boat ramp at Hoods Landing, strapped on trolleys and retired to the carpark for lunch. An hour later the trolleys were readjusted to balance the kayaks equally fore and aft before starting the 10km portage to Waiuku. When planning the trip we considered reducing the portage distance by paddling up the Awaroa but concluded that drainage and farm works rendered the river barely navigable, even by kayak.

The put in at Tuakau Bridge boat ramp 7.10am departure.

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by Neil Watson and Roger Crum The Awaroa portage between the Waikato River and Waiuku via the Awaroa River was well known to early Maori. Once traders and missionaries introduced wheat, potatoes and fruit to the Waikato, produce from Maori gardens was transported by canoe down the Waikato River, carried across the portage and onto Auckland via the Manukau Harbour to Onehunga. In 1853, 337 canoes arrived at Onehunga during the year carrying £3,297 of produce. In the 1870’s and subsequent decades numerous proposals were made for a canal between the Waikato River and the Manukau Harbour. These were finally laid to rest with the construction of Great South Road and completion of the rail line from Auckland to Hamilton. The first 6km of the portage was straight and flat along Hoods Landing Road and Otaua Road. We stuck to the right-hand side, to face oncoming traffic. The remaining 4km climbed gradually through winding sections before descending to Waiuku and the Manukau. We made frequent road crossings to stay on wider road shoulders and maintain an adequate sight distance for approaching traffic. With more people on the trip, groups on the road would need to be limited to 2 kayaks and well spaced to minimise the traffic hazard. Two and a half hours after leaving Hoods Landing, we rolled into Waiuku Township. The


name Wai-uku is drawn from local Maori tradition. The ancestor Tamakae, used ‘uku’, a soft white clay, to enhance his appearance and win the hand of a Waikato chieftainess. We reluctantly passed the Kentish Hotel, crossed Kitchener Road to Tamakae Reserve and lunched on the riverbank. The 95-year-old sailing scow, Jane Gifford, was tied up to the jetty on the Waiuku River. Her owner, a well-attired and commanding woman, arrived for a chat. She outlined her plan to use the scow for public excursions. This required upgrading the jetty area and making the channel navigable at all tides. We wished her luck and set off on the out-going tide, with a light south westerly and high cloud. The destination for the night was Awhitu Regional Park about 5km down the Awhitu Peninsula from Clarks Beach. As the river widened, the east-west trending valleys on the left channelled the afternoon wind across our bows. The chimneys of the Glenbrook steel mill furnaces appeared on the horizon well before we passed the mill. A shell bank on the left was crowded with several roosting bird species. Closer inspection caused a crescendo of abuse as spoonbills, terns and oystercatchers rose into the air. The spoonbills banked and returned overhead, their distinctive bills thrust forward and legs trailing behind. We stayed on the left side of the river to reduce exposure to the wind then cut across to Clarkes

Beach for afternoon tea. The yacht club entrance provided shelter from the wind and vertically oriented moisture. Conditions were still a bit damp back on the water but cleared late afternoon as the tide swept us northwards along the shoreline of Awhitu Peninsula into the Manukau Harbour. The Manukau Harbour is the second largest natural harbour in New Zealand and was once (about 2 million years ago) a large embayment open to the Tasman Sea. The peninsula is a sand dune barrier formed by alternating phases of deposition and erosion. Maori tradition records that about 300 years ago the side facing the Tasman Sea was a large forested sand flat similar to the Whatipu sand flat today. The Harbour supports a rich and diverse estuarine flora and fauna. It is an important nursery area for fish and a major wintering area for migratory shorebirds. By 6.00pm with the Waiatarua masts and Manukau Heads in sight, one of the team conceded that we were lost. Resorting to the map case and interpolating between two adjacent but barely overlapping sheets, the navigator announced Plans B and C; either paddle 9km back to Awhitu Regional Park or 1km further to Orua Bay. After the briefest debate, we decided on Orua since the boats were already pointing in that direction.The setting sun penetrated the low cloud and turned the water into a succession of undulating black troughs and golden crests. The coastline on the north side of the harbour entrance had long receded into shadow when we ran out of water 20m off Orua beach. A jovial middle aged Englishman greeted us at the camping ground. He was staying on site in a campervan to look after the place for the proprietor. Tents were pitched in the dark before we retired to the showers and cookhouse. The next morning was fantastic; calm, no wind, no moisture or cloud, an incoming tide, the promise of a south westerly at our backs and a shorter paddle distance than originally planned! We trolleyed the boats over the Orua Beach tidal flat and aimed for Puponga Point at the end of Cornwallis Beach.

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23


Sand dredge, Waikato river.

Off the Point, 1m high white-capped waves occupied the channel. This section was crossed parallel to the waves with a few low braces in the more turbulent bits. In windless glassy conditions we swung out of the tidal stream past Cornwallis Beach and northeast to Taumatarea and Langholm Points. Roger grew up here, spending time on the water, so he was familiar with the coastline and harbour channels. A lone kayaker stopped for a chat. He was out for his weekend exercise, paddling up current to

Langholm for the morning paper. Cloud had descended and a light south westerly risen by the time we approached Green Bay beach. We trolleyed the boats one at a time through a tidal flat of soft deep black mud. A local on the Karaka Park coastal walk remarked, “You should have come ashore in the central area of the beach where the sea bed is firmer.” (next time!). We washed muddy trolleys, legs and footwear and eased our bladders at the toilet block before manhandling the boats up the pathway to the south end of Portage Road. The road was an original portage between the Manukau and Waitemata Harbours for Maori waka. A pa on the headland above Green Bay Beach controlled traffic. From 1850 various schemes were considered to cut a 2-mile long canal between Karaka Bay (now Green Bay) on the Manukau and the Whau River. Proposals included cuts up to 130 feet deep with locks, pumping stations and river dredging. As with the Awaroa Portage, the canal proposals lapsed when the rail line from Auckland to Hamilton was completed in 1908.

Tuakau to Takapuna Stage Tuakau to Hoods Landing (Waikato River) Hoods Landing to Waiuku Waiuku to Orua (Manakau Harbour) Orua to Green Bay (Manukau Harbour) Green Bay to Great North Road (Whau River) Great North Road to Takapuna Beach (Waitemata Harbour) Total

24

Distance Duration 26 km 10 km

3 hours (0710 to 1000) 2.5 hours (1100 to 1330)

32 km

4.5 hours (1400 to 1830) Ebb tide, south westerly

16 km

2.5 hours (0730 to 1000) Flood tide, south westerly

4 km

1 hour (1030 to 1130)

28 km

3.5 hours (1200 to 1530) Ebb tide, south westerly

116 km

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Including an ice cream stop the portage to the Whau River took about an hour. We were now deep in ‘Crum country’. Roger’s grandfather in 1905 established brick and pipe works in New Lynn. His father carried on in 1929. The business was sold in the 1970s and Roger is now back there short term as Project Engineer managing a plant upgrade. CRUM bricks can be seen set in the floor of the Arataki Visitor Centre on Scenic Drive in the Waitakere Ranges. The put in was on the right bank of the Whau River immediately downstream of the Great North Road Bridge. The river used to be navigable by small vessels and steamers to this point, but mangrove growth and silt now prevent this. We lunched on

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the grass above the bank waiting for the tide to turn; then carefully slid each boat down the bank, one person at the top of the bank and the other down at water’s edge. The river is sheltered by mangroves over its upper reaches but becomes exposed downstream where the channel widens. We favoured the left bank’s protection from a developing cross wind. A pit stop was needed at the Bridge Avenue marina before passing under the North Western Motorway Bridge and into the expanse of the Waitemata Harbour. We pointed northeast above the Motu Manawa Reserve to avoid the shallows and set up for a surf down the harbour. In a south westerly rising to 20 knots the boats surfed 3km to the right of the port mark off Te Tokaroa Reef (Meola) then lined up on the north abutment of the Auckland Harbour Bridge for another 3km. We passed under the bridge amid heavy boat traffic. Briefly 2nd and 3rd in a yacht race we were forced to give way to a somewhat larger vessel before squeezing between the shore and the northern bridge pier. Beyond the bridge, traffic eased and the following sea reduced. Sunday boaties were heading home from the gulf or playing in the harbour. We passed the familiar landmarks of Stanley Point and Devonport Naval Base in quick succession. E421 (Canterbury) with its white ensign flying was tied up at the outer wharf. The low symmetrical profile of Rangitoto Island slid into full view around North Head. The tide carried us past Cheltenham and Narrow Neck Beaches and along the Takapuna cliffs. On flat water the kayaks nosed gently into Takapuna Beach. A Sunday walker generously agreed to photograph the team before we strapped the boats on trolleys and completed the last 1km portage home.


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25


Official Speights Coast to Coast Results Narelle Ash

Photo by: Pauls Image Centre

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Place No. Names WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP OPEN MEN 1 208 RICHARD USSHER 2 133 GORDON WALKER 3 116 ROSS ROTHERHAM 4 160 RICHARD GREER 5 122 TIM PEARSON 7 56 BLAIR JORDAN 8 221 KRIS CLAUSON 9 60 RYAN KIESANOWSKI 10 158 HAMISH ROBB 11 43 ALLISTER ACKERS 12 92 GARY FAHEY 13 57 WILL SAMUEL 14 148 PHIL COSTLEY 15 219 GUY ANDREWS 16 150 PAUL CURRANT 17 31 JOHN MUDGWAY 20 120 ROB TAYLOR 22 171 GRANT CLIFFORD 24 138 GLEN RICHARDSON 25 74 KENT WILSON 26 6 SCOTT DONALDSON 27 54 STUART FREW 28 83 SCOTT KINZETT 29 126 ROGER GRANT 30 90 RICHARD KINGSFORD 32 135 DAN JONES 33 213 GARY MACPHERSON 34 3 CRAIG DUNNETT 35 66 DANIEL FOGGO 36 202 ERIK WAHLUND 37 111 CHRIS HASLETT 38 14 JONATHAN COLE 39 201 FREDRIK LINDSTROM 43 113 GRAHAM HUNTER 44 87 DAVE SCHAPER 46 106 MATTHEW BLUNDELL 47 143 GEOFF MCELREA 49 29 TIM BAILEY 50 159 MIKE KELLY 51 18 JONATHAN ROBINSON 52 32 DOUG PATERSON 53 10 RICK PALMER 55 62 PAUL SCALES 56 157 MORT SHEPHERD 57 173 EWAN MCCAFFREY 58 20 PHIL STRUTHERS 59 107 ROBERT DOBSON 60 44 ALAN MOSCRIP 61 25 DANIEL ANSTISS 62 129 BEN GEORGE 64 102 DAVE SEATH 65 98 GREG MARCHANT 67 128 RALPH WEHNER 68 88 GLEN SANDERS 69 110 WAYNE SPEAKMAN 71 210 SAKKIE MEYER 73 141 MICHAEL CLAY 74 78 TREVOR HURLEY 75 34 JONATHAN CLELAND 77 16 GRANT MCIVOR 78 58 GRAY PATTERSON 80 1 PETER SINCLAIR 82 12 BRUCE STUMBLES 84 103 LOUIS SCHINDLER 85 53 RYAN MENDES 87 124 DON REID 88 73 LINDSAY MCCORD 94 50 GERRY WHITEHOUSE 96 63 ANDREW SLOAN 98 127 JIMMY KEMP 99 211 PHILIP HAYWARD 101 136 CHRIS ELLIOTT 102 80 NICK HIRSCHFELD 103 33 BEN WATT 104 108 ROB BROOMFIELD 109 46 PERRY TURNER 115 89 BRENT CHATTERTON 116 59 CALEB WHAREPAPA 117 156 ERIC WATERSON 118 169 ALAN VANDERMOLEN 119 36 MARK SMALE 121 61 MAX CLUER 122 165 PAUL ROBINSON 123 84 JOSH GEDDES 124 134 ALAN SWARBRICK 125 55 DEAN BISHOP 126 70 DENNIS FAHEY 127 37 BRETT HENSHAW 131 132 RICHARD TROW 133 2 KEVIN MACKAY 134 140 PAUL MORAN 138 67 JIM HOUSTON 142 112 ROB WELLS 144 115 BRIAN ASTRIDGE 146 5 HEATH BROWN 150 39 GLENN AIKIN 151 13 GARETH HOLEBROOK 153 217 CORI JONES 154 105 RAYMOND KEARNS 158 77 MICHAL PETRUS 160 69 ANTON WESSELINK 8 GRAHAM O’NEILL 11 ROBERT LOVERIDGE 19 MARK VIVIAN 22 PAUL VLIESTRA 45 GUY POWER 51 COLIN LAWRY 71 JEFF SWANNEY 72 TIM EVES 117 GLENN RUSSELL 121 DAVID KOOI 149 WARRICK WEBER 154 ANTHONY OSWALD 204 HING TONG (JIMMY) YEE 207 GEORGE CHRISTISON 215 ANDY BEALE 218 KYLE SEATH 7 MIKE KELLY 86 PHIL LEMON WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP VETERAN MEN (OVER 40) 21 99 PETER BLAIR 31 155 NATHAN LIVINGSTONE 40 130 DALE BUTCHER 41 139 BRENT O’NEILL 45 166 HAMISH GOODWIN 48 15 ANDY HORNE 54 95 STEVE FRANCIS 83 24 ANDREW MCLEOD 90 49 DAVID HOWARD 92 41 KEVIN COOMBES 93 21 ANDY CLARK 95 151 SEVERN SMITH 97 4 BARRY BROWN 105 101 KELVIN WONG 107 97 GARY BROWN 108 114 MIKE FOOY 111 40 NEILL WILLIAMS 114 96 SIMON HAMPTON 129 27 GINGE BURNETT 130 94 PETER BENNETTS 135 119 GREG JOHNSTON

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

NEW ZEALAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH ALEXANDRA TAURANGA AUSTRALIA CHRISTCHURCH ALEXANDRA AUCKLAND TIMARU WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH AUSTRALIA SCOTLAND PAHIATUA AUCKLAND HASTINGS BLENHEIM TARADALE ROTORUA NEW PLYMOUTH BRIGHTWATER OTAGO WELLINGTON AUCKLAND UNITED KINGDOM HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH SWEDEN LYTTELTON WELLINGTON SWEDEN CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON AUSTRALIA CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON QUEENSTOWN CAMBRIDGE RANGIORA NEW PLYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH NAPIER CHRISTCHURCH WESTPORT AUSTRALIA HIKURANGI WAIKUKU BEACH HONG KONG HAMILTON POKENO SWITZERLAND CHRISTCHURCH GREYMOUTH SOUTH AFRICA AUCKLAND NELSON AUCKLAND AUCKLAND WELLINGTON WAITATI SOUTH AFRICA BLENHEIM WEST INDIES CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND OTAKI CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON SOUTH AFRICA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND TE PUKE AUCKLAND RANGIORA PORIRUA WELLINGTON WELLINGTON MOTUEKA SOUTH AFRICA INVERCARGILL BURNHAM CHRISTCHURCH WHENUAPAI INVERCARGILL AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON AUSTRALIA OPOTIKI UNITED KINGDOM HASTINGS WARKWORTH LYTTELTON CHRISTCHURCH UNITED STATES WELLINGTON AUCKLAND HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON DUNEDIN AUSTRALIA OTAUTAU WELLINGTON WHANGAREI AUCKLAND UNITED STATES QUEENSTOWN PIOPIO HONG KONG NEW ZEALAND UNITED KINGDOM UNITED STATES QUEENSTOWN WAIPAWA

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

1:50:52 1:51:03 1:51:36 1:51:19 1:50:58 1:51:05 1:50:53 1:51:13 1:51:35 1:51:02 1:51:24 1:51:14 1:51:04 1:51:07 1:52:58 1:51:21 1:50:57 1:52:05 1:53:51 1:51:18 1:51:02 1:51:45 1:51:03 1:53:31 1:51:58 1:52:01 1:52:28 1:51:26 1:53:39 1:51:25 1:52:59 1:51:55 1:51:38 1:51:14 1:52:37 1:53:10 1:52:41 1:52:33 1:59:57 1:52:26 1:52:23 1:53:48 1:53:37 1:52:08 1:51:55 1:53:22 1:54:38 1:53:50 1:52:22 1:53:37 1:53:58 1:51:19 1:56:14 1:52:24 1:52:09 1:52:08 1:53:01 1:53:14 1:54:10 1:53:14 1:52:47 1:53:35 1:52:44 2:00:06 1:52:37 1:59:19 1:52:31 1:53:06 1:51:38 1:51:33 1:52:42 1:53:12 1:53:00 1:53:04 2:01:05 1:53:57 1:51:32 1:54:47 1:54:47 2:00:24 1:53:25 1:52:50 1:52:25 2:03:57 2:00:03 1:53:27 1:54:39 2:10:05 1:59:11 2:01:31 1:54:41 1:53:01 2:01:50 2:00:47 1:56:12 2:12:20 2:00:31 2:00:19 2:01:06 2:10:49 1:59:43 1:52:04 1:51:16 2:00:07 2:36:08 2:00:14 2:02:18 2:12:29 1:54:25 2:13:08 2:00:03

1 7 28 18 4 10 2 14 27 6 22 16 9 12 77 20 3 43 103 17 5 34 8 94 41 42 60 24 98 23 78 38 30 15 64 86 67 63 131 59 55 101 97 47 39 91 109 102 54 96 105 19 117 57 48 46 80 90 106 89 72 95 69 133 65 126 62 85 29 26 68 87 79 84 142 104 25 113 112 135 92 73 58 149 132 93 110 150 125 145 111 81 146 138 116 158 137 134 143 155 129 46 17 142 183 143 159 177 115 178 139

1 7 25 16 4 10 2 12 24 6 19 14 9 11 52 18 3 33 73 15 5 28 8 66 31 32 42 21 70 20 53 29 27 13 45 59 47 44 87 41 38 71 69 35 30 63 77 72 37 68 75 17 83 39 36 34 55 62 76 61 50 67 49 89 46 85 43 58 26 23 48 60 54 57 94 74 22 81 80 91 64 51 40 98 88 65 78 99 84 96 79 56 97 93 82 101 92 90 95 100 86 35 15 95 113 96 105 111 80 112 92

3:05:56 3:16:23 3:05:05 3:26:29 3:23:14 3:36:21 3:32:20 3:39:33 3:42:23 3:30:06 3:41:15 3:54:23 3:21:34 4:06:05 3:51:54 3:31:06 3:50:57 4:02:47 4:08:06 4:02:32 4:10:03 3:58:56 4:07:58 3:51:27 4:25:20 4:07:52 4:19:43 3:59:04 4:06:11 4:12:00 3:51:46 4:07:41 4:03:51 4:08:39 4:33:40 4:18:05 3:57:52 4:35:45 4:14:31 4:35:31 4:32:36 4:19:06 4:29:26 4:19:55 4:22:22 4:28:03 4:15:52 4:24:53 4:26:47 4:28:00 4:38:15 4:15:40 4:16:09 4:39:11 4:37:05 4:24:38 4:35:19 4:30:53 4:08:29 4:42:53 4:43:43 4:40:56 4:34:12 4:14:52 4:43:12 4:45:41 4:35:32 4:35:51 4:41:24 4:24:40 4:38:22 4:43:16 4:26:07 4:47:27 4:54:29 4:52:25 5:27:10 4:50:17 4:50:18 5:16:29 5:27:21 5:37:56 4:45:50 5:06:09 5:21:35 5:15:08 5:20:25 5:22:52 4:46:33 5:22:50 5:13:19 5:21:21 5:25:34 5:43:05 5:14:53 5:20:57 5:46:22 5:14:02 5:39:13 5:08:48 6:16:35 5:39:18 3:44:07

