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Editorial February/March 2003

Welcome to the Twentieth Edition of the New Zealand Kayak Magazine. For this special magazine we have put together articles from the previous nineteen issues. We felt it would be interesting to look back in time at the best articles from previous issues. I trust that you will enjoy a little of the magazines’ history as well as many new stories and photos. We have included the official race results for the Speight’s Coast to Coast which once again has proved to be the event of the year for all adventure seeking kiwis. Get out there and enjoy NZ! If you need more motivation than these following pages offer, come in to one of our specialist kayak shops or give me a call, and we will get you out on the water having fun. Peter Townend

CONTENTS EDITORIAL

3

THE 3 MUSKETEERS

6

WHANGAROA HARBOUR

8

LOOKING FOR THAT COLD

9

FRONT SURF LANDINGS AND

10

DEPARTURES PADDLING INTO RETIREMENT

11

BETWEEN OCEAN & ICE

12

KAYAKING WITH KIDS

18

FAMILY IN FIORDLAND

19

ENJOYING THE VIEW

20

CANOE POLO LEAGUE

21

WHANGANUI CANOE TRIP

22

DIVING FROM A KAYAK

24

WHANGAPARAPARA HARBOUR

26

COOL STROKES

28

PADDLE FLOAT

30

T-RESCUES

31

HOTEO RIVER

32

TURKISH DELIGHT

34

BETTER THAN JUST OKAY!

35

CLUB SANDWICH

36

7 GREEN BOTTLES

38

FUN & FREEDOM - TAUPO

39

DEAR UNCLE EDDY

40

OFFICIAL COAST TO COAST

43

RESULTS HOKITIKA RIVER

52

NZRCA

54

NIAMH TOMKINS RODEO

56

ALONE… ON THE YUKON!

58

EQUIPMENT CATALOGUE

60

CLASSIFIEDS

66

FRONT COVER: PHOTO BY PETE TOWNEND ROB CRAIG – PUKEKOHE The most determined athlete in this years Coast to Coast. Not even a concussion and 4 hours in hospital could prevent this man from finishing his race.


WOW!!! 20 ISSUES! Want to sub

Phone 0508

EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: [09] 473 0036 Fax [09] 473 0794 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz ASSISTANT EDITOR/ADVERTISING: Brenda Flood: Ph: 027 243 8938 OR [09] 479 1002 Email: brenda@canoeandkayak.co.nz DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Pauline Whimp PawPrints Design & Illustration 78 Hillside Road Glenfield, Northshore City Ph: [09] 441 9030 • Fax [09] 441 6190 Mob [025] 287 1923 Email: pauline.whimp@xtra.co.nz PUBLISHER: Kayak NZ Magazine is published six times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PO Box 100 493, NSMC, Auckland PRINTING: Brebner Print DISTRIBUTION: IMD SUBSCRIPTIONS: New Zealand – 1 year 6 Issues = $30 Overseas – 1 year 6 Issues = $50 Payment to: Canoe and Kayak Ltd, Po Box 100 493, NSMC, Auckland. Ph [09] 473 0036 • Fax [09] 473 0794 Overseas subscribers can make payment via credit card number on subscription form. CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors of articles and photos. • Text should be submitted on disk or emailed as a Word text file. • Please send a self addressed stamped envelope. • Photos should be accompanied with negatives and in good condition or emailed as a high resolution (300 dpi) jpg. • All care will be taken to safeguard and return material. • No responsibility is accepted for submitted material. • Material published in the magazine must not be reproduced without permission. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: brenda@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine PO Box 100 493 NSMC, AUCKLAND


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3

The

Speight’s Coast to Coast Adventure

Musketeers

With Steve, Tony and I rushing the last bits and pieces into the Kayak Magazine 4x4 at 4.45am, it was inevitable some things would be forgotten. The purpose of the trip was a well deserved break for us, the support of the competitors we had spent the last year training to paddle white water, meeting new people, and taking hundreds of photos. Relaxing on the ferry with a can of Speight’s, my mind started to work and the missing items we had forgotten to pack were remembered – all my camera equipment and worst still my thermarest bed roll. I had brought a spare as I always do, however, the spare proved to be a foam piece of rock which was most uncomfortable. My camera gear was more of a problem. Quick thinking and modern communications saved the day. Using my cell phone I arranged a 24 hour courier which took 72 hours! This meant that the first photos on the West Coast were taken with a disposable camera, the latter with my trusty well travelled Cannon. This was following a seven

6

hour detour from the Southern Alps to Cobra Kayaks in Christchurch to collect the cameras which left us with less than 5 hours sleep at Mt White Bridge on the Waimakariri River on Friday night. At 4.30am we set up all the paddling gear and were on the water by first light. The morning was stunning with stars overhead and a light breeze as we, ”the three musketeers“ set off on our mission. The Waimak wound its way though countless shallow braided rapids before slowly increasing its speed and becoming more technical as it approached the gorge. We set up for a short wait for the first competitors to arrive. Tony made breakfast, Steve found some sunshine for a rest and I considered sun and angles for the photos. Over the next 2 hours we took loads of photos, cheered on our paddlers and rescued countless swimmers and their equipment. Moving on we paddled and chatted with many people all enjoying the magic scenery that surrounded us, mammoth cliffs, huge brown dry hills all framed with the majestic Southern Alps. Here we meet Doug, one of the oldest competitors (60 plus). He was having a bit of a hard time with the river and was shivering from a previous swim. So we all stopped and had a picnic for half an hour as Doug redressed in nice dry poly props. Refueled and warm he headed off to the finish line in fine form. He even won a prize for the longest river paddle and I don’t think there was a happier competitor at the prize giving. This race for most, is about the completion of a personal challenge, to run, cycle and kayak across the South Island in one or two days. With these people, comes an enormous amount of camaraderie and support which makes even the spectators feel involved. Hundreds if not thousands turn out to support and encourage not only the competitors but also the support people who when driving back though Christchurch get clapped and cheered almost as much as the competitors. This is the essence of what the Speight’s Coast

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


to Coast is, and why so many people have participated in the past and will in the future dedicate a year of their lives to a personal challenge which will take them across the South Island and into a huge sense of achievement and satisfaction. For those of you considering taking up the Speight’s Coast to Coast challenge next year a few observations from race day. Rescues occupied much of the time the ”Three Musketeers“ spent on the river. Many new paddlers are encouraged to believe that a river racing certificate awarded after one, two days instruction will be all they need on the race day. Quite simply it won’t. I believe that five to eight weekends of quality instruction on rivers and at least one practice paddle on the Waimak is the minimum that any one should consider adequate to compete in this or any Grade Two river race. The number one skill lacking was a reflex LOW BRACE. This stroke needs time and on-going coaching to develop. However, once cemented as a reflex in the paddlers mind and body, it will stop 99% of all capsizes. The carrying of extra warm clothing is essential. It is part of the conditions to enter the race, so if you have a swim and start shivering, get off the water and get warmed up before going on. Shivering is the start of hypothermia and it is essential to treat the first symptoms seriously. The longer you leave the shivering the more your minds ability to function will be impaired, and consequently the less likely you will be able to help yourself or indeed recognize that you are starting to take an extreme risk. The weather this year was perfect, lots of sun and light winds and this allowed under prepared paddlers to take many swims and still finish the race. If the weather had been overcast and colder, as it has in previous years, many of these paddlers would not have finished. We all enjoyed the Speight’s Coast to Coast enormously and our thanks and appreciation to Robin Judkins and the crew for once again turning it on with style

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NORTH SHORE

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

7


VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1

Whangaroa Harbour- August Delight

If your idea of fun is getting away for a weekend to some deserted islands, sea caves and tunnels - you’ve got to read this!

a torch), long tunnels and some crystal clear rock pools. A great summer snorkelling spot. Whangaroa Harbour is definitely a sea kayaker’s paradise, once visited you’ll return again and again.

Whangaroa Harbour is a beautiful sea kayaking wonderland, north of the Bay of Islands. Thirteen adventure seekers (Roger, Tony, Mark, Dan, Graeme, Steve, Sue, Donna, Lou, Taua, Fiona, Vanessa and Marise - we had to mention everyone) headed north on a recent Friday evening for a mid winter break. Whilst Auckland was being treated to an “ugly winter weekend”, Whangaroa Harbour escaped the rain and cold and instead enjoyed temperatures of up to 16 degrees. Windy conditions could be challenging at times, but there were many optional routes to choose from which allowed us to avoid the worst. The scenery was both breathtaking and inspiring. There were so many areas within the harbour to explore, including some beautiful sheltered bays that lay peacefully at the base of huge cliff faces of varying colours and textures. We paddled among these sandy bays. In one we watched in trepidation as a trainee abseiler descended a very high cliff. An abseiler’s paradise maybe, but perhaps not our cup-of-tea. Alternatives to sandy bays were rock covered nooks and crannies where good footwear was essential. Aptly named “The Winterless North” any waterfalls carried mere trickles. Only enough to moisten the cliff faces and make them glisten in the warm sunlight. We meandered into the mangroves and found a quaint little island to have lunch. Pete’s homemade vegetable soup all round! After a day on the water we still had energy to burn and amused ourselves playing cricket. We could simply smell summer was just around the corner. Whilst one group had dinner under way, another made a sortie for supplies down at the local pub. Saturday evening was full of hilarity ranging from jokes to leg pullers, and then on to charades. Finally it was lights out and everyone went to bed exhausted. Several paddlers on Sunday found the cause for their sea sickness was something to do with the previous evening’s entertainment and nothing to do with the sea. A slower start on Sunday had us following Pickmeres Atlas - a great guide to refer to. You can explore some huge caves, (we were glad to have brought

Summer or winter it’s a pure delight.

8

Blast from the Past

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


VOLUME 1 ISSUE 2

Weather Tips

Knowing what the weather will throw at you is vital for every outdoor activity - but more especially when you’re on the sea. Taking a quick look at the latest forecast and weather map should be part of every pre-trip routine. Once you know what is lurking around out in the Tasman, you can be on the lookout for signs that bad weather is on its way long before it arrives. The following is only a basic guide to the passage of a cold front. Due to the nature of weather, every front is different and therefore can display combinations and variations of the signs listed below. Different fronts move at different speeds. The first sign normally noticed is the wind will change to the northwest. It is important to remember the wind funnels down valleys, along coastlines and around headlands and bays, altering its direction at sea level. Watch the clouds to see in which direction they are moving. The lower the altitude of the cloud, the easier to see where it is being blown from. This will give you a better idea of what the general wind flow is. Cirrus clouds invading the sky from the west is another sign a front is probably on the way. Cirrus is a white, fibrous, high altitude cloud that takes on the form of mare’s tails or streamers. It extends several hundred kilometres ahead of a front and usually at least 12-24 hours ahead of any rain. Cirrus also gives a good indication of what the wind is doing at high altitude. Consider the form of the cloud. The thick end is the down wind end. If you are carrying a barometer with you, the air pressure will start to drop.

halo (a faint, fully circular rainbow with the sun or moon in the centre) may be seen. As time moves on the cloud continues to thicken and darken blocking out the sun or moon. The cloud base will gradually lower. The northwesterlies will be slowly strengthening all the time. The sky will eventually be completely overcast with grey featureless cloud. At this point the rain will start at any time. If you look to the west or northwest you will probably see it coming as streaks falling from the cloud base. Once the rain starts it may last for quite a long time. This all depends on how fast the front is moving and how wide the rain band is. You won’t be able to tell this without access to a weather map so hang tight. You will know when the front has gone through when the wind backs to the west or southwest, (remembering the wind direction at sea level may have been altered by the local terrain). The wind speed normally decreases with the passage of a front as well. The temperature will drop (the more active the front, the bigger the temperature drop). The continuous rain will ease to showers. The air pressure starts to rise. There may be a period of thunderstorms and very heavy rain just as the front passes. This only occurs in the more active fronts.

With all three of the above signs present, it is highly likely a front is heading your way.

The cloud will start to break up so that patches of blue sky are visible.

The high altitude clouds will continue to thicken until a continuous thin veil covers the sky. This cloud is called cirrostratus. The sun or moon may still be shining through and a

Steve Knowles

Blast from the Past

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

9


Tips and Tricks

Surf Being graceful and safe is good, skewered and squashed is not…

Landings & Departures The more paddling I have done the more I look forward to a good surf. When I’m expecting a calm sea kayak trip and I come across some surf the immediate reaction is ye-ha, then a more cautious look to see if it’s friendly. A major part of the day is then spent cruising the waves and getting wet! It is difficult to enjoy surf without having a bomb-proof roll. It’s no fun having to swim your water filled kayak back to the beach while having tons of water dumped on your head! Decide if surf is something you wish to survive or enjoy. The rest of this article is about surviving it with a reasonable amount of grace. If you would like to enjoy it then get yourself to a rolling class to learn the moves, or hire/borrow a sit-on-top and practise surfing in moderate waves. Remember the first rule of kayaking, ‘if you wouldn’t swim it you shouldn’t paddle it’. For more tips and tricks refer to the December 1997 issue (0102 p12)

Bilge pumps, sponges and bailers are essential but watch out for leads attaching them to your kayak as you may become entangled. If going out for a practice take a helmet with you but most people find packing them in their kayak for extended trips an over kill - your call.

The Sea This is the heavy-weight sumo in the equation. If you treat it with disrespect it will teach you some hard lessons. The only way to win on a regular basis is to get to know it. Learning to recognise the conditions and making honest appraisals of your own skills is vital. Here are some ideas to help you get to know the surf and make safe landings. There are three types of landings you can choose from: back, middle and front.

Back Landings This type of landing requires you time your run for the beach to coincide with a small set of waves, and to paddle along behind the breaking wave. This takes a lot of speed and timing to be successful.

Middle Landings Equipment Personal: look at what you are carrying on your person if you are anticipating a surf landing or departure. If you stuff up the most likely outcome is that your kayak will not end up anywhere near you. Consequently having all your survival equipment in your kayak may be of little use. Pack small water proof bags of goodies into your pockets. Ensure they contain shelter, fire lighting material, and food/water. Personally check your own equipment to ensure it is secure. Ensure your buoyancy aid fits well and will not come off over your head. Kayak: ensure all equipment is secure and will not come off the kayak during a major beating. Tape over any sharp objects on your kayak ie. your rudder assembly and the cockpit rims of fibro kayaks with insulation tape and ensure the inside of the cockpit has no sharp bits. Safety: paddle floats are an essential safety tool, but their use in the surf zone is not easy or even sensible as they require a long time to set-up while you are in the water. Also there is a distinct possibility of the lead becoming entangled around you as a wave takes you, your kayak, paddle and paddle float on the worst trip of your life. The paddle float can only be used outside the surf zone.

10

Catch the wave and surf it like a surf board turning and changing your direction to avoid the white water, where you will lose control.

Front Landings Catch the wave and sprint paddle out in front of it so the wave breaks behind you. Rudder up or down? Your choice. In unknown waters I personally leave my rudder down as it allows you to more quickly correct your position prior to catching a wave. Once on the wave it has little effect. When landing on the beach it has a habit of wrecking itself.

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


VOLUME 2 ISSUE 1 Leaning back to stop the bow digging in? In my opinion this is a total waste of time. In any surf, in any kayak, the amount of weight moved has little or no effect. It can also hinder proper control when attempting to rectify a situation. If you find your bow starting to disappear a. tilt your kayak onto its side allowing the bow to come free or b. use the stern rudder pushing out from the stern of the kayak to turn the kayak side on and drop down the wave sideways. Towing into beaches? This is a definite no no as the chance of being skewered is real. Also having a water filled kayak landing on you is a real hazard - even the smallest kayak weighs 200kg or more. The only way of getting a spare kayak into the beach is by giving it a push onto a wave and letting it find its own way. If the conditions are suitable tow the kayak out to flat water to reunite it with its paddler. Remember, don’t get between the kayak and the beach for any reason or else ouch!

VOLUME 2 ISSUE 3

into Retirement

Launching Your Kayak

I was reaching that stage in my life where it was time to move out of the workforce and into retirement.

Spend time getting the feel of the beach - where are the biggest waves, the rips, the swimmers, the other craft? Decide where the smallest waves are. These will probably coincide with the rips, and also where the low usage is. Then think about your return trip. Know what the forecast is. If the forecast is for rising winds or swells and you are already unsure of the launch then you will probably ‘dislike’ the landing later on in the day. Your best call could be calorie loading for the next trip! Before launching spend some time warming up as surf does twist and bend you more than the usual sea kayak trip.

In a Group Put your second best paddler out first as s/he will probably be able to play with the surf and find the best avenue for the less experienced. Launch each paddler one at a time. Meet up outside the surf zone until the whole group is present. The same applies when landing. Have the most experienced paddler check it out - remember to confirm your paddle signals prior to departing as verbal communication is impossible anywhere near surf. Pete Townend

My mind wrestled with the problem of what other activities a person in their sixties could take up to replace some of the long hours spent working every day. Having been an avid ‘boatie’ for many more years than I care to remember, some form of water sport appealed. I had often seen people paddling around the beaches on the North Shore near where I live, in what I thought were canoes, and the idea that I might be able to get out there on the water on a sunny day and drift along with them, started to form. It sounded good, it looked good, then I thought no, I was probably far too old to try, and that it was obviously a young person’s sport. I probably couldn’t even fit into the cockpit, let alone learn how to paddle; and what if I tipped out all the time? Well, I thought and thought about it, then, before I changed my mind, I rushed in and bought myself a small nine foot boat, a Sprite. I paddled this up the Wade River, the Okura River, the Puhoi River and very soon realised what a wonderful new world was opening up for my pending retirement. Back to the canoe shop, I traded my Sprite in on a larger kayak. I was hooked, on what has been one of the best decisions I have made. Yes I have changed boats a few times, each time getting bigger and better and I’m now the proud owner of a Sea Bear which for the last few years has taken me to so many idyllic places around the Hauraki Gulf and northern coastline. My advice to anyone thinking about it, is try it. Try it with other people, join one of the many organisations involved in kayaking. I have met so many like minded people, young and not so young. One chap I met at Castor Bay recently is 89 years old and as you can see in the background picture he still gets out. Being retired, it is merely a matter of phoning another retiree during the week and off we go to a nearby island for a day’s paddle. Day trips, cruising, sailing (yes, I even have a sail on my Sea Bear), fishing, exploring, I quickly discovered that age is no barrier to the endless possibilities now available to me.

My only wish is that I had been introduced to kayaking sooner.

Blast from the Past

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

11


Between Ocean

& Ice

by Mark Jones

Three kiwis achieve a world first kayaking 800km along the coast of Antarctica to cross the Polar Circle AND NOW CHILE HERE WE COME!


Marcus, Mark and Graham are currently adventuring in Chile. Checkout their web page for the latest updates on their adventure:

www.adventurephilosophy. com


The roar of surf on the cape was constant. From where I stood I could see huge plumes of water blasted skywards behind the headland. Those same waves curled around the cape to break on the granite flank we had been forced to land on. The coast on each side of the cape was ice cliffed for as far as we could see. I’d made it ashore, Marcus and Grum, sat in their kayaks beyond the break, yet to make their run. A smaller set of swells lured them in closer. Suddenly Marcus was too close. “Go Marcus! PADDLE!!” A big wave broke behind him, the first of a set... with horror movie fascination, I watched as he wrestled with the waves, and the waves smashed onto the granite teeth of the shore. Somehow Marcus avoided being in them and escaped to deeper water. It was our 30th day on the peninsula and this would be camp 20, if we could get ashore. Behind me Cape Bellue climbed in rocky steps to the snow; avalanches thundered from ice cliffs crouching above the bay and grounded bergs listed in the swell. It was as dramatic a place as I could imagine. The next wave broke foaming onto the teeth. Marcus chose his moment and ran his kayak up onto a ramp of rock and we pulled his boat clear. Then Grum, timed his run between swells. Another successful landing, another day closer to the polar circle. Our journey to paddle the Antarctic Peninsula had begun three years before; Graham was dreaming aloud on an email to Marcus and we pushed send. His was the vision that we pursued. We were not constrained by preconceptions of what was possible and what was not. We had a blank canvas and dreamed with bold strokes. The impossible became improbable, and we could work with that. But the dreaming was over and reality smelt like penguins and old socks. We had been offered a ride from South America to the Ice by Sir Peter Blake. His boat, Sea Master dropped us at Hope Bay, the northern tip of Antarctica. It was a one way ticket. A 48-foot yacht called Tooluka would meet us 5 weeks later south of the Antarctic Circle, and take us home.

14

We stood by our boats amid a pile of gear and food and waved them good-bye. After two hard years of planning and preparation we were on our own at last, relying on our wits and our friendship, finally poised to launch into the waters we’d dreamed of. The first day in our kayaks was a journey into the dangerous territory of sensory overload. We launched amongst grounded bergy bits into a bay teeming with penguins. It was cold, snow falling in fluffy clumps. Within minutes 3 fins a metre tall sliced through the chilly air before disappearing again. Orca!, They swam beneath us and continued on their way. An ice cliff off our beam heaved a ten tonne block into the sea with a roar. We encountered strong currents and patches of slush-ice, like porridge to paddle through, and patches of ice blocks called brash. An ice berg tipped over without warning. We gave the next one a wide berth. The place was wild, uncompromisingly and unapologetically wild. It was 11:30pm and still light enough to read the map, when we reached Gourdin Island and found a place to land and camp; the first opportunity to do so in 30 kms of kayaking. We were exhausted from paddling kayaks heavy with provisions, but the day wasn’t ever over until the tent was pitched and protected, the kayaks tied down and enough water found to rehydrate and cook a meal with. We woke to the sound of penguins, and wind. Overnight the latter had crammed our side of the island with ice. We were trapped for the time being. No longer were we 10,000 miles away in a warm room making plans over paper charts. We were perched on a bleak Island, playing chess with the environment. More than 700km of some of the world’s most dramatic coastline separated us from our objective, the polar circle. But the future lay hidden from us, like the ice cliffs stretching away into the enveloping cloud. We had no idea what the next day would bring. More than 2300 cubic kilometres of ice is calved from the ice sheet each year resulting in about 300,000 icebergs free to roam the southern ocean. We ate breakfast while we watched one such berg drive purposefully into the wind, plumes of spray flying from its bow as it smashed into each

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


swell like a shapeless barge. It was not the last time we would witness strange unseen forces at work on the trip. We had a lot to learn. Our maps offered little encouragement regarding landings for the next 250 km or so. Each day we set out, destination unknown, with blind faith that we would find a place to land. Our faith was tested often. Especially those first days when bodies protested at the miles; when each place we hoped to land proved too steep, too rough, too exposed to avalanches for us to land. One of our longest days was on this section. We had had several hard days on the go, intent on getting as far south as we could before the weather pinned us down again. Large open bays exposed us to violent offshore winds that are common there. We snatched lunch in the kayaks between bays, landing through surf onto a narrow beach threatened by rockfall. It was no place to stay long. Under an overhang of rock Marcus brewed the billy while I wolfed down Voltarin for an old injury that nagged. Patched up and with spirits lifted we continued south. Our hopes of a landing at the next cape were dashed with the swell running up the rocks. To continue was a grim prospect; Charcot bay lay before us. But the wind had died to a whisper and other options weren’t leaping out at us. For four hours we crept across the bay holding our breaths, hoping the mountains would hold theirs. Eventually across Charcot Bay, we rounded a point and Marcus was hit by a wave. It stripped his iceaxe from his deck and surfed him sideways toward the wall of the cape. It was a close call, but we would have closer ones. Ahead were the Jaquinot Rocks. We had them marked as a probable landing. The largest stuck out of the water like the bows of a ship, sinking by the stern. The others resembled smaller vessels in trouble. We had yet to encounter any islands more inhospitable to landing and we paddled on with optimism, born of the fact that it was our last card to play. A distant breaking shore offered salvation. We landed through surf and hauled our boats out onto a bench of land, making camp next to a Weddel seal. After 14 hours and 65km food is not just a marvel, it is sheer genius.

Weaving magic with our freeze-dried dinners was a role that we shared. Our fare was simple but tasty. Porridge for breakfast, food bars, chocolate, salami and crackers for lunch. Enormous ice cliffs leaned threateningly over the bay beside our camp. Every now and then they shed avalanches. Like moths drawn to a flame, the three of us moved closer to catch the action on film. It was perfect timing... a colossal wall of ice ten stories tall let go. It smashed into the bay like a giant fist. An instant later it was obvious we were going to get creamed. I ran for my life through the soft snow, my boot stuck and stayed behind as I flailed my way up hill. I heard the wall of water crest the 3 metre rise and sweep up the slope behind me carrying my boot with it. I snatched it from the tide before the wave receded...It was that close! Marcus and Grum were panting back at the tent, having also discovered how fast they could cover 50 yards in soft snow. A line of ice blocks between the shore and our home showed how close we were to losing everything. We got little sleep that night as we lay listening to the crack and thunder of the cliffs continuing to avalanche. Despite the dangers there was a feeling of joy in the simplicity of our days, the clarity of our goal. The press south was like a migratory urge, every day of enforced rest made us fidgety and restless, but there was never a shortage of things to do. There are no ordinary days in Antarctica. Each day had a feature that set it apart from the others. Days with whale encounters, huge humpbacks surfacing mere feet from our boats, their breath foetid and fishy, purged in a steaming plume. We often sat mesmerised by the wildlife- a solitary Crab Eater seal, far from shore, predatory Leopard seals tearing a penguin apart, skua gulls hanging overhead.... Graham Passage offered a stunning corridor through the mountains, a grand and fitting entrance way to what lay beyond. The mountains were steeper here, the plateau higher. Enormous Glaciers poured into the head of Charlotte Bay. This signalled an end to the exposed first. Soon we would reach the relative sanctuary of the middle third of the journey where landings were more

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

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common and human contact was guaranteed, the “tour zone”. In the following two weeks we visited two bases, a ship, two yachts and Antarctica’s only official Royal Post office. We had made good progress and could afford to be more relaxed in this section, enjoying the amazing wildlife, the scenery that continued to get more spectacular and the people encounters. The last such contact was at Vernadsky. We left with a fresh baked loaf of Russian bread and Ukranian good wishes. South of here the nature of the coast was characterised by deep bays and fiords with few if any landings. Mountain chains rose sheer from the sea and giant glaciers ran between the two. Our plan was to island hop for the most part to avoid the worse of the katabatic winds that descend from these mountains and sweep out to seaislands and the odd cape offered the only possibility of landing anyway. At times we found ourselves paddling by compass in a whiteout from one small island to the next, on other days in sunshine, far from land, adrift with the bergs. Some islands offered little more than a spit of stony beach barely dry between the tides, but occasionally we were able to make landfall on the mainland, such as at Cape Bellue. The Coast continued to be more dramatic as we ventured south. It was a zone in constant flux, its heartbeat the glacial thud and shudder, its voice the whip-crack of cleaved ice and the skua’s cry. It spoke of life and death and the raw beauty of the icescape and promised nothing but endless change and the age old cycle of freeze and thaw. Day 34 found us camped at the Kidd islands. We had just retired to our tent when the roar of what I took to be an approaching wind gust sped toward us. When it arrived the tent wasn’t flapping. I poked my head out the door to see the sea surging around our islet. The channel to the next island was a raging rapid, complete with haystack waves and undertows. Those strange forces at work again. The Antarctic Circle lay just an hour or so South of us, tantalisingly close. Tooluka was still out of radio contact and we decided it must be well north, perhaps still crossing the Drake Passage, delayed by a storm. As we ponder the little food we have left the radio crackled into life. We listened to a broken conversation between two vessels and discover the cruise ship Explorer would pass by Adelaide Island late the following day. “What if we were to meet up with them and hitch a ride north” Grum suggests. We decided it could work and Grum picked up the radio. “Explorer, Explorer, Kiwi Kayakers. How copy?” We all stared at the radio, while the

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static crackled and spat like brash ice in a billy. We willed it to answer and it did and in a short while a ride north had been arranged. The problem was we were 80 kms away from where they would pass... We needed to leave immediately and paddle through the night if we were to make the deadline. An air of urgency swept through camp, tinged with the apprehension of knowing we were setting ourselves up for an epic paddling leg. And it was! We left at 10:30pm and paddled into a sunset to die for, the sky was ablaze, bergs silhouetted against the horizon like spilt chess pieces. Marcus monitored the GPS and soon he called a halt. Together we coasted the last few metres over the invisible line we had come so far south to cross, 66o 30’ South. We had done it, We grinned and hugged and thought how great life was..., but we were far from safety. We paddled through the night beneath old blue stars and a sickle moon, the water winking with phosphorescence and ice built up on our kayaks with each splash and stroke as we wove our way south through a maze of bergs. It was like kayaking in a freezer. Our boats became heavy with ice-glaze; the deck compass became a frozen blob; only our arms, always moving, avoided the armour coating. Daylight brought different problems, dense brash ice and we were forced to backtrack and head out to sea to find a lead south. Then frightening winds as we crossed the huge Lallemand Fiord and we ran for the lee of an island. We finally landed after 16 long hours in the saddle, exhausted and sore but with great relief. Three hours later Explorer made contact on her way north. The wind had blown itself out and after another hours paddling we met her in the deep waters of Hannuse Bay. Our boats were hoisted aboard and we entered a separate reality of beer on tap, showers on call and people that didn’t smell like penguins. We adapted quickly. As we made our way up the peninsula to reach the Tooluka (delayed), we found ourselves fascinated anew by the coastline we had kayaked along. We had lived on the ragged edge of the land, between relentless ocean and implacable ice. But like the hour between darkness and day, it lacked the harshness of either, and yet was somehow more than both, a twilight of unforgettable beauty and dramatic change. To live out of a kayak and journey along this wonderland is to experience life stripped bare. What remains is the essential core of living: friendship, endeavour and the beating heart of the wilds. Each dawn was a brushstroke across the soul; each dusk the

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


kaleidoscope turned and I no longer saw the world the same. On the day we left there was a final moment when nothing was spoken but everything was said. A baby minke whale arrived with a sigh. It slid between our kayaks, ever so slowly, close enough to touch, then drifted beneath us upside down, the green-white of its belly inches below our boats; finally “spyhopping” from the water, it fixed us with a glistening eye before vanishing beneath the brash. It was an emotion filled farewell from the peninsula we had come to feel a part of and to love. It was difficult to say goodbye to a place that had given us so much, but winter was fast approaching. It was time for us to go.

Tait Radios Invaluable to Success: Tait New Zealand provided two Orca Elan hand held VHF radios and enough batteries to last for the five weeks of the expedition. These allowed line of sight communication and were used to contact the pick up vessel when it was within range. They were also very useful in Ushuaia, Southern Argentina, when the team was preparing for departure. “There was an enormous amount to do. We had final supplies to source and purchase, filming to do, equipment to test, and the radios were a great way to keep in touch with each other in the city and inform each other of changes in plans, maximising the time we had to get everything done”. The Adventure Philosophy team needed a compact hassle free VHF unit. Marine channel 16 was programmed into the radio and another channel for conversation. “There were many occasions when we were glad to have the VHF radios. Several ships came into range that we would not have been able to get weather forecasts from had we not had them”. Check out their latest adventures at www.adventurephilosophy.com

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

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VOLUME 2 ISSUE 2

Beginners Guide

Kayaking with Kids

Playtime on Muri Lagoon, Rarotonga is enjoyed by Jessica, Zoe and Tom Phillips

Family kayaking can make for a great day out on the water, but as Suzi Phillips explains, you need to be extra well prepared to cater for a range of attitudes, abilities and appetites. Our three children aged 6, 9, and 11 years, have quickly taught us four basic principles of kayaking with kids. They are; comfort, confidence, kicks and conditions. Firstly, their comfort. It’s vital to keep them warm and content to minimise their grizzles and your stress levels. A child’s small body mass means they feel the cold a whole lot faster than we do, so we have them in a wetsuit each as a minimum, and always a set of polypro and a jacket in the kayak for a backup as soon as they hit land. They might decide to spend all the lunch break swimming and body surfing, but the cold always seems to catch up with them - often on the return trip. Do remember sunhats, and sun block, and a warm hat for cold spells is a help too. Comfort also includes a full tummy.

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Pack heaps of food for all meals and lots of snacks to hand out during sea crossings or down the river. When they get the mid afternoon drops, a good calorie boost makes all the difference. It’s necessary for us when we are out kayaking, but its vital for them. They also need plenty of liquids, so take along lots. We have drink bottles on the kayaks and five litres as a backup with extra in the van for the drive home. Confidence is another important ingredient for a successful trip. Give them heaps of encouragement, especially when they are tired. Kids are small and light and it takes them a while to build up the fitness and strength to become competent paddlers. If they grasp the basic technique, they are doing great, and if they manage to put it all together for more than five minutes at a time, they deserve a medal. Our three differ hugely in their abilities and attitudes. If they were all thrill seekers, it would be a lot easier. Instead, we get through the hard times, (headwinds, against the tide etc), with lots of cajoling and encouragement. Any effort gets huge praise, and at the end of it, they get a great deal of satisfaction from their achievement.

Kids need to get their kicks from kayaking. It has to be fun, or they just won’t want to go out again. For the older ones, this might be trying to surf in on their first wave, or run their first rapid. For the younger ones, it might just be the thrill of reaching “treasure island” and going for a ramble along the rock pools, or exploring a cave. Conditions are important too. If you are experienced sea kayakers, you might think nothing of going out in 10-15+ knot winds. Fine, but don’t take the kids. Leave them at home with grandparents or friends, and go and have fun. Take the kids out on warm sunny days with light winds and great sea conditions. Nothing else is much fun for them, unless they are unusually tough and stoic. Double check the forecast and the tide, because you don’t want any nasty surprises half-way through the day, and if in doubt, don’t go out! Finally, safety checks. Before you go anywhere on the water, make sure all the kids have well-fitting buoyancy aids or life jackets. They should preferably be good swimmers, and at least confident in the water. Make sure you have all the basic safety equipment you will need for an emergency, including first aid kit, spare paddles, tow ropes, flares, whistles, compass, paddle floats etc. If you can give the kids a lesson in

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

wet-exits, in shallow water, it will be a big help if you ever capsize with them. At least show them what you do after a capsize, (assuming you know!), and teach them the basics such as hold your paddle and hang onto that kayak! If you take the kids out in good conditions and make it a fun time for them, they will hopefully become confident and competent paddlers, and you’ll have lots of great experiences together. There are lots of places around the Hauraki Gulf that offer safe day trips for families. Some of our favourites are the Weiti/Okura Inlet, the Mahurangi area, including Motuora and Saddle Islands, and the Tawharanui coastline. We get five of us on the water by putting three in our double kayak, a Sea Bear ll Packhorse Express, (the smallest goes in the centre hold, with an adult in the rear and our middle child in the front), and an adult in a Puffin, towing (for safety), the eldest child in another Puffin. We recently took our eldest daughter, aged 11, down the Whanganui River in Canadian canoes, and during the four days, 87 kilometres, and 91 rapids, she blossomed into a confirmed adrenaline junkie! She’s our first thrill seeker, now we just have to convert the younger two.


VOLUME 3 ISSUE 1

Considered by many to be the most rugged wilderness area for kayakers to venture into, several of my close kayaking friends were surprised when they learned that Fiordland was where my wife, daughter and I were off to for a weeks kayaking during our Xmas break. Our route was one I had travelled before, and I felt it was within the capabilities of Margaret and Melz, who were both experienced sea and river kayakers. Our first day would take us from the end of the road, down the Holyford River to the confluence of the Pike River, where we would make our way upstream to Lake Alabaster. After staying the night at Lake Alabaster hut, we planned to kayak down the Pyke and Holyford Rivers to Lake McKerrow, paddle across the Lake to the coast and the Martin Bay hut. From here we would take to the open sea and kayak down the coast to Milford Sound where we would make camp for the night. Our trip would end the following day when we reached Milford.

Well, that was plan A. When you’re planning a trip within Fiordland, you must also have a plan B, C, and D, as the weather can disrupt even the best organised trips in this area. Day one. After an hour of packing our sea kayaks with six days of supplies, we launched ourselves into the crystal clear waters of the Holyford from the end of the Holyford road. The river flows gently through a forest of thick native bush, which gives way to the rugged mountain ranges topped with white snow surrounding the Holyford valley. It was a perfect day for kayaking, and after five hours of leisurely paddling, which included one long portage around the only rough section between the end of the road and Lake McKerrow, we arrived and proceeded up the Pyke River to Lake Alabaster. We made camp with several other trampers at Lake Alabaster hut and I was able to get a marine forecast through

the mountain radio. It was not very good. A front was expected to move onto Fiordland the next day bringing strong westerly winds and a four metre north-westerly swell. Day two. The lake was crystal clear as we paddled out to the Pyke River and back into the Holyford. After two hours we arrived at Lake McKerrow, made a stop at the McKerrow Island hut and set off across the lake. At about mid-day we were paddling into a strong westerly wind when the predicted front hit us. We slowly struggled up the northern shoreline trying to take shelter in the bays and being slammed by the powerful headwind as we rounded each point. As the lake narrowed to the outlet we were able to paddle in the shelter of the trees which grew out over the shore, and conditions became a little easier. We could hear the noise of the surf as it hit the beach on the opposite side of a long bar, which runs north for about 3km, to the river mouth and Martin Bay Hut. That night we shared the hut with 14 other trampers who all had varying stories of their struggle in what was now a storm. That night the marine forecast from our mountain radio was for four to five metre northerly swells with westerly winds gusting to 50 knots! Day three. The sea was a furious mess, so our plan was to check out the local seal and penguin colonies by foot. We also tramped into the Martin Bay Lodge where we made some tentative arrangements for a lift out by helicopter if conditions did not improve - plan B! Day four. The forecast was not very good, and a second front was forecast to arrive later in the afternoon. Our plan was for Melz and I to paddle out over the river bar and decide whether we should continue down the coast to Milford once we were out there. It was approaching high tide, but there were still some fairly big breakers coming in over the bar. We waited

some time for the waves to die down. When they did the paddle out was not so bad. We went out for some distance before we stopped to assess paddling down the coast. A steep four metre swell was coming in from the west and with the prospect of it only getting worse, we abandoned the coastal paddle. Paddling back to the river mouth, the swell was now behind us and both of us were more than a little worried about crossing the bar to where Margaret was waiting for us. We sat for some time just beyond the bar, waiting for a break in the waves. The noise from the waves breaking in front of us played hell on our nerves. After a couple of really big waves passed under us, there looked like there was a smaller one following. We paddled in with it, dropping off the back as it smashed down onto the bar. Our paddling strokes rocketed as we sprinted our kayaks to try and keep ahead of the following wave. Glancing behind I could see it had broken and was about to pick us up. Luckily, it was a short break over the bar and we were both able to control our short surf back into the river and back to Margaret. Melz and I were on a high for some time after our short paddle in the sea, but we felt good about our decision not to go down the coast. The paddle back across Lake McKerrow was very pleasant with only a slight following breeze to contend with. We reached Lake McKerrow Island hut about mid afternoon, about three hours before the front which was forecast arrived. I think it was more like a storm, and we were thankful for the shelter of a good cosy hut. Day five. A low mist covered everything for most of the morning, and we wondered if the helicopter might cancel coming in to collect us. About noon the mist cleared and not long after we heard the helicopter coming across the lake. The pilot was used to carrying kayaks and within ten minutes, were flying back up the Holyford River to Gunn Camp and our vehicle. The trip did not quite end as we had planned, but we had spent five days in a very remote and beautiful part of New Zealand. It was a truly great trip and an exciting adventure.

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VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2

Whitewater Trip

Agreement in Full I was about to grab my boat and scoot for the bottom get-in (below the waterfall). Just then Craig saunters over and confirms that I still want to do it! - The waterfall. This is a moment that is hard to explain. I could easily have told Craig “naaaa lets not muck around”, lets just get on and do the run from below the falls. But no, from somewhere I produce a smile! “You bet!.” Instantly the mouth is dry, and the hands are wet. Suddenly John’s porridge thuds into the bottom of my stomach. This frees the butterflies...

The Long Walk

the VIEW

While Craig is away doing the shuttle, I busy myself lowering the other boats to the bottom get-in. With this accomplished I take the walk back up the road to where my boat and Craig wait. Honestly at this stage I’m a basket case. I search wildly for an escape route, but I’m hemmed in. I sit on my boat and try not to worry. Craig returns and we negotiate the tricky walk down to the upper get-in.

Warming Up We quickly paddle the 50m of chutes and pools down to the waterfall. I’m feeling a bit better now we’re on the water, the simple trip down to the pool just above the falls warms me up, distracts me from the event ahead. We get out at the pool above the falls, Craig shows me the line. Actually getting to the part where you fall off the edge is the hardest part of the waterfall. The pool above the falls is like a half full swimming pool with only a 1.5m wide channel leading out over the edge. Throw in a dog leg left, and hitting the water at the bottom of the falls is the least of my problems.

The Drop

Before the club left on Friday night Pete asked me to write an article for NZ Kayak Magazine. I spent the weekend pondering the best angle to use to maintain your (the readers) interest. The trip was unremarkable in many ways, only four people, three runs down the beautiful stretch on Aniwhenua from the power station to a stretch of road in the middle of nowhere - nothing out of the ordinary there! We camped at Lake Aniwhenua and the weather was fantastic. We did three runs of the river, with the BOP Power-board helping to keep the variety up by putting the river at a different flow each time. We had a fantastic barbecue on Saturday night washed down with a few beers. Not particularly exciting on its own, but very significant in finding an angle for my story. (As you will see.) The high point of the weekend for me came on Sunday morning when I paddled the 6m high waterfall at the start of Aniwhenua. This was my first waterfall, and the subject of much angst on my part. It happened like this:

Agreement in Principle I have had the urge to paddle the waterfall at Aniwhenua for a while. I was not however at the stage where I would have volunteered to do it! Agreement in principle was cleverly teased from me on Saturday night after just a couple of refreshments (not a coincidence). The dialogue went something like this. Craig: “Want another beer Mark?”, then whispering “Want to run the waterfall tomorrow morning?” Mark: “Cool!” Alka: “Really Mark? You’re so brave.” Mark: “It’s just a beer.” Alka: “No, I mean agreeing to do the waterfall.” Mark: “Ummmmm, right.” That’s it! Agreement in principle. I told myself that we’d all had a couple of drinks so we’ll never remember - wrong! The morning begins as normal. Breakfast passes without incident, John’s porridge (made with real cement) is outstanding, and makes it very difficult for the butterflies to fly around my stomach. We get to the car park, the boats are transferred and polypropylene is dragged on. No-one mentions anything about the waterfall. I think I’ve got away with it...

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Craig briefs me, he’s completely relaxed. This helps me a lot. Craig waits by the channel leading out of the pool while I get back in the mighty Supersport and paddle out into the pool. I consider the possibility of paddling back up the river to the campsite and hiding in my tent. With a sigh I put in the sweep stroke that points me at the exit chute. The dog leg means that I can’t actually see the falls - thank you! I float into the chute and begin to accelerate. Craig had pointed out the big nasty to avoid, a cleft on the left hand side. If the bow of the Supersport catches in there I’ll be wedged across the chute, faced with the unattractive prospect of swimming over the falls. If that didn’t kill me the humiliation would! put in a sweep to avoid the cleft and lift the right rail for extra insurance. Unfortunately I’m a little over zealous and I start to teeter, (later, Craig admitted to thinking that I was about to do the remainder of the trip upside down. He called it a “facial”).

A Lot of Things Happen at Once As I turn the dog leg in the chute, the view opens up. Before me I can see the drop now. I can see for miles down the river. It’s quite panoramic. The problem is that I’m too busy with my low brace to admire the view, and as I come back to level, I can hear the eternal cry of the river guide, “PADDLE, PADDLE, PADDLE!” I only manage two short forward strokes before the world suddenly turns white and rushes towards me. I hit and it’s soft, the water is aerated from the drop, I sink in, and pop up. I’m at the bottom (of the falls, not the river). Just behind me the water roars its applause and the small audience in the pool at the bottom put away their first aid kits and voice their approval. The feeling is amazing, the adrenaline is running. Behind me Craig comes over the falls. He explains after he surfaces that he was trying something called “boofing”. It looked like he botched it to me. For the rest of the day the air seems sweeter the sky bluer and water softer, more welcoming. A great day paddling. In all seriousness I would like to thank Craig for giving me the chance to do the drop. He could have kept his suggestion to himself, and saved himself the stress. To me, paddling white water is about pushing personal limits. Of course to do this safely, we need people who have been there done that, to make sure we don’t push too hard! As far as Aniwhenua goes, well it’s a great place. I think you should all go on the next trip there. The camp site is great, the scenic township of Murpara is just down the road. If you’re worried about swimming, the water in Aniwhenua is really warm. The river is great. PADDLE THERE!

Blast from the Past

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


Canoe Polo League Canoe Polo is a fun and exciting team game. The objectives are the same as water polo, the only difference is that the competitors move around the playing area in canoes (kayaks)! The 2002 Canoe Polo Season has been very successful with a fun social C Grade league on Wednesday nights and a more serious B Grade league running Thursday nights at Northcote College Pool. Rangitoto College currently have a number of teams competing with surrounding schools in the social C Grade league alongside the adults. Canoe & Kayak North Shore is offering local schools the opportunity to enter teams to compete in a new North Shore Schools Canoe Polo

League. The structure of the league is progressive and will be based on the 4 school terms.

Introductory League - E Grade Teams will spend a couple of weeks being taught the basics of canoe polo including confidence and safety in a kayak. They will then take part in a league competition for the remaining part of the term, moving into the advanced league at the beginning of the next term. It is hoped that new teams will be introduced each term which will continue the cycle into the advanced league.

Saturday Mornings @ Northcote College Pool

Advanced League - D Grade Teams progress from the Introductory League where skill levels and the rules of the game are developed. New teams will continue to join the advanced league each term.

Saturday Afternoons @ Northcote College Pool

Schools Cup A weekend tournament will take place during the final summer school term to find the best team on the Shore. Players can be selected for school representative teams to play at the regional school champs.

For further information please call: Canoe and Kayak PH: 09 479 1002 email: rob@canoeandkayak.co.nz ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

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Pete, Mike, Chris, Tony & John’s

VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2

Whanganui Canoe Trip by John Elia

Thursday

Saturday

North Shore to Taupo’s Canoe & Kayak Lodge is a 4-hour drive and a welcome bed for the night.

Light rain was falling when we emerged from out tents but with a good cup of tea and something in the puku, life ain’t bad. On the river, old hawk eye Pete spied blackberries. We all piled out for an impromptu feast. Back on the river our next stop was by a bridge on our left. Mike scrambled up and, to our surprise, did a bum slide down the rock face into the river. Not content with that he went up again and got hold of a swing rope. For the next half hour Chris and Mike attempted to entertain us. Chris is only tiny but we soon learned that she has a big appetite for daredevil events. Later we came upon a group of people preparing for a raft race. A couple showed great interest in the Nova craft. Pete gave them a full rundown. We left them to their race and had lunch. They soon floated past. By the time we had repacked we were moving down the river with them until they finally reached their destination. We paddled on to the Ohura River junction and pulled the canoes into the rock wall. This is normally a beautiful waterfall but the river flow was so low it was a rock shelf. We pulled the boats onto the hard and climbed to the top of the hill. This area is called Maraekowhai. All that is left of a settlement are two poles. One is a war pole, the other a peace pole to mark the end of the Hau Hau wars. A houseboat was moored here in the early 1900’s. We chose a DOC campsite, well grassed and with a sheltered table area. Mike soon had it completely covered in, another good fire going and a great meal underway.

Friday After breakfast, gear sorted and vehicle loaded with a Pacifica and 2 Novas, we set off to the putin at Taumaranui. First we practised a few strokes and eddy turns. A lot of hazards were visible, mainly trees. Clearly, the river was pretty quiet. A short easy paddle and we pulled up on a bank, boiled the billy and had lunch enjoying the quiet surroundings and listening to Mike the clown. We reached the first campsite in the early evening. It was raining, which complicated the gathering of firewood, cooking the meal and pitching tents with a huge fly over the picnic table. We used the canoes and driftwood as anchor points, and then we sat, ate tea, and played cards till bedtime. There is road access to this site and equipment had to be kept secure.

Sunday We woke to a clear sky and after yet another good breakfast we were back on the river again enjoying the rapids and the scenery. It was obvious that the floods at the beginning of the year had been very high. The river banks were covered in branches and tree stumps.

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ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

The further down the river we went the worse it became. The sun was now shining, the temperature up and the morning was sheer bliss. It did not seem long before we passed the Retaruke Stream, which is the access from Whakahoro. Several canoes were tied up at the steps of the Mungapapa camping site. Tony yelled out “lets pinch these canoes” and suddenly heads popped up everywhere. Drifting downstream paddling and running a few rapids, our bellies told us it was lunch time. We dined on bacon and eggs. Great. The aroma drifted upstream attracting all other river adventurers. But they got none! Time for a swim and a stone-skipping contest won by the current universe champion. He’s open to any challenge. Further downstream we called into another campsite only to find that the flood-water had ruined much of it. It turned out that DOC personnel were rebuilding many sites. We explored a side stream, picking our way through stumps and snags. As the day progressed we chose an area of riverbed for a really great campsite. Pete


suggested setting the breakfast table in the river to impress the other groups coming down. But we slept in.

Monday We must have been eating pretty well as packing up got quicker every day. This morning’s paddle was at an easy pace, and we enjoyed the changing scenery with every bend of the river. Goats, ducks, and other wild life frequent the area. We reached the boat landing which gives access to the Bridge to Nowhere and walked to the bridge up ridges encompassed by native trees and plants, occasionally glimpsing deep ravines to the river far below. We passed some relics of the early days in this area. The bridge plaque tells of its origins. It resembles Grafton Bridge in Auckland but would have been much more of a challenge to build. And guess what? Here was another challenge for Chris. A bridge to walk across, but not as we would do it. No, Chris climbed onto the handrail and walked across the full length of the structure. It was a pretty clever stunt .... Or was it. We

returned to the landing just in time for Pete to rescue one of the craft as it broke free of its anchor. We moved off and paddled down to our next night’s campsite. Bush gave way to broken farmland. We chose to camp opposite the Marae. Other canoeing groups were congregating for the last dash. We shared our site with a group who had some young enthusiastic possum hunters amongst them. As the dark closed in Peter and Mike decided to play possum with them. They crept through the bush and created a hullabaloo, which scared the pants off the young set. After yet another great day on the river and another enjoyable meal we hit the sack.

on each side keeping the fully laden boat evenly balanced while attempting to swap sides. Oops, splash! Luckily the boat stayed upright. It seemed sometime before we came to the master rapid but it was PLAYTIME. The boats were emptied of equipment and out into the rapids they went. Canoes coming down the river, which failed to get the right line, were rescued. Meantime we had the fire going for the last snack on the river. We then headed for the take out at Pipariki. Back to Taupo to pack up, a last meal together and the slog back to the concrete jungle. A truly memorable and enjoyable experience for both the trip and the company.

Tuesday Everybody rushed about trying to be first away. Out of chaos came a plan which started with a water fight and then a little later a shower underneath one of the beautiful water falls. The river flow was very low and paddling for five days had taken its toll. Chris & Mike’s antics never failed to surprise. Their latest stunt was a deck walk around the gunwale of the canoe, one

THE YAKITY YAK KAYAK CLUB RUNS REGULAR TRIPS ON THE WHANGANUI RIVER IF YOU’RE KEEN TO GO EXPLORING. JOIN THE CLUB AND HAVE THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE.

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

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VOLUME 4 ISSUE 1

DIVING

If someone had suggested using a kayak as a platform for SCUBA diving a few years ago we would have laughed. Back then diving and kayaking just weren’t compatible. But now with the new sit- on, self-draining kayaks it’s possible to SCUBA dive from them. These versatile craft are an alternative to launching the inflatable boat at a boat ramp or swimming off the beach for a dive.

Some dive sites are an extremely long swim from the nearest beach but are hardly worth launching a boat for. In summer the heavy traffic at the local boat ramp and the long walk back after parking the car and trailer are also a real negative. Suddenly the kayak option seemed a good idea. The brochures all show dive gear neatly stowed and a diver paddling out. They also show a tropical scene, light wetsuit and no heavy weight belt so how well would it work in colder water and heavy gear? We purchased two sit-on kayaks that were recommended as ideal learners’ kayaks but had the advantage of also being suitable as dive platforms. Even at this stage we were still sceptical about kayak diving. The best way to find out was to test the theory. Although the kayaks were designed to be carried on a roof rack we modified our trailer to carry them. This only involved removing the front and back boards so the kayaks could sit, one on top of the other, on the floor of the trailer. We loaded with twotwo sets of SCUBA gear and twoand housed loadedour ourcarcar with sets of SCUBA gear two cameras housed

BY JENNY AND TONY ENDERBY

and headed for the nearest quiet beach. Somewhere with few spectators would be a good place to attempt to load all the gear onto the kayaks for our test run. The rear of the kayak is perfectly designed to fit a fully-rigged scuba tank, one fin each side and dive mask attached. The weight belt fits in the front of the foot rests and the camera rigs and drybag at the front. Amazingly there was still room for us to sit - and the fully laden kayaks still floated after we dragged them into the sea! With wetsuits on for the paddle out there was no need for life jackets. This was the start of a whole new era in our diving and kayaking. A velcro leg rope from a surfboard solved the problem of what to do with the paddles when we reached the dive site. They floated alongside the kayaks, out of the way but still safely attached. A small grapple, chain and anchor rope found on a previous dive, fitted just right on the kayak’s bow. The two kayaks were joined by using the backrest hooks or a rope and clips. We were now ready for our first dive off the kayaks. We turned our air on, slid the assembled scuba rigs into the water, ensuring they were attached to the kayaks. Fins, masks and weight belts

The sun’s rays sparkle between the kayaks as Jenny returns to the kayaks.

Tony slides the SCUBA gear into the water off the kayak. were donned and into the water we went. At this point the stability of the kayaks showed. At no stage during our entry manoeuvre did a capsize look imminent. The next step was to climb into our BCDs (buoyancy compensators), vent the excess air and descend. From here it’s no different to any other SCUBA dive. First, a quick check to ensure the anchor was secure or we could have a long swim back. A dive flag could be attached to the kayak with a bit of ingenuity using the drain hole for the flagpole. Our dive site was approximately 1500 metres from the beach and because we were diving and leaving our kayaks unattended, we chose to dive where there was no current running. Large numbers of fish including jack mackerel and trevally swirled all

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Main pic: Tony peers underwater to check our dive site and visibility. The resident large yellow moray eel from the northern end of Goat Island

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around us. Further down other school fish, blue maomao, sweep and snapper cruised. Bottom dwelling fish such as blue cod, red moki, goatfish and paketi moved in and out of the rocks and kelp. In the crevices amongst the rocks were numerous small rock lobsters, feelers out waving in the surge. We planned to come back when they were bigger. The sun’s rays streamed down and sparkled through the sea around our bright yellow and red kayaks sitting at anchor ten metres above us. Using a compass it is easy to plan a dive on an “out and back” or triangular course and surface close to the kayaks. We found with the large amount of boat traffic around, that surfacing next to the kayaks increased our safety margin. Over summer it can be hazardous surfacing in open water after a beach dive even if you are towing a dive flag and float. At the completion of our dive it was just a matter of climbing out of our BCDs and attaching our SCUBA gear to the kayaks. Our weight belts were then lifted onboard. It was very easy to climb back on and we only had a short paddle back to the beach. As our kayak paddling skills improved we found it easier to paddle further. Now at last we could paddle to the outer reefs of the nearby Goat Island Marine Reserve. On our way to the dive site we paddled around the island first, exploring the caves. One cave in the channel has a sandy beach at the back where it is possible to land kayaks. The caves are home to little blue penguins and we were careful not to disturb any which have been nesting there. Arriving at the northern point we looked for the top of the reef through the clear water and lowered the anchor. The bottom here was very rocky and there were many cracks and crevices for crayfish to hide in. Some of them were very large and were out in the open during the day. We found a large wrinkly yellow moray eel and were lucky to have him pose while we took photographs. These much maligned creatures belie their aggressive appearance and we have always found them to be curious and approachable. It was easy to extend a dive here even after the film was exhausted. The numbers of fish in the reserve far exceed those found in other coastal areas. Eventually however the dive must end and we returned to the kayaks. At the beach we found yet another benefit of using kayaks. We could just pull them on to the sandy beach fully laden. The usual problem of having dive gear covered in sand after a beach dive was no longer an issue. We are now totally converted to diving off the kayaks and our inflatable boat has gathered considerable dust. Outside the marine reserve the kayaks would make a good base to spearfish or fish from. Trolling for fish while paddling around the coast is another option. We have noticed a big increase in the number of sit-on kayaks. They are a handy asset for a family especially if some members do not dive. It makes an ideal family day out if some wish to dive from kayaks, while the rest of the group paddle off to explore the coastline and meet up later. On some trips bottlenose dolphins, less frequently Orca, which cruise along this coastline, may accompany kayakers. Keep paddling when dolphins come alongside and they will get under the bow and give you a ride. For anyone diving or snorkelling New Zealand’s coast, kayaks are a worthwhile investment. When you add the dolphin experiences they fall into the must have category. For us more than half our dives are now from kayaks - we couldn’t do without them!