2 3 1 7 5 11 10 12 15 8 13 22 4 33 20 9 16 30 38 29 43 25 37 18 65 36 53 26 34 44 19 35 31 41 77 51 24 83 46 81 75 52 70 54 58 69 49 63 67 68 90 48 50 92 86 61 80 72 40 97 102 95 78 47 99 103 82 84 96 62 91 101 66 106 113 111 147 108 109 131 148 153 104 120 139 129 135 143 105 141 125 137 146 156 127 136 159 126 155 121 160 165 17

2 3 1 6 5 10 9 11 13 7 12 18 4 25 17 8 14 23 30 22 33 20 29 15 48 28 42 21 26 34 16 27 24 32 56 40 19 61 35 59 55 41 53 43 44 52 38 47 50 51 64 37 39 66 63 45 58 54 31 69 72 67 57 36 70 73 60 62 68 46 65 71 49 76 80 79 95 77 78 87 96 97 74 81 91 86 88 93 75 92 83 90 94 99 85 89 100 84 98 82 101 103 13

4:42:49 4:46:16 4:54:02 4:59:47 4:58:25 5:10:48 5:08:20 5:12:48 5:07:09 5:12:17 5:18:42 5:09:10 5:39:18 4:56:12 5:10:35 5:27:36 5:33:36 5:24:23 5:26:30 5:31:25 5:30:04 5:27:24 5:23:51 5:41:38 5:11:43 5:39:59 5:26:19 5:21:43 5:32:37 5:32:09 5:33:01 5:36:44 5:32:26 5:43:18 5:25:44 5:11:41 5:46:35 5:26:12 5:30:06 5:26:47 5:33:45 5:33:35 5:36:49 5:38:56 5:39:34 5:39:32 5:45:11 5:37:02 5:40:04 5:47:01 5:27:44 6:00:21 5:52:15 5:45:09 5:31:44 5:46:53 5:51:55 5:47:54 6:07:34 5:42:48 5:49:14 5:46:24 5:46:25 6:01:09 5:42:30 5:31:12 5:43:46 5:52:01 5:47:36 6:26:34 6:04:05 5:55:01 6:04:39 6:01:55 5:41:56 5:56:39 5:36:33 6:01:56 6:02:08 5:33:28 5:44:41 5:37:03 6:19:38 5:55:47 5:50:25 5:52:30 5:55:15 5:36:24 6:22:17 5:46:02 6:10:46 5:52:12 6:06:54 5:53:12 6:06:56 6:23:19 6:17:07 6:45:59 6:04:02 6:33:06 5:48:56 6:04:33

1 2 3 6 5 12 9 16 8 15 19 10 64 4 11 32 49 23 28 39 35 31 22 72 14 70 27 20 44 41 45 57 43 82 25 13 92 26 36 30 50 48 58 63 66 65 86 59 71 96 33 126 110 85 40 95 107 100 139 80 102 90 91 127 79 38 83 108 98 154 134 119 135 128 76 124 56 129 130 47 84 60 148 122 105 111 120 55 150 88 142 109 137 113 138 153 147 160 133 157 101 136

1 2 3 6 5 11 8 15 7 14 16 9 48 4 10 26 39 19 23 31 28 25 18 53 13 51 22 17 35 33 36 43 34 57 20 12 65 21 29 24 40 38 44 47 50 49 61 45 52 67 27 83 76 60 32 66 73 69 93 56 71 63 64 84 55 30 58 74 68 99 89 79 90 85 54 82 42 86 87 37 59 46 96 81 72 77 80 41 97 62 94 75 91 78 92 98 95 101 88 100 70 90

2:04:31 1:59:42 2:16:06 2:06:06 2:14:23 2:03:24 2:13:30 2:01:41 2:08:41 2:16:37 2:03:21 2:07:48 2:13:13 2:12:58 2:13:23 2:20:58 2:10:12 2:12:36 2:11:23 2:16:06 2:11:10 2:24:50 2:22:08 2:19:17 2:20:02 2:09:48 2:11:16 2:38:31 2:18:29 2:15:55 2:33:59 2:16:10 2:28:00 2:15:21 2:07:07 2:38:30 2:30:38 2:14:36 2:29:51 2:19:54 2:16:14 2:29:07 2:22:13 2:31:17 2:28:53 2:25:06 2:31:02 2:32:24 2:29:32 2:20:29 2:30:59 2:24:12 2:27:49 2:17:16 2:33:54 2:31:34 2:17:13 2:28:07 2:30:29 2:24:35 2:17:47 2:24:40 2:35:01 2:33:01 2:30:51 2:33:41 2:38:46 2:35:15 2:39:02 2:17:37 2:25:52 2:33:57 2:45:08 2:27:12 2:32:15 2:36:48 2:28:54 2:40:12 2:40:02 2:37:05 2:23:23 2:25:23 2:35:37 2:33:26 2:27:32 2:40:30 2:34:55 2:36:11 2:48:24 2:47:56 2:39:45 2:56:00 2:35:14 2:38:20 2:59:35 2:42:05 2:35:32 2:41:51 3:00:32 2:58:20 2:53:01

5 1 27 7 22 4 21 2 10 31 3 9 19 18 20 45 12 17 15 28 13 57 48 41 43 11 14 123 39 26 106 29 70 25 8 122 88 24 81 42 30 76 49 94 74 59 92 99 79 44 90 54 69 34 104 95 33 71 86 55 36 56 109 100 89 103 124 111 127 35 62 105 140 65 97 119 75 130 129 120 53 60 114 101 67 132 108 117 144 143 128 151 110 121 155 136 113 135 158 154 150

5 1 24 6 20 4 19 2 9 28 3 8 17 16 18 38 11 15 14 25 12 45 39 34 36 10 13 85 33 23 73 26 52 22 7 84 60 21 58 35 27 56 40 64 54 46 63 67 57 37 62 42 51 30 71 65 29 53 59 43 32 44 75 68 61 70 86 77 87 31 48 72 94 49 66 81 55 90 89 82 41 47 79 69 50 91 74 80 96 95 88 98 76 83 100 93 78 92 101 99 97

11:44:07 11:53:23 12:06:49 12:23:39 12:26:59 12:41:36 12:45:02 12:45:14 12:49:48 12:50:00 12:54:41 13:02:34 13:05:07 13:06:21 13:08:48 13:10:59 13:25:41 13:31:50 13:39:48 13:41:20 13:42:18 13:42:54 13:44:59 13:45:53 13:49:01 13:49:38 13:49:45 13:50:42 13:50:54 13:51:27 13:51:44 13:52:29 13:55:55 13:58:30 13:59:05 14:01:25 14:07:44 14:09:05 14:14:24 14:14:36 14:14:57 14:15:35 14:22:05 14:22:15 14:22:43 14:26:01 14:26:40 14:28:08 14:28:43 14:29:06 14:30:55 14:31:31 14:32:25 14:33:59 14:34:51 14:35:12 14:37:27 14:40:07 14:40:41 14:43:28 14:43:30 14:45:33 14:48:20 14:49:07 14:49:09 14:49:51 14:50:34 14:56:12 14:59:39 15:00:22 15:00:59 15:05:25 15:08:53 15:09:37 15:09:42 15:19:48 15:24:07 15:27:10 15:27:13 15:27:24 15:28:49 15:33:11 15:33:29 15:39:18 15:39:33 15:41:33 15:45:13 15:45:31 15:56:24 15:58:18 15:58:29 16:02:33 16:09:30 16:15:23 16:17:35 16:38:39 16:39:32 16:42:10 16:44:51 16:51:02 16:58:14

1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 20 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 43 44 46 47 49 50 51 52 53 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 64 65 67 68 69 71 73 74 75 77 78 80 82 84 85 87 88 94 96 98 99 101 102 103 104 109 115 116 117 118 119 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 131 133 134 138 142 144 146 150 151 153 154 158 160

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101

5:27:53 5:45:21 6:05:49 5:29:58

155 169 174 158

99 105 108 100

6:04:22 172

107

1:51:59 2:59:35 1:50:56 1:51:23 2:09:48

44 185 3 23 162

33 114 3 20 107

3:56:39 26 5:18:15 137 3:46:27 18

19 89 14

AUCKLAND W V 1:51:21 21 2 3:26:08 6 1 5:46:07 AUCKLAND W V 1:52:19 53 11 4:08:54 42 5 5:29:17 ALEXANDRA W V 1:52:07 45 7 3:52:10 21 2 5:34:07 PALMERSTON NORTH W V 1:51:49 35 4 4:08:19 39 4 5:34:52 HASTINGS W V 1:51:06 11 1 4:33:36 76 10 5:14:43 QUEENSTOWN W V 1:52:10 49 8 4:05:54 32 3 5:43:11 CHRISTCHURCH W V 1:52:24 56 12 4:23:03 59 8 5:33:22 WANAKA W V 1:51:39 32 3 4:40:18 94 13 5:46:51 WHANGAREI W V 1:56:11 115 16 4:37:00 85 12 5:47:14 OPUNAKE W V 1:51:54 37 5 4:22:05 57 7 6:23:02 WELLINGTON W V 1:52:39 66 13 4:24:38 60 9 6:12:05 AUCKLAND W V 1:59:02 124 19 4:12:35 45 6 5:56:08 AUCKLAND W V 1:52:13 51 9 4:43:13 100 14 5:54:26 WELLINGTON W V 1:52:05 44 6 4:34:40 79 11 6:03:37 MORRINSVILLE W V 2:00:58 139 23 4:49:23 107 15 5:52:40 AUCKLAND W V 1:59:00 122 18 5:03:27 116 18 5:31:11 CHRISTCHURCH W V 1:55:10 114 15 5:28:34 149 28 5:32:26 RAKAIA W V 2:01:00 140 24 4:52:23 110 16 5:53:54 INVERCARGILL W V 1:59:36 127 20 5:18:28 133 23 5:46:41 QUEENSTOWN W V 1:58:59 121 17 5:18:34 134 24 5:54:03 GREYMOUTH W V 2:00:25 136 22 5:24:16 144 26 5:58:51 Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

89 34 51 53 18 81 46 94 97 152 143 123 117 131 112 37 42 114 93 115 125

9 2 6 7 1 8 5 11 12 25 21 17 16 19 13 3 4 14 10 15 18

2:28:15 2:18:43 2:38:51 2:22:25 2:21:36 2:27:28 2:32:14 2:29:39 2:33:37 2:18:01 2:25:40 2:49:25 2:30:25 2:40:14 2:31:00 2:45:14 2:25:05 2:36:09 2:44:18 2:44:43 2:36:43

72 40 126 50 47 66 96 80 102 38 61 146 85 131 91 141 58 116 137 139 118

9 2 18 4 3 8 13 10 14 1 7 25 11 19 12 23 6 16 20 22 17

13:31:49 13:49:11 13:57:13 13:57:24 14:00:59 14:08:43 14:21:02 14:48:26 14:54:00 14:55:00 14:55:00 14:57:09 15:00:16 15:10:35 15:13:59 15:18:50 15:21:14 15:23:25 15:49:02 15:56:18 16:00:14

21 31 40 41 45 48 54 83 90 92 93 95 97 105 107 108 111 114 129 130 135

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

ISSUE TWENTY

nine • 2005

27


Place No. Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

136 137 141 145 149 155 159

Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

65 ANDREW SMIDS AUCKLAND W V 1:52:15 52 10 5:14:58 128 22 6:32:28 68 KEITH JUDSON HAMILTON W V 1:52:51 74 14 4:59:12 115 17 6:35:06 161 KEN SCOTT ALEXANDRA W V 2:01:16 144 25 5:06:05 119 20 6:15:30 42 PETER STRAY TIMARU W V 2:02:17 148 26 5:06:01 118 19 6:08:16 100 GHENE SNELLEN CHRISTCHURCH W V 2:10:33 154 27 5:24:24 145 27 6:15:19 9 JUAN MCDONALD WELLINGTON W V 1:59:40 128 21 5:11:47 124 21 6:29:52 38 TOM LEIGHS CHRISTCHURCH W V 2:12:20 157 28 5:21:51 140 25 6:22:25 17 STEPHEN FOWLER AUCKLAND W V 2:11:07 171 31 6:10:07 175 33 23 GREG TAYLOR LOWER HUTT W V 2:14:35 179 34 47 JOHN PAYNE MT MAUNGANUI W V 1:51:55 41 6 5:29:44 157 31 75 PHIL ISON AUCKLAND W V 1:53:56 109 16 4:39:08 95 13 5:40:51 79 PETER GIBSON AUCKLAND W V 2:10:10 165 29 93 DON ABBEY WESTPORT W V 2:27:44 181 35 118 ERIC DODD SCOTLAND W V 2:11:46 173 32 5:54:42 171 32 205 PING YIN MAK HONG KONG W V 2:59:35 186 36 5:19:34 140 26 153 MURRAY HEALEY WHANGAREI W V WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP VETERAN WOMEN (OVER 40) 120 146 SARAH KENNEDY INVERCARGILL W VW 1:59:53 130 2 5:08:56 122 1 5:42:04 128 30 ROBYN ABBEY WESTPORT W VW 1:59:02 123 1 5:22:51 142 3 5:55:25 143 145 JENNY GREEN AUCKLAND W VW 2:10:19 152 4 5:21:23 138 2 5:51:00 147 85 SARAH BLAIR CHRISTCHURCH W VW 2:10:31 153 5 5:34:19 152 4 5:54:25 157 170 DIANE TALANOA OAMARU W VW 2:02:09 147 3 5:38:39 154 5 6:10:33 28 MARGARET STANLEY-HARRIS AUCKLAND W VW 2:10:27 167 5 6:05:00 173 6 WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP OPEN CLASSIC MEN (OVER 50) 18 109 ERIC ROSS KUROW W C 1:52:56 76 1 3:51:02 17 1 5:13:54 72 123 RUSSELL TROTTER WELLINGTON W C 1:53:03 82 2 4:29:50 71 3 5:45:12 89 48 JIM HARGEST INVERCARGILL W C 1:54:23 108 5 4:21:57 56 2 5:47:38 100 64 JOE SHERRIFF INVERCARGILL W C 1:53:13 88 3 4:31:56 74 4 6:06:17 112 76 PETER WOOD UNITED STATES W C 1:53:41 99 4 5:16:31 132 7 5:42:02 139 131 ALASTAIR MCLAREN AUCKLAND W C 2:11:44 156 8 4:38:06 88 5 6:13:51 140 175 PETER COOK TE PUKE W C 2:16:35 160 9 5:32:51 150 8 5:34:20 148 52 CHRIS COLL WESTPORT W C 1:58:44 120 6 5:43:26 157 9 5:54:52 156 147 TOBY NIELSEN SOUTH AFRICA W C 2:10:09 151 7 5:05:14 117 6 6:39:49 167 RICHARD FRAHER AUCKLAND W C 2:40:35 184 10 INDIVIDUALS TWO DAY OPEN MEN 1 372 LUKE VAUGHAN CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:14 2 2 3:19:10 1 1 4:41:08 2 497 CAMERON CARTER CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:57 14 12 3:43:40 5 4 4:42:46 4 344 JAMES RICHMOND CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:22 20 18 3:48:55 6 5 5:00:47 5 351 JONATHAN CLEINE CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:08 18 16 3:55:23 8 7 4:56:29 6 306 BENJE PATTERSON INVERCARGILL I M 1:47:27 21 19 3:53:53 7 6 5:01:47 8 539 STEVEN MCKINSTRY AUCKLAND I M 1:46:37 7 6 3:34:15 2 2 5:22:42 9 397 ADAM FAIRMAID QUEENSTOWN I M 1:46:39 9 7 4:03:16 11 9 5:00:34 10 362 MARK GEORGETTI WARKWORTH I M 1:48:19 33 29 4:05:13 13 11 4:58:39 11 467 JEREMY PUGH CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:52:07 38 34 3:39:40 4 3 5:14:40 12 417 CRAIG GORDON BROOKSIDE I M 1:47:16 19 17 4:04:57 12 10 5:05:58 13 373 KIERAN FITZGERALD TEMUKA I M 1:44:23 1 1 4:33:29 29 21 4:54:40 15 511 MARK THRUPP CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:52 13 11 4:23:35 21 17 5:05:33 16 321 GREG FLYNN AUCKLAND I M 1:48:03 29 25 4:30:28 26 20 5:03:02 17 295 BEN HOY CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:38 24 22 4:35:51 32 24 4:50:00 18 253 LEE MORTON INVERCARGILL I M 1:47:44 26 23 4:27:14 24 18 5:13:46 19 365 ROBERT BRUTON AUCKLAND I M 1:48:48 34 30 4:17:59 16 14 5:09:52 20 328 JAMES HARTSHORNE ENGLAND I M 1:52:58 44 37 4:37:45 35 27 4:52:51 21 363 CAMERON DURNO WELLINGTON I M 1:46:46 12 10 4:13:24 14 12 5:26:40 22 534 ANDREW EVANS CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:31 5 4 4:15:58 15 13 5:20:04 23 420 MATTHEW KEIR CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:43 11 9 4:34:42 30 22 5:03:02 24 285 MATTY GRAHAM HOKITIKA I M 1:52:01 37 33 4:21:52 19 16 5:20:44 25 460 LACHLAN BOYLE CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:59 15 13 4:39:12 36 28 5:17:46 26 376 BRENDAN HICKMAN WHANGAREI I M 1:48:08 30 26 4:37:03 34 26 5:14:43 27 334 SHAUN PORTEGYS WINTON I M 1:46:30 4 3 4:35:56 33 25 5:13:33 31 291 MATT MARK CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:59:32 76 63 4:45:08 42 32 5:11:10 32 422 KIERAN BYRNE RENWICK I M 1:47:36 23 21 4:57:18 53 39 5:10:33 33 331 CRAIG NIEPER DUNEDIN I M 1:53:09 46 38 4:43:40 38 29 5:21:04 36 434 MATTHEW CROW WELLINGTON I M 1:53:34 51 41 4:29:44 25 19 5:21:45 37 356 GAVIN LLOYD AUCKLAND I M 1:47:29 22 20 4:53:40 48 37 5:20:05 39 464 MIKE MACLENNAN CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:52:49 40 35 4:57:21 54 40 5:12:44 40 308 ANDY VAUGHAN CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:53:54 55 44 4:34:54 31 23 5:37:29 41 544 GORDON WATSON GLENORCHY I M 1:47:03 17 15 5:15:27 86 53 5:02:49 42 436 RICHARD HUNTER CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:43 10 8 4:01:19 10 8 6:08:09 43 274 MARK DEACON BALCLUTHA I M 1:52:56 42 36 4:55:20 51 38 5:26:58 44 332 JOE CORNFORTH HAMILTON I M 1:53:29 49 39 5:10:00 75 50 5:00:31 45 431 SIMON MACKLE KAIKOURA I M 1:54:45 62 50 4:44:42 40 31 5:19:17 46 423 PHIL PAGE DUNEDIN I M 1:53:46 53 42 5:09:27 74 49 5:18:22 48 415 REUBEN ALLAN WAIMATE I M 1:54:44 60 48 4:44:24 39 30 5:35:12 49 341 DANIEL SHAW CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:03 16 14 5:29:02 104 67 5:10:43 50 272 ADAM HOLMES CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:48:17 32 28 5:27:25 102 66 5:07:09 51 498 KARL THOMPSON TAKAKA I M 2:02:02 101 76 4:49:34 43 33 5:22:37 52 345 ANDREW HENWOOD KAMO I M 1:59:44 79 65 4:20:50 18 15 5:20:28 53 518 DAMIEN WARD TAKAPAU I M 1:54:45 61 49 5:12:20 77 51 5:21:49 55 506 NATHAN HAY CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:47 27 24 5:18:34 94 60 5:23:54 57 333 BRENT THOMAS CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:55:00 63 51 5:15:55 88 55 5:18:51 59 290 LUKE NUTTALL CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:51:47 36 32 5:16:19 91 57 5:09:53 61 548 CAMERON BOWER AUCKLAND I M 2:00:19 83 67 4:51:47 45 35 5:21:21 65 388 ROBERT ACUTT RANGIORA I M 2:00:40 89 71 5:24:18 96 61 5:11:54 66 425 HAYDEN BARKER PLEASANT POINT I M 1:48:12 31 27 4:49:51 44 34 5:36:48 67 261 BRETT HOOD WHANGAREI I M 1:54:37 59 47 5:05:05 66 46 5:30:14 68 465 SCOTT NOAKES CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:59:17 72 59 4:58:39 56 42 5:38:01 70 359 ANTHONY LYTH CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:00:36 85 68 5:15:29 87 54 5:22:35 74 459 DUNCAN CROSBIE OTAUTAU I M 1:58:12 67 54 4:57:26 55 41 5:40:44 77 408 MATTHEW MURPHY NAPIER I M 2:01:20 96 75 5:16:51 93 59 5:34:17 78 513 MARK GREANEY AUCKLAND I M 1:59:19 73 60 5:05:07 67 47 5:40:03 80 521 DANIEL BATCHELOR WANAKA I M 1:46:33 6 5 6:03:53 148 88 5:07:52 81 298 PAUL FAGAN HAMILTON I M 2:00:39 88 70 5:30:14 105 68 5:24:30 82 407 MICHAEL NOONEY CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:06:35 123 90 5:04:33 64 44 5:31:16 83 302 DOUG MILTON AUCKLAND I M 2:00:42 90 72 4:59:54 60 43 5:40:10 85 268 MARK MCEWAN CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:54:18 57 46 5:25:27 98 63 5:43:15 86 304 ROBIN OAKLEY SOUTHBRIDGE I M 2:11:34 153 99 5:31:46 109 72 5:15:04 87 516 TREVOR TAIT AUCKLAND I M 2:00:38 86 69 5:26:06 100 64 5:21:48 90 439 LANCE BARNES NELSON I M 1:58:04 66 53 5:08:18 70 48 5:37:33 92 277 AARON SCOTT CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:02:53 104 78 4:53:32 47 36 5:34:20 93 549 RUPERT KERR CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:59:32 75 62 5:16:37 92 58 5:42:40 94 492 GLENN THOMSON DANNEVIRKE I M 1:53:50 54 43 6:06:31 152 90 5:04:55 100 531 SIMON BOWDEN WANAKA I M 2:02:56 107 81 5:46:13 126 77 5:21:37 101 293 DEAN ASHBY CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:58:22 68 55 6:00:33 140 84 5:12:51 102 326 BEN THOMPSON ARROWTOWN I M 1:48:49 35 31 5:30:26 106 69 5:51:35 103 541 MIKE BROWN CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:54:16 56 45 5:58:14 137 82 5:17:20 105 394 DAVID STUART INVERCARGILL I M 2:00:09 81 66 5:16:00 89 56 5:34:28 106 499 CRAIG COX CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:27:37 214 116 5:31:26 108 71 5:19:03 115 396 JONATHAN ELSMORE CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:09:20 141 97 5:25:13 97 62 5:43:04 116 456 JASON WOODYARD AUCKLAND I M 2:05:47 122 89 5:39:30 117 73 5:41:56 117 318 GARETH WORTHINGTON AUCKLAND I M 2:02:55 106 80 5:15:03 85 52 5:36:03 119 286 SEAN ARMSTRONG AUCKLAND I M 1:58:49 69 56 6:07:41 154 92 5:21:33 121 543 CAMERON SCOTT AUCKLAND I M 1:55:05 64 52 5:31:24 107 70 5:53:37 123 255 PHILLIP LASH WHANGAREI I M 2:07:59 131 92 5:41:10 122 75 5:35:32 124 339 TURI HODGES PORIRUA I M 2:08:32 136 94 6:15:09 161 95 5:13:14 126 483 IAIN COSSAR WELLINGTON I M 2:08:16 134 93 5:50:09 130 79 5:38:37 127 312 JAMES RUSSELL AUCKLAND I M 2:05:20 120 88 6:07:31 153 91 5:33:56 129 429 PHIL MAYO CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:01:14 95 74 5:41:49 123 76 5:57:19 131 386 ANDREW CORKERY AUCKLAND I M 1:53:32 50 40 5:57:08 135 81 6:02:09 136 457 KEVIN DEANE MORRINSVILLE I M 1:59:43 78 64 6:28:15 172 98 5:15:32 138 514 ALAN CONNOLLY OHOPE I M 2:11:07 151 98 5:48:20 129 78 5:52:57 139 418 AUSTIN HEFFERNAN OTOROHANGA I M 2:08:38 138 95 5:40:31 119 74 6:05:06 140 357 ANDREW SHAW CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:58:50 70 57 6:28:56 173 99 5:40:32 142 280 MIKE PETERS CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:11:53 155 100 6:18:42 164 97 5:32:11 143 287 CAMPBELL GOURLAY AUCKLAND I M 1:59:29 74 61 6:15:14 162 96 5:31:50 145 340 ANDREW MCLEOD NEW PLYMOUTH I M 2:23:03 199 112 5:56:55 134 80 5:35:42 146 416 SCOTT JULIAN WELLINGTON I M 2:04:50 116 86 6:30:24 174 100 5:31:22 147 500 HENRY BALLANTYNE UPPER HUTT I M 2:12:09 157 102 5:04:40 65 45 6:28:40 155 445 THOMAS LESLIE DUNEDIN I M 2:03:56 111 84 6:45:02 182 104 5:34:11 156 278 AARON HAYMES CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:59:16 71 58 6:00:16 139 83 6:03:45 157 458 BRENDON FLANAGAN WELLINGTON I M 2:00:51 92 73 6:05:45 150 89 6:07:47 160 374 TIM SMITH CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:09:15 140 96 5:27:15 101 65 6:21:36 161 489 JAMES MASON HASTINGS I M 2:03:02 109 83 6:35:46 177 101 5:51:02 165 476 WILL RADFORD CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:05:02 117 87 7:04:44 202 111 5:30:04 166 257 ANDREW MUIR MOSGIEL I M 2:02:10 102 77 6:11:02 159 94 6:01:04 168 540 ROBIN GHOSH UNITED KINGDOM I M 2:19:14 180 108 6:01:52 142 86 6:01:18 172 281 JAY GARDEN CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:02:56 108 82 6:46:08 184 105 5:36:36 175 256 NICK BONIFACE CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:04:19 114 85 7:01:28 199 109 5:49:12 180 347 SHANE WILKINSON INVERCARGILL I M 2:13:38 168 105 6:41:29 180 103 5:50:20 181 370 TRISTAN BARTON UNITED KINGDOM I M 2:19:14 181 109 6:01:52 143 87 6:18:45 182 535 DAMIAN CHASE HAMILTON I M 2:12:38 163 103 6:38:28 178 102 5:42:55 185 421 CARL HUXFORD ROTORUA I M 2:45:41 236 122 6:01:07 141 85 5:54:34 190 353 DEREK ALSTON CHRISTCHURCH I M 2:19:44 182 110 6:48:33 187 106 5:59:11 Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