VOLUME 4 ISSUE 2

Whangaparapara Harbour

What an amazingly, unbelievable day!! We paddled into Whangaparapara Harbour on a beautiful spring day with a stunning mountain backdrop and were all enjoying this view when a dolphin flew from the water. A unanimous yell of excitement shattered the tranquility. Dozens of dolphins playfully surrounded us. They raced towards the side of our kayaks and at the last moment suddenly changed course to match ours. They swam along under our kayaks vying for best position. Their enthusiasm and the pressure wave that formed on top of the dolphins all seemed to pull us along. We raced across the bay yelling and whooping while they whistled and squealed. Then they shot out to either side and raced off to play leaping in the air. In the excitement Mike ended up in the water with the dolphins all around him. This was too much for Roland who also ended up in the water and was instantly surrounded by dolphins. The noise on the surface was of whoopees, yahoos and wahoos with his snorkel only muffling the enunciation of the words not the feeling or volume. The dolphins played with us for over two hours until we dragged ourselves exhausted back on board the MV Friendship. We watched them playing into the early evening. The next day we visited the Harbour Master’s place, the old whaling station, which stopped operating years ago. It is now a boat yard with piles of huge rusty steel buoys, which I think were used in harpooning whales. In the typical Barrier way nothing is wasted as the vege garden

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in a dingy shows. As you enter Whangaparapara Harbour the Whaling station is on your port side. Opposite is the Wharf and Great Barrier Lodge with accommodation, bar, food and a store to restock supplies. Heading up the estuary past the lodge on the port side is the DOC Camp situated on a rocky, oyster covered beach under an impressive Pohutukawa tree. A high tide and good footwear makes landing easy. This Harbour is a must to

visit. The coast on both sides is beautiful and has road access if you are not inclined to paddle too far. Bonaventure and the MV Friendship are often in this area so give Captain Bob a call and do it in style. Thanks Bonaventure and the dolphins for a memory of a lifetime. Peter Townend

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TARANAKI

• Courses • Equipment Hire • Tours • An excellent range of kayaks and accessories • Visit a seal colony • Experience the thrill of white water • Enjoy a scenic paddle showing the best of Taranaki Come and visit our friendly family business, dedicated to giving Taranaki professional service in all kayaking activities!

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Ph/Fax: 06 754 8368 email: canoekayak@maxnet.co.nz McClean Street, Waitara ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

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cool STROKES

ISSUE 11

Guts and determination decrease with time and even the strongest person tires quickly when wasting energy. Here are some extracts from the Auckland Kayak Schools Operation manual to help develop your technique. If your copy of NZK gets all wet whilst trying to follow the instructions get onto a good skills course. SECONDARY COACHING POINTS TO FINE TUNE YOUR POWER STROKES. Paddle splash on entry results from starting to pull the paddle back before it is submerged, hence wasting a lot of energy.

This is the paddle stroke which gets us from A to B and thus requires a lot of focus. A poor power stroke makes it hard to keep up with the group and makes any trip much less enjoyable.

Paddle splash on exit is the result of not feathering your paddle blade to allow a clean exit from the water. The paddle should be removed vertically at the hip. If you are lifting water think how heavy the water on each blade is. It will be anything from a quarter to one full kilo – after many thousands of paddle strokes on any trip, you are going to be either real strong or real tired!

PRIMARY COACHING POINTS In the main picture Rob is making a box shape with his arms and paddle. This is the starting point of a good paddling style. To begin, the paddle goes in the water at your toes to give the maximum length of stroke.

The top hand punching out at eye level is the strongest place to be pushing forward. If your hand is going higher then think about dropping the other hand further into the water, this will bring the top hand down.

The paddle stays close to the side of the kayak, to minimise the turning effect on your kayak. Ensure you keep the blade fully immersed. Remove the paddle at the hip as beyond the hip the paddle is starting to lose its effectiveness.

TRUNK ROTATION Trunk rotation is where the majority of sustainable power comes from. Briefly this involves using the main body muscle groups to supply the majority of power to the paddle. It is done by concentrating on pulling the paddle down the side of the kayak by twisting your body rather than pulling with your arms.

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Rob is keeping his body position forward and constant at all times.

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ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


SWEEP STROKES

LOW BRACES

The sweep stroke turns your kayak in tight areas or in windy conditions. Start with box shape as shown in Primary Coaching Points. The paddle goes in at the toes with the top hand in a lower position than the power stroke.

The low brace is used to prevent capsize and with enough practice will become a reflex reaction to an imminent capsize. It should be developed in shallow water where the paddle can hit the bottom to prevent an actual capsize and then progress to deep water as confidence and ability improve. When starting to capsize, make a vertical box as in power and sweep strokes but bring paddle shaft down to your spray skirt.

The paddle is pulled around in a half circle away from the kayak.

Use the back of the blade to push down, keeping your elbows above the shaft. This is the strongest position for your body giving more power whilst reducing the chances of injury.

The paddle finishes at the back of the kayak.

The body provides power by twisting from the waist and also reduces stress on the shoulder by limiting over extension.

Use a ‘hip flick’ to recover your kayak. This is the use of your lower body (including your feet, knees and butt) to anchor yourself firmly into the kayak. Your hips will provide a flexible point from which you can flick the kayak back into the level position. When the paddle has provided enough support recover by twisting the blade forward into a vertical position before removing it from the water.

Keep your top hand close to the spray deck to extend the paddle to its maximum reach and provide greater leverage to help your turn.

the Past Keep the blade fully immersed and your head facing forward and the kayak level.

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paddleFLOATrescue Out on your own and in the drink? You’d better know how to perform a self-rescue! When you are sea kayaking anywhere solo, or if there is a chance that you may be separated from your buddies you need a good self rescue method. The most reliable and the least complicated is the Paddle Float Rescue - ‘PFR’. The PFR comes into its own when water and wind toss your kayak around. The inflated paddle float, on the extended paddle, forms an outrigger which provides stability for you to climb back into the kayak. Look at the steps shown here and get out on the water for a practice session. Remember it is essential to practise in the weather conditions you may experience, to be sure that you are safe. Do ensure that extra help is at hand and observe normal safety procedures. 1. Capsized paddler exits and keeps hold of the kayak.

can enter the cockpit. Keep your weight 2. Fit your paddle float to your paddle. on the paddle float. Ensure the leash is firmly tied to your 7. Swivel forward into the cockpit, still on kayak. your stomach until your groin is over the seat.

The importance of being able to empty or get back into your kayak may be simply convenient or absolutely crucial depending on the circumstances.

8. Flip yourself over so that your backside

The modern sea kayak can travel long distances relatively easily and handles varying weather conditions. These qualities may, on some occasions, result in an unplanned capsize. The premise that paddlers are usually with a buddy allows us to assume that one paddler of the pair has remained upright. This sets the stage for an assisted rescue.

3. Right your kayak after you have set up your Paddle Float as the kayak will be less affected by the wind while upside down. Also it won’t take on any more water.

drops down into the seat. 9. Bring the paddle around onto your deck,

4. Fit the paddle to your customised paddle holder on the rear hatch or hold the paddle on the rear deck behind the cockpit with your hand securing it. The paddle is extended out at 90 degrees. 5. Swim/pull yourself up on to the back pump out remaining water, secure your spray skirt, then re-pack and secure the paddle float.

6. Continue on to the kayak until your feet

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2. The rescuer then paddles to the bow of the capsized kayak. If possible, the swimmer gives their paddle to the rescuer to be placed safely under the forward deck bungies of the rescuer’s kayak. The swimmer moves to the stern whilst continuing to hold onto the kayak. Remember it is possible for the wind to blow the kayak away faster than a person can swim. The rescuer is now across the bow of the overturned kayak, at a 90 degree angle to the cockpit, grasping the bow. The rescuer stows their own paddle under their forward bungie alongside the other (see main pic above).

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If you are still unsure or can’t get the PFR to work, enrol in a course and get it sorted. deck lying face down. Put your feet on the paddle shaft for balance and support.

1. After capsizing a kayak, the swimmer holds onto his or her kayak and paddle. The rescuer makes visual and voice contact with the swimmer to ensure he/she is okay and realizes that help is at hand. The rescuer reminds him/ her to hold onto kayak and paddle.

Ross Huff demonstrates the easy way.

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ISSUE 12

T-RESCUES By Ross Huff and Andy Blake

5. The empty boat is bought alongside, with its stern next to the rescuer’s bow. Both paddles are stowed under the bungies on the disengaged side. To assist the swimmer climb into his/her kayak by keeping it stable, the rescuer holds the front of the empty kayak’s cockpit rim with the hand farthest from the swimmer’s kayak, and positions the near side arm over the foredeck. 6. The rescuer asks the swimmer to let their feet float behind and mount 3. To empty water from the upturned kayak, the rescuer lifts the boat until the hull lies under the bow of the upturned kayak. The rescuer then flattens the hull, whilst pulling the bow of the waterlogged kayak onto their cockpit rim. When directed, the swimmer helps by pushing down on the stern of the waterlogged kayak This is especially necessary with a heavily loaded boat. 4. The rescuer now lifts the bow to head height as the stern is pushed further down by the swimmer. Most of the water drains from the cockpit. The kayak is rotated to float upright. The bow is lowered. Be very careful to turn the rudder away from the persons face at the stern.

the back hatch behind the cockpit, positioning the belly button in the centre of the hatch. Use the rescuer’s kayak for stability. The swimmer swivels around to face the stern of their kayak, again using the rescuer’s kayak for support. Legs slide into the cockpit whilst keeping body weight and head low. With the groin over the cockpit seat, the swimmer turns towards the rescuer. The swimmer finally sits in the seat. 7. The kayak should be virtually empty of water. However, continue to support the swimmer’s kayak until the spray skirt is fastened and composure recovered. 8. Ensure he/she is okay, and happy to carry on under their own power. Release him/her.

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ISSUE 13

6 intrepid sea kayakers on the

Hoteo River

David, Dianne, Rachelle, Mark, John and I, Natasha, met at David’s place on the Kaipara Coast. By 9.30am we were on our way north to the mouth of the Hoteo River to leave some cars. We carried on 26 km inland to start the trip.

No problem we thought - we’ll have the tidal flow pulling us out as well as the river flow so 26 km.... should be done soon after lunch time ... well maybe 3 or 4pm by the latest. Hmmph! We hadn’t bargained on the obstacle course that the first couple of kilometres of the river presented. It took an hour and a half and mucked up our time-estimates! This bit of the river was narrow and we had to proceed in single file. All of us except John had done a white-water course as well as the Whanganui River so we were going over all the basics to give him a quick lesson. It probably put the fear of God into him ... go for the “V”, keep away from trees, hug the rock if you get pinned on it, if you fall out...., if there’s a waterfall .... if this ... if that .... And the heap of equipment we took would probably have the locals laughing. Although we had a 1:50 000 topographic map, had scouted the area by road 2 weeks before, spoken to the locals, and found a couple of guys who had been down before, none of us had been on the river before. All our YY training came in handy and we had First Aid kits enough for a battle field, a tent, sleeping bags, cookers and extra food, a clutch of cell phones (there was no reception!), and even a GPS!, enough throw ropes to tangle a whale, split paddles, you name it we had it! In fact we could have put on an outdoor expo for Canoe and Kayak no problem! And best of all? We didn’t need most of it. Why did the first two kilometres take so long? We were getting our river legs back, taking each piece of water cautiously. Mark at the front, David at the rear and the less intrepid explorers between. Our ears were pricked

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for water noises.... were we going to be smacked by rapids all day.. and what about that waterfall one local mentioned? Why were there 2 named rapids at the end of the trip - were they monsters or just obstacles to boats coming up from the sea? And then we spotted the first hazard. A bloated stinking sheep carcass! Urggh! I averted my eyes and held my breath as we passed ... but then there was another and 10 minutes later another all in different stages of decay. They had been swept against obstacles and were often just where we needed to squeeze through .... there was even one hiding in a bush that John so nearly put his hand on to pull himself through ... it was a stinking cesspool!!! There were also trees across the river - one in particular was quite a challenge. This is where certain members’ skill at the Limbo was put into practice - I mean how else were we to get through without getting our feet wet? David was already out and crawling through branches when John decided to shove his way under the trunk and it worked for him. Then it was my turn, but my buoyancy aid was jammed so full of stuff (and me I suppose!) that I couldn’t

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flatten myself forward on the deck. I tried the Limbo routine and came up very close with a gnarly old tree I managed to squeeze under. Then it was Dianne’s turn followed by Rachelle, which is when the music started in our heads - you know that Caribbean petrol drum stuff! It certainly kept us entertained to watch all the contortions required to continue with the trip! But it took ages. Next time we would miss out that first bit and go in near the rail bridge instead.

Luckily the river widened a little after that and was a lot cleaner. We relaxed and the scenery occupied our minds - pastures with sheep and lambs (living ones!), patches of bush and indigenous forest .... and soon an hour had passed and we hadn’t seen a single carcass .... We found a good place for lunch, hauled out the GPS and checked it against the map ... mmm our progress was slow but we could see where we were, the weather was good and we were having fun. The river is varied and meanders back and forth in great loops through the hills. We found the expected waterfall and hung back while one of the guys went to investigate. We landed on an island with the raging waterfall on our left and a blockage on the right that could well be an exciting jump for white water crazies when there is more water. We staged a few photos posing our sea-kayaks in death defying positions and then hauled them all over the top. Resuming paddling we saw whitebait nets and traps but still had not met a soul all day, heard no traffic noise, just enjoyed the sighing of the wind in the trees, the babbling of the river (and no, we didn’t hear the buzzing of the blow-flies!). So we were surprised to come upon a whole family around a corner with their four wheel drives, chairs, chilly bins, and a fire, tending their whitebait

nets. So surprised were some of us that we took our eyes off the river at a crucial stage and got stuck high and dry ... good grief, Dianne had done another rock-splat!! Some people just bond with some things and Dianne and rocks have built up quite a special relationship this past year! Never mind, at least we gave our audience some entertainment - they had looked pretty bored! The last third of the trip the river opened up a bit. We had Mount Auckland on our left with its fantastic display of bush - the Kowhai in splashes of yellow and other trees with a spring flush of bright green. And still we hadn’t found the two named rapids! We’d had a couple of good ones to negotiate but they were in the wrong place so we knew more were coming. We did find them eventually and had fun on the first and I got stuck on the second - all those damn flat rocks just under the surface kept getting attached to the bottom of my boat ... what did I say about special relationships? But the named rapids were behind us and a weight off our minds (we sea kayakers are a timid bunch, you must remember!). Now the slog began, the river widened and the wind began to funnel up the valley blasting us in places. We had a good flow helping us along but we kept wondering when we were going to get there ... just around the next bend ... only another 3 or 4 kms ... It had been a long day Eventually the road bridge came into sight and there were Cheryl and the kids waiting patiently for us (we were an hour and a half later than we said we would be). What a relief to haul out and have a cup of tea and a well-travelled muffin, to stretch legs and make use of the fancy facilities provided by Rodney Council. It was 5.30pm and we had started our paddle at 10.30am. It was quite an effort driving home - I was exhausted and my muscles were tired. But we have all made entries in our diaries for next year - maybe a week or two earlier to catch the Kowhai in full bloom, and making sure that high tide is early afternoon so that the tidal flow helps us along the last section. We wanted to take a small group this time as we had no idea what to expect, but next year it will definitely be a busy club trip. A good introduction to rivers with a few friendly rapids to add excitement. Perhaps a good trip to do before the Wanganui, to practise paddle strokes and gain river knowledge and get some confidence on a river. Definitely an excellent trip to be included in the club calendar. Natasha

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5VSLJTI %FMJHIU by Rob Howarth

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YEE HAAAAA!!!

ISSUE 14 Every now and again someone will end up taking an unpleasant swim, usually I can work my magic and have them laughing and joking within a few minutes of landing on solid ground, but not this time. Ben, (aged 17), was bawling his eyes out in the uncontrollable manner that you can associate with childhood. I tried reassuring him by saying, “Everyone takes a swim from time to time - even the most experienced boaties,” - no joy. Then I tried to convince him the hole in his lower lip and the copious amounts of blood was just a graze and could be stitched up in a jiffy. The local hospital was only up the road and Mustafa the village doctor was very good - No joy. Even my attempts to convince him that we would be able to find his front teeth washed up in an eddy somewhere didn’t work. I was beginning to lose hope when all of a sudden Ben stopped shaking looked me in the eye and said “My Mum’s going to kill me, I’ve just ruined seven years of orthodontic treatment.” At this point I felt like bawling my eyes out! Needless to say Ben was soon stitched up and back on the river within a couple of days, grinning a big toothless grin. Turkey 2000 was a youth expedition down the mighty River Coruh, (pronounced ‘Choroo’), in North East Turkey which I had organised in conjunction with Dave Manby. Dave has been at the cutting edge of white water paddling for over quarter of a century and has been running commercial trips down the Coruh since the mid eighties. He is, to all intents and purposes, Turkish and the locals treat him as such. The Coruh rises at around 3000m and flows for about 650 km through the Kacgar Mountains to the Black Sea. Between Ispir and Artvin the river winds its way over 130 km of excellent white water, from grade 2 to grade 5. There is always something to keep you amused and for twelve students from Exeter College in the UK the Coruh was the perfect river to hone their white water skills. The Coruh must rank in the top ten white water rivers in the world and coupled with the intense daytime heat the river was the only place to be. At night we camped under the stars. This part of the world is pretty much untouched by western tourism. The culture and scenery make it an unforgettable trip and you can understand why Dave Manby has been returning year after year. If you are planning your big OE, book this in on your itinerary, (www.coruhriver.co.uk), but don’t delay because they are already building a hydro scheme on the lower reaches of the river. You might be wondering who I am and why I’m writing this article? Well my name is Rob Howarth and after ten years of paddling cold wintry British Rivers (with the odd warm exception! ) I ‘m now living over here and running the Canoe & Kayak Store on the North Shore. Drop in and say hi!

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ISSUE 15

by Richard Dukes It was a beautiful spring day when 11 members of the Taupo chapter of the Yakity Yak Sea Kayaking club converged at the Tutukau Bridge. This bridge over the Waikato River is about 20 kilometres north of Taupo as the crow flies. Being the second paddle since the club was formed, it was good to find the 15-20 knot winds of the first paddle absent! The plan was several hours paddling down the Waikato River to Orakei Korako (O.K), enjoy the scenery and stop for lunch and a dip in hot pools. Sandra Rowland, a local clubbie, had organised the trip. We entered the water under the bridge and prior to setting off received some words of wisdom from Sandra: “Paddle like you are in America - keep to the right of the river out of the way of water skiers and wake boarders”. Good advice, as throughout the day several motor boats roared past us on our left. Sandra also said the Tutukau Bridge was popular for jumping off - a good reason to come back in summer! It was a very tranquil paddle, surrounded by native bush, scrub and bird life. The area is famous for its thermal activity, wafts of steam rise from the hillsides at regular intervals. About two thirds of the way into the trip Sandra directed us to a point directly below one steaming spot and with some complicated mooring manoeuvres 11 kayaks were tied up to the river bank. A short walk up the hill revealed clear, boiling water bubbling out of the ground and flowing 30 metres into the Waikato. This explained the two baths and plastic pipes we had seen earlier! After a quick lunch several paddlers took the opportunity to wallow - nice! Back in the boats a half hour paddle took us to

Orakei Korako past several very hot creeks. The last was the hottest - directly opposite Orakei Korako. I was getting nervous about having only a thin layer of plastic to stop me being poached! The paddle ended here for some of us. I drove up to Auckland for the Kayakers Ball - where I did get ‘poached’! Others continued to explore the broad stretch of the Waikato River called Lake Ohakuri. Everyone had an enjoyable day, and agreed that a return trip was a must. All up a great paddle for people of all abilities. Note: A lot of the land at Orakei Korako is privately owned and congestion can be a problem. We had pre-arranged permission to land there. There are other entry and exit points around Lake Ohakuri.

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CLUB SANDWICH By Ruth E. Henderson

That’s freedom!


Rangitoto clean-up brigade.

How often have you made or heard these refrains? “I’m not into joining things - I’m a free spirit - I paddle/walk/ride for the solitude, the peace and quiet.” “I have such an ordered, structured working week that I sure do not want to be organised on the weekend.” “I’ll wait and see what the day brings - I just want to play it by ear, see what crops up, go with the flow.” And, so say all of us from time to time. And hey, I hope you do love yourself and can enjoy your own company, the bliss of silence; can give yourself time off occasionally to just blob-out; and are able to be spontaneous. I do. But I want to do a pitch for participating in club activities and events. This - coming from someone who only joined the Yakity Yak club for the 10% discount on her initial purchase of sea-kayak, spray skirt, buoyancy aid and paddle (the bare essentials); who then decided that for once in her life she should do the equivalent of reading the instruction manual and do a course or two; who then took four years before she went on her first club paddle. This - is a bit rich. I agree. But, not tongue in cheek. Whether you are into week long, or weekend expeditions or are a day-tripper and haven’t yet done the group thing - give it a go, take the plunge. At first I thought that the club would be full of young, competitive ‘bucks’ and I’d be the exception, the ‘auntie’ or even the ‘granny’. But no, sea-kayaking attracts all ages and is a middle-aged pursuit for many. I have made many kayaking buddies that I link up with for private trips as well as club ones. In fact, I’d describe my attitude to the YY club as a “ family of friends.” I find I still need the 10% discount, as every time I go out with a group I’m exposed to another piece of gear or gadget I NEED. (This Christmas the headlamp torch is so useful, I wonder why it took so long to become essential!)

A year or so ago it was sails. Now with the topical emphasis and interest being on visibility, Kiwi ingenuity is focused on flags, lights and methods of attachment. Recycling takes on a new meaning when, whilst out paddling, you spot old 33 LP records. Safety in general is a big benefit of clubbing. There is safety in numbers, and peace of mind for those on the shore, with the knowledge that you’re with other experienced paddlers and trained leaders, who purposely or by example pass on tips and are coaching constantly. Another advantage of trips organised by other people is getting to go to places you’ve never heard of, or possibly would not contemplate on your own. Congratulations on the North Shore YY club initiative for having a regular Sunday paddle. I do like the idea that if I unexpectedly find I am footloose and fancy free, and it is too late to get some friends together, I don’t dip out. Just toss the kayak on the roof; chuck the paddle and gear bin in the car and bowl up to the shop at 9.30.and

Kathy makes friends - with a takahe at Tiritiri Matangi.

Tony Dumper takes a tumble or two every trip to reinforce rescue techniques.

A gizmo junkie - who me? Gordon Daglish

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

37


ISSUE 16

7 by Ruth E. Henderson

MORNIN’!!!

The pre trip blurb went like this “ Papaaroha is about 10 mins drive north of Coromandel...with nice lattes and food...accommodation will be basic ...tent ...we want easterlies...two hour paddle to nearby islands. Be there or be square.” The Metservice recreational forecast was “easterly 20 knots rising to northeast gusting to 35 with seas becoming rough and occasional rain with poor visibility.” Enough attraction for eleven ‘keen-ish’ kayakers to crawl away from Auckland’s rain and wind and eternal traffic queue to join up by cellphone and in person along the way. Kayaks being rather conspicuous there was no need for precise rendezvous: Thames’s ‘Pack and Save’ for the essential milk and bread and the nonresistible chocolate rolos, pistachios, kettle sticks, Camembert...Coromandel’s ‘Fish and Chip Shop’ ... and finally Papaaroha’s camping ground where an early bird was ensconced saving us waterfront possies. With just enough light left, pup tents and roof racks formed a different queue before we congregated in and around Charlie’s van for the odd tipple and nibble before bed. Dawn was wet, misty and too miserable for three fair weather folk and back they went. Down to eight. After more deliberation and more rain the toss up between antique shops and lattés, or coastline exploration, we dropped to seven. Our reward was a wee spot of sun, up close and personal views of some amazingly tenacious pohutakawa in full flower, and a shared hot cuppa in a sheltered bay as we inspected Charlie’s Scottish friend’s fancy craft with

38

retractable centreboards. Back to base, a few lusty squalls tried to ferry a few “less coast hugging than we ought to have been paddlers” across the Firth of Thames. They put paid to revised plans to go island hopping. Food now took precedence. Lunch in the dry comfort of the campground kitchen was an eye opener to this museli bar, and dry cracker cruncher. Fresh green salad with tuna on the side; crackers layered with Camembert, tomato slices, lightly dusted with salt and pepper; Roses chocolates. After all that...some trouped into Coromandel for window-shopping or was it the lattes? Others battled with the NZ Herald in the wind or snoozed the time away before the next main event. Pre-dinner drinkies. And eats. Once more we crowded into Charlie’s van, or should I say Café? There was Brie, corn chips, salsa, guacamole, and salami spread out on an upturned gear bin. Even without a couple of Cabernets, a girl could be forgiven for wondering where she was and which group she was with. The ‘Cappuchino Crowd’, the ‘Café Kayakers’, Cuisine Canoers’? No, the Yakkity Yak club. I questioned the stayers why, considering the weather, they were still happy to stay put with soggy surroundings and slithers of foam to sleep on, when at home they had soft beds, warm dry kitchens and lovers. The general consensus was that just getting AWAY for the weekend - the ESCAPE was everything, even if the weather was unkind, the kayaking limited and the tent whacked you repeatedly on the face all night. Or an appropriate analogy for this particular weekend would be “just because a cake doesn’t rise, doesn’t mean its a total flop, or inedible.”

Blast from the Past

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


TAUPO! FUN

& FREEDOM!!

If you love getting away from it all, relaxing and unwinding in beautiful surroundings then Canoe & Kayak Taupo’s “2 HOUR GUIDED KAYAK TRIP” is just what you need! Your 2-hour adventure begins at Canoe & Kayak Taupo’s specialist store where you will be greeted by the friendly staff who will introduce you to your guide for the trip. Your guide will explain what’s involved and will fit and adjust your lifejacket. There are changing rooms, a toilet and a secure area for you to leave your belongings in. From here we drive to the Waikato River and after a safety brief, we get on the water ready to start our great kayaking adventure. The Waikato River is New Zealand’s longest river, the section we use is about 5km long and is predominately flat but quite swift in places. It provides for an outstanding scenic cruise. You need no experience for this trip and fitness levels are not important, in other words it’s great for everyone! As you kayak your way down the river you will pass by Cherry Island which is a picturesque animal farm park, you will pass under Taupo Bungy where you may see some jumpers. Next stop along the way sees us at a Natural Hot Spring where we stop for a soak in water where the temperature can reach 42 degrees centigrade! The trip ends at a reserve called Reids Farm. There is another optional activity on the river and that is the “Giant Rope Swing”, try it if you dare! We also have a unique arrangement with Taupo Bungy where we will give away a free bungy jump for every ten adults booked onto any given trip, one lucky person will get to jump while the rest of us wait below and offer typical constructive encouragement! Canoe & Kayak Taupo have an impeccable safety record, the kayaks we use have large open cockpits so there is no chance of being stuck in the kayak. The kayaks are very stable, the chances of falling out are very remote. We provide all equipment and our experienced guides carry a comprehensive medical kit and a full set of safety gear. We have a ratio of 7 kayakers to 1 guide, this ensures that everyone is well looked after at all times. The youngest we can take on the river is 4 years and there is no limit on the adult age! This is a fantastic trip for school groups, conference groups, social clubs… for any group in fact! We are fully licensed by the Taupo District Council and the Ministry of Internal Affairs.

38 Nukuhau Street, TAUPO Ph: 0800 5292569 ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

39


t ispor mult g g y n n i i d r nte e Ed k rac Uncl started e the kaya ch r a e D ea tly oy d on ecen y enj I’ve r nd I reall so focuse ve any a ha m races ly, now I’ at I don’t do. h n t uld I t O o . n h e s v leg t An advice column for kayakers with problems. e a . Wh ming upco anymore s d frien nely love nd lo a y l l o d a a e S ake t y her dIr nely. can t vice e Edd iends an ing toget o l l u c o d n y n d l U o r s a Sad a road Dear love my f ater padd yaking to . My Dear re many situation k off the w ly ka ? l I e a a t i e e m a a r t s h y I e n o w t. A Ther ur prese tisport ka nch of e go e to g ng ou bu ul yo that w kinda lik ’m wimpi a r m f e r t o l u a hen I’d kI e yo r in front k and t el a but... y all thin t s r o t a e c k s e i e r h kaya you l ll wh and t of of er or sea Subaru a e!). You’l o r n t i n r l a o p u o t o C ew it u whit ver it in y you’ve go time with suck o o r , but w n e u e o t v o n n n i a i i y r l k d Co em nds ust j es if s e r I i e ( a r r f , c Dear se you ar a f Dear U c drive ndles o od! ncle Ed . Who ur Who bu dy th Of co it anyway e scared. ciate with I find I have e fire me r o ’m o ’ s having r our u y and d think you ant to as s l te l d s e n bottle if thi os ds s of win ficulty gettin da ver w e is t frien of my s g more e into ak an ay ne My advic y m Ed a k y e th th a kaya a e front sea if the r again. k. Is th Andy compa n it. e big e c is h i v t n i n r e tm o rmal? ent you go w uy a oat, b die to playb pink car Dear A big ndy nice I myse lf have c d E ome u and th p again ere is n st this o easy of us w prob way ar ho enjo o u nd it. T lem y a gla day’s p h ss at th addlin e end o ose g, (rem and pa Dear Uncle Eddy. fa ember ddle), not to will jus manuf d Is it possible to get that rank smell out of r in t h k acture rs for a ave to lobby accom poly prop underwear. the fron modate s a stan t hatch that Ed Kevin dard c arton o f wine . Dear Kevin Only if you wash it with clean water and soap more than once a year. and k a y a Ed . pk Eddy t on to I need a Uncle y d a si s r e k t n n r i o Dear w th o ot I’ve g lways ut my wife what I’ve a b h t t i i e w k li ck really ne. Do I sti Dea o r ? e e g f g i bi I re r Unc my w e s a le c to ple a re ently Edd bou y a e l m b o Rob tro lc arg gh u we al don ble is ain ($ t a roo n that o a i t n s i , b e 3 f Ro qu hen Me ’t hav it doe 9.95 rack Dear ge-old e to time w nd please a wit e l off s v n a n any i a s n i m ’ y i s r t t i t Th thin stay h a fr the T is to from ing a t o e s c d i e n V i y v o a e go Dea ad as ot b up ag n it n the set o for m rM ip. My t you’ve g nstance, h h s . n y f F c o W i u a e irst yo or hat ar ve steak new relati e with wh ly, lvin th it. F ves? Have i r f car h s w i k y t s h w e g e n w oul ld ll thin e wa your o you d I ell, e ives). . It wa It is to yo me y t in th erent t or d If f i u f i o n v d d t s T o i o en o? ? ith few ime ord obvio ur hea u wer wh he k spin the yed w ood long t c i a l u p q e u e e d e nI sh o to for a Wh r but s tha by t drun dag hen g r out he ha t yo he i at y dis k, i ke he and only t a and s t t n t p u o o y l wa fo ro u n ar y to on rk the er model. spe our ne need portio e not merci s 4am tend g n’t wo r s a a t l o e e n o w o a n d d at d r ly l gu , an pol ting u that of get ice ntil t oofrac o now ely stu a ch y wit d you e s n e h e h to w car k exp . Th ey bo and is take pid as apska the b had a atc w t t te o ig te gun i h h hen we sw t on’ , le h Ed c e f th e pol t hav t alo ill ha rash o driv telev ll. e fi th! n e i v e rst you cema to w e buy e two ff into dow ision o a n n , Ed a tick will rry ab any t effec the pa the r nd st t r r o con et f s t a o a h . sh ut A] d a ap it of or b fi ein scate your r on TV You w an on t high ga n im your l oof ra again on’t b comi ng e a bec icen ck b eca nd B] able se ile f y u wit o hou r a w se th ou t an hile e nic e exc and use giv e .