28

ISSUE TWENTYn

ine • 2005

156 158 146 140 145 155 151

27 28 23 20 22 26 24

2:22:49 2:35:24 2:44:37 2:59:52 2:45:37 3:03:34 2:58:05

51 112 138 157 142 160 153

5 15 21 27 24 28 26

16:02:29 16:02:31 16:07:28 16:16:25 16:35:52 16:44:51 16:54:40

136 137 141 145 149 155 159

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

72

8

78 121 106 116 141

1 4 2 3 5

2:38:47 2:30:24 2:50:08 2:40:30 2:56:35

125 84 147 133 152

2 1 4 3 5

15:29:38 15:47:41 16:12:49 16:19:44 16:47:55

120 128 143 147 157

1 2 3 4 5

17 87 99 136 77 144 52 118 159

1 4 5 7 3 8 2 6 9

2:16:52 2:28:22 2:48:47 2:30:34 2:29:16 2:59:45 2:40:37 2:52:39 2:51:34

32 73 145 87 77 156 134 149 148

1 2 6 4 3 9 5 8 7

13:14:43 14:36:26 14:52:43 15:01:59 15:21:28 16:03:26 16:04:22 16:29:41 16:46:44

18 72 89 100 112 139 140 148 156

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

1 2 12 6 13 68 11 7 38 21 5 20 16 3 36 25 4 80 51 17 55 44 39 35 29 27 56 62 52 32 117 15 205 82 10 49 46 106 28 23 66 54 64 74 47 26 58 31 115 91 119 65 134 103 127 24 77 93 128 141 40 63 118 104 138 19 61 33 165 42 105 48 140 135 111 60 171 108 34 122 101 181 195 41 169 201 132 96 95 109 94 225 102 198 204 220 162 90 191 193 114 156 159 215 139 173 186

1 2 10 6 11 54 9 7 31 17 5 16 13 3 30 20 4 57 41 14 44 36 32 29 24 22 45 49 42 26 77 12 110 58 8 40 37 70 23 18 53 43 51 55 38 21 46 25 76 60 79 52 84 67 81 19 56 61 82 89 33 50 78 68 86 15 48 27 93 35 69 39 88 85 73 47 97 71 28 80 65 100 106 34 96 108 83 64 63 72 62 118 66 107 109 116 92 59 103 104 75 90 91 113 87 98 101

1:54:45 2:00:07 1:58:50 2:02:09 2:01:48 2:02:44 1:59:39 1:59:56 2:06:26 2:10:35 2:02:51 2:01:47 1:58:35 2:08:47 2:00:22 2:13:45 2:07:18 2:04:40 2:10:17 2:17:03 2:09:38 2:02:25 2:06:36 2:11:37 1:59:03 2:06:25 2:04:21 2:21:02 2:05:20 2:10:11 2:07:27 2:08:49 2:20:33 2:04:27 2:19:22 2:28:11 2:08:13 2:17:45 2:05:32 2:09:36 2:18:20 2:52:46 2:05:32 2:04:31 2:06:41 2:20:30 2:29:12 2:09:00 2:32:25 2:17:43 2:12:39 2:11:11 2:19:17 2:09:12 2:18:02 2:07:17 2:11:59 2:25:23 2:28:10 2:09:03 2:14:00 2:24:33 2:32:26 2:46:32 2:19:43 2:14:36 2:15:41 2:15:45 2:16:50 2:18:24 2:37:49 2:10:27 2:22:40 2:13:26 2:47:05 2:15:35 2:26:14 2:25:16 2:15:08 2:18:15 2:11:21 2:21:01 2:10:44 2:30:00 2:22:57 2:25:47 2:14:13 2:22:41 2:39:03 2:32:28 2:24:44 2:48:21 2:17:05 2:38:37 2:31:18 2:53:35 2:22:31 2:19:42 2:46:06 2:44:05 2:43:17 2:19:42 2:37:48 2:43:36 2:49:37 2:46:29 2:39:40

1 8 4 13 12 15 6 7 26 49 16 11 3 36 9 65 32 20 46 82 43 14 27 56 5 25 17 109 21 45 33 37 106 18 101 144 35 88 22 42 92 216 23 19 28 105 147 38 157 87 59 52 99 40 89 30 57 129 143 39 66 125 158 203 104 68 74 75 79 94 178 48 116 61 204 73 136 127 69 91 54 108 50 150 119 133 67 117 181 159 126 208 83 180 154 218 114 102 199 193 191 103 177 192 211 202 183

1 7 3 11 10 13 5 6 23 40 14 9 2 30 8 48 27 18 38 58 36 12 24 44 4 22 15 74 19 37 28 31 72 16 67 87 29 61 20 35 64 116 21 17 25 71 88 32 92 60 46 42 66 34 62 26 45 83 86 33 49 80 93 112 70 51 55 56 57 65 98 39 76 47 113 54 85 82 52 63 43 73 41 89 78 84 50 77 101 94 81 114 59 100 90 117 75 68 108 106 104 69 97 105 115 111 102

11:41:16 12:13:29 12:35:53 12:41:07 12:44:55 12:46:18 12:50:08 12:52:05 12:52:52 13:08:44 13:15:22 13:17:46 13:20:06 13:22:15 13:29:04 13:30:24 13:30:51 13:31:29 13:32:49 13:41:29 13:44:14 13:46:21 13:46:29 13:47:36 13:54:52 14:01:52 14:02:13 14:06:04 14:06:32 14:13:04 14:13:43 14:14:07 14:16:42 14:19:40 14:23:21 14:26:55 14:29:47 14:32:03 14:32:18 14:32:25 14:32:33 14:33:48 14:34:25 14:34:45 14:36:26 14:38:28 14:42:39 14:45:52 14:47:16 14:47:38 14:48:36 14:49:50 14:55:38 15:01:39 15:02:30 15:05:34 15:07:22 15:07:47 15:08:54 15:12:03 15:12:24 15:13:03 15:16:20 15:17:16 15:18:31 15:19:52 15:26:27 15:27:30 15:27:39 15:28:12 15:28:26 15:28:32 15:40:17 15:40:38 15:41:04 15:43:38 15:46:20 15:49:56 15:52:02 15:55:15 15:58:07 16:01:21 16:03:32 16:13:29 16:15:20 16:20:01 16:22:30 16:25:26 16:25:34 16:28:08 16:31:18 16:33:49 16:40:13 16:41:54 16:45:40 16:51:40 16:52:20 16:59:32 17:00:21 17:06:28 17:08:56 17:14:40 17:23:13 17:23:26 17:23:37 17:27:50 17:47:08

1 2 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 31 32 33 36 37 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 48 49 50 51 52 53 55 57 59 61 65 66 67 68 70 74 77 78 80 81 82 83 85 86 87 90 92 93 94 100 101 102 103 105 106 115 116 117 119 121 123 124 126 127 129 131 136 138 139 140 142 143 145 146 147 155 156 157 160 161 165 166 168 172 175 180 181 182 185 190

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107


Photo by: Pauls Image Centre

Rob Howarth

ISSUE TWENTY

nine • 2005

29


Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

Place No. Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

191 192 195 198 200 206 209 210 215 219 220 226 228 231 238

INVERCARGILL HAMILTON AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUSTRALIA RAKAIA TAPANUI WELLINGTON AUCKLAND WELLINGTON AUCKLAND QUEENSTOWN WAIKAKA AUCKLAND SAMOA CHRISTCHURCH RAKAIA OHOKA AUSTRALIA IRELAND IRELAND

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

2:02:54 2:13:03 2:13:50 2:19:54 2:16:55 2:29:26 2:12:09 2:26:38 2:23:29 2:43:29 2:07:52 2:24:50 2:27:51 2:28:44 2:30:07 2:07:37 2:00:00 1:46:12 2:12:58 2:21:52 2:21:58

105 164 170 183 176 218 156 209 202 233 129 203 215 216 221 131 83 2 169 200 202

79 104 106 111 107 119 101 115 113 121 91 114 117 118 120 93 67 2 107 116 117

7:38:57 7:12:42 6:11:00 6:50:12 6:55:00 7:25:08 7:57:07 7:02:45 7:09:56 7:54:21 9:14:17 8:45:05 8:08:26 8:14:18 9:37:06

CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON UPPER HUTT UNITED STATES WHANGAREI WINTON NGONGOTAHA WELLINGTON UNITED KINGDOM AUCKLAND RAKAIA CHRISTCHURCH KAIAPOI WELLINGTON LYTTELTON ROTORUA WELLINGTON WELLINGTON WELLINGTON TIMARU AUCKLAND ASHBURTON CHRISTCHURCH OTAUTAU QUEENSTOWN WELLINGTON WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH KAIKOURA KAIAPOI PALMERSTON NORTH ROTORUA BLENHEIM WELLINGTON INVERCARGILL AUCKLAND NELSON AUCKLAND WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH NEW PLYMOUTH PICTON AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH GREYMOUTH AUCKLAND

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

1:46:28 1:53:40 1:59:51 2:00:55 2:01:52 1:59:37 2:07:23 2:08:37 2:09:54 2:18:01 2:00:33 2:10:48 2:07:20 2:10:52 2:03:28 2:08:31 2:12:22 2:02:00 2:07:44 2:12:24 2:05:11 2:15:36 2:12:13 2:11:37 2:22:33 2:21:51 2:29:22 2:29:38 2:29:48 2:19:03 2:21:12 2:31:44 2:26:19 2:26:38 2:21:02 2:34:25 2:34:24 2:44:51 2:53:30 2:52:37 3:06:41 2:38:48 3:48:27 2:19:53

3 52 80 93 98 77 127 137 144 177 84 147 126 148 110 135 160 99 128 162 119 175 158 154 198 192 217 219 220 179 188 222 206 207 185 226 225 234 239 238 240 232 253 184

HOKITIKA AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH LITTLE RIVER CHRISTCHURCH LAWRENCE QUEENSTOWN CHRISTCHURCH PAHIATUA NELSON NELSON PAEROA TE KUITI AUCKLAND AUCKLAND HAMILTON TIMARU WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH PALMERSTON QUEENSTOWN KAIAPOI AUCKLAND TIMARU AUCKLAND AUCKLAND SCOTLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND MALAYSIA NELSON CHRISTCHURCH ASHBURTON CHRISTCHURCH MT MAUNGANUI HAMILTON OTAKI CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH HAMILTON RANGIORA DUNEDIN AUCKLAND NELSON DUNEDIN UNITED KINGDOM AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND OAMARU CHRISTCHURCH UNITED STATES TIMARU INVERCARGILL AUCKLAND AUCKLAND WAIKOUAITI AUSTRALIA OMAN CHRISTCHURCH DUNEDIN AUCKLAND

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V

1:47:42 1:47:58 1:56:41 1:46:38 1:54:25 1:53:25 2:05:07 1:53:18 2:10:54 2:01:27 1:52:57 2:11:13 2:05:42 2:00:43 2:00:09 2:00:38 1:52:32 2:04:18 2:01:12 2:04:37 2:02:00 2:12:19 2:10:38 2:13:40 2:07:58 2:25:54 2:15:09 2:22:26 2:07:08 2:08:05 2:09:45 2:21:06 2:10:57 2:08:15 2:14:28 2:22:30 2:21:16 2:18:17 2:13:13 2:13:17 2:21:17 2:09:31 2:13:16 2:25:57 2:38:43 2:20:18 2:34:22 2:21:09 2:14:17 2:15:03 2:02:27 2:21:41 2:26:38 2:23:20 2:27:37 2:36:25 2:23:18 2:37:30 2:35:32 2:51:03 2:22:49 1:56:18 2:12:47 2:43:55