Dear Uncle Eddy.

40

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


Dear Uncl e Edd I’m h y opin g y with this g ou can he uy no lp me I thin wf ? I’ kh done e really l or about t ve been g oing i h anyth kes m r out i e but ee month sure what ng more t , like s , we’v and like han k to do sugg , is e next. est Do yo s and like never Jamie ions? , I’m u, lik n e, um o m, ha t ve an Dear y , like , ahh Wha , Jam tI you c think you ie r rea an’t d l pro is ever ble dime tinguish betw m is, is th nsion colum e at, lik en re i t is yo n for e, ali u d Wee kly re esperate live in. T ty and wh h at pa ka is teena gers ir page fo yakers, no is an ago o n r t ride nah y thr ormo angst ridd a Women nally en em s some ough the d oti su riv a pare dvice for mmer. Ho en roller onal nts to you. -coas w e v Ditch er, I d t buy y have o ha er the ou m a pim ore thrills a whitew guy and g ve ate et yo pl fr ur Oh a y faced fi om that th r kayak. nd on You’l fteen an yo l e oth year u “like ever er o ” all t will f he tim thing. Fo ld with a rom Ed sk r god e. ’s sak ateboard e sto p say . ing

FOR SALE! Manukau

Canoe & Kayak Shop, Would you like to join us as Managing Director/owner operator of the Canoe and Kayak Manukau shop?

to otor rd m a he o b in dy t on t le Ed fitting an esting ou rst, c n U i Dear t finished now I’m t . (Safety f can d re ip us I’ve j kayak an rst real tr w is, whe an i c a o f e n y t s k tha I my re m want to it so , I need befo p I r k t e c a t o wa Wh ec s Also me). for th eck. y arm that’s faring kit e sprayd ow get m o a l. D f th eh I buy e level o can som ing whee r I h t t e a e e t rais ck th se the s eas? u ny Id ay de a spr that I can a keel? A d so into nk I’ll nee i h you t eorge ories yG ccess ens Craz a k e a g y li Geor the A ed ka razy’ y power far from he road C ‘ r a t t De , no uy m oss e Us’ ays b d acr I alw utbars ar arage an re. ‘N nt rg from hip repai et hire ce s k c e c a spa traitj the s from Ed

You will get your own established and growing business; the support of a nationwide company which provides training for you and your staff; buying power; courses and activities for your customers; assistance which ensures that you will succeed… The opportunity will suit a physically fit, kayak enthusiast with good human relationships, a strong desire to own a business which operates comfortably and effectively within the wider Canoe and Kayak team. He, or she, will spend 2 weeks studying the business in a now proven introductory course. This enables you and Canoe & Kayak Ltd to proceed confidently or not at all. Canoe & Kayak Ltd is preparing to open Licensed Operations in two other centers.

Interested? Then send me a brief resume of your background to pete@ canoeandkayak.co.nz and I’ll be glad to have a chat.

Eddy Lines advice to readers is of a very serious nature and in no way is meant to minimize the problems that the contributor may be facing.

All approaches will be dealt with in confidence.

Peter Townend Managing Director Canoe & Kayak Ltd

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

41


RACE RESULTS

Dear Competitor Congratulations on completing the 2003, 21st Anniversary Speight’s Coast to Coast. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. Next year is the 22nd anniversary and again I’m planning something special. The dates for the 2004 event are February 6th and 7th. Entry forms will be sent out on June 1st 2003. Entries for 2004 will be accepted by return mail only (no hand deliveries) and all entries must be on the official entry form or copies of it. Entry forms must be returned by June 14th 2003. International competitors have until December 31st 2003. One hundred places will be reserved for international competitors, 94 for 2003 prizewinners and 130 for the 2003 waiting list provided they all enter within the prescribed time. The remaining places will be balloted. A confirmation of entry will be sent to all competitors by June 30th. Those on the waiting list will also be advised of their waiting list number by June 30th and their likelihood of getting in. Kayaking Certificates: All new competitors must submit with their entry forms a letter

Key to Event Letters W = World Multisport Championship Key to Section Letters M = Open Men, VW = Veteran Women (over 40), X = Mixed,

I = Individuals Two Day

W = Open Women, C = Classic Men (over 50), CO = Corporate,

Place No. Names City / Country WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP OPEN MEN

Ev Sect

Time

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

1:44:09 1:42:06 1:42:06 1:44:19 1:44:23 1:44:09 1:44:13 1:44:09 1:44:17 1:44:24 1:44:26 1:44:12 1:44:08 1:44:15 1:44:19 1:44:09 1:44:18 1:44:16 1:44:19 1:44:24 1:44:20 1:44:18 1:44:16 1:44:10 1:50:45 1:44:13 1:44:15 1:44:36 1:44:18 1:51:21 1:44:29 1:51:14 1:44:28 1:44:28 1:44:14 1:44:32 1:44:28 1:50:59 1:44:18 1:44:07 1:44:30 1:44:26 1:44:27 1:44:29 1:44:17 1:44:23 1:51:24 1:44:22 1:44:23 1:51:07 1:50:52 1:44:31 1:44:34 1:51:05 1:44:29 1:50:53 1:51:15

157 24 161 108 166 158 18 95 143 138 134 159 153 103 41 54 135 36 160 152 124 21 37 87 26 125 77 121 44 67 74 144 33 86 22 75 19 80 115 61 167 39 59 83 66 113 9 150 114 52 72 25 142 147 168 42 92

STEVE GURNEY KRIS CLAUSON NEIL GELLATLY RICHARD USSHER ERIC BILLOUD MARCEL HAGENER GORDON WALKER MICHAEL CAUSER ROSS ROTHERHAM MARK GREEN SCOTT WILLIAMS SHAUN FAHEY RICHARD ANDERSON STEVEN HOFMANS ERIK VAN EYNDHOVEN TIM GRAMMER MARTIN DREYER AL CROSS ROBIN WILSON DAMON GOERKE ANDREW ROBERTSON MIKE GILBERT STEVE BECKETT LAURENCE MOTE AARON JEFFERIES RAY HOPE ALLISTER ACKERS MURRAY GRAY ANDREW NICHOLSON DAVID BRINSON MICHAEL JOBBINS JEREMY WHITE GEOFF LUDEMANN GARTH SPENCER NICK WARREN BRENT O’NEILL DALE BUTCHER DAVID BEECHE MATTHEW JONES MURRAY HEALEY JOHN MCKINNEL DAVID STEELE RAYMOND DONALDSON RICHARD HARDING ANDREW BARKER ANDY BEALE ROB NEILSON ANDREW PETERSON DAVE VAN BEEK DAYLE SUTHERLAND RICHARD ADAMS MARK DAVIES DANIEL BROWN SIMON DARK THOMAS PATTERSON CRAIG HART JASON BIRCHALL

CHRISTCHURCH AUSTRALIA ARTHURS PASS QUEENSTOWN QUEENSTOWN GERMANY AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND UNITED KINGDOM GREYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND NEW PLYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON SOUTH AFRICA WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH AUSTRALIA CHRISTCHURCH HAMILTON LYTTLETON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH DUNEDIN AUCKLAND DUNEDIN BAY OF PLENTY CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON WAIHEKE ISLAND WELLINGTON PALMERSTON NORTH ALEXANDRA AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH WHANGAREI CENTRAL OTAGO CAMBRIDGE TE ANAU DUNEDIN CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUSTRALIA HOKITIKA CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND HONG KONG UNITED KINGDOM AUSTRALIA QUEENSTOWN ROTORUA

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

or certificate from a kayaking instructor stating that they are capable of paddling a grade two river. Competitors from previous years need only state the year or years they presented their kayak certificate. TV Coverage: 22/02/03 6:20pm SKY Sport, 24/02/03 11:00pm SKY Sport, 24/02/03 5:00pm SKY Sport 2, 25/02/03 3:00am SKY Sport 2, 28/02/03 9:30pm SKY Sport, 01/03/03 6:00pm SKY Sport 2, 02/03/03 3:00am SKY Sport Promotional Tour: I will be doing a promotional tour of the North and South Islands in April & May this year. Invites will be sent in late March to everyone on my database to attend. Don’t miss these evenings, they’re a hoot! If you change your address during the year, please let me know. If you have any friends who wish to enter, please tell them to write to me at 56 Clifton Terrace, Christchurch 8008, or phone (03) 326 5493 or fax (03) 326 7493 or e-mail judkins@xtra.co.nz Well, that’s it for the 2003 event. See you on the beach at Kumara next February for the Twenty Second Anniversary event. Regards,

T = Teams

V = Veteran Men (over 40), CW = Classic Women, F = Family Cycle1 Pl 6 2 1 28 36 7 12 5 21 37 42 10 4 15 27 8 25 17 26 39 29 23 19 9 61 11 14 59 22 105 48 93 45 44 13 54 46 72 24 3 50 41 43 49 20 35 111 32 34 80 63 51 56 79 47 64 94

Sec Pl Time 6 2 1 27 32 7 12 5 20 33 37 10 4 15 26 8 24 17 25 35 28 22 18 9 51 11 14 50 21 77 43 70 40 39 13 48 41 58 23 3 45 36 38 44 19 31 79 29 30 63 52 46 49 62 42 53 71

3:08:40 3:08:16 3:13:11 3:08:30 3:16:38 3:13:32 3:26:30 3:09:50 3:08:03 3:23:41 3:32:52 3:32:34 3:27:26 3:37:48 3:27:01 3:28:45 3:31:21 3:27:46 3:48:52 3:37:11 3:38:09 4:03:10 3:44:49 3:40:38 4:03:22 3:55:41 3:45:21 3:52:57 4:08:51 3:48:25 4:08:05 4:07:59 4:08:55 4:17:01 4:07:43 4:11:42 4:03:01 4:14:13 4:16:20 4:19:03 4:05:19 4:06:52 4:19:11 4:17:21 4:23:57 4:18:30 4:31:56 4:17:35 4:16:02 4:20:50 4:29:01 4:24:10 4:04:39 4:53:16 4:30:28 4:30:19 4:50:03

Mt Run Pl Sec Pl Time 4 2 6 3 8 7 10 5 1 9 17 16 12 20 11 14 \15 13 27 19 21 35 24 22 36 33 25 30 44 26 43 42 45 54 40 46 34 49 51 59 38 39 60 55 62 57 74 56 50 61 71 63 37 95 73 72 88

4 2 6 3 8 7 10 5 1 9 17 16 12 19 11 14 15 13 25 18 20 29 22 21 30 27 23 26 37 24 36 35 38 43 34 39 28 40 42 47 32 33 48 44 50 46 57 45 41 49 54 51 31 70 56 55 65

4:24:43 4:33:50 4:32:34 4:40:15 4:36:49 4:52:38 4:39:05 4:51:59 4:51:34 4:44:39 4:40:58 4:41:37 4:46:55 4:47:48 5:00:13 4:58:37 4:41:55 5:00:40 4:51:21 4:56:02 5:06:15 4:58:42 5:10:21 5:24:31 4:57:13 5:17:27 5:08:16 5:19:39 5:19:40 5:19:48 5:03:43 5:08:40 5:17:32 5:02:06 5:19:50 5:16:17 5:17:26 5:12:11 5:17:45 5:28:10 5:28:22 5:26:03 5:28:23 5:22:31 5:17:56 5:24:51 5:13:18 5:29:45 5:19:03 5:24:44 5:15:43 5:29:15 5:48:31 5:00:47 5:35:01 5:26:48 5:14:58

Kayak Pl 1 3 2 6 4 17 5 16 15 10 7 8 11 13 25 23 9 26 14 18 31 24 35 63 21 46 33 51 52 54 30 34 47 28 55 44 45 38 48 71 72 67 73 58 49 66 39 77 50 65 43 76 111 27 88 70 41

Sec Pl Time 1 3 2 6 4 16 5 15 14 10 7 8 11 12 21 19 9 22 13 17 26 20 29 49 18 36 27 41 42 44 25 28 37 24 45 34 35 30 38 54 55 52 56 46 39 51 31 59 40 50 33 58 78 23 64 53 32

1:56:37 1:54:40 1:53:56 1:58:10 2:00:48 1:51:19 1:54:14 1:59:26 2:01:48 1:56:54 1:56:44 1:58:26 1:58:26 1:56:32 1:55:35 1:57:22 2:17:34 2:03:20 1:55:26 2:05:46 1:57:13 1:50:26 1:58:04 1:56:48 1:57:24 1:51:30 2:11:01 2:00:20 1:50:26 2:07:43 2:13:42 2:03:20 2:01:01 2:11:54 2:04:49 2:04:38 2:15:04 2:02:51 2:04:24 1:53:16 2:06:59 2:12:51 1:59:00 2:07:58 2:07:34 2:06:09 1:59:37 2:05:19 2:22:04 2:06:21 2:08:27 2:09:02 2:12:26 2:06:51 2:03:25 2:05:49 1:58:53

Cycle2 Pl 18 13 8 27 42 3 11 36 50 21 19 28 29 17 15 23 119 60 14 75 22 1 26 20 25 4 100 39 2 88 109 59 46 103 69 66 111 56 65 6 83 106 33 90 86 79 37 72 128 81 93 96 104 82 61 77 32

Sec Pl Time 15 11 7 23 33 3 9 29 37 18 16 24 25 14 13 20 79 42 12 51 19 1 22 17 21 4 70 31 2 60 76 41 35 71 47 46 77 39 45 5 57 74 28 62 59 53 30 49 86 55 64 66 72 56 43 52 27

11:14:08 11:18:51 11:21:45 11:31:13 11:38:37 11:41:36 11:44:00 11:45:22 11:45:40 11:49:37 11:54:59 11:56:47 11:56:54 12:06:21 12:07:07 12:08:52 12:15:07 12:16:01 12:19:57 12:23:21 12:25:56 12:36:35 12:37:29 12:46:06 12:48:43 12:48:49 12:48:52 12:57:31 13:03:13 13:07:15 13:09:58 13:11:11 13:11:55 13:15:27 13:16:34 13:17:08 13:19:58 13:20:13 13:22:46 13:24:36 13:25:09 13:30:11 13:30:59 13:32:18 13:33:43 13:33:51 13:36:14 13:37:00 13:41:31 13:43:00 13:44:02 13:46:56 13:50:09 13:51:57 13:53:21 13:53:47 13:55:08

Overall Pl Sec Pl 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 24 26 27 28 30 31 32 34 35 36 38 39 40 42 43 44 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 55 56 57 61 62 63 64 65 67 68 70 71 72 74

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57

43


Cycle1 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Mt Run Pl Sec Pl Time

Kayak Pl

Sec Pl Time

Cycle2 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Overall Pl Sec Pl

Place

No.

Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

100 62 129 90 17 2 96 111 107 146 164 43 110 11 68 127 141 73 94 13 57 35 48 117 10 51 126 88 40 102 120 140 15 38 123 91 137

GRANT CHITTOCK JEREMY MARTIN AARON NICHOLSON ANDREW SLOAN KELVIN SYME GREIG HAMILTON NIGEL COX RYAN MENDES ALEXIS MIDDLETON GERARD SVARC GREG FARLEIGH JOHN BARKER JOHN PAYNE DAVID BURNETT MICHAEL FOOTE JASON HART MATTHEW WITHYCOMBE GARRY ANDERSON STUART ROBERTS MATTHEW MAKGILL RUSSELL BLOMQUIST MARK CHADWICK GRAHAM BURRELL KEITH MITCHELL SEAN MCELROY ALASTAIR MACKINTOSH IAN CHAN MILTON BLOOMFIELD MATT MCLAUGHLIN ANTON WESSELINK ANDREW WARNER BRUCE STUMBLES ANDY CLARK JOHN MCDONALD IAN GRAY NEIL BAXTER MARTIN THALMAN

CHRISTCHURCH RANGIORA WANAKA DUNEDIN AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WEST INDIES AUCKLAND AUSTRALIA HONG KONG AUCKLAND MT MAUNGANUI INVERCARGILL AUCKLAND WANAKA ENGLAND WELLINGTON SOUTH AFRICA WELLINGTON WHANGAREI AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND LOWER HUTT CHRISTCHURCH CHINA HAMILTON AUCKLAND SOUTH AFRICA WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH SWITZERLAND

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

1:51:08 1:51:07 1:51:19 1:51:23 1:50:53 1:51:17 1:44:24 1:44:31 1:51:17 1:51:09 1:44:16 1:51:27 1:51:04 1:51:10 2:01:23 1:50:59 1:50:56 1:51:20 1:51:26 2:01:19 2:01:21 1:50:54 1:51:29 1:51:28 2:01:20 1:51:10 1:51:00 2:09:55 1:51:21 1:51:11 1:50:58 2:01:17 2:01:18 1:44:20 1:44:27 1:51:32 1:59:59

83 81 101 108 65 97 38 53 98 86 16 117 78 88 135 73 69 102 115 131 134 66 119 118 132 89 75 137 104 90 71 127 129 30 45 127 128

65 64 74 78 54 72 34 47 73 66 16 81 61 67 89 59 56 75 80 86 88 55 83 82 87 68 60 90 76 69 57 84 85 29 40 85 86

4:25:56 4:36:42 4:38:39 4:27:17 4:45:12 4:50:46 4:54:58 4:57:43 4:38:58 5:04:50 4:50:27 4:55:45 4:44:10 5:10:42 4:56:04 4:34:30 4:51:20 4:52:43 5:15:56 4:54:35 4:57:09 4:48:12 5:12:27 5:27:08 5:11:30 5:41:12 5:37:37 5:42:01 5:15:58 5:27:41 5:53:57 5:39:35 5:38:28 4:47:53 3:55:59 4:50:58 5:53:49

66 77 78 68 83 90 100 105 79 109 89 101 81 112 102 76 91 93 119 99 104 87 116 125 114 134 130 135 120 127 141 133 131 89 34 94 148

52 59 60 53 63 67 72 76 61 77 66 73 62 78 74 58 68 69 81 71 75 64 80 83 79 88 85 89 82 84 90 87 86 64 28 69 92

5:32:06 5:38:07 5:31:56 5:34:05 5:48:11 5:42:36 5:41:37 5:37:51 5:49:55 5:23:58 6:01:12 5:38:08 5:47:22 5:28:28 5:24:05 6:14:55 5:47:36 5:57:21 5:19:46 5:38:48 5:42:11 6:05:46 5:51:50 5:31:08 5:36:49 5:45:05 6:01:31 5:46:21 6:19:02 6:04:40 5:58:04 6:16:14 6:23:02 DNF DNF DNF DNF

84 94 83 86 110 100 98 92 112 60 127 95 107 74 61 134 109 122 53 96 99 132 115 82 90 103 129 105 138 131 125 136 141

62 67 61 63 77 72 70 66 79 47 83 68 75 57 48 87 76 81 43 69 71 86 80 60 65 73 84 74 89 85 82 88 90

2:08:56 2:02:10 2:07:21 2:19:47 1:53:34 1:54:09 1:58:33 2:00:35 2:00:58 2:03:19 1:54:22 2:05:00 2:08:04 2:07:48 2:19:27 2:01:34 2:12:46 2:05:44 2:23:47 2:16:54 2:13:42 2:10:53 2:09:33 2:19:37 2:19:44 2:04:20 2:06:17 2:10:58 2:23:34 2:28:25 2:18:28 2:23:44 2:18:02

95 52 85 127 7 10 30 40 45 58 12 70 91 89 123 49 105 74 134 116 108 98 97 125 126 64 80 99 132 140 122 133 120

65 38 58 85 6 8 26 32 34 40 10 48 63 61 82 36 73 50 89 78 75 68 67 83 84 44 54 69 87 90 81 88 80

13:58:05 14:08:04 14:09:14 14:12:30 14:17:49 14:18:47 14:19:31 14:20:39 14:21:07 14:23:14 14:30:14 14:30:19 14:30:39 14:38:08 14:40:58 14:41:57 14:42:37 14:47:07 14:50:54 14:51:36 14:54:22 14:55:44 15:05:18 15:09:20 15:09:21 15:21:46 15:36:24 15:49:14 15:49:53 15:51:54 16:01:25 16:20:48 16:20:49

75 76 77 78 81 82 83 84 86 88 94 95 96 98 99 100 101 102 105 106 107 108 109 111 112 117 126 131 132 134 135 138 140

58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 DNF DNF DNF DNF

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

1:44:31 1:50:55 1:44:35 1:51:17 1:44:39 1:51:13 1:51:27 1:51:23 1:51:25 1:51:18 1:51:21 2:01:11 2:01:18 2:21:12 2:10:08 2:18:09 1:51:20

52 67 58 96 60 92 116 109 113 99 106 124 130 142 138 141 105

1 4 2 6 3 5 11 9 10 7 8 12 13 16 14 15 9

3:51:51 4:07:58 4:19:00 4:12:42 4:33:24 4:58:02 4:44:01 4:47:41 4:53:39 4:53:37 5:06:06 5:01:34 5:39:16 5:14:35 5:49:30 5:49:30 4:02:10

29 41 58 47 75 106 80 85 97 96 110 107 132 118 139 140 34

1 2 4 3 5 10 6 7 9 8 12 11 14 13 15 16 2

4:56:27 4:47:19 5:12:04 5:10:21 5:13:22 5:32:29 5:47:23 5:43:10 5:37:17 5:39:08 5:24:42 5:30:48 5:24:25 5:52:01 5:56:20 5:50:15 DNF

19 12 37 36 40 85 108 101 91 97 64 81 62 116 119 113

2 1 4 3 5 9 13 12 10 11 7 8 6 15 16 14

1:53:06 2:00:48 1:57:24 2:05:09 2:02:46 1:59:11 1:59:18 2:01:10 2:02:54 2:02:16 2:05:47 2:17:20 2:11:18 2:07:14 2:24:52 2:22:57

5 43 24 71 55 34 35 48 57 53 76 117 101 84 135 131

1 5 2 10 8 3 4 6 9 7 11 14 13 12 16 15

12:25:54 12:46:58 13:13:02 13:19:27 13:34:08 14:20:53 14:22:08 14:23:23 14:25:14 14:26:19 14:27:56 14:50:50 15:16:16 15:35:01 16:20:48 16:20:49

23 29 41 45 60 85 87 89 90 91 92 104 115 124 139 142

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

4:46:56

86

8

32 20 29 57 69 42 59 89 104 78 121 79 114 56 135 117 137 120 140 106 102 139 118 142 126 133 123

3 1 2 6 8 4 7 11 13 9 19 10 15 5 23 16 24 18 26 14 12 25 17 27 21 22 20

1:55:40 2:00:51 2:05:57 1:59:54 2:01:04 2:02:42 2:03:26 2:08:19 2:08:36 2:14:13 2:00:46 1:58:47 2:16:41 2:11:29 2:15:13 2:22:21 2:03:33 2:26:35 2:22:55 2:04:42 2:16:26 2:26:29 2:18:08 2:36:38 2:30:25 2:19:31 2:24:58

16 44 78 38 47 54 62 92 94 110 41 31 115 102 112 129 63 139 130 67 114 138 121 142 141 124 136

1 5 11 3 6 7 8 12 13 15 4 2 18 14 16 21 9 25 22 10 17 24 19 27 26 20 23

12:21:02 12:23:44 12:49:07 13:30:58 13:31:59 13:33:52 13:34:00 13:44:53 14:14:32 14:28:04 14:33:53 14:47:20 15:06:25 15:10:38 15:14:28 15:19:42 15:22:40 15:28:03 15:29:59 15:35:17 15:39:20 15:45:06 15:47:00 15:49:53 16:02:08 16:14:06 16:20:49

20 22 33 52 54 58 59 66 79 93 97 103 110 113 114 116 118 119 122 125 127 129 130 133 136 137 141

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP OPEN WOMEN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

154 30 149 163 81 119 148 156 130 116 155 122 151 71 93 132 85

JILL WESTENRA FIONA HALL CLAIRE SYKES KOLEIGHNE FORD JOANNA GOSSE KERRY FITZGIBBON TUI SUMMERS PAM HEWLETT PAULETTE BIRCHFIELD RACHEL CASHIN ALICE FOOTE THEA DE PETRIS GILLEAN HILTON SANDY GREEN LINDA WRIGHT NIKKI BANNERMAN LARA PRINCE

WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH MOTUEKA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND WANAKA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH TAUMARUNUI CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUSTRALIA TAUPO AUCKLAND ALEXANDRA CHRISTCHURCH

DNF 97

JAN HALES

WELLINGTON

W

W

1:51:14

94

6

16

RACHEL PETERSON

CHRISTCHURCH

W

W

2:31:56

158

19

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V

1:44:16 1:44:22 1:44:21 1:44:26 1:51:20 1:50:55 1:51:01 1:44:22 1:51:10 1:51:25 1:51:22 1:51:07 1:51:16 1:50:56 1:51:09 1:51:24 1:51:12 2:01:13 1:51:03 2:00:04 2:01:17 2:01:09 2:15:45 1:51:29 2:08:39 2:10:38 2:01:20 2:00:56

18 33 30 40 103 68 76 31 87 112 107 82 95 70 85 110 91 125 77 122 126 123 140 120 136 139 133 130

1 4 2 5 15 6 8 3 12 18 16 10 14 7 11 17 13 22 9 20 23 21 27 19 25 26 24 22

DNF

DNF DNF

DNF

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP VETERAN MEN (over 40) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

109 136 28 162 29 131 99 1 112 84 76 47 70 106 69 65 20 32 53 46 8 23 139 118 5 45 63 60

MIKE SIM BRIAN WEEDON WAYNE HODGETTS ANTHONY REID RUSSELL TROTTER ANDREW MCLEOD ADAM BEGG MASON STRETCH JOHN FORRESTER BILL HEWITT BARRY BROWN DAVE RUDGE GREG ADLAM GREG OKE EOIN MCKENZIE ANDREW HAMER PETER COOK ALAN MCLINTIC VINCE LANGFORD IAN GLOVER PATRICK BROUGHTON MIKE DIXON TOM LEIGHS BILL MARTELL TERRY CHARLES ERROL BARNES STEPHEN CLARK PHILLIP LINDSAY

WELLINGTON WANAKA AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON WANAKA AUCKLAND DUNEDIN CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND WELLINGTON WELLINGTON FIELDING INVERCARGILL NELSON CHRISTCHURCH SCOTLAND PORIRUA MT MAUNGANUI AUSTRALIA BLENHEIM CHRISTCHURCH PORIRUA HAWARDEN DARFIELD KAIAPOI DUNEDIN

3:34:16 3:41:22 3:55:13 4:24:55 4:12:50 4:25:11 4:16:59 4:16:48 4:28:33 4:52:24 4:44:52 5:27:09 5:07:14 5:47:02 4:52:51 5:12:25 5:10:53 5:03:30 4:54:18 5:43:19 5:36:45 4:56:43 5:19:31 4:46:08 5:24:23 5:31:15 5:57:11 5:16:20

18 23 32 64 48 65 53 52 69 92 82 126 111 138 94 115 113 108 98 136 129 103 122 84 123 128 142 125