432 REUBEN BONIFACE 279 ANDREW BOYD 545 IAIN LINTON 493 MATT COWIE 411 PETAR PERIC 270 ANDREW WRIGHT 392 CRAIG THOMAS 364 NATHAN COLEMAN 316 SIMON VARI 327 DUNCAN CATANACH 350 PETER HOLT 462 BRENT FLEMING 389 SHANE THOMAS 325 PETER SMITH 377 RAMA FA’AVAE POHE 271 ANDY GREENLEES 273 GREG MEADOWS 294 BRUCE CLULOW 348 NATHAN FACER 550 JAMES O’CALLAGHAN 551 MARK POLLOCK INDIVIDUALS TWO DAY OPEN WOMEN 14 358 KATRINE LAWTON 30 338 FLEUR PAWSEY 64 349 KIRSTINE COLLINS 75 448 HAILEY BALDWIN 79 502 KATE WOOD 88 530 KERRI NEYLON 89 313 HANNAH THORNE 91 369 STACEY PRICE 96 424 RUTH BRADBROOK 98 387 SARAH OWEN 104 275 SARAH MCCORMICK 111 484 MIRANDA DE GOUW 112 311 LISA FINNERTY 113 486 HEATHER KIRKHAM 114 379 VANESSA WALKER 120 361 ELOISE COTTEE 133 403 KIM MURRAY 134 496 TINA MILLWARD 135 542 MARGOT NEAS 141 401 JENNI GUARD 152 354 LEAH O’NEILL 154 437 WENDY GALBRAITH 164 297 CLARE GARTHWAITE 170 299 JOANNE KNOWLER 171 405 GEMMA PEMBERTON 176 522 MEREAMA CHASE 186 289 HELEN PETERS 187 478 CATH WEIR 193 320 ROBYN DUNMORE 196 430 NICHOLA HOLLAND 204 450 KELLY FOGDEN 211 375 ALICE KEVERN 212 264 ANNABEL SMITH 213 251 KRYSTIE MILLWARD 217 391 CARLY ANDERSON 222 346 JULIETTE SHARPE 223 296 CORDELIA SHARPE 227 335 SARAH GAZLEY 229 525 HELENA COURT 233 366 GENEVIEVE MURRELL 237 342 KAREN O’BRIEN 239 447 LISA MCKENZIE 258 MEGAN DOWD 282 VALERIE MEYER 435 KATRINA ROBERTSON 259 BRIDGET TAPPER INDIVIDUALS TWO DAY VETERAN MEN (OVER 40) 3 472 DUNCAN HAMILTON 7 381 GEOFF PARKIN 28 283 ROLAND MEYER 29 317 JOHN FITCH 35 371 NIGEL SMITH 38 479 GEOFF SCOTT 47 336 BRUCE MCKAY 54 533 KELLY BARBER 58 319 BILL WALLACE 60 466 ROB MARSHALL 62 419 WILLIAM HARRIS 63 260 IAN BUCHANAN 69 315 BRENT NORRISS 71 323 BARRY SNOW 72 413 MIKE BAKER 73 383 LEX DE JONG 76 412 LINDSAY WILLIAMS 95 491 DANNY SHEEHY 97 400 GEOFF DILLON 99 446 GRAEME MCLEOD 110 469 DAVE TRUSCOTT 122 507 ALAN MATCHETT 125 310 SIMON BRACKSTONE 128 292 EVAN TAYLOR 130 314 BRENT MEEKAN 132 510 DAVID BOSOMWORTH 137 337 IAN GIBSON 144 505 PETER DIDSBURY 148 532 IAN RUDD 149 355 BRIAN POTTER 150 406 DAVID CAIRNS 151 300 BRIAN WEARING 153 329 STEVE DELANEY 158 265 JIM WATSON 159 269 CHRIS PROCTER 162 482 MIKE DE JONGH 167 254 DAVE MACFARLANE 169 410 GEOFF BALME 173 526 RICHARD LAURENSON 174 524 DAVID MORTIMER 177 305 GREGOR COSTER 178 402 TONY VINE 183 438 CHRIS OH 184 343 NIGEL BRATTEN 194 470 BRUCE WARBURTON 197 301 STEWART HASTIE 199 284 MARK ELDER 202 252 RALPH GILL 203 441 RICHARD RIDDELL 205 368 MIKE WARD 208 384 NEAL WALLACE 214 263 GRAHAM SHEWARD 216 515 TONY SCOTT 218 494 IHAIA BRIGGS 221 471 PAUL ELLIS 224 322 CHRIS BOBERG 225 454 TONY VAN DER SLUIS 230 266 ANDREW WAGG 232 276 WILLIAM HUNT 240 303 MARTIN MOORE CORRY 309 WARREN HAGGERTY 324 TIM SMITH 433 NEVILLE GEARY 453 PAUL LIDDY 519 CARL FERGUSON 536 STEPHEN WEIR 409 CALUM MCINTOSH 455 BLAIR BERMINGHAM 468 SIMON HUNTER INDIVIDUALS TWO DAY VETERAN WOMEN (OVER 40) 34 352 LYNNE POTTER 56 288 MICHELE ALLISON 84 414 WENDY RIACH

30

ISSUE TWENTYn

216 204 158 190 194 209 221 200 203 220 238 234 223 224 240

115 113 93 107 108 114 117 110 112 116 121 120 118 119 122

6:34:43 178 5:00:03 61 6:40:25 183

102 44 105

1 2 4 6 7 3 12 15 16 24 5 17 11 18 9 14 21 8 13 22 10 23 20 19 29 28 32 33 34 25 27 35 30 31 26 37 36 39 41 40 42 38 44 26

4:24:44 4:25:23 5:03:41 5:08:56 4:53:28 5:40:54 5:08:23 5:13:48 5:39:53 4:59:05 5:55:50 5:14:24 5:42:34 5:12:53 5:52:26 5:34:16 6:02:09 5:58:14 6:08:35 6:02:39 6:06:06 6:12:29 6:48:32 6:24:14 6:25:13 6:22:43 6:43:32 6:46:15 6:45:59 7:01:12 7:22:24 7:37:42 7:33:39 7:02:45 7:49:47 8:33:08 8:33:09 8:39:22 6:56:39 8:44:13 8:46:16 8:58:19

22 23 63 73 46 120 71 81 118 58 133 83 124 79 132 112 144 138 155 145 151 160 186 167 169 166 181 185 183 198 207 215 214 201 219 226 227 232 195 233 235 237

1 2 5 7 3 13 6 9 12 4 16 10 14 8 15 11 18 17 21 19 20 22 29 24 25 23 26 28 27 31 33 35 34 32 36 37 38 39 30 40 41 42

6:46:30 186

29

25 28 65 8 58 48 118 47 149 97 43 152 121 91 82 87 39 113 94 115 100 159 145 169 130 204 174 195 124 132 143 186 150 133 172 197 189 178 165 167 190 142 166 205 231 184 224 187 171 173 103 191 208 201 213 229 200 230 228 237 208 66 164 245

2 3 9 1 8 7 19 6 28 14 5 30 20 12 10 11 4 17 13 18 15 31 27 35 22 51 39 47 21 23 26 42 29 24 37 48 44 40 32 34 45 25 33 52 59 41 55 43 36 38 16 46 53 50 54 57 49 58 56 60 51 9 32 64

3:36:33 3:56:44 4:21:53 4:19:02 4:32:03 4:40:34 5:00:55 5:28:01 4:58:58 4:54:58 5:33:00 4:59:14 5:08:02 5:12:34 5:01:48 5:13:29 4:55:05 5:14:55 5:08:49 5:14:16 5:19:45 5:16:15 5:41:03 5:26:00 5:34:42 5:37:41 5:44:22 5:51:16 5:36:19 6:03:25 6:24:54 5:11:20 5:47:41 6:21:45 6:34:47 6:25:42 6:49:09 6:03:09 6:40:19 6:05:04 6:17:08 5:57:18 6:52:22 6:10:15 6:50:03 7:00:35 7:00:27 7:22:02 7:40:30 7:27:14 6:53:17 7:25:16 7:24:12 7:41:59 7:17:24 8:37:07 8:25:29 9:23:57 8:33:59 8:34:50

3 9 20 17 28 37 61 103 57 49 111 59 69 78 62 80 50 84 72 82 95 90 121 99 113 116 125 131 115 147 168 76 128 165 176 170 188 146 179 149 163 136 191 157 189 197 196 206 217 213 192 210 208 218 205 230 225 239 228 229

1 2 4 3 5 6 11 23 9 7 24 10 13 16 12 17 8 19 14 18 21 20 28 22 25 27 29 31 26 34 39 15 30 38 41 40 43 33 42 35 37 32 45 36 44 48 47 50 54 53 46 52 51 55 49 59 56 60 57 58

5:56:02 135 7:16:25 206

32 49

2:28:38 226

58

7:56:08 227

58

5:36:07 6:01:20 6:45:32 6:20:23 6:15:18 5:52:34 5:56:40 6:13:41 6:25:50 5:52:20 6:00:08 6:20:28 6:37:05 6:51:57 6:37:01

112 194 235 216 212 168 178 211 224 166 188 217 229 238 228

74 105 121 114 112 95 99 111 117 94 102 115 120 122 119

2:32:09 2:24:09 2:44:33 2:37:55 2:41:30 2:46:20 2:33:58 2:58:07 3:07:23 3:06:37 2:15:24 2:46:14 3:06:25 3:10:59 2:32:47

156 123 194 179 186 201 167 224 234 233 72 200 232 235 161

91 79 107 99 103 110 96 118 121 120 53 109 119 122 95

17:50:05 17:51:13 17:54:54 18:08:23 18:08:43 18:33:28 18:39:53 18:41:11 19:06:36 19:36:46 19:37:39 20:16:37 20:19:45 20:45:57 21:16:59

191 192 195 198 200 206 209 210 215 219 220 226 228 231 238

108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122

5:06:41 5:24:21 5:24:08 5:28:12 5:48:02 5:19:59 5:40:02 5:36:30 5:21:32 5:33:21 5:21:05 5:51:33 5:17:53 5:43:58 5:27:14 5:43:18 5:27:22 5:39:58 5:38:45 5:45:25 6:03:46 5:44:58 5:22:51 6:05:55 5:52:31 5:43:19 5:58:46 5:53:04 6:03:15 6:02:54 5:46:49 5:58:30 6:10:51 6:24:21 6:46:25 6:10:29 6:04:35 5:58:37 7:41:45 6:32:19 6:07:18 6:43:33

22 76 75 86 153 50 125 113 59 100 57 164 45 144 84 142 85 124 123 149 199 145 70 202 167 143 185 170 197 196 151 182 208 223 236 207 200 184 240 226 203 232

1 8 7 11 23 3 16 13 5 12 4 24 2 19 9 17 10 15 14 21 32 20 6 34 25 18 29 26 31 30 22 27 37 38 41 36 33 28 42 39 35 40

1:57:34 2:11:17 2:17:01 2:17:38 2:19:21 2:13:30 2:19:16 2:17:27 2:11:30 2:33:22 2:10:55 2:20:47 2:29:55 2:30:06 2:16:54 2:19:07 2:22:37 2:25:21 2:18:07 2:23:54 2:22:52 2:26:17 2:31:55 2:25:32 2:27:55 2:47:47 2:18:23 2:27:42 2:33:16 2:34:00 2:51:48 2:33:59 2:37:08 2:58:26 2:28:55 2:34:28 2:45:24 2:53:50 2:55:36 2:47:29 3:11:20 3:04:54

2 53 81 86 100 62 98 84 55 165 51 107 149 151 80 97 115 128 90 122 118 137 155 131 142 206 93 141 164 169 214 168 176 225 145 172 196 219 221 205 236 230

1 3 7 9 14 5 13 8 4 29 2 15 25 26 6 12 16 19 10 18 17 21 27 20 23 36 11 22 28 31 37 30 33 40 24 32 34 38 39 35 42 41

13:15:26 13:54:40 14:44:40 14:55:41 15:02:42 15:13:58 15:15:03 15:16:20 15:22:48 15:23:47 15:28:22 15:37:30 15:37:41 15:37:48 15:40:01 15:45:11 16:04:28 16:05:32 16:13:10 16:24:21 16:37:53 16:39:19 16:55:31 17:07:17 17:08:12 17:15:40 17:30:02 17:36:39 17:52:16 17:57:09 18:22:13 18:41:54 18:47:56 18:52:09 19:26:08 19:52:29 19:57:31 20:16:40 20:27:29 20:56:38 21:11:34 21:25:33

14 30 64 75 79 88 89 91 96 98 104 111 112 113 114 120 133 134 135 141 152 154 164 170 171 176 186 187 193 196 204 211 212 213 217 222 223 227 229 233 237 239

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42

5:01:56 5:00:20 5:14:22 5:36:57 5:23:37 5:23:03 5:00:10 5:03:06 5:20:15 5:28:43 5:11:32 5:23:30 5:22:46 5:29:16 5:35:20 5:27:05 5:51:00 5:32:50 5:57:13 5:45:23 5:50:37 5:45:15 5:26:15 5:38:31 5:47:20 5:35:48 5:48:32 5:49:51 6:17:53 5:41:57 5:40:42 5:59:49 6:01:07 5:56:54 5:33:12 5:40:13 5:28:44 6:12:46 5:25:59 5:54:51 5:45:18 6:20:33 5:42:15 6:00:21 5:49:21 6:00:55 5:48:25 5:46:08 5:54:49 5:58:33 6:21:26 6:18:20 6:22:01 6:34:19 6:45:05 6:09:18 6:21:57 5:54:28 6:38:27 6:41:26

14 9 37 116 73 71 8 18 53 87 30 72 69 89 107 83 161 98 180 148 160 146 79 121 152 110 155 158 213 136 133 187 192 179 99 130 88 210 78 175 147 218 137 189 157 190 154 150 174 183 219 214 222 227 234 206 221 172 230 231

3 2 6 22 11 9 1 4 7 15 5 10 8 17 20 14 38 18 43 30 37 28 13 23 32 21 34 36 51 26 25 45 48 42 19 24 16 50 12 41 29 53 27 46 35 47 33 31 40 44 54 52 56 57 60 49 55 39 58 59

2:09:13 2:00:50 2:16:35 2:07:07 2:15:17 2:12:08 2:25:39 2:10:17 2:07:18 2:15:14 2:06:01 2:09:51 2:12:46 2:07:35 2:13:34 2:13:33 2:19:01 2:30:24 2:15:54 2:22:03 2:23:52 2:33:33 2:34:18 2:42:17 2:33:00 2:24:26 2:26:39 2:23:19 2:32:39 2:40:53 2:21:22 3:05:22 2:39:34 2:21:37 2:26:53 2:26:12 2:26:24 2:32:49 2:49:32 3:01:08 2:53:15 2:54:55 2:36:39 2:48:45 2:34:11 2:36:22 2:45:25 2:44:59 2:29:09 2:51:19 3:20:18 2:48:03 3:03:10 2:52:42 3:11:21 2:43:13 3:04:25 2:41:37 2:58:01 3:19:34

41 10 77 29 71 58 132 47 31 70 24 44 60 34 64 63 96 153 76 113 121 166 171 188 163 124 139 120 160 184 110 231 182 111 140 134 138 162 210 226 217 220 175 209 170 174 197 195 146 213 240 207 228 215 237 190 229 187 223 239

6 1 16 3 14 9 24 8 4 13 2 7 10 5 12 11 17 30 15 20 22 34 36 42 33 23 27 21 31 40 18 57 39 19 28 25 26 32 48 54 51 52 38 47 35 37 45 44 29 49 60 46 55 50 58 43 56 41 53 59

12:35:24 12:45:51 13:49:30 13:49:43 14:05:22 14:09:09 14:31:50 14:34:42 14:37:23 14:40:20 14:43:30 14:43:48 14:49:16 14:50:06 14:50:51 14:54:45 14:57:37 15:22:27 15:23:07 15:26:18 15:36:13 15:47:21 15:52:14 16:00:27 16:02:59 16:03:48 16:14:42 16:26:52 16:33:58 16:34:19 16:36:42 16:37:36 16:39:18 16:48:30 16:49:20 16:54:35 17:05:32 17:07:00 17:09:02 17:14:20 17:16:57 17:22:15 17:24:31 17:25:16 17:52:18 17:58:09 18:08:38 18:14:17 18:18:43 18:32:09 18:37:26 18:53:18 19:16:01 19:32:19 19:41:27 20:06:01 20:15:08 20:37:31 20:45:58 21:26:52

3 7 28 29 35 38 47 54 58 60 62 63 69 71 72 73 76 95 97 99 110 122 125 128 130 132 137 144 148 149 150 151 153 158 159 162 167 169 173 174 177 178 183 184 194 197 199 202 203 205 208 214 216 218 221 224 225 230 232 240

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

2 5 1

2:17:31 2:25:25 2:16:46

85 130 78

2 5 1

14:04:47 34 14:35:50 56 15:10:37 84

AUCKLAND I VW 1:52:50 41 1 4:31:49 27 1 5:22:38 67 WELLINGTON I VW 1:53:07 45 2 4:44:50 41 2 5:32:29 97 CHRISTCHURCH I VW 2:04:18 112 3 5:32:12 110 5 5:17:21 43 Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

ine • 2005

1 2 3


Ian Rudd Photos by: Pauls Image Centre

Chris Stewart

ISSUE TWENTY

nine • 2005

31


Place No. Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

107 108 109 118 163 179 188 189 201 207 234 235 236

PALMERSTON AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH NEW PLYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH INVERCARGILL TIMARU LINCOLN INVERCARGILL

I I I I I I I I I I I I I

508 546 528 443 481 395 520 399 262 330 385 428 360

JANE MATCHETT BUBBLES BOURKE LINDA CRAIG JANET MCLEOD FIONA DE JONGH TONI LAMING DEBBIE JOHNS ALISON JARVIS SUE SUCKLING HELEN MCKENZIE BARBARA LOOMES JO MUNRO MAUREEN ARCHER

Place No. Names 1

City / Country 1

TEAMS TWO DAY OPEN MEN 1 760 BEN FOUHY TAUMARUNUI 2 710 GRAEME CAUSER CHRISTCHURCH 3 624 ROBIN WILSON CHRISTCHURCH 5 743 BRENDON METCALFE NEW PLYMOUTH 7 623 GARY GLASSON BLACKBALL 8 635 IAN WALSH AUCKLAND 9 678 PHILIP EVANS HOKITIKA 16 633 MIKE DUNN OTATARA 20 679 BEVAN IRONS MOTUEKA 21 629 BLAIR MCROBBIE TAUPO 22 697 HAYDEN HICKEY WANAKA 26 690 MATTHEW HAZLETT CHRISTCHURCH 29 627 RALPH MADDISON AUCKLAND 34 677 DEAN RYAN AUSTRALIA 40 642 ANDREW DAY PAHIATUA 42 676 RODNEY STUDD AUSTRALIA 43 613 STUART CLARK CHRISTCHURCH 44 640 DAVID LE LIEVRE AKAROA 58 730 PAUL BUICK CHRISTCHURCH 59 696 CARL FINNIGAN WASHDYKE 63 724 WILLIAM SNOWDEN MOTUEKA 70 758 MILAN TALLEY UPPER MOUTERE 75 694 TIM ODGERS CHRISTCHURCH 85 751 KERIAN HIBBS WELLINGTON 89 649 DAVID RIELLY OAKURA 109 675 NICK STEWART CHRISTCHURCH 119 762 STEPHEN COZENS AUCKLAND 120 739 SHANE LYNCH CHRISTCHURCH 121 691 GREG COLLINS WINTON 133 680 MARK LONGSTAFF AUCKLAND TEAMS TWO DAY OPEN WOMEN 27 702 GINNY BUSH WANAKA 66 668 LUCI BEEMAN ASHBURTON 68 749 JEANNA MCDRURY CHRISTCHURCH 92 706 MARY MCBRIDE WELLINGTON 101 742 CHARLOTTE MEEHAN AUCKLAND 107 752 SAMANTHA THOMPSON CHRISTCHURCH 113 708 FIONA KIRK CHRISTCHURCH 136 672 LISA JEFCOATE GREYMOUTH 142 748 EMMA MONK WELLINGTON 144 645 RUTH HORRELL PALMERSTON NORTH 147 664 CHARLOTTE HALL RENWICK 152 606 TESSA FRASER CAMBRIDGE 155 734 CHARLOTTE BARTON UNITED KINGDOM 161 617 REBECCA WARREN AUCKLAND TEAMS TWO DAY VETERAN MEN (OVER 40) 10 655 DAVE RUDGE WELLINGTON 15 759 ANTHONY BEVERLEY WELLINGTON 33 634 ADRIAN BLUNT WANAKA 35 650 STEVE CRACKEL CHRISTCHURCH 36 644 DOUG MCKIRDY TIMARU 38 628 TONY LOUGH AUCKLAND 47 630 RICHARD WILLIS CAMBRIDGE 51 611 MARK VAN DEN ANKER AUCKLAND 62 695 NEIL CARTER AUCKLAND 72 661 WAYNE KNIGHT WAIUKU 76 653 PAUL GRAINGER ENGLAND 82 735 GRAEME MARKWICK AUCKLAND 88 744 SCOTT MURRAY UNITED STATES 90 727 JOHN SHANAHAN AUSTRALIA 96 764 MIKE LITTEN CHRISTCHURCH 98 741 DOC GODFREY AUCKLAND 102 729 GERALD CARTER CHRISTCHURCH 106 699 MICHAEL SEXTON AUCKLAND 108 682 CHRIS REID AUCKLAND 111 750 MARTIN POULSEN AUCKLAND 112 684 PETER STANDRING DUNEDIN 127 705 GEOFF EVANS AUCKLAND 128 726 JAMIE TULLOCH CHRISTCHURCH 131 656 KIRK CHENEY WELLINGTON 132 615 PETER WILLIAMS CHRISTCHURCH 134 701 MIKE ROBERTSON CHRISTCHURCH 137 671 NEVILLE QUEEN CHRISTCHURCH 139 736 KEVIN O’GORMAN CHRISTCHURCH 143 683 IAIN MACKAY DUNEDIN 145 715 ALLAN CRAIG OAMARU 150 704 TOM PRYDE QUEENSTOWN 151 607 TIM WILKINSON AUCKLAND 158 731 GERALD COURT ASHHURST 162 754 GERARD GIBB WANAKA TEAMS TWO DAY VETERAN WOMEN (OVER 40) 135 654 ROSE CHAMBERS CHRISTCHURCH 148 732 JILL CUMMERFIELD PUKEKOHE 159 631 SHANNON CLARK CHRISTCHURCH 160 604 LYNDSAY GOUGH RANGIORA TEAMS TWO DAY MIXED 4 722 JILL WESTENRA WELLINGTON 13 761 DEAN FORD WELLINGTON 14 707 CAMERON DRURY NAPIER 17 612 SCOTT CHAPMAN CHRISTCHURCH 18 662 GRANT CHITTOCK CHRISTCHURCH 24 616 ANDREW HAMER NELSON 30 728 IAN GRAHAM CHRISTCHURCH 31 651 JESSICA MEYER RANGIORA 37 646 PETER LYELL AUCKLAND 48 669 MERV HONEYBONE CHRISTCHURCH 49 618 JIM SHERBORNE CHRISTCHURCH 53 626 JASON DAVIDSON HOKITIKA 55 757 NICOLA MACE WELLINGTON 56 658 JOHN RUSSELL AUCKLAND 57 638 BRUCE MCGREGOR CHRISTCHURCH 60 625 MATT DOHERTY CHRISTCHURCH 64 733 CHRIS DAVIES CHRISTCHURCH 67 688 DEREK CARLINE INVERCARGILL 71 660 MATTHEW LAWLOR BALCLUTHA 77 712 ZAHRA CHAMPION AUCKLAND 81 643 MURRAY GANE BLENHEIM 84 603 SHAUN BROOKES LINTON CAMP 91 721 JEFF WALKER WINTON 93 763 DAVID BENNISON CHRISTCHURCH 110 614 ANDREW BLAY CHRISTCHURCH

VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW

Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

2:12:23 2:08:38 2:07:17 2:10:45 2:22:27 2:27:06 2:34:29 2:22:03 2:26:52 2:26:52 2:32:27 2:21:54 2:44:58

161 139 125 146 196 212 227 194 211 210 223 193 235

7 5 4 6 10 13 15 9 12 11 14 8 16

5:06:57 4:55:28 5:35:49 5:47:00 6:25:44 6:09:10 6:32:33 6:53:34 7:26:06 7:26:07 8:00:21 8:53:54 8:39:15

68 52 114 127 171 156 175 193 211 212 222 236 231

4 3 6 7 9 8 10 11 12 13 14 16 15

5:40:24 5:55:20 5:30:31 5:26:49 5:40:13 5:56:39 5:51:12 5:40:03 5:38:18 6:12:24 7:11:28 6:48:13 6:44:51

131 176 92 81 129 177 163 126 120 209 239 237 233

2:30:10 2:34:58 2:21:59 2:19:01 2:26:13 2:49:57 2:42:18 2:45:51 2:41:07 2:29:51 3:13:27 2:55:56 3:01:55

152 173 112 95 135 212 189 198 185 148 238 222 227

8 9 4 3 6 13 11 12 10 7 16 14 15

15:29:53 15:34:23 15:35:36 15:43:34 16:54:36 17:22:51 17:40:30 17:41:29 18:12:21 18:35:13 20:57:41 20:59:56 21:10:58

107 108 109 118 163 179 188 189 201 207 234 235 236

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

Names 2

City / Country 2

Ev Sect Time

JONATHAN WYATT MIKE CAUSER SIMON YARRELL AARON CHAMBERS PATRICK SWEENEY PETER KING BENJAMIN NILSON EDWARD HOHEPA SCOTT GIBBONS MATTHEW FRICKER CAMERON LECKIE ANDREW BARKER MARK CLATWORTHY GREG LOW MIKE COHR DAVID CRANEFIELD PATRICK METHVEN JOHN MASEFIELD ALEX LEWIS GARY DEW RICHARD POLLOCK ANDREW TALLEY SAM KILKENNY DOUG FARGHER CRAIG SCOTT NICK SINCLAIR STEVE HARROP PHILIP LYNCH NEIL MCDOWALL JAMIE BUTLER

WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH OPUNAKE GREYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH HOKITIKA CHRISTCHURCH MOTUEKA PUKEKOHE WANAKA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND ASHBURTON WELLINGTON AUSTRALIA CHRISTCHURCH AKAROA AUCKLAND GREYMOUTH MOTUEKA NELSON CHRISTCHURCH UPPER HUTT OAKURA ASHBURTON OAMARU CHRISTCHURCH INVERCARGILL PAPAKURA

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

1:43:14 1:43:09 1:46:10 1:46:29 1:46:53 1:46:40 1:51:22 2:00:08 1:57:37 1:52:05 1:51:47 1:51:51 1:51:54 1:52:07 1:52:07 2:03:11 2:00:56 1:52:27 1:43:40 2:02:52 2:11:49 2:11:50 2:06:06 1:58:10 2:10:00 1:47:00 2:27:41 2:06:45 1:58:14 2:23:28

2 1 4 5 14 10 19 61 44 31 23 26 28 33 34 68 62 38 3 67 99 100 76 52 94 15 130 83 54 120

2 1 4 5 7 6 9 20 17 13 10 11 12 14 15 23 21 16 3 22 27 28 24 18 26 8 30 25 19 29

3:06:39 2:59:42 3:20:37 3:37:33 3:57:59 3:41:00 3:50:45 4:10:22 4:05:09 4:30:53 4:20:12 4:25:18 4:48:20 3:56:30 5:02:47 4:31:03 5:12:58 5:02:50 6:14:40 5:23:06 5:16:44 5:16:41 4:49:50 6:05:18 5:40:16 6:42:49 5:39:34 6:33:00 7:26:47 6:06:35

2 1 4 6 12 7 10 18 15 27 20 23 42 11 51 28 61 52 117 75 68 67 45 108 95 130 94 123 150 109

2 1 3 4 8 5 6 10 9 13 11 12 15 7 17 14 19 18 27 22 21 20 16 25 24 29 23 28 30 26

4:13:03 4:33:11 4:50:58 4:49:19 4:44:59 5:00:41 4:46:53 5:14:57 5:37:22 5:16:12 5:19:10 5:28:30 5:18:48 6:08:10 5:19:13 5:40:53 5:14:13 5:20:32 4:40:50 5:36:19 5:36:54 5:30:07 6:21:42 5:26:25 5:40:18 5:26:51 6:10:58 5:37:00 5:05:41 6:30:00

1 3 10 9 6 22 7 36 79 37 41 61 40 134 42 89 35 45 5 74 76 63 148 56 87 58 137 77 27 152

1 2 7 6 4 8 5 11 24 12 14 19 13 27 15 26 10 16 3 21 22 20 29 17 25 18 28 23 9 30

1:48:37 1:53:24 1:51:10 1:59:57 2:00:14 2:10:06 2:10:07 2:01:55 2:03:23 2:04:26 2:13:47 2:08:37 2:02:39 2:15:27 2:11:37 2:13:38 2:04:42 2:19:41 2:34:26 2:12:00 2:14:27 2:30:13 2:16:06 2:14:29 2:21:01 2:45:10 2:46:28 2:48:40 2:35:34 2:42:55

1 3 2 8 9 38 39 11 16 18 55 30 14 61 44 53 19 80 122 45 56 112 62 57 86 145 150 154 124 140

1 3 2 4 5 12 13 6 8 9 17 11 7 20 14 16 10 22 25 15 18 24 21 19 23 28 29 30 26 27

10:51:33 11:09:26 11:48:54 12:13:17 12:30:03 12:38:25 12:39:05 13:27:20 13:43:30 13:43:36 13:44:54 13:54:15 14:01:40 14:12:13 14:25:42 14:28:44 14:32:47 14:35:29 15:13:35 15:14:16 15:19:53 15:28:50 15:33:44 15:44:22 15:51:33 16:41:49 17:04:39 17:05:23 17:06:16 17:42:57

1 2 3 5 7 8 9 16 20 21 22 26 29 34 40 42 43 44 58 59 63 70 75 85 89 109 119 120 121 133

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

LYN WEEDON HILARY THOMPSON LISA KNOWLER JOANNA SMITH LISA ROBERTS JULIA STEVENSON PENNY SHAW ANNETTE GUERIN ANNABEL RITCHIE JANE BLAIR JENNIFER BROWN AMANDA WRIGHT ANNA KILONBACK AVIETTE MUSIN

WANAKA ASHBURTON RIVERTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH GREYMOUTH WELLINGTON INVERCARGILL GREYMOUTH CAMBRIDGE UNITED KINGDOM AUCKLAND

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

2:05:27 2:05:47 2:17:49 2:18:17 2:30:12 2:09:32 2:10:07 2:54:29 2:54:46 2:06:49 2:54:29 2:40:21 2:32:15 2:25:05

70 73 107 112 133 89 96 160 161 84 159 147 137 126

1 2 6 7 9 4 5 13 14 3 12 11 10 8

4:49:13 5:17:32 5:16:23 5:41:44 5:30:34 5:19:56 6:37:47 7:00:05 6:33:13 7:39:51 7:00:04 6:45:21 6:26:05 8:22:32

43 70 66 96 83 72 128 142 124 154 141 132 119 160

1 3 2 6 5 4 9 12 8 13 11 10 7 14

4:54:08 5:40:47 5:33:23 5:40:12 5:43:30 6:35:22 5:27:35 5:41:55 6:15:45 5:49:38 6:07:33 6:36:55 7:17:39 6:05:46

14 88 71 86 102 155 59 93 142 113 133 156 162 131

1 5 3 4 7 12 2 6 11 8 10 13 14 9

2:07:18 2:19:59 2:17:22 2:16:27 2:28:46 2:23:56 2:36:23 2:23:46 2:27:54 2:45:37 2:30:00 2:46:21 2:44:59 3:11:33

28 81 68 65 108 92 128 91 106 147 111 149 143 162

1 4 3 2 8 6 10 5 7 12 9 13 11 14

13:56:04 15:24:04 15:24:57 15:56:39 16:13:00 16:28:45 16:51:50 18:00:14 18:11:37 18:21:54 18:32:05 18:48:58 19:00:57 20:04:55

27 66 68 92 101 107 113 136 142 144 147 152 155 161

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

GRAHAM SINNAMON NIGEL MUIR BRUCE THOMSON GRAEME CROSSON ANDREW O’LOUGHLIN ANDREW SHELLING CHRIS WOOD DAN BENTLEY STEVE BELL JUAN TOLEDO PETER FOWLER JOHN HURFORD PATRICK PELLEY JOHN MONTGOMERY CRAIG PARK MARTIN CAHNBLEY NICK CARTER MURRAY KINSELLA PETER HOGAN JULES STEPHAN STEPHEN MOODIE PETER SHOESMITH STEWART CARRUTHERS DOUGLAS STEVENS PETER MONRO SANDY HAZLEDINE DAVID WELLS ROY NORRIS PETER NOTMAN ALISTER WILSON EVAN CUMMINS VICTOR WONG BILL ANDERSON STEVE SCURR

OTUREHUA AUSTRALIA WANAKA RANGIORA CHRISTCHURCH HELENSVILLE AUCKLAND QUEENSTOWN NELSON WAIUKU CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH UNITED STATES AUCKLAND AMERICA AUCKLAND ENGLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND DUNEDIN AUCKLAND AUCKLAND WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH WANAKA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND DUNEDIN OAMARU AUCKLAND AUCKLAND PALMERSTON NORTH WANAKA

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V

1:57:22 1:51:31 1:51:53 1:46:36 1:58:47 2:07:15 2:13:48 2:01:05 2:06:09 2:02:30 2:09:58 2:32:50 2:06:18 2:18:05 2:34:29 2:18:30 2:32:33 2:04:38 2:09:54 2:24:55 2:14:22 2:18:23 2:30:21 2:25:20 2:43:56 2:28:39 1:59:32 2:43:55 2:41:52 2:10:27 2:30:12 1:58:09 2:43:43 2:52:06

41 20 27 9 59 86 102 63 77 66 93 139 81 109 142 115 138 69 92 125 103 114 135 127 155 131 60 154 150 98 134 51 152 158

4 2 3 1 6 13 17 8 11 9 15 28 12 19 29 21 27 10 14 22 18 20 26 23 33 24 7 32 30 16 25 5 31 34

3:50:14 4:20:44 5:08:40 5:27:33 4:55:46 4:15:19 4:40:44 5:31:33 5:12:53 4:49:13 4:45:44 5:26:27 5:31:30 4:55:20 5:33:29 5:06:34 5:33:33 6:11:03 6:10:52 5:46:46 5:36:06 6:34:03 6:54:37 6:44:10 6:10:22 7:26:08 6:54:05 6:10:35 6:46:54 6:28:11 6:51:52 8:50:14 6:46:13 8:34:10

9 21 56 79 48 19 35 85 60 44 40 78 84 47 87 54 88 115 114 100 92 126 139 131 112 149 138 113 134 120 137 163 133 161

1 3 10 13 8 2 4 15 11 6 5 12 14 7 16 9 17 23 22 19 18 25 31 26 20 32 30 21 28 24 29 34 27 33

4:53:17 5:08:55 4:58:06 4:39:56 5:19:59 5:42:50 5:25:18 5:14:07 5:37:55 6:01:38 6:05:37 5:25:05 5:44:06 6:16:21 5:39:47 6:18:48 5:48:06 5:32:07 5:43:04 6:14:59 6:28:33 5:41:48 5:48:55 5:38:38 6:07:12 5:37:27 6:08:43 6:52:50 6:23:58 7:06:36 6:34:53 5:27:52 7:25:43 6:24:08

12 28 18 4 44 98 55 34 82 126 130 54 105 143 85 145 110 70 99 140 151 92 111 84 132 80 136 160 149 161 154 60 163 150

2 4 3 1 6 16 8 5 12 21 22 7 18 26 14 27 19 10 17 25 30 15 20 13 23 11 24 32 28 33 31 9 34 29

2:05:04 1:58:23 2:09:02 2:18:43 1:59:20 2:13:07 2:27:37 2:04:51 2:17:57 2:35:51 2:32:52 2:17:27 2:25:56 2:24:29 2:15:22 2:24:41 2:25:53 2:37:54 2:33:23 2:17:56 2:25:41 2:55:46 2:16:16 2:46:48 2:36:51 2:25:27 3:00:40 2:17:32 2:27:15 2:37:42 2:45:00 2:28:39 2:40:00 3:13:28

21 4 33 76 6 48 104 20 74 126 118 70 101 93 60 94 100 134 120 73 99 157 64 152 130 97 160 71 103 133 144 107 135 163

4 1 5 13 2 6 21 3 12 25 23 9 19 14 7 15 18 28 24 11 17 32 8 31 26 16 33 10 20 27 30 22 29 34

12:45:56 13:19:32 14:07:40 14:12:46 14:13:51 14:18:30 14:47:25 14:51:35 15:14:53 15:29:11 15:34:09 15:41:48 15:47:50 15:54:14 16:03:06 16:08:32 16:20:03 16:25:40 16:37:13 16:44:35 16:44:42 17:29:59 17:30:08 17:34:56 17:38:20 17:57:41 18:02:59 18:04:51 18:19:58 18:22:56 18:41:56 18:44:54 19:35:39 21:03:50

10 15 33 35 36 38 47 51 62 72 76 82 88 90 96 98 102 106 108 111 112 127 128 131 132 134 137 139 143 145 150 151 158 162

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

LYN GODSIFF RACHEAL DAVEY KAREN REID FIONA CHAN

KENEPURU SOUND ROTORUA CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH

T T T T

VW VW VW VW

2:42:42 2:40:59 2:45:40 2:36:31

151 149 156 143

3 2 4 1

6:50:52 7:00:54 7:32:07 8:11:06

136 144 151 159

1 2 3 4

5:51:37 6:19:06 6:18:54 6:11:23

116 147 146 138

1 4 3 2

2:33:58 2:36:33 3:00:36 2:46:18

121 129 159 148

1 2 4 3

17:59:07 18:37:32 19:37:16 19:45:17

135 148 159 160

1 2 3 4

MARK BEESLEY JAN HALES ANITA WILLIAMSON JASMIN PERCASKY TAMSIN CHITTOCK RACHEL THOMAS-LADLEY SUSSAN PIRIE-GRAHAM GEORGE MEYER MAUREEN LYELL TUI SUMMERS TRINA MARSHALL JOLENE SOARES LINCOLN JACKSON ALISON KNOWLES ROCHELLE LEWIS LAUREN KAVANAGH HELEN MAHON-STROUD KATE WATKINSON TERESA O’RIORDAN BILL TREMAYNE GEORGINA GANE LUCY BURT LENA LUBCKE JESSICA PATCHETT CHERIE HAY