1 2 3 7 4 8 6 5 9 12 10 22 17 26 13 19 18 16 14 25 24 15 20 11 21 23 27 20

5:06:51 4:57:10 5:03:37 5:21:45 5:26:46 5:15:06 5:22:35 5:35:25 5:46:14 5:30:03 5:56:54 5:30:18 5:51:16 5:21:12 6:15:16 5:53:33 6:17:04 5:56:46 6:21:45 5:47:13 5:44:53 6:20:47 5:53:37 6:35:40 5:58:42 6:12:43 5:57:21 DNF

7

KEVIN STOBBS

CHRISTCHURCH

W

V

1:51:16

97

14

5:25:41

129

23

DNF

79

JOHN LANGMUIR

INVERCARGILL

W

V

2:21:38

153

31

5:37:44

137

27

DNF

151

31

DNF

DNF DNF DNF 104

GRAEME JONES

METHVEN

W

V

2:10:01

147

28

5:57:49

55 DNF 49

DENNIS MARSHALL

TAURANGA

W

V

2:31:59

159

33

DNF

GHENE SNELLEN

CHRISTCHURCH

W

V

2:03:21

146

27

DNF

DNF DNF

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP CLASSIC MEN (over 50) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

128 6 145 4 101 14 34 27 3 31

KEN RICHARDSON BRUCE MEDER KEVIN OSBORNE JOE SHERRIFF MICHAEL WOOD BRIAN HATELEY ANDREW CUDWORTH ROD MARKHAM JUSTIN CALDER BRIAN PORTER

GREYMOUTH LYTTELTON HASTINGS INVERCARGILL AUCKLAND WESTPORT CHRISTCHURCH DUNEDIN QUEENSTOWN TAURANGA

W W W W W W W W W W

C C C C C C C C C C

1:44:33 1:44:35 1:51:08 1:50:49 1:51:00 1:51:26 1:51:19 1:51:31 2:01:18 2:01:04

55 57 84 62 74 114 100 121 128 131

1 2 5 3 4 7 6 8 9 10

3:52:59 3:49:11 4:28:42 4:26:57 4:47:48 5:16:43 5:25:48 5:44:56 5:12:35 5:58:57

12

GEORGE SCOTT

UNITED KINGDOM

W

C

2:31:33

157

13

DNF

31 28 70 67 86 121 124 137 117 152

DNF DNF

44

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

2 1 4 3 5 7 8 9 6 10

4:58:08 5:30:19 5:26:17 5:34:35 5:29:09 6:04:19 5:57:53 5:37:54 6:01:27 DNF

22 80 68 87 75 130 124 93 128

1 4 2 5 3 9 7 6 8

1:54:04 2:05:21 2:04:44 2:02:04 2:07:42 2:15:48 2:13:31 2:17:22 2:25:42

9 73 68 51 87 113 107 118 137

1 4 3 2 5 7 6 8 9

12:29:43 13:09:25 13:50:50 13:54:24 14:15:36 15:28:15 15:28:30 15:31:41 15:41:01

25 37 69 73 80 120 121 123 128

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


Place 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125

No. 381 523 432 600 376 354 583 584 364 521 530 334 437 342 501 514 522 481 576 493 506 401 538 331 361 305 320 453 392 540 390 363 448 516 325 544 414 550 380 377 572 599 314 444 575 450 337 415 539 319 356 593 408 374 527 306 328 386 442 435 347 551 443 535 474 545 537 362 338 430 458 422 594 403 322 558 541 373 371 412 468 349 418 348 379 483 484 451 316 397 404 591 588 546 428 329 500 561 577 411 402 534 578 557 447 394 393 396 510 459 445 482 421 496 391 598 429 433 581

Names GREG HART DAVE BALL TOM FERGUSON MIKE DE BOER CARL BEVINS ANTHONY OSWALD ANDREW MARSH GRANT WATSON MIKE DUNN TROY HAROLD JONATHAN CLEINE STEVE GUISE KELLY BARBER GREGG SIMPSON PAUL HARRISON CRAIG HARPER HAMISH MCKENZIE STU HENWOOD BEN JOHNS CRAIG GORDON KURT FINNIGAN ADAM HOLMES TIM FOSTER JONATHAN POOCH LEIGHTON GREER GREG MEADOWS ROBERT BRUTON ANDREW DILLON PHILIP MACKAY PETER SWANSON GREG MARCHANT CHRISTOPHER CLEMENTS AARON POWER WAYNE SPEAKMAN GREIG SINCLAIR RICHARD GIBSON TIM KEIR ALAN DALY CHRIS DAWSON TREVOR HURLEY ANDREW MILLS DANE HARRIS BRANDON WILSON RODNEY ARMSTRONG DEREK CRAIG CHRIS ELLIOTT BRENDON HALE JOHN KEIR BERNARD ROBINSON GRANT SHUKER MARK SMALE JONATHAN WHEELER CHRIS HARGREAVES MATT CURRIE CRAIG SHAKESPEARE JAMES MCGROGAN EDWARD PINCKNEY DREW BROADLEY MARK DAWSON CRAIG ROSS MARTIN DE BOCK MATT DOHERTY GARY LEAF GARY MACPHERSON KELVIN BEERE GUY JOHNSTON BRENT JARVIS ALEX BALL STEPHEN DOYLE NORMAN CROSSWELL MARTIN RICHARDS RAYMOND KEARNS PETE WILLIAMS STEPHEN RODERICK MIKE DUNN DAVID WATT PAUL LINDSAY HAMISH FARRAR PETER DONALDSON ROBIN OAKLEY RICHARD MCKEE PADDY O’HALLORAN TIMOTHY WALSH DANIEL O’BRIEN TIM CARPENTER IAN PALMER KERRY PHELVIN PHILIP ARMSTRONG CHRISTOPHER BOYLE JIM SHERBORNE MARK BENNETT SIMON HUNTER CHRIS BIRKETT NIGEL SMITH PHILLIP WARE TIM EVES CRAIG HASTIE DEREK KERR MIKE LAWRENCE MARK MCMORRAN BRENDON METCALFE NIGEL CRAIG JOCK MURDOCH JONATHAN ASH JAMIE THOMAS ALASTAIR COOMER TONY KNIGHT SHANE HASSAN MICHAEL ROBERTSON WARREN HARRISON RICHARD TATTLE JARRED MARFELL MARK BALDWIN DAVID HULSTON MARK TAYLOR JANJAAP APPELS ALISTAIR HALL GRANT FAIRBAIRN COLIN SPRATT

City / Country OTANE QUEENSTOWN CULVERDEN BURNHAM AUCKLAND ALEXANDRA CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH NEW PLYMOUTH DUNEDIN CAMBRIDGE QUEENSTOWN WHANGAREI CHRISTCHURCH LEESTON UNITED KINGDOM CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH ASHBURTON ASHBURTON AUCKLAND BLENHEIM FAIRLIE AUCKLAND POKENO CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND GREYMOUTH HAMILTON WELLINGTON WAIPUKURAU CLIVE LOWER HUTT NELSON WELLINGTON TUAKAU CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON BALCLUTHA WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH WAIPUKURAU AUCKLAND WELLINGTON MOTUEKA AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH TAUPO PLEASANT POINT AUCKLAND WELLINGTON ALEXANDRA AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH WHANGAREI OAKURA AUCKLAND HAVELOCK NORTH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND OTAUTAU MOTUEKA PORIRUA ASHBURTON CHRISTCHURCH PALMERSTON NORTH WELLINGTON WELLINGTON WELLINGTON CARTERTON CHRISTCHURCH WHANGAREI WHANGAREI CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND PALMERSTON NORTH NAPIER AUCKLAND AUCKLAND INVERCARGILL WELLINGTON ENGLAND AUCKLAND UNITED STATES OF AME CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WHANGAREI CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND DUNEDIN UNITED KINGDOM NEW PLYMOUTH NAPIER SCOTLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND ASHBURTON LEVIN WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND WELLINGTON DARGAVILLE DUNEDIN WELLINGTON NEW PLYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH INVERCARGILL UNITED KINGDOM CHRISTCHURCH

Ev Sect Time I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

1:42:48 1:40:30 1:42:54 1:42:43 1:42:49 1:42:48 1:42:51 1:48:39 1:48:39 1:42:38 1:42:52 1:48:20 1:48:34 1:42:49 1:50:56 1:48:29 1:42:44 1:51:17 1:48:24 1:48:12 1:42:47 1:51:45 1:48:27 1:42:45 1:48:23 1:48:20 1:48:25 1:48:41 1:48:23 1:51:20 1:42:52 1:48:25 1:48:19 1:48:26 1:51:30 1:48:42 1:48:13 1:51:44 1:48:17 1:53:03 1:48:19 1:42:42 1:51:46 1:56:59 1:51:24 1:48:25 1:51:11 1:57:01 1:48:43 1:48:38 1:57:15 1:48:39 1:51:38 1:51:32 1:48:25 1:42:59 1:57:29 1:51:36 1:51:42 1:57:25 1:48:40 1:51:14 1:51:38 1:51:22 1:57:00 1:48:20 1:48:15 1:51:43 1:51:16 1:48:24 1:57:13 1:51:42 1:57:37 1:51:53 1:51:46 2:12:06 2:12:02 1:51:44 1:53:43 2:03:43 1:58:53 1:59:15 1:57:07 2:04:06 1:51:39 2:03:30 1:58:48 1:48:33 2:09:08 1:57:19 1:58:54 1:57:47 1:58:49 2:13:48 1:57:30 1:57:33 1:57:29 1:48:39 1:42:52 2:03:59 1:48:29 1:57:06 2:03:45 1:51:49 1:57:14 2:03:31 1:58:43 1:57:19 2:17:02 1:57:20 1:57:35 2:03:20 1:58:50 1:57:22 1:58:42 2:03:37 1:58:37 2:03:56 2:03:38

Cycle1 Pl 16 1 23 7 17 15 19 59 58 4 20 33 53 18 65 50 8 70 40 25 13 95 48 9 38 32 43 61 37 71 22 44 31 46 78 62 26 93 29 106 30 6 97 109 73 41 66 111 64 55 119 57 87 79 42 24 134 85 90 129 60 67 88 72 110 34 27 92 69 39 117 91 143 101 96 219 217 94 108 181 160 165 113 199 89 173 154 51 214 121 161 145 155 229 136 139 135 56 21 195 49 112 183 99 118 174 152 122 248 123 142 168 157 125 150 177 147 191 178

Sec Pl Time 15 1 22 7 16 14 18 51 50 4 19 31 46 17 56 44 8 60 36 24 13 76 42 9 34 30 39 53 33 61 21 40 29 41 64 54 25 74 27 81 28 6 78 84 63 37 57 86 55 47 91 49 68 65 38 23 98 67 71 97 52 58 69 62 85 32 26 73 59 35 89 72 103 80 77 143 142 75 83 125 113 116 88 134 70 120 108 45 141 93 114 104 109 144 100 101 99 48 20 131 43 87 127 79 90 121 107 94 148 95 102 117 111 96 106 123 105 129 124

3:47:48 4:07:21 3:48:15 4:06:21 4:05:12 3:49:46 3:57:55 4:04:47 3:58:48 4:09:11 4:09:23 4:05:26 4:16:10 4:24:11 4:22:44 4:19:21 4:13:08 3:58:56 3:58:15 4:13:52 4:39:03 4:24:45 4:48:39 4:20:23 4:31:39 4:38:52 4:35:06 4:39:49 4:15:58 4:30:36 4:23:15 4:20:53 4:23:06 5:04:21 4:51:28 4:39:03 4:38:46 4:44:55 4:57:39 4:34:26 4:58:15 5:05:06 4:52:46 4:32:55 4:39:07 4:51:10 4:52:54 4:43:11 5:16:20 4:36:57 5:09:38 4:59:06 4:57:52 5:17:13 5:38:15 5:03:24 4:32:40 4:55:45 5:11:16 5:10:33 4:54:55 5:01:41 5:02:20 4:55:28 5:15:18 5:15:34 5:25:21 5:19:25 5:04:22 5:18:03 5:22:20 4:51:05 5:07:34 5:15:37 5:22:26 5:24:14 5:02:03 5:33:36 5:06:08 5:23:32 5:07:21 4:49:21 5:18:29 5:21:42 5:53:42 5:39:13 5:35:21 5:33:43 5:23:08 5:46:04 5:46:56 4:54:25 5:34:25 5:06:31 6:02:50 5:37:11 5:08:04 5:51:15 6:34:50 5:53:43 6:22:16 5:58:23 5:31:40 5:07:30 5:54:58 5:07:23 6:16:29 5:52:46 5:09:37 5:50:00 5:34:51 5:41:22 6:06:16 6:02:36 6:25:39 6:15:55 5:21:33 5:41:54 5:03:19

Mt Run Pl Sec Pl Time 8 21 9 20 18 10 12 17 14 23 24 19 29 36 33 30 25 15 13 26 51 37 58 31 41 49 46 54 28 40 35 32 34 83 63 52 48 57 71 45 73 86 64 43 53 62 65 55 111 47 101 74 72 112 153 82 42 70 104 103 67 75 78 69 108 109 128 116 84 114 121 61 95 110 122 126 76 143 88 124 91 59 115 119 177 155 147 144 123 164 165 66 145 89 194 151 96 171 230 178 216 187 140 94 179 93 209 174 100 170 146 160 198 193 219 208 118 161 80

6 18 7 17 15 8 10 14 12 19 20 16 24 31 28 25 21 13 11 22 42 32 48 26 34 41 38 45 23 33 30 27 29 68 52 43 40 47 59 37 61 70 53 36 44 51 54 46 85 39 79 62 60 86 106 67 35 58 81 80 56 63 65 57 82 83 97 89 69 87 92 50 76 84 93 96 64 100 71 95 73 49 88 91 118 108 104 101 94 112 113 55 102 72 127 105 77 116 142 119 137 122 99 75 120 74 136 117 78 115 103 110 129 126 138 135 90 111 66

4:53:12 4:50:00 5:03:37 5:00:34 5:02:50 5:17:54 5:13:06 5:02:37 5:09:16 4:58:57 4:58:12 5:10:45 4:57:52 4:56:28 4:59:15 5:04:39 5:14:40 5:27:14 5:04:38 5:33:11 5:10:47 5:18:37 4:59:20 5:25:18 5:22:44 5:08:10 5:17:02 4:58:22 5:28:30 5:12:21 5:40:29 5:33:56 5:36:35 4:54:07 5:11:14 5:29:08 5:17:25 5:20:56 5:07:42 5:25:08 5:02:14 5:16:49 5:16:41 5:30:27 5:37:01 5:28:30 5:21:17 5:29:31 5:11:19 5:24:52 5:15:58 5:25:39 5:28:45 5:13:17 4:58:42 5:36:33 5:36:59 5:25:34 5:08:37 5:23:46 5:51:59 5:22:59 5:31:43 5:49:44 5:27:30 5:31:42 5:20:38 5:24:27 5:46:47 5:38:39 5:05:41 6:01:30 5:33:32 5:40:35 5:33:13 5:19:14 5:35:34 5:31:00 5:40:45 5:20:16 5:35:14 5:50:17 5:43:32 5:36:35 5:18:27 5:24:22 5:28:13 5:41:12 5:27:29 5:20:50 5:16:48 5:51:35 5:37:29 5:46:04 5:16:17 5:19:43 6:02:44 5:32:36 5:09:46 5:31:25 5:03:43 5:24:18 5:50:44 6:05:38 5:38:57 5:56:57 5:13:18 5:45:50 5:57:49 5:42:58 5:58:27 5:52:11 5:39:43 5:42:54 5:32:59 5:36:52 6:08:51 6:16:14 6:46:06

Kayak Pl 5 4 26 20 24 68 52 23 42 17 13 44 12 11 18 29 58 102 28 126 45 72 19 97 83 39 66 14 107 49 160 131 142 7 47 110 67 80 38 96 22 65 63 116 147 108 81 112 48 93 59 99 109 53 15 140 146 98 41 86 207 85 121 198 104 120 78 91 188 152 32 234 129 162 127 74 138 118 164 77 137 199 174 141 70 90 106 165 103 79 64 204 148 184 60 75 238 124 43 119 27 89 201 244 153 216 54 181 221 172 225 208 158 170 125 144 250 257 275

Sec Pl Time 5 4 22 17 21 49 38 20 31 14 11 33 10 9 15 25 41 71 24 89 34 52 16 68 60 29 47 12 76 37 108 92 98 7 35 79 48 58 28 67 19 46 44 82 101 77 59 81 36 66 42 70 78 39 13 96 100 69 30 62 126 61 86 121 73 85 56 65 120 104 27 134 91 110 90 53 95 83 111 55 94 122 116 97 51 64 75 112 72 57 45 125 102 119 43 54 135 87 32 84 23 63 124 137 105 128 40 117 129 115 130 127 106 114 88 99 140 142 150

2:09:05 1:57:02 2:03:30 1:56:43 1:59:12 2:03:28 2:01:23 2:00:38 2:00:39 2:07:15 2:13:02 2:02:08 2:05:28 2:06:13 1:56:50 2:00:51 2:05:50 2:01:52 2:34:57 1:56:31 2:00:31 2:04:19 2:04:09 2:14:01 2:00:35 2:08:11 2:04:35 2:18:38 2:12:56 2:12:10 2:01:40 2:07:09 2:04:49 2:09:44 2:02:54 2:00:47 2:13:53 2:02:18 2:07:54 2:11:07 2:15:49 2:01:15 2:08:57 2:10:54 2:04:16 2:05:15 2:08:00 2:07:05 2:00:43 2:27:00 2:01:31 2:12:46 2:09:12 2:06:06 2:02:50 2:05:49 2:22:10 2:19:22 2:24:18 2:06:12 2:02:44 2:23:22 2:15:39 2:07:11 2:04:18 2:08:37 2:14:50 2:13:45 2:09:00 2:07:52 2:29:30 2:12:30 2:19:56 2:10:45 2:12:37 2:04:37 2:11:20 2:06:05 2:23:35 2:16:55 2:24:00 2:30:20 2:10:09 2:07:22 2:06:09 2:05:12 2:11:31 2:10:27 2:15:29 2:11:18 2:13:11 2:33:49 2:11:57 2:17:09 2:07:36 2:34:41 2:20:56 2:19:20 2:05:47 2:04:46 2:20:18 2:15:08 2:10:34 2:32:26 2:12:05 2:38:12 2:21:57 2:15:33 2:27:33 2:23:16 2:22:48 2:20:34 2:13:02 2:18:07 2:06:08 2:14:12 2:44:01 2:20:02 2:29:47

Cycle2 Pl 85 6 37 4 7 36 23 13 14 72 115 28 54 66 5 18 59 27 222 3 11 43 39 126 12 80 44 156 113 109 26 70 48 89 34 17 125 29 78 100 140 22 83 98 40 53 79 69 16 191 24 112 86 62 33 58 177 160 184 65 32 180 139 71 42 81 133 124 84 77 203 110 164 96 111 45 102 61 181 146 183 207 90 73 64 52 104 93 137 101 118 217 107 149 75 221 172 159 57 47 168 135 95 212 108 232 176 138 192 179 178 170 114 153 63 128 248 167 204

Sec Pl Time 62 5 27 3 6 26 16 9 10 52 83 20 39 48 4 13 42 19 136 2 7 31 28 88 8 58 32 102 81 77 18 50 35 64 24 12 87 21 56 71 97 15 60 70 29 38 57 49 11 120 17 80 63 44 23 41 111 104 117 47 22 114 96 51 30 59 92 86 61 55 125 78 105 69 79 33 73 43 115 98 116 128 65 53 46 37 74 67 94 72 84 133 75 99 54 135 109 103 40 34 107 93 68 130 76 141 110 95 121 113 112 108 82 101 45 89 146 106 126

12:32:52 12:34:53 12:38:14 12:46:20 12:50:02 12:53:55 12:55:14 12:56:41 12:57:22 12:57:59 13:03:28 13:06:38 13:08:03 13:09:40 13:09:45 13:13:19 13:16:21 13:19:19 13:26:13 13:31:45 13:33:06 13:39:26 13:40:34 13:42:26 13:43:20 13:43:31 13:45:06 13:45:30 13:45:45 13:46:26 13:48:16 13:50:21 13:52:49 13:56:38 13:57:06 13:57:39 13:58:15 13:59:51 14:01:32 14:03:43 14:04:36 14:05:50 14:10:09 14:11:14 14:11:46 14:13:18 14:13:21 14:16:47 14:17:05 14:17:26 14:24:20 14:26:08 14:27:25 14:28:06 14:28:10 14:28:43 14:29:17 14:32:16 14:35:52 14:37:55 14:38:17 14:39:15 14:41:20 14:43:45 14:44:04 14:44:12 14:49:02 14:49:18 14:51:25 14:52:57 14:54:42 14:56:47 14:58:37 14:58:49 15:00:02 15:00:09 15:00:59 15:02:23 15:04:10 15:04:25 15:05:27 15:09:13 15:09:17 15:09:45 15:09:56 15:12:16 15:13:52 15:13:53 15:15:14 15:15:30 15:15:47 15:17:34 15:22:39 15:23:30 15:24:12 15:29:07 15:29:12 15:31:49 15:33:14 15:33:53 15:34:44 15:34:55 15:36:43 15:37:22 15:43:12 15:46:02 15:50:26 15:51:26 15:52:00 15:53:32 15:53:41 15:57:26 15:57:50 16:00:58 16:03:27 16:10:36 16:13:02 16:22:06 16:22:49

Overall Pl Sec Pl 8 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 27 28 29 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 58 59 61 62 63 65 66 67 71 73 76 77 78 79 80 83 84 85 86 87 89 91 92 93 97 99 100 101 102 105 107 108 109 110 111 113 115 116 117 119 120 121 122 123 125 126 129 130 131 132 134 135 137 140 141 144 147 148 149 150 152 154 158 160 164 166 167 168 169 170 171 173 179 182 185 186 187

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125

45


Cycle1 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Mt Run Pl Sec Pl Time

Kayak Pl

Sec Pl Time

Cycle2 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Overall Pl Sec Pl

Place

No.

Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152

574 531 563 455 559 387 503 467 358 460 457 365 502 556 480 355 491 596 309 511 570 340 351 446 529 473 449 383

JEREMY RAINES DAVID ANDERSON ROBBIE VANT WOUT SIMON MARLEY STEPHEN OLIVER CHRISTOPHER STUMBLES RICHARD LATHAM SHANE WILKINSON DAVID WHITFIELD PETER WILKINSON STEVEN HOPKINS CRAIG DUNN CHRISTOPHER HARTY GLENN DRUMMOND MARCO DE GROOT MATT DOUGLAS GARETH MASLOWSKI PETER TAYLOR TOBY OSBORNE ANDREW MCCLURG PHILIP SKINNER TURI HODGES ROSS WATSON BRENDON FLANAGAN ANDREW BROOK GLENN LIVINGSTONE DEANO VERRALL NATHAN FACER

INVERCARGILL QUEENSTOWN WELLINGTON AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND WELLINGTON INVERCARGILL WELLINGTON WINTON AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH NETHERLANDS CROMWELL CHRISTCHURCH HUNGARY HASTINGS CHRISTCHURCH METHVEN PORIRUA MT MAUNGANUI WELLINGTON AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH MT MAUNGANUI AUSTRALIA

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

1:57:15 1:58:57 2:04:00 2:04:55 2:14:24 2:04:04 2:03:22 2:04:17 1:51:35 1:53:09 2:03:29 2:03:57 2:04:23 2:09:07 2:03:36 2:14:13 1:58:50 2:03:50 2:08:10 2:03:44 2:31:12 2:15:01 1:58:52 2:04:12 2:31:38 2:37:37 2:30:17 1:56:59

120 164 196 207 240 198 169 203 83 107 171 192 205 213 176 233 156 187 211 182 266 244 158 202 269 275 264 107

92 115 132 138 146 133 118 136 66 82 119 130 137 140 122 145 110 128 139 126 150 147 112 135 151 152 149 82

6:09:55 5:47:14 5:39:13 6:06:58 6:01:07 6:30:33 5:29:40 6:15:51 5:58:51 6:27:38 7:01:41 6:39:44 6:06:51 6:00:40 5:40:01 6:04:04 6:08:25 6:51:12 8:11:20 7:29:21 6:32:18 7:52:18 5:57:16 7:34:22 7:11:21 7:39:13 9:06:07 5:33:24

204 166 154 201 191 224 138 207 189 223 247 234 199 190 158 197 203 241 273 262 227 270 184 263 253 267 282 144

133 114 107 131 125 140 98 134 123 139 145 143 130 124 109 128 132 144 151 147 141 150 121 148 146 149 152 100

5:34:55 6:03:35 5:27:52 5:45:53 5:42:14 5:38:18 6:20:48 5:40:31 6:38:15 5:58:45 5:29:28 5:39:43 6:00:43 6:07:52 6:57:34 6:08:23 6:16:25 6:22:38 5:05:27 5:50:26 5:58:38 5:17:55 8:02:38 6:11:41 6:16:18 6:22:15 6:41:13 DNF

136 241 105 182 169 150 261 161 271 227 111 159 233 247 278 248 259 265 31 200 226 69 283 251 258 264 273

93 136 74 118 113 103 145 109 148 132 80 107 133 138 151 139 144 147 26 123 131 50 152 141 143 146 149

2:42:19 2:35:43 3:15:25 2:33:05 2:37:40 2:25:03 2:47:55 2:42:06 2:14:48 2:28:16 2:13:37 2:26:52 2:41:23 2:36:08 2:34:16 2:52:55 3:18:07 2:32:40 2:28:21 2:29:49 2:59:09 2:41:51 2:18:07 2:30:52 2:28:05 2:58:33 2:36:12

246 225 279 215 231 186 257 245 132 197 121 190 239 228 220 266 281 214 198 205 274 242 152 209 195 273 229

145 137 151 132 140 118 147 144 91 123 85 119 142 138 134 148 152 131 124 127 150 143 100 129 122 149 139

16:24:23 16:25:29 16:26:29 16:30:51 16:35:25 16:37:57 16:41:45 16:42:43 16:43:29 16:47:47 16:48:13 16:50:15 16:53:18 16:53:47 17:15:25 17:19:34 17:41:45 17:50:20 17:53:17 17:53:19 18:01:15 18:07:05 18:16:51 18:21:05 18:27:22 19:37:38 20:53:48

189 191 194 197 199 200 203 204 205 208 209 212 214 215 224 227 238 242 244 245 249 252 254 255 258 271 280

126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152

CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH LEESTON HAWARDEN CHRISTCHURCH HELENSVILLE CAMBRIDGE QUEENSTOWN WAIPUKURAU CHRISTCHURCH WARKWORTH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND PREBBLETON AUCKLAND GREYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH LOWER HUTT CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH AUSTRALIA OHAKUNE AUCKLAND AUSTRALIA WINTON AUCKLAND ASHBURTON AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH FIELDING AUCKLAND NELSON AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON AUCKLAND NEW PLYMOUTH WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH TUAKAU WELLINGTON AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH WALTON CHRISTCHURCH

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

1:48:26 1:48:26 1:51:33 1:51:32 1:57:35 1:51:28 1:48:36 1:57:25 1:51:26 1:57:35 1:51:36 2:03:58 1:57:31 1:58:56 1:57:12 1:57:24 1:51:29 2:03:51 2:03:46 2:04:02 2:03:49 2:04:21 1:58:56 2:12:03 1:57:27 2:03:59 1:57:20 2:07:24 2:12:16 2:14:10 2:04:11 2:37:08 2:14:07 2:12:07 2:33:03 1:57:23 2:14:23 2:14:14 2:10:17 2:18:36 2:12:09 2:30:01 2:44:48 2:03:29 2:21:41 2:22:25 2:35:02 2:14:32 2:26:00 2:14:19 2:57:57 2:57:15 3:22:40 1:57:16

47 45 81 80 140 75 54 130 74 141 84 193 138 163 116 128 76 188 185 197 186 204 162 218 132 194 124 210 222 232 201 273 231 220 270 127 239 234 216 250 221 262 280 172 253 257 272 242 259 237 283 282 284 120

2 1 8 7 17 5 3 14 4 18 9 25 16 20 10 13 6 24 22 27 23 29 19 32 15 26 11 30 35 37 28 49 36 33 47 12 40 38 31 42 34 46 50 21 43 44 48 41 45 39 52 51 53 11

4:07:54 4:25:28 5:02:06 4:43:37 4:32:57 5:04:23 4:49:57 5:03:19 5:08:56 5:07:22 5:10:00 5:14:44 5:41:06 5:27:09 5:02:26 5:27:12 5:23:55 5:29:28 5:17:58 5:35:43 5:32:23 5:32:18 5:51:24 5:29:33 5:48:57 5:51:40 5:53:11 6:20:19 5:57:32 6:06:55 6:01:15 6:03:35 6:27:27 6:55:58 5:55:03 6:37:14 6:43:38 6:31:13 6:47:48 6:54:28 6:53:56 6:27:24 7:38:11 7:05:36 7:05:32 7:12:18 7:00:39 7:34:49 7:17:33 8:05:46 7:43:12 8:33:40 9:11:15 5:25:36