AUCKLAND WELLINGTON MASTERTON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WAKEFIELD CHRISTCHURCH RANGIORA AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH RUNANGA WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH PALMERSTON NORTH CHRISTCHURCH INVERCARGILL IRELAND AUCKLAND BLENHEIM LINTON CAMP INVERCARGILL WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

1:51:48 1:47:22 1:46:42 1:52:19 1:51:55 1:47:05 1:51:48 2:05:52 1:58:11 2:01:13 1:57:50 1:51:45 1:58:25 2:15:31 1:58:20 1:57:34 1:58:06 1:47:12 1:57:15 2:23:11 2:05:45 1:51:56 2:23:50 1:46:33 2:05:50

25 18 11 36 29 16 24 75 53 65 46 22 58 105 56 43 49 17 40 118 71 30 121 6 74

8 5 2 11 9 3 7 23 17 20 14 6 19 27 18 13 15 4 12 29 21 10 31 1 22

3:20:05 4:05:40 4:37:17 4:32:58 4:35:06 4:39:48 5:02:41 4:25:34 4:42:03 5:15:47 5:11:07 5:31:57 5:15:53 4:54:40 5:12:19 5:48:21 5:29:58 5:38:52 5:24:10 4:43:09 6:04:25 5:54:10 5:36:05 6:03:45 7:03:25

3 16 32 30 31 34 50 24 36 63 58 86 64 46 59 101 82 93 76 38 107 102 91 106 145

1 2 6 4 5 7 11 3 8 14 12 18 15 10 13 21 17 20 16 9 25 22 19 24 30

4:49:00 5:02:34 4:31:50 4:55:17 4:59:52 5:12:59 5:02:08 5:26:46 5:21:23 5:20:52 5:21:00 5:13:13 5:43:32 5:43:11 5:44:45 5:19:17 5:31:49 5:41:29 5:31:49 6:15:14 5:17:54 5:36:12 5:37:10 5:43:14 5:20:43

8 25 2 16 19 31 23 57 50 48 49 33 103 100 106 43 68 90 69 141 39 73 78 101 46

2 6 1 3 4 7 5 15 14 12 13 8 25 23 27 10 16 21 17 32 9 18 19 24 11

2:02:11 2:09:45 2:11:16 2:07:36 2:06:19 2:07:03 2:05:58 2:06:13 2:13:32 2:12:05 2:20:09 2:19:40 2:08:47 2:13:16 2:13:44 2:09:11 2:20:29 2:17:17 2:35:50 2:13:10 2:12:58 2:20:06 2:17:25 2:27:05 2:13:12

13 36 43 29 24 27 22 23 52 46 83 79 31 51 54 34 84 67 125 49 47 82 69 102 50

1 9 10 6 4 5 2 3 16 11 22 20 7 15 17 8 23 18 30 13 12 21 19 25 14

12:03:03 13:05:20 13:07:05 13:28:09 13:33:10 13:46:54 14:02:34 14:04:25 14:15:08 14:49:56 14:50:05 14:56:33 15:06:36 15:06:38 15:09:07 15:14:22 15:20:20 15:24:49 15:29:04 15:34:43 15:41:02 15:42:24 15:54:28 16:00:35 16:43:09

4 13 14 17 18 24 30 31 37 48 49 53 55 56 57 60 64 67 71 77 81 84 91 93 110

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

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Photo by: Pauls Image Centre

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Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

Place No. Names 1

City / Country 1

Names 2

City / Country 2

Ev Sect Time

114 681 KEVIN EDGAR 116 670 MIKE JAMES 117 723 MURRAY LORD 138 740 STUART DICKINSON 140 602 PAUL FINNIGAN 141 720 PATRIC PFEIFER 146 666 BRIAN FREDRIC 149 665 KIERAN O’NEILL 154 673 JANE SCOTT TEAMS TWO DAY FAMILY 23 692 TOBY OSBORNE 25 608 GRANT JONES 32 632 IAN MCALPINE 39 636 NICK ROSS 41 711 TONY STRETCH 45 622 DON THOMPSON 50 753 GUY JOHNSTON 52 716 PETER BOURKE 61 641 DENIS WOODS 65 689 SERRA STEWART 69 652 GRAHAM EWING 73 601 MAX MAYER 78 747 BRIAN THOMPSON 79 648 IAN AUGUST 80 686 SIMON CRAIG 87 713 WILL GAGE-BROWN 95 756 NEIL YOUNG 97 687 DAVID SOAR 100 703 JOHN MILL 103 693 CLARE ROBERTS 104 610 PETER CLULOW 118 698 MICHAEL SNOOKES 122 659 SIMONE MOORS 123 700 BRIAN ELLWOOD 125 663 JEREMY LIVINGSTON 126 725 JEFFREY MOSEN 129 667 JOHN CLARK 130 605 GERRY BURGESS 153 647 CHRISTOPHER HADEN 163 637 CLARE MUTCH 755 RICHARD CLARK TEAMS TWO DAY CORPORATE 6 639 BRAD WILLIAMS 11 619 IAIN HARRISON 12 745 LEN SMYTH 19 621 GRAEME KING 28 674 DAVE MAITLAND 46 620 NICOLE FRANCE 54 738 MARK TAYLOR 74 719 CHRIS SMITH 83 717 BEN COOMBE 86 709 SIMON CARRODUS 94 685 ROBIN HUGHES 99 609 MARK ANDERSON 105 657 ROB WHITMORE 115 718 MARK BRAMWELL 124 714 MURRAY KIRKNESS 156 746 WERNER VAN HARSELAAR 157 737 GORDON DAGLISH

MOSGIEL CHRISTCHURCH UNITED STATES AUCKLAND ASHBURTON UNITED STATES CHRISTCHURCH INVERCARGILL CAMBRIDGE

KATE VERCOE JACQUI WILLIAMS HEATHER TOMMASI JESSIE KELLY MARIA BOLGER NICOLA BLACKLEY NICOLA ANDERSON LAURA THOMPSON GRAHAM SCOTT

DUNEDIN CHRISTCHURCH GREYMOUTH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND OAMARU AUSTRALIA CAMBRIDGE

T T T T T T T T T

X X X X X X X X X

2:18:09 2:07:59 2:23:20 2:27:34 1:58:08 2:06:16 2:06:09 2:30:26 3:01:14

111 87 119 129 50 79 78 136 162

28 26 30 32 16 25 24 33 34

5:59:11 6:42:17 6:09:57 6:57:23 7:50:18 7:35:41 7:52:55 7:09:15 6:47:08

104 129 111 140 157 153 158 146 135

23 27 26 29 33 32 34 31 28

6:04:39 5:43:35 5:42:42 6:08:39 5:51:01 5:49:06 5:37:37 6:18:16 6:33:51

129 104 96 135 114 112 81 144 153

30 26 22 31 29 28 20 33 34

2:30:26 2:23:13 2:44:30 2:31:07 2:27:54 2:37:38 2:46:29 2:40:16 2:34:58

113 89 142 116 105 132 151 137 123

27 24 33 28 26 31 34 32 29

16:52:25 16:57:04 17:00:29 18:04:43 18:07:19 18:08:41 18:23:10 18:38:12 18:57:10

114 116 117 138 140 141 146 149 154

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

HASTINGS CHRISTCHURCH BLENHEIM ASHBURTON ASHBURTON ALEXANDRA DUNEDIN AUCKLAND WINTON DIPTON CHRISTCHURCH EKETAHUNA CHRISTCHURCH SHANNON PUKEKOHE HAMILTON PUKEKOHE CAMBRIDGE CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH KAIAPOI AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND UNITED KINGDOM CAMBRIDGE

KEVIN OSBORNE DALE JONES CLARE MCALPINE CHARLES ROSS SAM STRETCH GLENN THOMPSON JOHN JOHNSTON HOLLY BOURKE HANNAH WOODS CHRIS STEWART SCOTT EWING HEATHER MAYER NICHOLAS THOMPSON HAMISH AUGUST ROB CRAIG ART GAGE-BROWN CASTELLE YOUNG HEATHER SIGNORINI CAMERON MILL HARRY ROBERTS TAMLIN CLULOW LOUISE GRAHAM CLAYTON MOORS JOHN MARSHALL DONNA MARRIS SUSAN BAMFIELD SUE CLARK CAMERON BURGESS CHRISTINA TER HAAR JULIA MUTCH ROBYN CLARK

HASTINGS CHRISTCHURCH BLENHEIM ASHBURTON ASHBURTON CHRISTCHURCH AUSTRALIA AUCKLAND WINTON DIPTON AUCKLAND EKETAHUNA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND PUKEKOHE HAMILTON PUKEKOHE CAMBRIDGE CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH KAIAPOI AUCKLAND AUCKLAND MARTON AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH CAMBRIDGE

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F

2:24:47 1:51:38 1:46:48 1:46:34 1:52:21 2:24:06 1:57:53 2:09:42 1:52:44 2:29:34 2:10:09 2:05:47 2:07:00 2:21:36 2:06:17 1:58:17 2:18:04 1:58:24 2:24:04 2:26:19 2:15:37 2:10:06 2:40:32 1:52:09 2:40:12 2:18:23 2:01:05 2:33:09 2:48:24 3:30:14 1:56:24

124 21 12 8 37 123 47 90 39 132 97 72 85 117 80 55 108 57 122 128 106 95 148 35 146 113 64 140 157 163 40

23 3 2 1 5 22 7 14 6 25 16 11 13 20 12 8 18 9 21 24 17 15 28 4 27 19 10 26 29 30 7

4:25:45 4:26:06 5:16:52 5:20:30 4:44:06 4:24:59 5:07:25 4:47:30 5:21:42 4:31:46 5:29:27 5:18:30 5:01:54 5:03:26 5:34:50 6:34:44 5:42:43 5:56:14 5:16:05 5:35:57 5:42:48 6:33:43 6:12:18 7:09:38 6:08:53 6:18:41 7:45:36 6:28:13 7:32:52 8:40:49

25 26 69 73 39 22 55 41 74 29 81 71 49 53 89 127 98 103 65 90 99 125 116 147 110 118 156 121 152 162

2 3 11 13 5 1 9 6 14 4 15 12 7 8 16 26 18 20 10 17 19 25 22 27 21 23 29 24 28 30

4:53:43 5:24:39 4:54:26 5:02:27 5:46:40 5:45:35 5:23:46 5:22:49 5:12:30 6:03:16 5:20:50 5:30:39 5:58:23 5:58:10 5:41:41 5:10:49 5:42:42 5:30:42 5:55:48 5:55:45 5:38:38 5:36:42 5:57:34 5:13:05 5:56:11 5:45:45 5:02:50 6:01:24 5:51:31 6:38:57

13 53 15 24 109 107 52 51 30 128 47 64 123 122 91 29 97 65 118 117 83 75 121 32 119 108 26 125 115 157

1 11 2 3 20 18 10 9 6 29 8 12 27 26 16 5 17 13 23 22 15 14 25 7 24 19 4 28 21 30

2:02:39 2:10:08 2:06:33 2:14:43 2:03:40 2:06:31 2:21:31 2:33:03 2:47:46 2:17:49 2:24:58 2:36:17 2:30:39 2:14:55 2:16:55 2:01:43 2:19:29 2:40:14 2:36:59 2:22:57 2:45:17 2:42:33 2:16:10 2:54:50 2:29:39 2:55:04 2:41:29 2:30:42 2:43:49 2:59:34

15 40 26 58 17 25 87 119 153 72 96 127 114 59 66 10 78 136 131 88 146 139 63 155 110 156 138 115 141 158

2 6 5 7 3 4 13 19 27 11 15 20 17 8 10 1 12 22 21 14 26 24 9 28 16 29 23 18 25 30

13:46:53 13:52:31 14:04:38 14:24:13 14:26:47 14:41:11 14:50:33 14:53:04 15:14:40 15:22:23 15:25:24 15:31:12 15:37:54 15:38:06 15:39:41 15:45:33 16:02:57 16:05:34 16:12:54 16:20:58 16:22:19 17:03:02 17:06:33 17:09:40 17:14:54 17:17:51 17:31:00 17:33:28 18:56:34 21:49:33

23 25 32 39 41 45 50 52 61 65 69 73 78 79 80 87 95 97 100 103 104 118 122 123 125 126 129 130 153 163

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH GREYMOUTH HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND MOMONA DUNEDIN AUCKLAND

STEVEN DINGWALL ANDREAS KACOFEGITIS STEPHEN MARK DEVERN BURCHETT PETER COCHRANE LISA NICHOLL GLEN TASKER GARRY COLEMAN ROD HIBBERD PETER NEALE JOHNNY EWEN JOHN BROOKES PETER COX COLIN GRAHAM PETER BRAAM EVAN MOORE ROB HOWARTH

CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH SPRINGSTON RANGIORA AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH GREYMOUTH HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND DUNEDIN DUNEDIN AUCKLAND

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO

1:46:34 1:46:51 2:09:27 1:57:45 1:57:59 2:13:14 1:52:05 2:09:42 2:38:35 1:57:32 2:14:31 2:33:11 2:06:31 2:21:18 2:18:05 2:39:48 2:43:49

7 13 88 45 48 101 32 91 144 42 104 141 82 116 110 145 153

1 2 8 5 6 10 3 9 15 4 11 14 7 13 12 16 17

3:34:31 4:01:35 3:46:27 4:04:55 4:42:05 4:39:47 5:27:38 5:14:32 4:08:54 5:25:53 6:00:03 5:10:37 6:31:19 5:42:13 7:00:07 7:17:39 7:43:48

5 13 8 14 37 33 80 62 17 77 105 57 122 97 143 148 155

1 3 2 4 7 6 11 9 5 10 13 8 14 12 15 16 17

5:00:24 5:00:07 4:55:45 5:30:45 4:52:45 5:42:18 5:30:46 5:42:39 6:44:22 6:02:41 5:28:50 6:01:13 5:17:30 6:39:27 5:34:00 5:56:39 6:13:20

21 20 17 66 11 94 67 95 159 127 62 124 38 158 72 120 139

4 3 2 7 1 10 8 11 17 14 6 13 5 16 9 12 15

1:59:56 2:02:10 1:59:11 2:08:52 2:23:25 2:09:46 2:09:22 2:25:33 2:10:13 2:18:41 2:19:02 2:24:48 2:29:00 2:11:11 2:20:32 3:10:48 2:31:09

7 12 5 32 90 37 35 98 41 75 77 95 109 42 85 161 117

2 3 1 4 12 6 5 14 7 9 10 13 15 8 11 17 16

12:21:24 12:50:42 12:50:49 13:42:15 13:56:12 14:45:04 14:59:50 15:32:24 15:42:03 15:44:46 16:02:26 16:09:48 16:24:19 16:54:08 17:12:43 19:04:53 19:12:06

6 11 12 19 28 46 54 74 83 86 94 99 105 115 124 156 157

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Speights Coast to Coast World Teams Challenge results in next issue of New Zealand Kayak magazine.

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Zahra Champion Photos by: Pauls Image Centre

Gordon Daglish

Pauls Camera Shop - Official photographer for Speights Coast to Coast. www.paulscamerashop.co.nz ISSUE TWENTY

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A Request for Your Help from the NZRCA and the Living Rivers Coalition

Press Releases Our rivers are under more pressure than ever before. Even when rivers have been given the equivalent status of a national park, a Water Conservation Order, it does not seem to be enough. There are many hydro schemes on the drawing boards, some of which (e.g., the Gowan River and Kaituna River) are unfortunately edging closer to reality. Also, the Government has proposed legislation that will potentially limit the ability of the NZRCA to oppose some projects.

a proven model - for many years the NZRCA has worked successfuly with Fish and Game and others to protect rivers such as the Mohaka, Rangitata, Buller and other rivers with Water Conservation Orders.

In response to this, the NZRCA recently joined Fish and Game, Forest and Bird and the Federated Mountain Clubs to form the Living Rivers Coalition (www.livingrivers.org.nz). It is a timely development - the need for a united front has never been stronger. The Coalition also builds on

The Living Rivers Coalition will launch its first campaign on 22 January, a signage campaign to highlight the unhealthy state of many of our rivers. We are hoping that this campaign will raise politicians’ and the general public’s awareness of the importance of ‘living rivers’ whether it is for

What’s On 2005 NATIONAL KASK FORUM Cobham Outward Bound School, Anakiwa, Marlborough Sounds. Midday Friday 25 - midday Monday 28 March, Easter weekend 2005. The forum is based in an ideal location at Anikiwa with beautiful bush and directly on the foreshore of Queen Charlotte Sound. Accommodation is in spacious bunkrooms. Guest speaker David Winkworth will be talking of his paddling trips in tropical Australia. David was awarded a bravery medal for his rescue of

The Coalition was launched on Wednesday 15 December. Hugh Canard, the NZRCA’s patron, gave a witty and poignant speech at the media launch - it’s well worth a read (www.rivers.org.nz/article).

kayaking, fishing, to preserve biodiversity or scenic beauty. As part of the NZRCA’s commitment to the Coalition, we are asking NZRCA-affiliated clubs and/or individual members to volunteer to be contacts or helpers for Living Rivers Coalition campaigns (including a campaign to save the Gowan River, protected only two years ago as part of the Buller Water Conservation Order). Please provide Alan Bell, the NZRCA’s membership officer (membership@rivers,org.nz), with your contact details if you or your club are prepared to help. If you have any questions on the Coalition and NZRCA’s involvement please contact the North Island Conservation Officer, Duncan Catanach, on niconservation@rivers.org.nz or 027-293-7014.

his fellow paddler from a large crocodile off the North Queensland coast.

Yakity Yak Trip

New Zealand experts on navigation, tidal and sea conditions will be giving workshops.

Hawke’s Bay Yakity Yak Easter trip to Mahurangi 25th - 27th March. Three day paddle staying on the Islands around the Mahurangi area. We would love to have some Yakity Yak Paddlers from other areas join us.

The annual forum is a great opportunity to take part in practical and theoretical sea kayak training opportunities, such as paddling skills and rescue techniques. And a great chance to see and share ideas on equipment and try out a range of sea kayaks. An overnight camp out paddle to Mistletoe Bay is planned for the Sunday night. For more information see www.kask.co.nz

Contact: Steve, Canoe & Kayak, Hawke’s Bay 15 Niven St, Onekawa, Napier. Ph: 06 842 1305 Fax: 06 842 1306

2005 New Zealand National Kayak Marathon Championships

9th and 10th April on the Wairoa River, Bethlehem, Tauranga, New Zealand.

For further information, Contact Phill Exeter, CRNZ Marathon Director - Phone/fax (09) 834 8393, (021) 134 5161, Email pelex@xtra.co.nz

Emergency Outdoors Care The Taupo and Hawke’s Bay Yakity Yak trip leaders attended a course on first aid in the outdoors over two days in Taupo. Peak Risk Management ran the course. The instructor for the weekend was Mark (Buggie) Woods. Arriving on Saturday we were thrown straight into a simulated accident near the river. As yet none of us knew each other. We were suddenly told to treat the victims. Mark had arranged them with good imitation wounds such as bones sticking out of legs and stomachs hanging out. All of us had a little first aid training, but we were to learn accident site management over the next couple of days. Buggie showing how to look after a back injury.