22 38 77 56 44 85 60 81 98 92 102 107 159 132 79 133 125 136 113 148 142 141 172 137 168 173 175 212 185 200 192 196 222 244 180 231 238 225 240 243 242 221 265 252 251 255 246 264 257 272 268 278 283 130

1 2 6 4 3 9 5 8 11 10 12 13 23 16 7 17 15 18 14 22 21 20 25 19 24 26 27 33 29 32 30 31 35 42 28 37 38 36 39 41 40 34 49 45 44 46 43 48 47 51 50 52 53 16

5:06:14 5:08:15 5:12:32 5:30:05 5:38:22 5:24:01 5:33:19 5:22:22 5:34:25 5:24:09 5:26:49 5:14:30 5:05:04 5:24:56 5:45:54 5:29:38 5:47:35 5:30:09 5:47:41 5:32:29 5:43:00 5:39:10 5:36:48 5:32:18 5:30:40 5:19:47 6:01:55 5:27:12 5:56:52 5:55:46 6:08:34 5:46:12 5:57:09 5:51:07 5:48:00 6:21:31 5:49:18 5:43:32 5:44:52 5:49:30 5:56:35 6:12:29 5:07:10 6:03:05 5:56:58 5:51:39 6:05:28 6:15:14 6:21:34 6:05:34 6:24:35 6:41:31 6:32:33 DNF

35 40 50 114 151 87 128 82 134 88 100 57 30 95 183 113 190 115 191 123 173 154 143 122 117 76 236 101 215 213 249 186 218 202 193 262 195 175 179 197 214 252 36 240 217 205 242 255 263 243 266 274 268

2 4 5 15 23 9 20 8 21 10 12 6 1 11 28 14 30 16 31 19 25 24 22 18 17 7 42 13 39 37 46 29 41 35 32 49 33 26 27 34 38 47 3 43 40 36 44 48 50 45 51 53 52

2:01:05 2:01:11 1:59:42 2:06:30 2:04:51 1:59:45 2:08:50 2:04:16 2:05:09 2:13:37 2:16:06 2:13:06 2:05:28 2:03:46 2:10:50 2:07:37 2:10:34 2:18:24 2:14:32 2:17:23 2:13:43 2:21:03 2:16:57 2:33:09 2:31:59 2:47:36 2:20:35 2:28:14 2:32:20 2:27:58 2:38:30 2:30:15 2:24:46 2:09:22 2:54:17 2:17:07 2:28:49 2:47:44 2:38:54 2:21:22 2:36:45 2:41:17 2:25:25 2:51:45 2:42:40 2:56:43 2:41:56 2:27:40 2:46:19 2:45:39 3:03:49 3:06:12 3:42:35

19 21 8 67 49 9 82 41 51 122 141 117 55 38 97 76 94 154 130 151 123 173 147 216 210 255 171 196 211 194 233 206 185 87 268 148 202 256 234 175 230 238 187 265 247 271 243 193 252 250 275 276 283

3 4 1 10 7 2 12 6 8 17 20 16 9 5 15 11 14 24 19 23 18 26 21 37 35 46 25 32 36 31 39 34 28 13 49 22 33 47 40 27 38 41 29 48 43 50 42 30 45 44 51 52 53

13:03:39 13:23:18 14:05:53 14:11:44 14:13:44 14:19:36 14:20:41 14:27:22 14:39:55 14:42:43 14:44:30 14:46:18 14:49:08 14:54:47 14:56:20 15:01:50 15:13:32 15:21:51 15:23:56 15:29:36 15:32:53 15:36:51 15:44:03 15:47:03 15:49:02 16:03:00 16:12:59 16:23:09 16:38:59 16:44:49 16:52:28 16:57:09 17:03:27 17:08:32 17:10:21 17:13:14 17:16:07 17:16:42 17:21:51 17:23:56 17:39:24 17:51:10 17:55:33 18:03:53 18:06:51 18:23:04 18:23:05 18:32:14 18:51:25 19:11:17 20:09:33 21:18:36 22:49:02

21 30 56 60 64 68 69 75 88 90 94 96 98 103 104 112 124 133 136 142 146 153 159 161 162 178 184 188 202 207 213 216 218 221 222 223 225 226 229 230 236 243 246 250 251 256 257 260 263 266 275 281 284

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V

1:42:48 1:48:22 1:48:42 1:48:34 1:48:22 1:51:55 1:51:37 1:51:53 1:48:17 1:57:11 1:51:30 1:51:57 1:58:43 1:57:31 1:57:08 1:51:55 1:57:26 2:13:53 1:51:48 2:06:04 1:57:27 1:58:40 2:03:34 2:12:37 1:58:37 1:57:22 1:51:16 2:03:39 2:03:39

14 35 63 52 36 104 86 102 28 115 77 105 151 137 114 103 131 230 98 208 133 149 175 227 146 126 68 180 179

1 3 6 5 4 15 10 13 2 18 8 16 27 22 17 14 20 47 11 39 21 26 32 45 24 19 7 34 33

3:27:43 3:46:49 3:59:46 4:14:37 4:26:41 5:07:18 5:09:07 5:14:22 5:25:18 5:11:56 4:38:53 5:43:00 5:25:26 5:26:20 5:44:15 5:22:06 5:39:38 5:05:45 5:39:50 5:25:44 5:20:56 5:37:39 5:30:47 5:28:57 6:07:56 6:32:05 4:55:21 5:53:39 5:49:42

1 7 16 27 39 90 99 106 127 105 50 162 129 131 163 120 156 87 157 130 117 152 139 135 202 226 68 176 169

1 2 3 4 5 9 11 13 16 12 6 27 17 19 28 15 25 8 26 18 14 24 22 21 35 46 7 30 29

4:54:39 4:58:51 4:54:44 5:05:50 5:18:30 5:07:29 5:05:56 5:13:36 5:12:45 5:10:48 5:47:48 5:02:53 5:24:53 5:33:35 5:16:17 5:16:27 5:24:48 5:41:29 5:39:34 5:44:37 5:42:57 5:47:19 5:52:18 5:22:58 5:38:02 5:14:08 6:55:03 5:49:26 5:41:53

8 16 9 33 71 37 34 55 51 46 192 25 94 130 61 62 92 166 156 178 171 189 209 84 149 56 276 196 168

1 3 2 5 14 7 6 10 9 8 37 4 18 19 12 13 17 27 24 33 30 36 41 16 23 11 64 39 29

2:02:41 2:00:25 1:55:21 2:01:34 2:19:19 2:02:42 2:16:24 2:05:58 2:00:40 2:11:39 2:13:23 2:07:34 2:09:36 2:05:29 2:10:58 2:44:10 2:13:06 2:23:47 2:20:30 2:15:25 2:35:11 2:14:08 2:11:44 2:35:53 2:04:41 2:06:52 2:16:32 2:14:56 2:26:35

30 10 2 25 158 31 142 60 15 105 120 74 88 56 99 249 116 182 169 136 224 127 106 227 46 68 144 134 189

5 2 1 4 30 6 24 9 3 15 19 11 12 8 14 55 17 37 35 23 46 20 16 48 7 10 26 22 39

12:07:51 12:34:26 12:38:33 13:10:33 13:52:50 14:09:23 14:23:03 14:25:48 14:26:58 14:31:33 14:31:33 14:45:23 14:58:36 15:02:53 15:08:37 15:14:36 15:14:57 15:24:52 15:31:41 15:31:49 15:36:31 15:37:46 15:38:21 15:40:23 15:49:16 15:50:27 15:58:12 16:01:39 16:01:49

2 9 12 26 46 57 70 72 74 81 82 95 106 114 118 127 128 138 143 145 151 155 156 157 163 165 172 175 176

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

DNF

INDIVIDUAL TWO DAY WOMEN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53

333 477 343 413 560 553 324 513 495 573 360 562 526 332 385 469 440 571 488 456 389 454 417 359 388 370 398 369 524 532 303 487 555 567 569 420 406 515 566 426 489 499 548 564 308 434 399 346 462 310 528 582 568 547

JEANETTE WRIGHT CATHY HAMER LUCY GOULD ARIANA SUMMERS FLEUR PAWSEY JACKIE PRINCE BRIDGET LEONARD KATE PATERSON HELEN CURTIN KYM WILSON LIZ MCNEILL ROSEMARY PARKIN ROSIE RHODES LOUISE GODFREY FIONA ROBERTS KIRSTY GALLAGHER CLEONE ARMSTRONG WENDY RIACH PRUE LAMB LOUISE BERKETT BRENDA KNIGHT CLAIRE SIDEY ERIN PENTECOST JOANNE BOLTON LYNDA RONALDSON FREYA SONNELAND JILLIAN ROSS VALERIE MEYER DENISSA HORA HEIDI GODFREY KERRY MCGROGAN ANNA ROGERS SEVERNA KILPATRICK RACHEL MAURD ROBYN MORRIS RACHEL LARNER JO PENDER CATHERINE BROWN HANNAH MCQUEEN SARAH OWEN TRACEY TIER SHARYN STILWELL LEIGH PETTIGREW CHARLOTTE IRELAND STACY CORSTON KATE HAYWARD SHARON ROSS KERYN HOWARD LEAH ALEXANDER MARIA CASSIDY KATE HILL KIRSTEE BLOOMFIELD KAREN DUNCAN LYNNE O’DONOGHUE

DNF

INDIVIDUAL TWO DAY VETERAN MEN (over 40) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

46

595 472 492 494 465 304 407 372 438 464 341 580 439 400 475 416 405 507 382 419 498 466 486 543 463 586 461 436 375

DUNCAN HAMILTON STEPHEN JOHN GEOFF PARKIN BILL NEVILLE JIM HARGEST TIM MANNING MICHAEL FOOY TIM WILKINSON GEORGE RICHARDSON GLENN BEEMAN SIMON MILLIGAN TREVOR PROFFIT MIKE WRIGHT VERNE SMITH JOHN GUNDESEN CHRIS SAYER BRYAN HODKINSON GARY BROWN JON CURRAN JON SUMMERS STEVE BELL JIM WATSON STUART WALKER KEVIN JARVIS GRAEME MURPHY ROB WHITMORE NIGEL WAKE PAUL BAMFORD DAVID WALTHALL

HOKITIKA WALES AUCKLAND GREYMOUTH INVERCARGILL AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CANADA UNITED KINGDOM CHRISTCHURCH DUNEDIN RANFURLY AUCKLAND FOXTON AUCKLAND MORRINSVILLE HAMILTON WALTON TAURANGA INVERCARGILL AUCKLAND NEW PLYMOUTH PALMERSTON NORTH CHRISTCHURCH AUSTRALIA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


Cycle1 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Mt Run Pl Sec Pl Time

Kayak Pl

Sec Pl Time

Cycle2 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Overall Pl Sec Pl

Place

No.

Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

441 368 315 590 327 427 317 323 478 367 301 336 423 470 509 378 339 330 476 350 597 485 592 508 549 533 517 311 312 504 585 384 519 471 554 326 366 425 497 302 DNF

NEVILLE GEARY JOHN DEADY DOUG MCKIRDY BRIAN BOYLE JAMES BEVERIDGE KEITH BRODIE JOHN BOULTON BERNARD LEWIS JOHN MURRAY SIMON WILKINSON PAUL KNIGHT MATTHEW WILLIAMS CARL MERTENS DAVID BISHOP MARK CRAIG MARK ELDER BRUCE MCLEAN PETER BOS TONY HILL KEITH WOODFORD PAUL MEIN RON MCKINLEY DAVE TRUSCOTT JOHN KENNEDY PAUL CARLETON GEOFF HUGHES MIKE WARD GRAHAM SIMPSON RAY LEACH GRAHAM STARR SIMON MAKGILL PETER WILLIAMS ROB CRAIG HITOSHI NUKADA FERNLY GOSLING KEITH BISHOP ROD THOMSON DOUGLAS STEVENS JOHN DAVIES DAVID PARSONS

AUCKLAND AUCKLAND TIMARU AUSTRALIA AUCKLAND KATIKATI PORT LEVY AUCKLAND DARGAVILLE WHANGAREI CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON AUCKLAND AUSTRALIA AUCKLAND RANGIORA MASTERTON BANKS PENINSULA AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AMERICA CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH NEW PLYMOUTH WELLINGTON NELSON PUKEKOHE PUKEKOHE CHRISTCHURCH CAMBRIDGE CHRISTCHURCH PUKEKOHE JAPAN AUCKLAND PIHA AMBERLEY WELLINGTON KAIAPOI WHANGAREI

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V

2:16:32 2:03:28 1:57:42 2:04:39 2:03:46 2:03:02 2:12:34 2:03:52 2:06:13 2:14:38 1:58:39 2:03:15 2:17:05 1:51:35 2:14:17 2:21:33 2:28:42 2:12:19 2:14:17 2:22:23 2:22:35 2:04:07 2:16:42 2:15:43 2:21:46 2:19:19 2:13:08 2:14:29 2:14:21 2:12:17 2:28:09 2:30:06 1:51:51 2:30:30 2:38:14 2:37:26 2:38:30 2:33:18 2:56:46 2:31:32

246 170 144 206 184 166 226 189 209 243 148 167 249 82 236 252 261 224 235 256 258 200 247 245 254 251 228 241 238 223 260 263 100 265 276 274 278 271 281 269

54 31 23 38 35 29 44 36 40 52 25 30 56 9 49 58 63 42 48 60 61 37 55 53 59 57 46 51 50 41 62 64 12 65 68 67 69 66 70 66

5:37:08 6:11:25 6:12:08 5:56:36 6:03:19 6:24:37 5:58:47 6:25:52 6:38:36 6:22:00 7:04:29 6:33:34 6:39:50 6:16:46 6:32:27 7:02:26 6:20:25 6:40:15 7:27:36 6:40:04 6:38:53 6:24:42 5:27:20 6:20:55 7:00:38 7:13:40 7:57:32 7:27:04 7:27:13 7:17:45 6:45:35 8:22:54 5:08:27 8:22:37 8:14:21 8:48:52 8:57:59 7:39:12 8:54:00 DNF

150 205 206 183 195 217 188 220 232 215 250 229 235 210 228 248 213 237 261 236 233 218 134 214 245 256 271 259 260 258 239 277 97 276 274 279 281 266 280

23 36 37 32 34 43 33 45 49 42 57 48 51 38 47 56 40 53 62 52 50 44 20 41 55 58 64 60 61 59 54 67 10 66 65 68 70 63 69

6:02:20 5:51:25 5:18:48 5:59:24 6:02:59 5:54:52 5:58:09 5:53:47 5:46:23 5:39:42 5:43:59 5:59:08 5:48:35 6:55:10 6:00:14 5:34:10 5:58:02 6:07:07 5:40:35 5:57:12 6:01:55 6:38:45 7:18:59 6:30:21 5:44:35 6:15:53 5:41:36 6:33:43 6:33:46 7:24:40 7:10:20 5:52:34 5:45:45 6:15:01 5:57:56 5:59:01 5:57:36 8:16:54 7:30:51

237 203 73 231 239 212 224 211 187 157 176 229 194 277 232 132 223 245 163 219 235 272 280 267 177 256 167 269 270 281 279 210 180 254 222 228 220 284 282

55 40 15 52 56 44 49 43 35 25 31 51 38 65 53 20 48 57 26 45 54 63 67 60 32 59 28 61 62 68 66 42 34 58 47 50 46 70 69

2:28:44 2:19:59 2:57:51 2:25:58 2:16:44 2:10:12 2:28:48 2:20:00 2:17:15 2:32:35 2:14:35 2:28:46 2:21:06 2:16:24 2:42:00 2:34:08 2:46:13 2:35:09 2:13:19 2:40:57 2:39:49 2:35:50 2:41:17 2:48:48 2:48:59 2:41:43 2:48:54 2:48:45 2:48:44 2:18:34 2:55:26 2:41:45 7:08:14 2:54:52 3:30:20 3:14:32 3:15:47 2:53:43 3:14:16

199 165 272 188 145 91 201 166 150 213 131 200 174 143 244 219 251 223 119 236 235 226 237 260 262 240 261 259 258 155 270 241 284 269 282 278 280 267 277

40 33 65 38 27 13 42 34 28 43 21 41 36 25 54 44 56 45 18 50 49 47 51 59 61 52 60 58 57 29 64 53 70 63 69 67 68 62 66

16:24:43 16:26:17 16:26:29 16:26:35 16:26:47 16:32:42 16:38:16 16:43:30 16:48:26 16:48:55 17:01:41 17:04:42 17:06:34 17:19:54 17:28:58 17:32:15 17:33:22 17:34:49 17:35:47 17:40:36 17:43:11 17:43:23 17:44:17 17:55:46 17:55:56 18:30:35 18:41:10 19:04:01 19:04:03 19:13:15 19:19:29 19:27:19 19:54:16 20:03:00 20:20:50 20:39:49 20:49:50 21:23:06 22:35:52

190 192 193 195 196 198 201 206 210 211 217 219 220 228 231 232 233 234 235 237 239 240 241 247 248 259 262 264 265 267 268 270 272 274 276 278 279 282 283

32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

DUNEDIN WANAKA WHANGAREI CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND TAURANGA CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND

I I I I I I I I I

VW 1:58:53 VW 2:09:14 VW 2:08:14 VW 2:03:55 VW 2:38:59 VW 2:31:30 VW 2:31:21 VW 2:38:27 VW 2:22:22

159 215 212 190 279 268 267 277 255

1 4 3 2 9 7 6 8 5

5:36:40 5:57:41 5:47:14 5:55:12 7:03:53 7:11:22 7:47:22 8:15:29 9:21:31

149 186 167 181 249 254 269 275 284

1 4 2 3 5 6 7 8 9

5:39:18 5:34:23 5:36:27 5:46:06 5:51:54 5:59:19 6:13:15 6:16:42 6:07:16

155 133 139 185 206 230 253 260 246

3 1 2 4 5 6 8 9 7

2:11:28 2:19:55 2:30:28 2:18:45 2:33:54 2:50:54 2:50:02 2:47:15 2:46:37

103 163 208 157 218 264 263 254 253

1 3 4 2 5 9 8 7 6

15:26:18 16:01:11 16:02:23 16:03:58 18:08:39 18:33:03 19:21:58 19:57:53 20:37:45

139 174 177 180 253 261 269 273 277

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

CHRISTCHURCH MT MAUNGANUI BALCLUTHA ROTORUA

T T T T

M M M M

2 6 3 11

1 4 2 6

3:16:48 3:31:41 3:23:53 4:10:25

1 5 3 27

1 3 2 10

4:13:29 4:31:49 5:04:40 4:36:04

1 5 26 6

1 2 9 3

1:45:27 1:48:09 1:56:17 1:52:52

1 2 16 4

1 2 6 3

10:58:15 11:34:18 12:07:27 12:22:05

1 2 7 8

1 2 3 4

INDIVIDUAL TWO DAY VETERAN WOMEN (over 40) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

579 587 452 313 520 490 352 431 409

PRUE POOLE LYNNE DONALDSON JULIE YOUNG SARAH BLAIR JUDY BARFOOT KATH TUCKEY GAYLENE MACFARLANE JUDE WILSON JANE JACKSON

TEAMS TWO DAY OPEN MEN 1 2 3 4

868 898 740 807

”DICK BRUNTON/SIMON YARRELL” ”TROY GRIFFIN/GRAEME PEARSON” ”KELVIN WATT/MICHAEL WRIGHT” ”LOGAN HAMMERSLEY/JAMES GRIFFIN”

1:42:32 1:42:40 1:42:37 1:42:46

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

47


Place

No.

6 727 7 818 8 747 9 755 10 707 11 891 12 757 13 758 14 738 15 796 16 803 17 739 18 783 19 713 20 845 21 779 22 820 23 887 24 886 25 908 26 709 27 907 28 701 29 794 30 856 31 775 32 834 33 817 34 896 35 860 36 792 37 730 38 728 39 761 40 838 41 746 42 770 15:33:41 43 801 44 808 45 889 46 765 47 821 16:26:48 48 859 49 831 50 864 17:42:45 51 800 52 875 53 712 893 DNF 835 DNF

Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

”IAN WALSH/PETER KING” ”SEAN GIDALL/RONALD HARDING” ”RICHARD CLARK/PAUL DUTTON” ”SIMON MACKLE/TOM SHARPE” ”JOHN ALLEN/GAVIN GRAHAM” ”BEN ALLAN/TOM STUDHOLME” ”GRANT MAWSTON/CRAIG HERBERT” ”BRENDON RAE/PATRICK SWEENEY” ”ROBIN HUGHES/JOHN EWEN” ”MARTIN SHEPHERD/JOHN MCKENZIE” ”IAIN HARRISON/BRENT PALMER” ”ROBBIE FORD/RICHARD CAMERON” ”DARRYL ANDREWS/JON CUNNINGHAM” ”IAN COOPER/TOM BOYLES” ”JON HARRIS/ANDREW BELL” ”SHANE CHRISTOFFERSON/ANDREAS KACOFEGITIS” ”PATRICK CONNELL/JOHN-PAUL LILBURNE” ”PAUL PRINGLE/HAMISH WILTON” ”MICHAEL ROBSON/CRAIG GRANT” ”ANDREAS ANSCHUETZ/MARTIN KNOCHE” ”JOHN TIMU/EION CROSSAN” ”JUERGEN JAKOB/RUSSELL SCOTT” ”SIMON NEALE/MATTHEW PARKER” ”ANDREW JOHNSTONE/SCOTT JOHNSON” ”MALACHY SHIVNAN/STEPHEN COTTRELL” ”ROGER BROOMHALL/PAUL SAMPSON” ”EDWARD O’CONNOR/PETER MELLOR” ”LUC MORREN/LEE HATTON” ”NICK WILLIAMS/GREG CLARK” ”TAMA TAURUA/THOMAS WATSON” ”GARY COOPER/RHYS ANDREWS” ”MARK BULLOCK/MURDOCH DRYDEN” ”AARON WOOD/GIDEON DU TOIT” ”RICHARD PLUNKET/BRENDAN JARVIE” ”CLINTON MOORE/CHRIS HURLEY” ”DANIEL SHAW/JASON STANBURY” ”DARRYN FAULKNER/GREG BEAMAN”

AUCKLAND NELSON CAMBRIDGE KAIKOURA MASTERTON WELLINGTON AUCKLAND GREYMOUTH GREYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON AUCKLAND UNITED KINGDOM CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH KAIAPOI WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH GERMANY AUSTRALIA GERMANY UNITED KINGDOM WELLINGTON TAURANGA CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND WANGANUI KAIAPOI OAMARU AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH

T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M T M AUCKLAND

129

42 PAEROA CHRISTCHURCH ASHBURTON NELSON

”ERIC SOUCHON/LUKE CURRAN” ”DAVID STEVENS/JOHN SCOBIE” ”CARL FINNIGAN/JAMES GRIFFITHS” ”KEN MAHON/JASON EVERETT” ”DAVIN MURDOCH/DAVID HANCOCK”

161 ”MARK LONGSTAFF/TONY MARRIOTT” ”NATHAN WALSH/MURRAY BLADEN” ”ANDREW BOYD/MICHAEL DIAMOND”

189

47 AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH

Cycle1 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Mt Run Pl Sec Pl Time

Kayak Pl

Sec Pl Time

Cycle2 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Overall Pl Sec Pl

1:48:38 1:42:39 1:51:09 2:12:08 2:08:25 1:51:27 1:51:29 2:03:01 1:51:22 1:51:31 1:48:14 1:57:16 1:51:32 2:03:57 1:57:19 2:05:21 2:21:53 1:47:48 1:51:04 2:03:36 2:03:27 1:56:53 1:42:42 2:12:04 2:10:05 1:57:24 1:58:09 1:58:41 2:03:42 1:58:32 2:04:01 2:08:18 2:12:17 1:57:08 2:31:19 1:57:25

26 5 32 138 128 41 42 96 37 43 17 69 44 120 72 123 172 12 29 113 107 57 7 134 131 74 78 88 117 83 121 127 142 64 189 75 T

9 3 11 44 39 14 15 30 13 16 8 22 17 35 23 37 49 7 10 33 31 19 5 42 41 24 26 29 34 27 36 38 45 21 52 25 M

3:48:33 4:21:45 4:14:06 3:50:47 3:43:45 4:11:35 4:21:56 4:14:33 4:08:17 4:32:14 4:25:32 4:21:22 4:22:39 4:21:42 4:30:20 4:23:40 3:48:07 4:46:20 4:30:22 4:14:27 4:39:17 4:25:31 4:59:14 4:33:34 4:30:51 4:30:34 5:08:42 4:56:56 5:26:43 5:25:50 5:06:11 5:05:39 4:34:30 5:20:12 5:16:03 5:25:27 1:57:00

17 39 30 18 13 28 40 32 25 55 46 37 41 38 49 43 16 70 50 31 63 45 92 56 52 51 102 89 131 128 100 98 57 123 114 127 59

7 17 12 8 5 11 18 14 9 27 22 15 19 16 23 20 6 31 24 13 30 21 33 28 26 25 36 32 46 45 35 34 29 41 39 44 20

5:15:33 4:50:48 5:00:41 5:19:01 5:28:59 5:21:40 5:10:31 5:03:36 5:26:16 5:06:49 5:22:58 5:08:26 5:09:34 5:16:01 5:25:10 5:23:21 5:44:48 5:16:30 5:19:17 5:48:25 5:26:56 5:56:52 5:20:51 5:38:53 5:46:01 5:50:25 5:30:46 5:36:31 5:13:46 5:18:32 5:38:47 5:52:11 6:06:31 6:01:37 5:31:03 5:55:56 5:10:33

52 12 21 58 104 71 40 25 92 27 77 35 37 53 86 79 141 55 60 151 95 163 66 131 146 152 108 120 48 57 129 155 178 170 109 162 106

15 4 6 19 31 22 13 8 28 10 24 11 12 16 26 25 37 17 20 39 29 45 21 36 38 40 32 34 14 18 35 42 47 46 33 44 37

2:01:15 2:00:08 1:59:32 1:53:33 1:56:20 1:57:35 1:58:34 2:03:51 1:59:12 1:56:36 1:55:31 2:06:31 2:11:06 2:00:01 1:58:58 2:04:10 2:04:36 2:10:03 2:22:38 1:58:37 2:07:21 2:07:51 2:24:33 2:04:06 2:06:13 2:16:46 2:06:17 2:13:47 2:03:49 2:13:51 2:08:33 2:01:41 2:15:38 1:59:24 2:05:54 2:07:04 6:15:49

42 37 34 5 17 23 28 57 32 20 12 84 112 36 30 62 63 106 163 29 89 93 170 61 77 140 79 123 56 124 96 44 135 33 75 88 194

19 18 16 4 7 10 11 22 14 8 5 29 37 17 13 24 25 35 47 12 31 33 48 23 27 44 28 39 21 40 34 20 43 15 26 30 50

12:53:58 12:55:18 13:05:28 13:15:28 13:17:27 13:22:17 13:22:30 13:25:01 13:25:06 13:27:08 13:32:13 13:33:35 13:34:50 13:41:40 13:51:46 13:56:31 13:59:24 14:00:40 14:03:20 14:05:04 14:17:01 14:27:07 14:27:18 14:28:35 14:33:08 14:35:08 14:43:54 14:45:54 14:47:58 14:56:44 14:57:30 15:07:48 15:08:54 15:18:20 15:24:17 15:25:51 2:10:19

14 15 22 25 26 30 31 32 33 35 38 39 41 44 48 50 54 57 61 63 68 72 73 75 79 80 85 86 89 100 103 109 111 117 121 123 109

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 36

T M 2:38:58 T M 2:22:55 T M 1:51:21 T M 2:10:03 WELLINGTON

201 175 36 130 T

53 50 12 40 M

5:28:49 5:19:09 6:36:28 6:10:39 2:12:05

133 119 180 167 135

47 40 49 48 43

5:22:18 5:51:52 5:25:37 5:53:23 5:24:49

75 154 88 157 126

23 41 27 43 43

2:15:12 2:19:21 2:30:37 2:12:10 6:32:51

132 152 179 115 201

41 46 49 38 51

15:45:15 15:53:15 16:24:02 16:26:15 2:17:04

139 143 158 160 141

43 44 45 46 45

T M 2:12:18 T M 1:51:37 HAMILTON T

143 46 M

46 5:15:09 18 7:46:56 2:16:57

112 198 161

38 52 47

7:33:21 5:01:48 6:43:49

206 23 182

52 7 50

2:07:24 2:36:21 6:11:12

91 193 190

32 52 49

17:08:12 17:16:41 2:30:48

179 182 180

48 49 50

207 180 98

53 48 30

2:15:34 2:32:40 3:02:12

133 187 207

42 51 53

17:53:27 18:39:31 18:52:23

192 199 201

51 52 53

”PETER COOPER/NIGEL SHATFORD” ”TERRY LYDON/STEVE KENNEDY” ”TONY VINE/MICHAEL CLARK” ”CARL THOMPSON/ROBERT GREEN”

50 RANGIORA AUCKLAND AUCKLAND TAKAKA

T T T T

M M M M

2:21:46 2:28:14 2:03:34 1:57:07

171 181 111 61

48 51 32 20

5:24:34 7:30:29 8:18:39 4:58:29

125 195 203 92

42 51 53 33

7:51:33 6:08:09 5:27:58 DNF

”JASON STEWART/TIM RADCLIFFE”

CHRISTCHURCH

T

M

1:57:22

72

24

5:34:45

145

49

DNF

WANAKA CHRISTCHURCH DUNEDIN NELSON TAURANGA CHRISTCHURCH DIAMOND HARBOUR ENGLAND DUNEDIN CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH QUEENSTOWN KAIAPOI DUNEDIN MAPUA SWITZERLAND HAVELOCK WALES AKAROA

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W

1:51:07 2:10:20 1:48:28 1:51:49 1:51:41 2:03:15 2:06:07 1:51:49 2:24:01 2:18:07 2:19:36 2:22:15 2:14:15 2:14:04 2:38:16 2:38:01 1:58:31 2:43:01 2:37:19 3:07:26

30 132 24 55 50 101 124 54 176 164 168 174 153 151 198 195 82 203 192 207

2 9 1 5 3 7 8 4 15 12 13 14 11 10 18 17 6 19 16 20

4:17:22 4:05:07 4:15:45 5:01:14 4:52:25 4:58:21 5:18:56 5:48:34 5:34:39 5:56:31 5:42:09 5:21:05 5:54:17 6:30:21 5:12:03 6:15:39 7:10:34 6:44:18 7:47:32 8:20:07

35 21 34 94 81 91 117 153 142 160 147 124 158 176 108 170 191 183 199 204

3 1 2 6 4 5 8 12 10 14 11 9 13 16 7 15 18 17 19 20

4:51:16 5:07:44 5:15:26 4:59:32 5:17:03 5:28:09 5:26:56 5:19:31 5:26:46 4:59:07 5:37:26 5:45:35 5:46:23 5:30:25 6:12:28 5:57:37 5:51:20 6:40:33 6:08:18 6:11:03

13 30 51 20 56 99 94 62 93 18 126 145 147 107 191 164 153 202 182 189

1 4 5 3 6 10 9 7 8 2 12 13 14 11 19 16 15 20 17 18

1:59:02 1:54:28 2:02:23 2:07:24 2:09:41 2:09:49 1:57:44 2:15:11 2:17:36 2:33:37 2:16:08 2:27:34 2:13:46 2:09:58 2:32:10 2:26:45 2:47:46 2:31:02 2:14:46 2:30:56

31 8 48 90 103 104 25 131 142 189 137 175 122 105 186 174 202 182 129 181

3 1 4 5 6 7 2 11 13 19 12 15 9 8 18 14 20 17 10 16

12:58:47 13:17:39 13:22:01 13:59:57 14:10:49 14:39:33 14:49:42 15:15:03 15:43:01 15:47:20 15:55:19 15:56:29 16:08:40 16:24:48 16:34:55 17:18:01 17:48:10 18:38:52 18:47:54 20:09:32

17 27 29 55 66 82 92 116 136 140 144 145 148 159 165 183 190 198 200 205

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

”PETER O’SULLIVAN /NEIL MAYO” ”BOB FOSTER/STEVE O’NEIL” ”DAVID MAITLAND/CHRIS COX” ”JOHN HUTCHINGS/GRANT WILLIAMS” ”TOM BARNFIELD/GUY DE LACEY” ”BRUCE MCCLELLAND/MICHAEL MORRISSEY”

PALMERSTON NORTH CHRISTCHURCH ROLLESTON WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH

T V 1:40:28 T V 1:42:42 T V 1:48:10 T V 1:56:58 T V 1:51:34 ASHBURTON

1 8 15 58 45 T

1 2 3 13 10 V

3:36:14 3:22:56 3:28:10 3:42:39 3:53:18 1:54:04

7 2 4 11 19 56

3 1 2 5 6 12

4:23:20 4:42:49 4:40:41 5:08:17 5:09:35 3:39:11

2 9 8 32 38 9

1 3 2 8 12 4

2:03:38 2:00:13 2:00:56 1:54:52 1:57:36 5:06:58

53 38 41 9 24 29

12 8 9 2 5 7

11:43:38 11:48:38 11:57:56 12:42:46 12:52:02 2:12:58

3 4 5 11 12 118

1 2 3 4 5 28

13

6 LOWER HUTT CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH WAKATIPU WINTON WESTPORT CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND KATIKATI CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND

T V T V T V T V T V T V T V T V T V T V T V PICTON

2:03:41 1:48:16 1:51:46 1:48:18 1:48:32 1:51:13 1:57:06 1:58:51 1:57:09 1:58:30 2:03:33 T

116 19 53 20 25 33 63 92 68 81 109 V

24 4:01:47 4 4:50:58 11 4:32:02 5 5:05:45 6 5:00:03 7 4:37:44 14 4:27:39 20 4:43:18 15 4:51:01 19 5:11:48 22 4:50:45 2:18:37

20 76 54 99 93 61 47 68 77 107 75 166

7 14 10 20 19 11 9 12 15 23 13 37

5:11:25 4:48:11 5:19:13 4:58:59 5:12:37 5:22:47 5:31:49 5:22:10 5:27:44 5:08:40 5:39:04 4:54:14

43 10 59 17 45 76 113 74 97 36 132 86

13 4 15 6 14 19 22 18 20 11 29 17

1:55:56 2:01:15 1:53:59 1:56:32 1:57:58 2:10:13 2:06:29 2:09:20 2:04:59 2:03:17 2:05:49 5:28:41

14 43 7 19 26 108 83 100 68 51 74 100

3 10 1 4 6 26 20 24 16 11 18 21

13:12:48 13:28:39 13:36:59 13:49:34 13:59:09 14:01:56 14:03:02 14:13:38 14:20:53 14:22:15 14:39:10 2:06:55

24 36 42 47 52 58 60 67 69 70 81 85

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 21

TEAMS TWO DAY OPEN WOMEN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

842 854 768 819 726 733 749 901 847 711 745 722 717 778 734 883 880 708 844 865

”GINNY BUSH/LYN WEEDON” ”MARGARET GIBSON/RACHELLE SMITH” ”AMY HURREN/SOPHIE HART” ”JANE MARTIN/HELEN FLANNERY” ”ANNA BERTHELSEN/LAURA SMITH” ”RACHEL ROBERTSON/JENNIE BELL” ”LINDSAY CROCKER/LUCY NICHOLL” ”KATHARINE EUSTACE/FLEUR ROBERTS” ”LUCY HEWLETT/JANET O’CALLAGHAN” ”ABBEY MIEDEMA/LOUISE SINCLAIR” ”TARINA PLACID/MELISSA BARBER” ”KERRY ROUGHAN/JACKIE BARKER” ”LEIGH SOPER/KEREN MCSKIMMING” ”NICHOLA HOLLAND/SHARON VERNEL” ”KATHRYN FLETCHER/TRACY WARD” ”CLAIRE WEBSTER/JANINE STAPLETON” ”MAFALDA WALZL/CAROL MASEFIELD” ”DEBBIE HEALEY/SUSAN MACKAY” ”ALISON COOPER/CATRIONA MACGREGOR” ”SUZANNE KNAPP/LISA MCKENZIE”

TEAMS TWO DAY VETERAN MEN (over 40) 1 829 2 840 3 906 4 841 5 806 6 789 12:53:10 7 862 8 825 9 744 10 716 11 890 12 790 13 723 14 861 15 729 16 799 17 811 18 867 14:48:25 19 791 20 909 21 878 22 703 23 848 24 787 25 724 26 805 27 736 28 767 29 748 30 876 31 737 32 900 33 857 34 754 34 35 721

48

”GRAHAM MOORE/MIKE TUBBS” ”KEN LIVINGSTON/IAIN MILLAR” ”MERV HONEYBONE/NIGEL ATHERFOLD” ”BRENT MCDONALD/PETER BENNETTS” ”DENIS WOODS/GRAEME BURBOROUGH” ”CHRIS COLL/GERALD HATELEY” ”PETER DE GOLDI/EVAN TAYLOR” ”ROGER FULTON/DAVID MORTIMER” ”COLIN GODSELL/STEPHEN HART” ”ROB POTTS/ANDREW DALLAS” ”RICHARD RIDDELL/GREG JONES” ”JOHN MEREDYTH-YOUNG/CHRISTIAN COUPER”

90 ”MATT FEARY/PETER MAY” ”JOHN QUIRK/ANTHONY HOWARD” ”DAVID SOUTHALL/DOUG JOHNSON” ”JOHN RYDER/TAYLOR ALLISON” ”PETER ELGAR/STEVE ELGAR” ”VINCENT POOCH/REX WILLIAMS” ”CLIFF JONES/IAN MARSHALL” ”JOHN SINCLAIR/COLIN MCLAREN” ”ROBERT FRIS/MARK OAKLEY” ”TONY OLIVER/GORDON MOUNSEY” ”STEVE HOTCHIN/MURRAY HUNT” ”MARTIN EWEN/GRANT SEAGAR” ”JAMIE TULLOCH/STEWART CARRUTHERS” ”RICHARD LAURENSON/MICHAEL MANNING” ”PETER NOTMAN/STEPHEN MOODIE” ”PADDY KENNEDY/PETER COSTELLO”

18 AUCKLAND AUCKLAND HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH MATAMATA CHRISTCHURCH INGLEWOOD CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND QUEENSTOWN CHRISTCHURCH OTAKI DUNEDIN SOUTH WESTLAND

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V

2:14:21 1:57:29 1:57:17 2:25:59 2:19:58 1:51:14 2:16:57 2:18:28 2:26:00 2:14:16 2:03:54 2:28:41 2:16:38 2:12:23 1:57:21 1:51:18

156 76 70 178 169 34 162 165 179 154 119 182 160 145 73 35

33 18 16 39 38 8 35 36 40 32 25 41 34 28 17 9

4:56:41 5:34:40 5:17:17 5:19:48 4:13:53 5:47:26 5:10:00 5:06:21 5:13:11 4:52:54 5:18:59 5:28:59 5:36:44 6:18:06 5:45:47 7:00:50

88 143 115 122 29 152 105 101 110 83 118 135 145 171 150 188

18 33 25 28 8 37 22 21 24 16 26 30 34 38 36 43

5:31:57 5:08:21 5:37:07 5:20:31 6:29:08 5:21:20 5:38:51 5:48:16 5:45:21 6:02:51 5:37:07 5:35:50 5:37:16 5:08:25 5:53:08 4:50:44

114 33 124 65 199 70 130 150 144 171 123 118 125 34 156 11

23 9 26 16 42 17 28 32 31 37 25 24 27 10 33 5

2:06:11 2:13:05 2:04:58 1:58:22 2:05:47 2:11:57 2:06:58 2:08:49 2:03:45 2:18:32 2:35:36 2:03:39 2:09:38 2:13:44 2:31:39 2:34:37

76 120 67 27 73 114 86 97 55 148 191 54 102 121 183 190

19 29 15 7 17 27 22 23 14 33 42 13 25 30 40 41

14:49:10 14:53:34 14:56:38 15:04:39 15:08:45 15:11:57 15:12:45 15:21:53 15:28:17 15:28:32 15:35:36 15:37:09 15:40:14 15:52:38 16:07:53 16:17:29

91 96 99 108 110 114 115 120 126 127 130 132 135 142 147 151

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

”DAVE TAYLOR/MURRAY MCDONALD”

OXFORD

T

V

2:39:02

202

43

5:19:34

121

27

6:04:43

175

38

2:14:18

128

31

16:17:36

152

35

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


Place

No.

Names

City / Country

Ev Sect Time

Cycle1 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Mt Run Pl Sec Pl Time

Kayak Pl

Sec Pl Time

Cycle2 Pl

Sec Pl Time

Overall Pl Sec Pl

TEAMS TWO DAYS VETERAN WOMEN (over 40) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

897 752 771 850 813 892 871 795 702 742

”MARGARET STANLEY-HARRIS/BUBBLES BOURKE” ”DIANE STEAD/SALLY OGILVIE” ”SUE STUBENVOLL/JANE MONTGOMERY” ”KATHY GARDEN/EMMA DE LACEY” ”JANET MCLEOD/SALLY MCCHESNEY” ”PHILIPPA FINNIGAN/HEATHER MILLIGAN” ”LORRAINE PROFFIT/JANICE THORNTON” ”LIZ MORSE/MARIA GOBBIE” ”LINDA MCDONALD/TRUDY MURDOCH” ”KAY BOOTH/ROSIE CLULOW”

AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND AUCKLAND UNITED KINGDOM CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH

T T T T T T T T T T

VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW

2:03:26 2:12:22 2:45:12 2:29:53 2:12:12 2:38:11 2:21:57 2:47:20 2:37:30 2:30:18

104 144 204 183 140 196 173 205 193 184

1 3 9 5 2 8 4 10 7 6

4:29:39 4:43:38 4:47:08 4:38:06 5:33:12 5:33:10 6:34:20 5:26:00 7:06:01 6:41:35

48 69 71 62 140 139 178 129 190 181

1 3 4 2 7 6 8 5 10 9

5:41:41 5:30:06 5:24:19 6:15:33 5:32:28 6:04:15 5:23:13 6:46:16 5:24:02 6:24:52

136 106 84 193 115 173 78 203 82 196

6 4 3 8 5 7 1 10 2 9

2:08:09 2:04:55 2:05:27 2:15:03 2:26:17 2:18:52 2:32:06 2:23:32 2:44:19 3:01:30

95 66 71 130 173 149 185 167 200 206

3 1 2 4 7 5 8 6 9 10

14:22:54 14:31:01 15:02:05 15:38:33 15:44:08 16:34:28 16:51:35 17:23:07 17:51:51 18:38:14

71 76 105 134 138 164 172 185 191 197

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

TEAMS TWO DAY MIXED 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

872 793 704 816 776 830 853 839 719 743 788 802 753 784 774 894 710 750 826 763 851 827

”KYLE DOEL/NICK ROSS” ”STEVE CRACKEL/AMANDA SMITH” ”CHRIS LUMSDEN/CARLA LUCAS” ”PAUL MASSIE/SUE MASSIE” ”CLARE REGISTER/BRAD WILLIAMS” ”DEVERN BURCHETT/KIM JOHNSTON” ”TREVOR VOYCE/RACHEL DIXON” ”PAUL BOURGEOIS/MELODY WING” ”KYLEE SIMPSON/MORGAN GALBRAITH” ”SAM DILLON/SUZIE LE CREN” ”MARK BIRDLING/TRACEY RICHARDS” ”VIC CRUTCHLEY/DEBBIE BEVINS” ”DON ABBEY/ROBYN ABBEY” ”RORY KEAY/MARILYN MORRISON” ”ROBYN GILBERTSON/SIMON SHEPHERD” ”MARK WARE/MAARAMA DAVIS” ”KIRSTEN LENG/MARK STAPLES” ”ANNA-MARIE MCDONNELL/GEOFF MCDONNELL” ”NICOLA SHORTEN/GRAHAM SEVICKE-JONES” ”COLIN ROBINSON/SUE JONES” ”STEVE WYLIE/DIANA PITTWOOD” ”DOUGALL STRUTHERS/JEANETTE CAMBRIDGE”

DUNEDIN CHRISTCHURCH WANAKA CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH TE KUITI CHRISTCHURCH TIMARU MARLBOROUGH RANGIORA AUCKLAND WESTPORT LOWER HUTT AUSTRALIA WELLINGTON AUCKLAND WELLINGTON WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

1:58:34 1:48:07 2:02:06 1:42:42 2:03:18 1:51:26 1:42:38 1:51:00 2:03:27 2:03:35 1:57:01 2:08:36 2:03:12 1:51:26 1:58:09 1:57:09 2:37:40 2:12:16 2:03:37 2:03:12 1:58:54 1:58:45

85 13 95 9 102 40 4 27 106 112 60 129 97 39 79 67 194 141 114 98 93 89

14 3 18 2 22 7 1 4 23 24 9 26 19 6 12 11 35 28 25 20 17 15

3:35:41 4:37:19 4:08:15 4:52:04 3:44:55 4:36:40 4:58:15 4:47:32 4:24:37 4:42:52 4:53:56 4:41:39 4:54:26 5:09:05 5:17:30 5:31:25 4:07:40 5:03:51 5:26:06 4:52:42 5:12:38 5:48:51

6 60 24 79 15 58 90 72 44 67 85 66 87 103 116 137 23 96 130 82 109 154

1 7 4 11 2 6 15 10 5 9 13 8 14 17 19 22 3 16 20 12 18 24

5:14:15 4:30:25 4:52:06 4:25:56 5:26:09 4:54:51 5:08:12 5:10:07 5:31:30 5:13:12 5:28:51 5:44:59 5:42:36 5:28:48 5:24:18 5:21:00 6:08:13 5:41:46 5:31:38 5:58:31 5:36:54 5:31:41

49 4 14 3 91 16 31 39 110 47 102 142 138 101 83 68 181 137 111 165 122 112

8 2 3 1 14 4 5 6 17 7 16 26 25 15 13 11 34 24 18 29 21 19

1:51:42 2:00:50 2:00:27 2:03:18 1:55:24 2:06:27 2:10:11 2:14:09 2:04:04 2:06:23 2:13:02 2:05:15 2:02:14 2:17:58 2:14:01 2:07:27 2:03:53 2:04:01 2:03:04 2:16:33 2:30:12 2:06:15

3 40 39 52 11 81 107 127 60 80 119 69 47 144 126 92 58 59 49 138 178 78

1 4 3 7 2 14 16 20 10 13 18 11 5 22 19 15 8 9 6 21 34 12

12:40:10 12:56:39 13:02:53 13:04:00 13:09:44 13:29:24 13:59:15 14:02:47 14:03:38 14:06:01 14:32:49 14:40:27 14:42:27 14:47:16 14:53:58 14:57:01 14:57:26 15:01:52 15:04:24 15:10:58 15:18:37 15:25:31

10 16 19 21 23 37 53 59 62 64 78 83 84 88 98 101 102 104 107 112 118 122

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

810 760 797 903 781 852 804 769 882 815 904 822 863 846 718 766 877 849 773 735

”GRAEME PRIEST/ANNIE BROADHURST” ”WARREN FALCONER/REBECCA MEYER” ”MARKO DEN BREEMS/SUE SUCKLING” ”MARK ROBINSON/JOANNE KISSICK” ”DON MILNE/SUSAN CLARK” ”KERRY HARFORD/LEIGH SONNTAG” ”MORGAN TROWLAND/KIM SPARKS” ”CIERAN NEW/STEVEN WHITESIDE” ”WENDY HORNING/GRAEME BAGRIE” ”ROBERT HOOD/BARBARA MCCARTHY” ”MEGAN SAUNDERSON/VAUGHAN MATTHEWS” ”DEIDRE HAY/CAMPBELL GOURLAY” ”KAREN O’BRIEN/CHRIS BORTON” ”CHRISTINE OSBORNE/DAVID GREEN” ”PAUL LIDDY/BARBARA LOOMES” ”JASON GORMACK/RYL JENSEN” ”MARTYN CHERRY/MARYANNE HANSEN” ”KEES WESSELINK/KARLA WESSELINK” ”RUTH HEAD/PETER JOHNSTON” ”REBECCA GRIGGS/GRAHAM O’NEILL”

CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND NEW PLYMOUTH CHRISTCHURCH QUEENSTOWN CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH LEVIN AUCKLAND AUCKLAND AUCKLAND STRATFORD HASTINGS WAIKOUAITI CHRISTCHURCH WELLINGTON HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

1:57:05 2:12:06 1:51:24 1:58:48 1:51:39 2:14:01 1:58:29 2:30:28 2:19:58 2:03:13 2:38:20 2:38:21 2:50:59 2:16:37 2:38:11 2:25:25 2:31:20 3:05:39 2:03:10 3:37:00

61 137 38 90 47 150 80 186 170 99 199 200 206 159 197 177 190 207 96 209

10 27 5 16 8 29 13 33 31 21 37 38 39 30 36 32 34 41 19 42

5:50:01 5:59:46 6:28:59 5:45:38 5:57:07 6:01:49 6:00:28 5:28:57 6:12:29 6:13:25 5:52:08 5:52:08 7:22:40 8:17:33 7:33:21 9:13:38 9:19:08 7:35:30 6:22:27 7:38:48

155 163 174 149 161 165 164 134 168 169 157 156 194 202 196 206 207 200 174 201

25 29 34 23 28 31 30 21 32 33 27 26 35 37 36 38 39 38 34 39

5:20:23 5:15:03 5:23:54 5:45:02 6:13:32 5:36:49 5:40:31 6:01:25 5:53:59 6:07:14 6:00:50 6:08:52 5:58:43 6:09:22 7:21:44 5:37:56 6:16:46 DNF DNF DNF

64 50 80 143 192 121 133 169 158 179 167 184 166 186 205 127 195

10 9 12 27 37 20 23 32 28 33 31 35 30 36 39 22 38

2:22:22 2:21:23 2:20:16 2:42:43 2:10:38 2:25:03 2:39:12 2:23:12 2:22:03 2:28:19 2:21:32 2:21:28 2:24:27 2:19:20 2:32:05 2:49:46 2:49:30

162 158 156 198 110 171 194 165 161 176 160 159 169 151 184 204 203

29 25 24 37 17 32 36 30 28 33 27 26 31 23 35 39 38

15:29:50 15:48:16 16:04:32 16:12:09 16:12:56 16:17:41 16:18:39 16:24:01 16:48:28 16:52:10 16:52:49 17:00:48 18:36:49 19:02:51 20:05:20 20:06:45 20:56:43

128 141 146 149 150 153 154 157 171 173 175 177 195 202 203 204 207

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 DNF DNF DNF

WANAKA CHRISTCHURCH PIOPIO BLENHEIM AUSTRALIA CHRISTCHURCH KAIAPOI CHRISTCHURCH SPRINGSTON CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH CHRISTCHURCH ASHHURST INVERCARGILL WHANGAREI CHRISTCHURCH HAMILTON CHRISTCHURCH AUCKLAND MACAU ALEXANDRA AUCKLAND AUCKLAND MASTERTON AUCKLAND DIPTON LYTTELTON DUNEDIN UNITED STATES OF AME NAPIER AUCKLAND HAMILTON

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F

1:42:43 1:48:11 1:57:09 1:48:15 2:03:31 1:51:46 2:12:05 1:58:54 1:48:19 1:48:10 2:03:26 2:03:15 1:57:46 2:06:23 2:14:19 1:51:41 2:17:54 1:57:09 2:14:05 1:51:40 1:57:06 2:03:45 2:12:52 2:14:24 2:31:23 1:58:51 1:51:09 1:48:19 2:31:05 2:04:21 1:58:38 2:03:33 2:28:00

10 16 65 18 108 52 136 94 22 14 105 100 77 125 155 49 163 66 152 48 62 118 148 157 191 91 31 21 188 122 87 110 180

1 3 12 4 20 10 25 17 6 2 19 18 14 24 28 9 30 13 27 8 11 22 26 29 33 16 7 5 32 23 15 21 31

3:43:21 4:07:25 4:08:40 4:39:19 4:15:11 4:23:06 3:44:26 4:19:06 4:39:40 4:51:53 4:49:48 4:53:36 5:09:17 5:03:55 4:37:08 4:52:25 5:03:43 5:13:27 5:35:51 6:06:09 6:29:15 5:59:22 5:47:19 6:45:47 6:28:23 5:33:08 7:04:12 7:12:49 5:54:32 6:53:55 8:08:39 7:55:38 9:11:06

12 22 26 64 33 42 14 36 65 78 74 84 104 97 59 80 95 111 144 166 175 162 151 184 173 138 189 193 159 186 201 200 205

1 3 4 9 5 7 2 6 10 12 11 14 17 16 8 13 15 18 20 24 26 23 21 27 25 19 29 30 22 28 32 31 33

4:36:32 5:10:33 5:19:24 5:01:08 5:21:14 5:21:40 5:47:04 5:25:35 5:19:51 5:11:12 5:22:07 5:26:04 5:20:51 5:29:49 5:46:34 6:09:58 5:40:52 5:54:31 5:25:57 5:03:03 5:06:51 5:24:00 5:41:13 5:38:26 5:35:29 7:08:14 5:13:09 5:28:58 6:26:25 6:09:17 5:33:10 5:42:44 6:09:52

7 41 61 22 69 72 149 87 63 42 73 90 67 105 148 188 134 160 89 24 28 81 135 128 117 204 46 103 197 185 116 139 187

1 5 8 2 11 12 27 15 9 6 13 17 10 19 26 31 23 28 16 3 4 14 24 22 21 33 7 18 32 29 20 25 30

1:56:32 1:55:37 1:56:05 1:57:31 1:53:52 2:04:51 2:01:43 2:05:32 2:07:02 2:06:28 2:12:22 2:09:17 2:18:24 2:10:56 2:15:35 2:09:30 2:09:00 2:13:52 2:11:12 2:36:15 2:04:48 2:16:36 2:52:09 2:03:07 2:12:22 2:07:59 2:44:04 2:32:43 2:17:44 2:19:05 2:19:21 2:39:39 2:40:32

18 13 15 22 6 65 45 72 87 82 117 99 147 111 134 101 98 125 113 192 64 139 205 50 116 94 199 188 143 150 153 195 196

4 2 3 5 1 9 6 10 12 11 20 15 25 17 22 16 14 21 18 29 8 23 33 7 19 13 32 28 24 26 27 30 31

11:59:06 13:01:46 13:21:16 13:26:12 13:33:46 13:41:23 13:45:17 13:49:07 13:54:50 13:57:42 14:27:43 14:32:12 14:46:17 14:51:02 14:53:35 15:03:32 15:11:29 15:18:58 15:27:04 15:37:06 15:37:58 15:43:41 16:33:31 16:41:42 16:47:35 16:48:11 16:52:34 17:02:48 17:09:45 17:26:37 17:59:48 18:21:34 20:29:30

6 18 28 34 40 43 45 46 49 51 74 77 87 93 97 106 113 119 124 131 133 137 163 167 168 170 174 178 180 186 193 194 206

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

AUCKLAND WELLINGTON AUCKLAND ROTORUA CHRISTCHURCH PALMERSTON NORTH CHRISTCHURCH DUNEDIN

T T T T T T T T

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO

1:48:24 1:51:46 2:06:33 2:19:24 1:51:01 1:57:18 2:16:21 1:58:35

23 51 126 167 28 71 158 86

1 3 6 8 2 4 7 5

3:36:28 4:48:34 4:31:22 5:15:28 5:38:22 5:19:18 7:11:46 6:48:55

8 73 53 113 146 120 192 185

1 3 2 4 6 5 8 7

5:36:07 5:24:27 5:11:45 5:16:28 4:53:43 6:06:12 5:27:19 6:03:42

119 85 44 54 15 177 96 172

6 4 2 3 1 9 5 7

2:01:58 1:55:19 2:18:04 1:59:55 2:29:53 2:05:19 2:17:59 2:44:49

46 10 146 35 177 70 145 201

3 1 6 2 8 4 5 9

13:02:55 14:00:04 14:07:42 14:51:15 14:52:59 15:28:05 17:13:23 17:36:00

20 56 65 94 95 125 181 188

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

TEAMS TWO DAY FAMILY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

837 873 833 910 786 785 715 866 777 899 902 714 762 772 824 782 764 731 843 809 855 751 823 888 706 874 732 780 836 879 759 798 895

”STEVE GRIEVE/DAVE GRIEVE” ”GREG MILLER/GEOFF MILLER” ”HILARY MURPHY/MATTHEW MURPHY” ”IAN MCALPINE/JAMES MCALPINE” ”CARL FERGUSON/GARY FERGUSON” ”STUART KENNEDY/TOM KENNEDY” ”PETER CLULOW/BRUCE CLULOW” ”BELINDA THOMAS/BRENT THOMAS” ”SHAUN COLENSO/MARC COLENSO” ”PAUL PETERSON/EMMA PETERSON” ”SOPHIE BURTT/CHARLOTTE BURTT” ”GEORGE POTTINGER/CLARE POTTINGER” ”MARK O’CONNOR/GREG O’CONNOR” ”NICHOLAS GREEN/JENNY GREEN” ”SABIN IVEY/KEITH IVEY” ”BRUCE COTTEE/DUANE COTTEE” ”JOHN TAYLOR/JAMES TAYLOR” ”ART GAGE-BROWN/WILL GAGE-BROWN” ”GRAHAM EWING/SCOTT EWING” ”ALLEN SMALL/DEBBIE PAYNE” ”PETER ASHLEY/ROBERT ASHLEY” ”DON THOMPSON/MAREE THOMPSON” ”DARREN CASH/LEON CASH” ”ADAIN SUMMERFIELD/SHAUN SUMMERFIELD” ”VICKY ORDISH/MARK ORDISH” ”BRIAN HARRISON/WAYNE HARRISON” ”CHRIS STEWART/GARTH STEWART” ”TREVOR BEST/SARAH-JANE BEST” ”SARAH TOOMEY/SEAN TOOMEY” ”JEFF MAURER/KARI MAURER” ”PAUL VIGGERS/SHERYL VIGGERS” ”JOHN WARD/RUTH NICOL” ”JULIAN MAZE/JOANNA MAZE”

TEAMS TWO DAY CORPORATE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

911 741 905 828 869 725 870 912

”BRITON SMITH/HAMISH EDGAR” ”SIMON WINSTANLEY/NIGEL GIGGINS” ”PETER BEEKHUIS/DUNCAN GOOD” ”STEFAN CRENGLE/BRYAN PARKES” ”DAVID VERONESE/PETER COX” ”NORMAN RUSS/MARK HUDSON” ”CHRISTOPHER PAULSEN/TONY PAULSEN” ”NIC DAHL/PETER BRAAM”

Looking forward to seeing you next year on the

SPEIGHT’S COAST TO COAST! ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

49


THE COMPLETE

,BZBL5SBJOJOHQBDLBHF GPS"MMOFX.VMUJTQPSUFST Ask anyone about the kayaking section of the Coast To Coast or any other great event and they will tell you stories about people capsizing and swimming repetitively, resulting in some receiving the label “DNF� (did not finish). With our extensive experience in training Multisport kayakers for events like the “Coast To Coast�, “Motu Challenge� and the “Tongariro Classic� we know exactly what is required and will not cut corners in your kayaking preparation for the race. When you arrive on the riverbank on race day you will be prepared and confident in your ability to successfully complete the kayaking section of the race.