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The course was very good. Everyone interacted well. Some shared explicit details of accidents they have had, or attended. We got to watch videos with lots of blood. We are all expert now on carrying out a ruptured spleen operation using our river knives and a needle with thread. Any volunteer patients out there? For two days we had classroom work with outdoor simulations. We learned everything from vital signs, CPR, fractures, head injuries to spine injuries and dislocations. The Taupo and Hawke’s Bay Yakity Yak kayak club members can now feel completely safe when paddling with their trip leaders, knowing they have the knowledge to treat and manage most injuries until help arrives.


Book Review

HELL OR HIGH WATER

Surviving Tibet’s Tsangpo River

by Peter Heller

If you like action, adventure and ‘tell it like it is’ stories this book is for you even if you are not a white water junkie.

boat back to the right, aimed it straight down the river’s throat, and dug in.”

The style is edge of your seat cinema graphic stuff: the reader gets to experience the excitement, get the pace, and feel the tension. It is very descriptive, and even a nonkayaking adventurer would get a clear picture of what’s going on, and wait, heart in mouth to see what happens next.

Paddling is only half the story: they were forced to traverse a terrifyingly steep mountain pass of snow and ice with their kayaks on their backs; haggle and argue with corrupt officials; stare downs violent, mutinous porters.

Reach for an atlas and you’ll see that the Tsangpo gorge is in Mt Everest country. It cuts through the eastern end of the Himalayas to form the deepest, most remote river canyon on earth. Led by filmmaker Scott Lindgren in February and March (that’s in winter!) 2002, seven of the world’s top expeditionary kayakers paddled the furious currents and into the throat of the gorge. They survived. It is obvious that author Peter Heller is himself a top-notch paddler - he uses his own experiences to shed light on the techniques, talent and skills of these international river ‘cowboys’ and gives us ringside seats. “Johnnie rolled up, slammed into the seething white pile of the next wave and disappeared. He was spat out the other side and rolled up again, terrified...Willie was cutting the air wildly, both arms up and straight, palms facing, frantically mouthing the word CENTRE!...Johnnie growled, spun his

MAGIC

His writing also conveys the beauty, and captures the ballet of the paddler’s movements; the grace, poise and precision and applauds it. “When they all glide out into the glacial milk green of the final pool, they are in sync, like a bluegrass band...the paddlers have moved beyond athleticism, risk, discipline and sport into something rare and fine.”

Interspersed with the account of the thirty-seven day epic, there are linking stories of explorers and naturalists of the past, and campfire philosophy. “Modern-day adventurers do much of what they do in creation of story. The tales pour out at the fire; they are savored and added to. One man’s episode becomes part of another’s repertoire, and the stories multiply and intertwine. It seems a wonderful, archaic way to live. Who lives like that anymore? Hollywood subsumes more and more of that part of our consciousness and lures us into the gray smog of routine, of consuming and producing, of a mass-produced narrative. We need adventures to create new, vibrant stories. It’s the blood of our humanity.” The only aspect of the book I felt uncomfortable with and question its necessity was the in-house arguments and ‘tittle tattle.’ The author obviously did not believe in the ‘what goes on tour, stays on tour’ philosophy. A map, photographs of the boys, and some of the action would be the only additions I’d like to see. Perhaps I’ll have to see Scott Lindgren’s movie. All up, I’d like to read the book again. It must be good. Published by Allen & Unwin RRP $35 Ruth E. Henderson

by Lou Farrand I found a way to beat the rain. it happened yesterday. it was raining like the devil when I launched to have a play.

Alas it didn’t last for long, this morning’s wet and cold. Please God can we have some more, before I’m too damn old.

As if by devine magic, the rain, it did retreat. this great big ball appeared on high generating heat!!!

They speak of global warming. which globe is thus affected? surely not the one I’m on more like, ‘’Ice age is expected.’’

I’m not quite sure what it was. could it have been the sun? I vaguely recollect seeing it waaaaaaaay back when I was young.

I’m know the rain will ease off soon it’s waiting for the day when heaps of us go kayaking and scare the stuff away.

Photo by David Russell

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S E A K AYA K I N G

Campsite Hopping Whitianga to Opotiki Trips are memorable for many reasons - campsites can leave memories that last longer than those of actual paddling. On this trip we enjoyed some fascinating locations - especially sweet when taken in secret in the midst of an unaware public. John and I left Whitianga’s Buffalo Beach midafternoon after a long drive from Gisborne. We had a couple of hours of easy paddling in empty boats past the scenic Cook’s beach, rocky coastline and the popular Cathedral Cove. At Hahei motor camp we were reunited with John’s wife Lynn and all our gear and food. We were lucky to catch the toasted sandwich place just before it closed. There are not a lot of takeaway food options at Hahei.

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand

KASK publishes a 146 page sea kayaking handbook which is free to new members: the handbook contains all you need to know about sea kayaking: techniques and skills, resources, equipment, places to go etc. KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/ equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums.

Website: www.kask.co.nz Annual subscription is $25.00.

Kask PO Box 23 Runanga 7854 West Coast

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Next morning saw the start of the trip proper. We had 260 Km to go and I was feeling only moderately confident that we would get there. Pre trip enquiries with local paddlers indicated a scarcity of good landings/campsites. Warnings about the Bowentown bar at the northern entrance to Tauranga Harbour foretold a challenge. We launched from Hahei into a moderate swell, no wind, and blue skies. Great. The morning was serendipity with rocky cliffs, coves, islands and an awesome cave/blowhole. Our digital cameras worked overtime. We paddled on past Hot Water beach without landing, as the surf was biggish and dumping. More cliffs followed, then lunchtime saw us at the very appealing Boat Harbour. It is only accessible by sea; has a small sandy beach and moored boats. There was much activity in the ocean, with big schools of fish engaging in mysterious and frenzied antics, plus flocks of birds sitting on the water or flying past. In the afternoon we passed the suburbia of Tairua Harbour and Pauanui area, a contrast to Opoutere Beach and its beautiful long sandy expanse, where we landed. Finding campsite number two was the next item on the agenda. Behind the beach rose a bank and then sand hills covered with scrubby bush. Oblique enquiries indicated a DOC antipathy to camping because of nesting birdlife. We turned down an offer from an ‘alternative’ group of people in a big permanent camp to join them. Our preferred option was to surreptitiously drag the kayaks up the bank and into the scrub, smoothing out the drag marks of our kayaks behind us. There we pitched our tents, unseen in some bushes. A beautiful evening and a still night with only the sound of the surf made us glad to be there. Morning brought a bit of a shock. The moderate surf was now BIG and impressive. We studied it with care. John thought he saw a way through between ‘lulls’. I considered time and distance between wave sets and saw probable carnage. After packing up we decided on a risk reduction strategy and dragged the kayaks a kilometre up the beach where the surf seemed a bit smaller. Even using a set of wheels this was exhausting. Time to commit: John launched. After a few near

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misses he was through. I was a bit behind and got creamed by a big wave that surfed me backwards and over. A frustrating series of false starts followed. Waves swept up the beach behind my beached kayak and swung me round. I had to get out, straighten the kayak, get back in, reset the spray skirt etc. Finally I got off the sand but then had to maintain position in the white water waiting for a lull in the big sets. It took ages but finally I got through. The morning was lovely and fine. We enjoyed the boost of a big following swell to Whangamata. Here the surfers were out in force but looked very small on the big wave faces. Our information was that the beaches further south had dumping surf so we decided on an early stop for the day hoping for a dropping swell. Entry into the Whangamata Harbour was interesting, sneaking between the big beach break and Te Karaka Point. Inside the harbour we pondered the options for Campsite no.3. The motor camp was apparently across town - no good to kayakers. There was a very appealing area of land just beside the harbour on the northern side - a quick kayak carry and we were hidden away just metres from the moored boats. With great satisfaction we spent the afternoon lazing in the sun in our hideaway. Next morning the swell was still big but had dropped. We paddled out of the Harbour and down the coast past Whitiroa to lunch at Mataora bay. This has to be the most beautiful bay I have ever seen. It is just gorgeous. A walk up a grassy hill opened up views that gobbled up lots of memory space on the cameras. Back on the water, we noted less fish and bird life, while the coastline progressively lost some of its beauty to become ho hum. As we neared Waihi Beach on a biggish following swell our landing options were not particularly attractive. Surf pounded the beach and a distant area of white marked the Bowentown bar and the northern entrance to Tauranga Harbour. There was a Surf Lifesaving Club and heaps of people on the beach near the bar. We imagined their comments as our kayaks got closer to the impact area. It was really difficult to evaluate. We adopted a paddle-stop-look-paddle strategy working our way further into the bar area with breaking waves all around us. We had decided to paddle the inside of the


Mataroa Bay

Big Surf Ohui

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harbour rather than outside Matakana Island so when we got to a point opposite the entrance we headed in. A few bigger waves made us backpaddle to avoid disaster and then it was a big push through the entrance against the strong outgoing tide. We ferry glided across the current, landed on the Island, relieved to have made it. Finding campsite no.4 was the next issue. Stories of night-time vigilante patrols in 4WD’s made us wary of camping on the Island. Churned up wheel tracks added to our unease, so we left the island and paddled towards the back of the harbour looking for a likely spot. Fosicking around along a muddy shore we found a great site hidden under some trees. It even had a barnacle-covered bath for John to pose in. The evening was suffused with the satisfaction of completing a challenging day. Although we made an early morning start to reach the middle of the harbour at high tide and avoid a long drag over the mud, it was still a challenge to find channels of water deep enough to paddle. We kept close to Matakana Island and only had to drag the kayaks for about 20 metres. Huge flocks of black swans flew up as we approached them. By mid-afternoon we were at the Tauranga end passing through the busy harbour entrance on bouncy water, trying to keep out of the way of boats powering through.

Once around Mt Maunganui we landed. People and High Rise Buildings persuaded us that the motor camp was not our scene. We re-launched! Surf at the beach meant we had to take care not to amuse the watching crowd. The beach stretched into the far distance with flat country behind and signalled a change of landscape for the rest of the trip. By the time we got to Papamoa Beach my back was cramping up. John was fine. He had spent most of the day with his sail up watching me paddle.

When we finally spotted vehicles we moved closer to look for campsite no.6.

Campsite no.5 was the suburbia of the Papamoa motor camp. While we set up our tents a dragon lady approached to set us straight on our camping responsibilities and the physical boundaries of our site. I assumed she was camp staff and adopted a compliant attitude, but John had seen her come out of a nearby caravan and his bristles rose.

Next day we experienced ugly ‘beaches’ and the black outflow of the Tarawera River (thanks to the Kawarau timber mill). Lunch was at a featureless beach near Thornton and the Rangitaiki River outlet. But the takeaways were good. Onward to Whakatane, where I called up the local Coastguard who could not see us among the swells, even when I described where we were. (Throughout the trip I kept in VHF radio contact with local Coastguard operators, giving them morning and evening updates of our progress, and found them to be unfailingly interested and helpful.)

That night we gorged on steaks at the local food bar. Next day the coastline extended in an unbroken line into the distance. Lunch was at Newdick’s beach just around the Town Point from Maketu. Getting around the Point and onto the beach took concentration. The beach was steep with dumping surf. The coastline from here was away from the road and made it difficult to assess where we were.

Ohui Sunset

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I saw a promising spot and suggested John land to investigate - there was no point in both of us getting trashed by the surf. As John paddled in I was bemused to see a TRAIN pass right through my imagined campsite. It was surreal. A bit further up the beach we landed and set up camp amongst sand hills and huge lupin bushes. Large rabbit holes abounded, and there was a mysterious railway building with a sign ‘Hauone’.

Campsite no.7 was a cove just around Kohi Point, between Whakatane and Ohope Beach. This is a lovely spot but also a very popular destination via a walking track from Ohope Beach. In the late afternoon we sat on the beach trying to look like


day paddlers but soon got bored and set up our tents. A vigilant local from a cliff top home promptly arrived to do his duty and tell us we were in a no camping DOC reserve. I regaled him with tales of Tramping Club ethics of zero impact camping and he finally, reluctantly left. That evening was particularly beautiful. Day 8 saw us paddling in mirror calm sea conditions, although an extra large wave at 15 minute intervals kept us from straying too close to shore. Approaching the breaking waves at the Waioeka River bar off Opotiki, John woke himself up by paddling through the middle of it. I didn’t

need the drama and went around. John periodically disappeared amongst the breaking waves but got through unscathed. He usually does. We landed just past the bar, with intentions of a campsite and a short last day to Opape, but decided that re-launching in the morning would be a problem if the surf got any bigger overnight. We carried on. The last 10 Km along the beach to Opape took most of our remaining energy, but the feeling of satisfaction when we hit the sand and completed our trip was something money could not buy. Our arrival completed a journey between

Gisborne and Auckland spread over the last three summers. Campsite no. 8 was at the Opape motor camp in a grassy paddock with few trees and campers. It was a million times more appealing than the one at Papamoa. The next morning our wives drove up to take us home. We left in a rosy after-glow, which is still there when I reflect on the great time we had. Photos by John Humphris and Mike Scanlan.

• No drainage hole • Strenghtening under flange • Only 3 rivets for mounting, less holes in your kayak • Fits Great Stuff safety flag DON’T SETTLE FOR LESS Bay of Plenty Beach

Available at all good Kayak stores email: greatstuff@graphics.co.nz

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BE SEEN ON THE HIGH SEAS SAFETY FLAGS A real recognized risk while enjoying your kayaking is a collision with a larger vessel. The Safety Flag will increase your visibility to other craft extensively. BE SEEN AND BE SAFE. Check out this latest design that simply plug into a rod holder. $49.95 (including rod holder) RRP

PERFORMANCE EYEWEAR AT AFFORDABLE PRICES Optic Nerve is the latest in sports eyewear now available through Canoe & Kayak and other leading sports retailers nationwide. A market leader already in the US, Optic Nerve is set to revolutionise the eyewear industry in NZ Finally, performance sports eyewear at affordable prices. The range includes styles for everyone from the serious athlete to the casual participant (and the ones watching). Polarised goggles and interchangeable styles that come with 3 different lens tints and a hard case plus a big range of polarized and general sports eyewear. All models have 100% UV protection, durable polycarbonate lenses with focal point technology and guaranteed optical clarity - all for $99 - $139!

WHEELS FOR YOUR KAYAK Make life easy with this essential addition to your kayak. The Canoe & Kayak Trollies are made of stainless steel so they don’t rust. Wide wheels - they don’t sink in the sand & a dinky little stand to make loading your kayak, the kids & your fishing gear on the trolly real easy.

Axis Goggle Polarised $139.95 RRP

BLACK RHINO DECK KAYAK TROLLY $249 RRP

Just out from Rasdex, these black Rhino Decks are the perfect choice for any colour kayak. $169 RRP

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HEAVY DUTY KAYAK TROLLY $349 RRP


n i W

an ESCAPADE Kayak valued at $910 Name: Email: Address:

For more information on any of these kayaks or equipment - fill in the form and receive an information pack and Go in the Draw to WIN....

Phone: Please send me information on: Send form to: WIN A KAYAK; New Zealand Kayak Magazine, 7/28 Anvil Rd, Silverdale or phone (09) 421 0662.

Prize drawn on 31 March 2005

NEW ZEALAND KAYAK MAGAZINE’S BUYERS GUIDE RECREATIONAL AND SIT-ON-TOP KAYAKS

SPECIFICATION Weight: Width: Length: Price:

SPECIFICATION

KAYAKS

34 kg 83 cm 4.70m From $1349

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

17 kg 68 cm 2.8 m $819

ACADIA 470 A great fun family boat with plenty of free board allowing for

ACADIA 280 A light easy to use family kayak. Enjoyable paddling for the

a heavy load. Excellent for sheltered water exploring. Paddles quickly and has excellent stability. Dry storage compartment.

whole family in sheltered waters.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

21.77 kg 597 mm 5.046 m From $1995

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

23.5 kg 62 cm 4.5m $1360

EXPEDITION is designed to go fast. It is built to accelerate quickly and get

SWIFT The swift is an easy handling and stable sit-on-top, with a hull

to its top speed in a short period of time. This boat has lots of storage and is ideal for any paddler interested in performance touring, sea kayaking and long distance cruising.

shape similar to that of a sit-in kayak to give it greater speed. The standard Swift comes rigged with a rudder and storage compartments, making it the ideal craft for those longer trips or a day out fishing beyond the breakers.

Weight: 22.68 kg Width: 711 mm Length: 4.55 m Price: $1195 (x A hatch and tank straps incl.)

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

27 kg 750 mm 3.46 m $910

TOURER This kayak has it all, even an adjustable leg length rudder

ESCAPADE Great general purpose kayak for fishing, diving and having

system. The low profile hull of the Cobra Tourer cuts down on windage, enabling paddlers to maintain high speed and straight tracking with easy handling in all conditions. The integrated keel provides stability and efficiency.

fun in the sun.

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We have many more kayaks available so please ask if you cannot see what you want.

RECREATIONAL AND SIT-ON-TOP KAYAKS

SPECIFICATION Weight: Width: Length: Price:

18.18 kg 790 mm 3.43 m From $895

THE EXPLORER is ideal for fishing, surfing and exploring and one of the driest ‘Sit-ons’ you will find. Great hatches for storing your goodies Weight: Width: Length: Price:

KAYAKS

We recommend that everybody who uses a kayak should participate in a training course. This will ensure your enjoyment and safety. Ask at your nearest kayak shop.

25.90 kg 915 mm 3.81 m From $1095

THE TANDEM ‘two person’ is ideal for fishing, surfing and exploring with great hatches for storing your adventure equipment. Now available with three person option. It is often used by one person. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

17.27 kg 710 mm 3.10 m From $649

SPECIFICATION

Weight: 25.85 kg Width: 914 mm Length: 3.81 m Price: From $995 (hatches & accessories not included)

FISH ‘N DIVE The ultimate fishing/diving kayak. A large well is located in the stern and holds up to three tanks. There is one centrally located seat and a smaller companion seat near the bow. It can also be fitted with an optional motor bracket for an electric trolling or small outboard engine. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

15 kg 780 mm 2.7m $469

THE PLAY is great for the paddler who wants a fun fast surf and flat water kayak. Kids love this Sit-on as it is not too wide for them to paddle and yet very stable. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

34 kg 840 mm 4.75 m $1459

SQUIRT A Sit-on-Top for the family. Able to seat an adult and a small child. It is easy to paddle and is very stable. Easily carried by one adult or two kids.

Weight: Width: Length Price:

SWING 470 PLUS A fantastic two person cruising kayak which is stable

23 kg 750 mm 3.3 m $770

and fast. It has plenty of storage and great features to make your adventures fun.

ESCAPEE Probably the closest you will come to finding one kayak that Weight: Width: Length: Price:

25 kg 780 mm 4.01 m $1039

SWING 400 PLUS Flat water cruising, well appointed with gear storage inside. Also includes an optional extra pod that detaches, which is great for carrying your fishing gear to your favourite spot. The pod can also be used as a seat. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

does it all. Surfing, fishing, snorkelling. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

22.7 kg 810 mm 3.12 m $889

TORRENT FREEDOM Great for the surf and the river with awesome manoeuvrability. Excellent finish.

14 kg 700 mm 3m $710

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

32 kg 830 mm 4.2 m $1160

SPRITE ONE A kayak for the family, able to seat an adult and child. Easy paddling, adjustable seat back and clip down hand grabs, paddles well in a straight line and is very stable. Suits flat water conditions.

DELTA DOUBLE Fun for the whole family at the beach or lake. Plenty of room and great stability.

Please note that all prices are subject to change without notice. Accessories and hatches as pictured may not be included in price.

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We have many more kayaks available so please ask if you cannot see what you want.

RECREATIONAL AND SIT-ON-TOP KAYAKS

SPECIFICATION Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

21kg 770 mm 2.5 m $630

WHIZZ A great multi-purpose family boat for big kids and small kids alike. Lots of fun this summer at the beach. (Hot surfer!) Weight: Width: Length: Price:

SPECIFICATION

KAYAKS

17.2 kg 736 mm 2.9 m $819

36.36 kg 915 mm 5.03 m From $1295

THE TRIPLE is an excellent performing family Sit-on. The centre seat area is dry with heaps of room so the kids can move and fidget without causing the adults any concern. The centre space also allows for storage of heaps of camping equipment. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

MINNOW Small, light, easy to paddle fun for the whole family. Suitable

32 kg 820 mm 4.5 m From $1170 to $1590

for all ages. Suits flat water conditions.

SPRITE TWO Two person cruiser, comes with dry gear storage. Fast, Weight: Width: Length: Price:

16 kg 685 mm 2.92 m $795

COBRA STRIKE A Wave Ski which the whole family can enjoy. Fantastic in the surf, it‘s a fast and manoeuvrable sit-on-top.

stable and easy to use. Adjustable back rest. Suits flat water conditions. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

20 kg 710 mm 2.98 m $849

Five O Amazing surf sit on top fun and agile and performance orientated.

LAKE AND SEA KAYAKS Weight: Width: Length: Price:

35 kg 800 mm 4.87 m $2579

CONTOUR 490 This double Sea Kayak is an ideal day tourer with the easy ability to do those weekend camping expeditions. It handles well, is fun to paddle and has well appointed accessories. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Weight: Width: Length: Price: Tourer Expedition

45 kg 760 mm 5.64 m $3379

ECO NIIZH 565 XLT This upgraded model is proving a hit with its new lighter weight and some excellent features. We now have a plastic double sea kayak that is great to use for all those amazing expeditions and adventures. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Your height, weight and paddling ability will affect the type of kayak best suited for your needs. Ask for advice at your specialist kayak shop. 20 kg 675 mm 3.7 m $1229 $1429

ACADIA 370 Flat water cruising, well appointed, a nifty adjustable backrest, an access hatch in the back which is great for carrying your extra gear.

27 kg 62 cm 480cm $2039

Weight: Width: Length: Basic Excel Excel lightweight

Std 22kg 610 mm 4.4 m $1410 $1750 $1920

CONTOUR 480 Is a roomy, manoeuvrable, easy to handle boat. A

TUI EXCEL A versatile touring kayak for lake, river and sea. Stability,

channelled hull provides outstanding tracking that helps keep you on course. Its upswept, flared bow makes crossing rough water a breeze.

speed and easy tracking enable an enjoyable day’s paddling. A larger cockpit allows for easier entry and exit.

Please note that all prices are subject to change without notice. Accessories and hatches as pictured may not be included in price.

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We have many more kayaks available so please ask if you cannot see what you want.

LAKE AND SEA KAYAKS SPECIFICATION

KAYAKS

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

KAYAKS

Weight: Width: Length: Price: Lightweight

28 kg 610 mm 4.85 m $2199

ECO IPIZO 490 The ECO IPIZO 490 is a truly modern kayak that is as unique as they come. A small keel ridge that runs the length of the hull, plus a raked stern adds several inches to the waterline, this translates into speed, efficiency and superb tracking. A fast sheltered water sea kayak. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

SPECIFICATION 27 kg 610 mm 5.3 m $2550 $2820

TASMAN EXPRESS Responds to rough conditions. Its low profile and flared bow enable it to perform well in adverse conditions. It is designed to give the paddler maximum comfort, with adjustable footrests, backrest, side seat supports and optional thigh brace.

22 kg 610 mm 5.3 m $3980

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Std 26 kg 590 mm 5.4 m $2559

TASMAN EXPRESS KEVLAR As per the plastic model, the kevlar Tasman Express responds to rough conditions but its decreased weight, and increased stiffness, gives even better performance. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Width: Length: Price:

storage, great features and the most comfortable seat your butt will ever meet.

26kg 640mm 4.5 m $1889

CONTOUR 450 This kayak is designed for day tripping and light overnight expeditions. It’s great fun to paddle and handles easily. Weight:

ECOBEZHIG 540 An enjoyable sea kayak, fast and nimble with huge

23kg kevlar/carbon 600 mm 5.6 m $4110 Kevlar

Weight: Width: Length: Price: Lightweight

25 kg 610 mm 4.8 m $2250 $2520

PENGUIN Has all the features for multi-day kayaking with ease of handling in all weather conditions. With great manoeuvrability this kayak is suitable for paddlers from beginner to advanced. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

22kg 600 mm 5.4 m $3960 Kevlar

TORRES A fast and stable sea kayak capable of handling the extreme expeditions. Huge storage and lots of leg room.

SOUTHERN SKUA Fast, stable sea kayak. Great in the rough and in the wind. Well appointed for expedition and day trips. Weight: 22kg Width: 590 mm Length: 5m Price: $3110 (Freight charges may apply)

CHALLENGE 5 Slightly larger volume than the Sequel and lighter at 22kg. A fast and stable touring sea kayak well appointed and featuring a great rudder/steering system.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

34kg 820 mm 4.5 m $1690

WANDERER EXCEL A stable fun kayak which is easy to handle. This is an enjoyable kayak for all the family.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

26kg 580 mm 4.93 m $2099 North Island $2195 South Island

SEQUEL Fast, light, touring kayak suits beginners through to advanced paddlers. The hull design allows for great handling in rough water. Well appointed and ideally suitable for multisport training.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

BREEZE Fully appointed sea kayak. Light weight and agile with a long waterline giving good speed in a smaller sea kayak. Designed with the lighter paddler in mind. Suitable for day or overnight trips. Fun in a compact package.

Please note that all prices are subject to change without notice. Accessories and hatches as pictured may not be included in price.

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22kg 600 mm 4.5 m $1785 North Island $1903 South Island


We have many more kayaks available so please ask if you cannot see what you want.

MULTI SPORT AND RACING SEA KAYAKS KAYAKS

SPECIFICATION Weight: Width: Length: Price:

11kg 450mm 5.65m $2995

REBEL This new fast funky Ruahine Kayak is designed for the smaller paddler in the 50 to 70kg range. It is 5.65 metres long, which is half way between the length of the Swallow and the Opus and it has a maximum beam of 450mm. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

16.5 kg 500mm 6.4 m $3495 kevlar & carbon $2995 fibreglass

OCEAN X This Racing Sea Kayak was designed specifically for the “Length of New Zealand Race” and built around the safety criteria drawn up for that race. The Ocean X is also very suitable for kayak racing in the many harbours, estuaries and lakes of New Zealand and lends itself well to the kayak sections of many multisport races.

12.5 kg 450mm 5.89m $2995

OPUS This kayak is for the competitive multisporter who has mastered the mid range kayaks like the Swallow and is paddling the river with skill and enjoyment. Advanced paddling ability is required to enjoy racing this Kayak. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

SPECIFICATION

KAYAKS

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

14.5 kg 540 mm 4.94m $2295

INTRIGUE This kayak is ideal for the beginner kayaker who is looking for a quick, light kayak with great stability.

12 kg 480mm 5.4 m $2795

Weight:

Length: Price:

SWALLOW The next step up from the entry level kayaks. Fast with good

13.5 kg Kevlar 12 kg Carbon / Kevlar 6.2 m $3095 Kevlar $3295 Carbon / Kevlar

stability. Medium skill ability is required to enjoy racing this kayak.

F1 This innovative new multisport kayak is designed for the advanced and Weight: 16.5 kg to 19 kg depending on construction Width: 510 mm Length: 6.43 m Price: $2980 - $3330 depending on construction

elite paddler. This radical kayak is fast with considerable secondary stability and is fitted with our new “bikini” seat. It will accelerate with ease, cutting wave trains and eliminating rocking.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

MAXIMUS Fast ocean going Racing Sea Kayak. The broad bow allows this kayak to ride over waves like a surf ski without losing any speed and is easy to control while surfing. A low profile reduces buffeting by the wind in adverse conditions.

19.09 kg 585 mm 5.03 m $1495

THE ELIMINATOR is a fast stable racing Weight: Weight:

26 26kg kg Glass Kevlar/Carbon 24kg Kevlar Width: 550mm Width: 550 mm Length: 7m Length: 7m Price: $4995 Price: $4995Glass - $5495 $5495 depending on construction Kevlar/Carbon

ADVENTURE DUET This lightweight, very fast and recently updated Adventure Racing double kayak continues to dominate adventure racing in NZ and is very suitable as a recreational double.

and training ‘Sit -on’. It has an adjustable dry seat and a cool draining system. Ideal for the paddler wanting a good fitness work out.

Give your specialist kayak shop a call and talk to one of our friendly team to help choose the best kayak for you.

Easy finance available. Conditions and booking fee applies Please note that all prices are subject to change without notice. Accessories and hatches as pictured may not be included in price.

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Learn To Kayak SEA KAYAKS, TOURING AND SIT-ON-TOPS

Stage 1

WHITE WATER AND MULTISPORT

Stage 2

Stage 1

Stage 2

INTRO TO WHITEWATER

SKILLS COURSE

ESKIMO ROLLING

A comprehensive course designed to cover the skills required to become a technically correct and safe paddler. The course progresses so you develop techniques and confidence at an enjoyable pace with great end results. This course is run over a weekend or by request in the evenings.

This course covers the skills required to become a technically correct Eskimo Roller. You increase your confidence, allowing you to paddle in more challenging conditions. Being able to eskimo roll will make you a more competent, safe and capable paddler.

A comprehensive course designed to cover the skills required to become a technically correct paddler. Starting off in a heated pool and progressing through flat water to moving water, it allows you to develop techniques and confidence at an enjoyable pace with great end results.

INTRO TO ESKIMO ROLLING

Course: 4 evening sessions COST $200

Course: Weekend COST $349

Course: 4 evening sessions COST $200

COST $295

Stage 3

This course covers the skills required to become a technically correct Eskimo Roller. This will increase your confidence, allowing you to paddle in more challenging conditions.

Stage 3

Stage 4

Stage 4

MULTISPORT On this course we continue to build on the skills gained on Stage One and Two Courses. Developing your skills, technique and confidence on the faster moving white water of the Waikato River and progressing on to a Sunday day trip on the Mohaka River. Includes, eddie turns, ferry gliding, rolling, surfing and building new skills in River Rescue techniques and River Reading.

During this course we build on the skills gained on the Stage One to Three Courses. Developing your moving water skills, technique and confidence in your Multi Sport Kayak. We start on the Mohaka River on Saturday and progress to the Whanganui on Sunday for some big water paddling. River racing competency letters are awarded to those who meet the standard and criteria as outlined on the Grade Two Competency Certificate. A copy is available from Canoe & Kayak Shops.

Course: Weekend • COST $349

Course: Weekend • COST $349

RIVER SKILLS WEATHER & NAVIGATION Understanding the weather and ability to navigate in adverse conditions is vital when venturing into the outdoors. Learn to use charts and compasses and forecast the weather using maps and the clouds.

Course: 4 evening sessions COST $150

OCEANS COURSE An advanced course designed to build on your skills. Covering paddling technique, kayak control, rescues, preparation, planning and decision making.

Course: Weekend/overnight. COST $350

Stage 6

Stage 6

Stage 5

Stage 5 KAYAKING SURF COURSE Surfing is heaps of fun when you know how. We will spend the evenings starting off in small surf and building up to one and a half metre waves. We will use a range of sit on tops and kayaks to make it fun and easy to learn. Skills to be taught include surfing protocol, paddling out, direction control, tricks and safety

RESCUE COURSE

Course: 4 evening sessions COST $349

Programme One Evening Cost $60

You need rescue skills to look after yourself and your paddling buddies in adverse conditions. This course covers Towing systems, Capsized kayaks, T Rescues, Paddle floats, Stern Deck Carries, Re-enter and Roll.

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RIVER RESCUE This course is designed to cover likely scenarios on white water rivers. The course is suitable for paddlers who feel comfortable on Grade One to Two rivers. The areas covered are rope skills, muscle techniques, team control, heads up, risk management and combat swimming. Also covering skills required in the following situations: entrapments, kayak raps, swimming kayakers and their equipment.

Course: Weekend • COST $349

Course: Weekend • COST P.O.A.

an ESCAPADE kayak valued at $910

For more information on any of these courses or tours - fill in the form and receive an information pack and Go in the Draw to WIN.... Prize drawn on 31 March 2005

48

ADVANCED WHITEWATER This course is designed to sharpen your whitewater skills and start learning simple rodeo moves. We will focus on skills such as river reading, body position and rotation, advanced paddle technique, playing in holes and negotiating higher Grade 3 rapids. We recommend you are feeling comfortable on Grade 2+ rapids. Ideally you should already be paddling the mid section of Rangitaiki or equivalent.

Name: Email: Address: Phone: Please send me information on: Send form to: WIN A KAYAK; New Zealand Kayak Magazine, 7/28 Anvil Rd, Silverdale or phone (09) 421 0662.


Directory: Things To Do

TAUPO Maori Carvings Half day guided trip to the rock carvings, Lake Taupo... only accessible by boat.

$85 per person (bookings essential. Call freephone 0800 KAYAKN for details.

Waikato River Discovery

Mohaka

2 hour guided kayak trip. Experience the magnificent upper reaches of the mighty Waikato River - soak in the geothermal hotsprings - take in the stunning environment... a perfect trip for all the family...

Need some excitement?? Take a kayak down this wicked Grade II river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down the Mohaka River.

Price: $40 adult $25 children Special group and family rates. Call freephone 0800 KAYAKN for details.

Accommodation available to Yakity-Yak club members and their families... Ideal for sport and school groups... Situated on the banks of the Waikato River our Kayakers Lodge accommodates up to 12 people, is fully furnished, with plenty of parking and a quiet location.

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of grade two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Rd Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealands lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealands pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $50. Phone: 06 769 5506

Two day trips $220.00 or one day $70.00. Phone 06 769 5506

A guided kayak trip round the safe waters of the Inner Harbour, while learning about the history of the area. During this stunning trip around the beautiful Napier Inner Harbour of Ahuriri, we stop to share a glass of fresh orange juice, local fruits and cheese platter.

All this for $40 per person. Phone 06 842 1305

Paddle to the Pub Kayaking to a local pub is a unique way of spending an evening, bringing your group of friends together by completing a fun activity before dinner and making a memorable experience. These trips are available to Riverhead, Browns Bay and Devonport Pubs. COST: $59.00 each • GROUP DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE!

Okura River Kayak Hire Company Phone: 09 473 0036

Okura River Tours Exploring Karepiro Bay and the Okura Marine Reserve. Enjoy this scenic trip with abundant wildlife and a stop at Dacre Cottage, the historic 1840 settlers house, which is only accessible by boat.

Okura River Kayak Hire Company Phone: 09 473 0036

Twilight Tours Departs from one of The East Coast Bays beautiful beaches. Enjoy the scenic trip with the sun setting over the cliff tops as you paddle along the coast line. COST: $49.00 • Group discounts available!

Okura River Kayak Hire Company Phone: 09 473 0036 Mobile: 025 529 255

0800 529256

Mokau River

Waitara River Tours

Hawkes Bay Harbour Cruise

Interested in a great adventure on this Magnificent River? Give us a call and we will give you a memory of a lifetime. Canoe & Kayak Taupo

Price: $100 per person. Call freephone 0800 KAYAKN for details. Phone: Taupo 07 378 1003, Hawke’s Bay 06 842 1305

TAUPO Accommodation

$25 per person per night. Phone: 0800 529256 for details

Whanganui River Trips

Sugar Loaf Island From Ngamutu Beach harbour we head out to the open sea to Nga Motu/Sugar Loaf Island Marine Reserve. View the Taranaki scenic, rugged coastline as we draw closer to the Sugar Loaf Islands. Enjoy the seal colony and experience the thrill of close up views of these fascinating marine mammals.

Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $50.00 per person. Phone 06 769 5506

Kayak Hire Taupo - Open for the summer and by appointment. Long Bay, Auckland - open on weekends and by appointment. Have some paddling fun on the beach or let us run a Tour for you and your friends and explore these beautiful areas.

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 KAYAKNZ for details

Customized Tours • Work Functions • Schools • Clubs • Tourist groups Whether it’s an afternoon amble, a full days frolic or a wicked weekend adventure we can take you there. If there’s somewhere you’d like to paddle we can provide you with experienced guides, local knowledge, safe up to date equipment and a lot of fun.

Contact your local store on 0508 KAYAKNZ

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NZKI

New Zealand Kayaking Instructors Award Scheme Become a kayaking Instructor and Guide. Get into gear and get qualified! It’s fun and easy to do.

Don’t delay phone 0508 5292569 now

Join the Yakity Yak Club Want to have fun, meet new people, have challenging and enjoyable trips, and learn new skills? PLUS get a regular email newsletter and this magazine! Also, get a discount on kayaking courses and purchases from Canoe & Kayak stores. Then, join us!

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 KAYAKNZ to find out more

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Getting into Multisport Kayaking? Ask anybody who has competed in a multisport race and they will say

One or two weekends training Is just NOT ENOUGH!!! We believe our comprehensive Grade 2 Training & Certification is the best you can get. To gain the skills to confidently paddle on white water, you need between 3 and 8 weekends on the water with an instructor.

PHONE NOW 0800 529256 OR CALL IN TO YOUR LOCAL CANOE & KAYAK SHOP

FOR MORE DETAILS AND COURSE DATES

2005 Multisport Package $795 50

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Official Sponsor


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DISCOVER ANOTHER WORLD

AUCKLAND CITY

ST LUKES RD

502 Sandringham Rd Telephone: 09 815 2073

YAKITY YAK CLUB PHONE YOUR NEAREST

Marine Retail Developments Ltd T/A Canoe & Kayak Auckland

SHOP

D

IL R

7/28 Anvil Road, Silverdale Please phone for opening hours Telephone: 09 421 0662

Flood Howarth & Partners Limited Trading as Canoe and Kayak North Shore

Canoe & Kayak Limited Trading as Canoe and Kayak Distribution

AU UH

.1

LIQUORLAND

3/5 Mac Donald Street Mount Maunganui (off Hewletts Rd) Telephone: 07 574 7415

J. K. Marine Limited Trading as Canoe and Kayak Manukau

Jenanne Investment Limited Trading as Canoe and Kayak Bay of Plenty

HAWKE’S BAY

RIVER WAIWHAKAIHO

NORTH

ON DEV

D ROA

LAKE TERRACE

38 Nukuhau Street, Taupo Telephone: 07 378 1003

Unit 6, 631 Devon Road Waiwhakaiho, New Plymouth Telephone: 06 769 5506

Rees and Partners Limited Trading as Canoe and Kayak Taupo

Peter & Bronnie van Lith Trading as Canoe and Kayak Taranaki

NORTH

NIVEN STREET

15 NIVEN STREET ONEKAWA, NAPIER Telephone: 06 842 1305 CSJ Limited Trading as Canoe and Kayak Hawke’s Bay

Easy finance available. Conditions and booking fee applies 52

www.canoeandkayak.co.nz

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KFC

MAUNGANUI ROAD

710 Great South Road, Manukau Telephone: 09 262 0209

TAUPO

ST ARIRO TONG

PHONE 07 847 5565

MACDONALD STREET

TARANAKI

K NU

S.H

OPENING SOON

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Issue 29