5)&USBJOJOHQBDLBHF

• As many weekends of White Water instruction (based from Taupo) as you need in order to build your Skills, Knowledge and Confidence so that you can enjoy kayaking the river and COMPETE well in the race. • All necessary kayaking equipment supplied on courses. • A free course repeat for each kayaking component of the package. • A comprehensive “Grade 2 Assessment and Certificationâ€?. • An “Outdoor Emergency First Aid Certificateâ€?. • Professional advice on equipment that you will require.

"MMUIJTGPSUIFVOCFBUBCMFQSJDF PGJODMVTJWFPG(45 "M40"7"*-"#-& Extensive specialist weekend and evening courses • Personalised one on one instruction • A range of tours for all abilities.

'PSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPO and to enrol call your nearest specialist Canoe & Kayak store.

0S1)0/&'3&&PO,":",/; 

50

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003


a paddlers

Step One “Introduction To White Water Kayaking” course. This builds the essential foundation of basic skills and knowledge required to become a Multisport Kayaker. Dates for this course are as follows: MAY 3-4 & 31-1(Jun) SEPTEMBER 6-7

JUNE 21-22 OCTOBER 4-5

JULY 5-6 NOVEMBER 1-2

Step Two “Intermediate White Water Kayaking”. This course builds on your previously learnt skills and is spent kayaking on classic grade 2 white water. This will provide you with the skills and knowledge you will need to successfully kayak in Multisport events. Dates for this course are as follows: APRIL 12-13 AUGUST 9-10 & 30-31

MAY 10-11 SEPTEMBER 13-14

JUNE 7-8 & 28-29 OCTOBER 11-12

JULY 12-13 NOVEMBER 8-9

Step Three “Long Boat Weekend”. Here using all your skills and knowledge you will paddle a multisport kayak down a grade 2 river. Learn about picking fast lines and river reading. Practise all your new skills including rescues while in a multisport kayak. Dates for this course are as follows: APRIL None AUGUST 16-17

MAY 17-18 SEPTEMBER 20-21

JUNE 14-15 OCTOBER 18-19

JULY 19-20 NOVEMBER 15-16

Step Four Repeat all of the above as many times as required to develop your skills, knowledge and confidence. Remember you get a free repeat for each step. Further repeats are available at $50.00 inc GST. Step Five A one day Grade 2 Assessment on the river. (Resits of assessments are $150.00 inc GST). Assessment dates are as follows: APRIL None AUGUST 17

MAY 18 SEPTEMBER 21

JUNE 15 OCTOBER 19

JULY 20 NOVEMBER 16

Step Six “Outdoor Emergency First Aid” This fantastic, comprehensive course will teach you how to handle situations you may unexpectedly face while racing. Dates for this course are as follows: APRIL None AUGUST None

MAY 24-25 SEPTEMBER 27-28

JUNE None OCTOBER None

JULY 26-27 NOVEMBER 22-23

SPECTACULAR SCENERY…

AWESOME RIVERS…

SPECIALIST STORE…

EXTENSIVE RANGE OF COURSES…

YAKITY YAK – THE best Kayak club in the world…

SPECIALIST GUIDING • RAPIDS • SCHOOLS • CONFERENCE GROUPS

APRIL 5-6 AUGUST 2-3 & 23-24

e s i d a r Pa ADVICE • ACCOMODATION • TOURS • GRADE 2 CERTIFICATION

MULTISPORT KAYAK 5SBJOJOH1BDLBHF

38 NUKUHAU STREET, TAUPO Phone: 07 378 1003 Fax: 07 378 1009 EMAIL: andy@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Step Seven Get out there, go racing, enjoy yourselves and know that you are a well trained, competent and confident grade 2 Multisport Kayaker.

TAUPO ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

51


December 2002 By Alan Bell

The Lower Hokitika is recommended as a good first time West Coast heli trip. After our NZRCA [New Zealand Recreational Canoeing Association] meeting was finished we got hold of Bruce Dando, the chopper pilot. It was all hands to the boats and gear. We piled everything into and onto the 2 4WD vehicles for the rough track to the helipad. Being a chopper trip it was important not to forget anything! The chopper flew overhead, and landed. Bruce disembarked, complete with helmet and the

apparently famous gumboots. We made sure he knew we wanted the Lower Hoki put in and NOT the Viagra section (good idea to make sure!) Paddling were Mike S, Mike B, Polly, Lynne, Duncan, Lisa, Tony, Glenn, Muzz, Alan, Stefan, Robin and Jonathan. The fly-in was short but spectacular, with great views of the Hokitika and Whitcombe Rivers as well as the surrounding bush and landscape. We lounged around on the rocks soaking up the sun and scenery [the sun seemed to keep the sandflies at bay] while we

waited for everyone to be shuttled in. Each trip brought 2 paddlers and their kayaks. 13 paddlers were split into 2 groups. In my group were Lynne, Robin, Polly, Stefan, Tony and Jonathan. We set off just below Kawau Gorge amongst easy but strong flowing water with some rocks. Here we warmed up catching eddies and playing on the occasional wave. After about a kilometre we came to Kakariki Canyon. The entrance rapid was an exciting dogleg with a swirly hole on the right if you were off line. Then we were in the gorge - a


truly magnificent place; crystal blue deep water surrounded by sheer cliffs of schist. It was superb and there was much ooooohing and aaaaahing. A steep rocky rapid followed, where Lynne had a bit of trouble after rolling twice. It was a convenient place to stop and scout the next couple of drops. These are the crux rapids. The surrounding slips are unstable and the riverbed can change in floods. Today the lines were obvious, more or less down the middle and paddle hard. Robin made it look easy Jonathan followed. Tony showed us how not to run it, with a roll just after the hole. Alan smashed through, Lynne and Polly both rolled but eddied out sweet. Several good drops followed with plenty of holes to push through. The drops eased back a bit and we had a kilometre or so of great rock gardens where we eddy-hopped our way down. The gradient dropped off but the flow increased as the Hokitika met the Whitcombe. The Whitcombe certainly has a lot more water than the Hokitika. Another few kilometres of bouncy grade 2 water and we were at the get-out. It was a magic run. Jonathan thought the level was around 35-40 cumecs. On Graham’s scale this equals about a class III+. Sounds about right to me. It took us around 2 hours to paddle. And I did take my camera! Afterwards we headed back to Hoki for coffee and dinner at the Filling Station. Thanks to Kokatahi Helicopters for the shuttle. For more information see page 201 of 125 Great Kayaking Runs by Graham Charles.

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

53


&WFSXPOEFSFE who’s working to keep your SJWFSTGMPXJOH

The New Zealand Recreational Canoeing Association is dedicated to ensuring that kayakers have the opportunity to experience kayaking in the safest way possible on rivers that flow freely. Since 1952, our members have funded the pursuit of water conservation orders, recreational dam releases, and preventing the exploitation of kayakable rivers. Local clubs play an important role in the NZRCA and their involvement is vital to preserve New Zealand’s whitewater resources and to enhance opportunities to enjoy them safely. Many clubs are already pursuing releases and access to rivers at local level. NZRCA is available to assist.

CONSERVATION 2002 was another busy year, but not one with many tangible outcomes. Of particular interest to North Island paddlers will be our agreement with Genesis Power to mitigate the effects that the Taupo Power Development Scheme (TPD) has had on white water. We reached agreement with Genesis Power Ltd about the ways in which the effect of the TPD on kayaking can be “mitigated”. The agreement will not actually take effect until Genesis finalise remaining appeals with other parties, which could take an indefinite


That agreement is basically as follows: • 3 weekends on the upper and lower Tongariro per year • 2 natural flow days on the Whakapapa (with backup days) • Flushing flow on the Moawhango • Creation of an artificial playhole (in conjunction with OPC) • Provision of a trust fund for developing kayaking (to be administered by OPC)

SUCCESS IN PROTECTING THE RANGITATA RIVER The Tribunal has ruled in favour of the NZRCA and Fish and Game by recommending a National Water Conservation Order for the Rangitata. Late last year we presented a full day of evidence to the Special Tribunal in support of Fish and Games’ application for a National Water Conservation Order to protect the Rangitata River from threats to its sustainability such as increasing irrigation demands and pollution. Several parties have appealed the decision so the next round of hearings will be heard in the Environment Court.

GOWAN RIVER SAFE FROM HYDRO DEVELOPMENT In February we, alongside Fish and Game, DoC and Tasman District Council, opposed the Majac Trust’s application to have the Buller Water Conservation Order severed from the Gowan. The High Court ruled in our favour, but the Trust appealed. We are happy to let you know that the Trust has given up its appeal. The Gowan River is (at the moment) safe from hydro development, and the Buller Water Conservation Order remains intact.

Waikato River/Ngaawaparua The NZRCA represented recreational kayakers at the mighty river power hearings. Due to the damming of the Waikato River, what used to be called the “Grand Canyon of the New Zealand” is now a series of rowing lakes. The only evidence of the original riverbed is Aratiatia rapids, Huka Falls and Ngaawaparua. Mike Birch and Wade Bishop did their best to convince the panel that Ngaawaparua is one of the most important rodeo destinations in the world.

Clutha We have met recently to discuss a similar issue with Contact Energy regarding the Hawea and Clutha. Central Otago Whitewater and the Otago Canoe and Kayak club are working together on the need for recognition of the kayaking amenity lost on the Clutha.

SAFETY We have a new Education and Safety Officer joining the Executive, Glenn Murdoch. The four kayaking deaths last year highlighted the difficulties Government agencies have in responding to and investigating kayaking fatalities. NZRCA members can claim a $45 subsidy on approved River Safety Courses and $60 for River Rescue Courses. Contact nzrca@rivers.org.nz for more information. May the rivers flow for you! Polly Miller Communications Officer - communications@rivers.org.nz


Niamh Tomkins Memorial

RODEO

The third annual Niamh Tomkins Memorial Rodeo was held in Taupo on the weekend of 14th & 15th December 2002. Niamh a member of the Irish Freestyle Kayaking Team, drowned swimming down the Full James rapid at the Worlds Freestyle

Kayaking Competition on December 5th 1999. Around 80 competitors participated. After a big night out on Saturday results reflected who got over their hangover!

Open Men 1. Andy Phillips (UK) 2. Toby Robertson (Taupo) 3. Damien McAuley (Napier) 4. Andy O’Connell (Taupo) 5. Johann Roozenburg (Tauranga)

Junior Men 1. Nathan Ashmore 2. Josh Neilson 3. Mike Dawson 4. Lawrence Simpson 5. Kaleb Hardgrove

Open Women 1. Polly Green (USA) 2. Helen Brosnan (NZ) 3. Hamer Toshie (Japan) 4. Jo Lucas (NZ) 5. Nikki Kelly (NZ)

Women Novice/Junior 1. Olivia Meehan 2. Louise Irwin

The event was generously sponsorsed by the Lion Foundation, Rapids Jet, Canoe and Kayak Ltd, Down Under, Rangatekei River Adventures, Eddyline, Prijon, Hiko, Rochfort Paddles, Bliss Stick Kayaks and e-paddles.com, ensuring excellent spot prizes.

Novice Men 1. Tom Neilson 2. Callum Reed 3. Richie Morrell 4. Mark Simmons 5. Vince Pink

With the recent re-formation of the Huka Falls Kayak Club and the combined efforts of the committee, the event was a huge success. A big pat on the back for the time and effort by the organizing team. We all look forward to next year’s event.

www.kayakhuka.org.nz.

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ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003




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Alone... on On a sunny afternoon, Laurent and I in a fat red canoe, and Fabien in a kayak left the banks of Whitehorse. We passed the last house and we were alone, alone on the Yukon! Yukon! It had always been our wildest dream, tumultuous waters flowing through Yukon and Alaska towards the Bering sea; hard and adventurous times of the Klondike gold rush to Dawson City; endless wilderness inhabited only by elks, moose and grizzly bears; freezing winter nights in a tiny moss-insulated log cabin with flashing neon-green Northern Lights in the sky... We had arrived in Whitehorse, the capital city of Yukon in northwest Canada in the beginning of October. Well into autumn the hills around town had turned a yellowish brown and the trees were quietly losing their leaves. “Very soon we’ll see the first snowfalls,” said the locals. But, we were determined to experience canoeing the Yukon river by ourselves! Migrating Canadian geese returning to Mexico after a summer in Alaska shrieked while we paddled quietly and the boys tried their luck fishing. They caught a grayling and it was time to camp. But on seeing an old bear-paw imprint on the sand bank we agreed that the “ideal” spot for the night was elsewhere, a wee islet in the middle of the river. In bear-country, everybody had delighted in telling us horrifying bear stories. The “bear scare” was real even

the


A few hours later as the grayling was cooking over the campfire there was a big ‘Splash.’ We instinctively grabbed whatever we could, a stick, an axe or a stone: The Bear!! It was attacking us, attracted by the smell of the fish! But nothing came of it. Next morning we realized that it had probably been nothing more than a beaver slapping his wide tail to alert his mates of our presence... Back on the water, we paddled down the Yukon, exploring each arm till we left the main course and followed a slower one. There, in the shallow and muddy water we were soon surrounded by dozens of ducks and white swans. Fabien in his kayak, quietly drifted with the current, and got very close to them. Our big canoe was too noisy and clumsy, so we took pictures at a distance. We were about to set up camp on a clay bluff, when we caught sight of an old discarded log-house overlooking the Yukon: Was it a remnant of the gold diggers of the Klondike era, a mere hunter’s cabin, or just a

weekend hideaway for some locals? On the third night, tired from our day of paddling and late nights waiting in vain around the campfire for the Northern lights, we were ready to go to bed. We were packing gear into waterproof bags when suddenly... this weak glow on the horizon, could it be ...? We stayed up for hours, cold and mesmerized by white threads of light which seemed to link one pole to another. Ghostly luminous panels flashed through the sky at an incredible speed. Next morning we awoke to snowflakes falling on the tent: Winter! We lit the fire for breakfast to try and warm up a bit. Bundled up in layers of clothes, our noses pink with cold, we arrived at Lake Laberge. We had been warned not to go to far from shore as conditions could quickly become treacherous. As soon as the river opened up into the lake, the wind began to pick up. We were greeted by a majestic bald eagle perched on top of stilts as though the whole lake was his. The scenery was fantastic. Snow-capped

mountains covered with dark pines, backed the pristine lake with a long bushy island in the middle. We paddled much more carefully, concentrating on each stroke for fear that the waves would swamp the boat. As the wind got stronger, it was too challenging for us so we decided to portage around a group of rocks. Fortunately on the other side it was more sheltered from the wind and we safely paddled on. Next morning at our destination we met a local man who was training his sled dogs for the winter rides on the lake by having them pull him on his four-wheeler. “Hey, winter is coming now, the lake will freeze up in no time... It’s too late in the year for kayaking now!”

Indeed, in the next few days Whitehorse was covered by a light blanket of early snow. It made our canoe trip on the Yukon even more special..!

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

59


PH: 0508 5292569

www.canoeandkayak.co.nz

Welcome to the NZ Kayak Catalogue. We have put this catalogue together to help you to make an informed decision on the purchase of your new equipment. Please phone me on the HELP DESK free phone 0508 529 2569 if you need any further advice or call into one of Canoe & Kayak great speciality Kayak stores. ROOF RACK AND ACCESSORIES TIE DOWNS Tie downs offer a quick, easy and safe way to secure your kayak to your roof rack. Almost fool proof.

Roof Rack $140 to $600 We have tested many sorts over the years and have absolute faith in the Mondial and Thule Brands, They will fit nearly every car in NZ without drilling holes. Ask the team for the rack to suit your needs.

LIBERTY LOADER

Liberty Loader $249 Do you struggle to load your kayak onto the car? Well stop straining and get a Liberty Loader on your tow ball. All your lifting troubles will disappear.

WHEELS

Wheels $299

PADDLES

Paddles $80 to $450 There are many different paddles available. We have sourced a range of paddles made from quality materials. When choosing a paddle here are a few things to think about. 1/ Shorter paddle mean more paddle strokes and longer paddles mean less. The longer the paddle the stronger you need to be, the shorter the paddle the less effort required. 2/ Smaller blades are less stress on the body because they slip through the water easier than a larger blade and consequentially means less work for the muscles and joints. 3/ The weight of the paddle is very important and the simple rule here is the longer you are going to spend using your new kayak the lighter the paddle should be. 4/ Shaft construction for the paddle is also very important. Our suggestion is to go with fibreglass as this will be lighter and more flexible, removing some stress from your joints and muscles.

Easy transport of your kayak to water. These are the best things you will ever get. Who likes having to work hard when there is an easier way. These Stainless steel, easy to assemble and easy to use wheels takes all the hassle away.


SPRAY SKIRTS

BUOYANCY AIDS

Spray Skirts $85 to $260

Buoyancy Aids and Life Jackets. $115 to $495

There are many different sizes and options. Find the right fitting one for your waist and cockpit of your kayak. Consider the type of paddling you will be doing, if you’re a fair weather paddler your needs will be different to a white water paddler.

We recommend kayakers buy Buoyancy Aids. There is a healthy range from ‘No Frills’, to the bells and whistle models. These are not to be scoffed at, as many a happy kayaker has been reunited with equipment because some kind soul spent money and bought a buoyancy aid with a tow line and pockets for safety gear. Life jackets are for the people still getting used to the water and swimming.

CLOTHING To keep warm use combinations and layers of clothing, i.e. neoprene shorts with polypropylene tops (bottoms if really cold) and wind/ waterproof outer shells with robust footwear (I prefer dive booties as they protect the whole foot and ankle).

DRY BAGS

Dry Bags $45 up There is a great range of dry bags. These Ortlieb bags will keep your gear dry as well as organised. A multitude of sizes and models to suit every application. All come with an amazing warrantee.

SAFETY GEAR This depends on the type of paddling to be undertaken. Consult your sales person or phone the help desk on 0508 KAYAKNZ to determine the correct equipment for your needs.

OUR GUARANTEE TO YOU Remember when you purchase your kayaking equipment from a Canoe & Kayak store, we “guarantee satisfaction”. If you are not happy with your choice of equipment we will exchange it for a product of the same value free of charge. The product must be returned within 7 days of delivery in new condition with no damage. All prices in this catologue are GST inclusive but do not include freight. PRICES ARE FOR EQUIPMENT ONLY AND DO NOT INCLUDE ACCESSORIES. FREE PHONE THE HELP DESK ON 0508 529 256 (O508 KAYAKNZ)


www.canoeandkayak.co.nz • 0508 5292569 FUN FAMILY KAYAKS SWING

DELTA DOUBLE

DESCRIPTION

SPECIFICATION

SWING Flat water cruising, well appointed with gear storage inside. Also includes an optional extra pod that detaches, which is great for carrying your fishing gear to your favourite spot. The pod can also be used as a seat.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

25kg 780mm 4.01 metres $990.50

DELTA DOUBLE Fun for the whole family at the beach or lake. Plenty of room and great stability.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

32kg 830mm 4.2 metres $1060.00

WHIZZ

WHIZZ A great multipurpose family boat for big kids and small kids alike. Lots of fun this summer at the beach. (Hot surfer!)

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

21kg 770mm 2.5 metres $480.00

SQUIRT

SQUIRT A Sit-on-Top for the family. Able to seat an adult and a small child. It is easy to paddle and is very stable. Easily carried by one adult or two kids.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

15kg 780mm 2.7metres $390.00

ESCAPEE

ESCAPEE Probably the closest you will come to finding one kayak that does it all. Surfing, fishing, snorkelling.

Weight: Width: Length Price:

23kg 750mm 3.3 metres $690.00

ESCAPADE

ESCAPADE Great general purpose kayak for fishing, diving and having fun in the sun.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

27kg 750mm 3.46 metres $790.00


KAYAK WAVE WITCH

EXPLORER

TANDEM

PLAY

SYNCHRO

TORRENT

TRIPLE

DESCRIPTION

SPECIFICATION

WAVE WITCH is a quick responsive surf and flat water Sit-on. The rudder and fins allow amazing control on and off the wave.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

16.36 kg 570 mm 3.15 m $695

THE EXPLORER is ideal for fishing, surfing and exploring and one of the driest ‘Sit-ons’ you will find, great hatches for storing your goodies

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

18.18 kg 790 mm 3.43 m $957 to $1086

THE TANDEM ‘two person’ is ideal for fishing, surfing and exploring with great hatches for storing your adventure equipment.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

25.90kg 915 mm 3.81 m $1259

THE PLAY is great for the paddler who wants a fun fast surf and flat water kayak. Kids love this Sit-on as it is not too wide for them to paddle and yet very stable.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

17.27kg 710 mm 3.10 m $552

SYNCHRO A funtastic two person cruising kayak which is stable and fast. It has plenty of storage and great appointments to make your adventures fun.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

34kg 840mm 4.75 metres $1268.00

TORRENT FREEDOM Great for the surf and the river with awesome manoeuvrability. Excellent finish.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

THE TRIPLE is an excellent performing family Sit-on which allows Mum and Dad to take the kids for a paddle. The centre seat area is dry and with heaps of room so the kids can move and fidget without causing the adults any

concern. The centre space also allows for storage of heaps of camping equipment. Weight: Width: Length: Price:

22.7kg 810mm 3.12 metres $749.00

36.36 kg 915 mm 5.03 m $1250


DESCRIPTION

SPECIFICATION

THE ELIMINATOR is a fast stable racing and training ‘Sit -on’. It has an adjustable dry seat and a cool draining system. Ideal for the paddler wanting a good fitness work out.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

19.09 kg 585 mm 5.03 m $1495

TRI BEAR Multisport kayak. Will perform in races like the Head to Head and Coast to Coast allowing the new paddler to enjoy the paddle even when tired. Number 1 selling Multisport kayak from our stores.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Std 18kg 570mm 5.3 metres $2209.00

OPUS Multisport kayak. This kayak is for the competitive multisporter who has mastered the mid range kayaks like the Swallow and is paddling the river with skill and enjoyment. Advanced paddling ability is required to enjoy racing this Kayak.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

12.5 kg 450mm 5.89m $2800

INTRIGUE

INTRIGUE Multisport kayak. This kayak is ideal for the beginner kayaker who is looking for a quick, light kayak with great stability.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

14.5 kg 540 mm 4.94m $2100

SWALLOW

SWALLOW Multisport kayak. The next step up from the entry level kayaks. Fast with good stability. Medium skill ability is required to enjoy racing this kayak.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

12 kg 480mm 5.4 m $2600

ACADIA

ACADIA Flat water cruising, well appointed, a nifty adjustable backrest, an access hatch in the back which is great for carrying your extra gear.

Weight: 20kg Width: 675mm Length: 3.7 metres Price: $968.00 Expedition Model includes rudder and dry storage Price: $1275.00

STORM A great multi-day kayak with lots of storage. An easy to use rudder control system. Large cockpit.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

MULTISPORT KAYAKS ELIMINATOR

TRI BEAR

OPUS

STORM

29 kg 61 cm 5.18 metres $2099.00


SEA KAYAKS TASMAN EXPRESS EXPLORER

ECOBEZHIG

PENGUIN

WANDERER EXCELL

EURO-EX

TUI

NORTH STAR

DESCRIPTION

SPECIFICATION

TASMAN EXPRESS Responds to rough conditions. Its low profile and flared bow enable it to perform well in adverse conditions. It is designed to give the paddler maximum comfort, with adjustable footrests, backrest, side seat supports and optional thigh brace.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

27 kg 61 cm 530 cm $2400

ECOBEZHIG This is the latest craft from Perception and has to be paddled to be believed. Huge storage, great features and the most comfortable seat your butt will ever meet.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Std 26kg 590mm 5.4 metres $2625.00

PENGUIN Has all the features for multi-day kayaking with ease of handling in all weather conditions. With great manoeuvrability this kayak is suitable for paddlers from beginner to advanced.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

25kg. 610mm 4.8meters $1995.00

WANDERER EXCEL A stable fun kayak which is easy to handle. This is an enjoyable kayak for all the family.

Width: Length: Weight: Price:

820mm 4.5meters 34kg. $1490.00

EURO-EX A new, faster sea kayak for lighter paddlers who may be interested in open water racing. The deck, developed for the European market, has deeper recesses for fittings. The Neoprene hatch covers are standard.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

17-23 kg 0.57 metres 5.31 metres Kevlar $3959.00

TUI EXCEL Latest Sea Kayak from Quality Kayaks. Based on the Penguin design, with the new padddler in mind. A fast, straight tracking fun kayak.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

Std 22kg 610mm 4.4 metres $1595.00

NORTH STAR A very stable, comfortable, double sea kayak. Large cockpits. Three big hatches. Great seating with high adjustable backrests. This double is excellent for the multiple day adventures.

Weight: Width: Length: Price:

40kg .75m 5.6 metres $3890.00


KAYAK TOURS

PLACES TO GO A drop off. A 4-6 hour paddle. An amazing dinner, bed & breakfast…

Okura River Tours Booking essential: 0800 461 559 Ph/Fax: 07 872 4505 email: styx.cafe@xtra.co.nz • www.styx.co.nz

Exploring Karepiro Bay and the Okura Marine Reserve. Enjoy this scenic trip with abundant wildlife and a stop at Dacre Cottage, the historic 1840 settlers house, which is only accessible by boat. Okura River Kayak Hire Company Phone: 09 473 0036 Mobile: 025 529 255

Waitara River Tours

TAUPO Float Trip

If there is somewhere you would like to go we have qualified guides ready to take you there.

COURSES

Call one of your Canoe and Kayak stores today. • Taranaki 06 754 8368 • Taupo 07 378 1003 • Manukau 09 262 0209 • North Shore 09 479 1002 For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of grade two rapids. Beginning at a historic swing bridge, the lower part of the Waitara River is a safe and ideal introduction to the thrill of white water paddling.

White Water Instructors WANTED

Windyglen farm guided horse trek Combine your paddling experience with a one hour horse trek through open dairy farming, a towering old eucalyptus plantation, historic battle sites and native bush. These trips are guided by fully trained staff at Windyglen Farm. Allow 4 hours combined or 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $70 pp combined or $40 paddle only.

SEA KAYAKING COURSES

Canoe And Kayak Taupo require instructors for their White Water kayaking courses. You will need to be a competent grade 3 kayaker, have a current 1st aid certificate and have completed or be prepared to complete a river rescue course. You will have a pleasant manner and be able to speak clearly and concisely. Training will be provided where necessary. Please send your CV to Andy Rees at Canoe And Kayak Taupo, 38 Nukuhau Street, Taupo. Or email: andy@canoeandkayak.co.nz For more information call 07-3781003.

STAGE 1 – 6: Packages include a comprehensive introduction, eskimo rolling, weather and navigation, ocean going, surfing and rescues. PHONE O508 KAYAKNZ FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Instructor/Guide WANTED Canoe And Kayak Manukau

WHITE WATER COURSES STAGE 1 – 6: Packages include a comprehensive introduction, eskimo rolling, river skills, multi sport and river rescues. PHONE O508 KAYAKNZ FOR MORE INFORMATION.

66

Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $40.00 per person

Canoe & Kayak Taranaki PH: 06 754 8368 Mobile: 025 608 3844 email: canoekayak@maxnet.co.nz

ISSUE TWENTY • FEBRUARY/MARCH 2003

are looking for a Kayaking Instructor/Guide to run tours and courses etc. based at this busy store. This can be a part time or full time position. You will need to be a competent Sea Kayaker, have a current 1st aid certificate and have a pleasant, fun manner and be able to encourage our customers and club members to achieve more. Training will be provided. Please send your CV to pete@ canoeand kayak.co.nz or phone 0508 5292569


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