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TAKAPUNA TO TAURANGA

SPEIGHT’S COAST TO COAST


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Karamea trip 27 Dec to 30 Dec 2001

Quinn Amoore (Eskimo Diablo), Craig Peters (Dagger FreeFall), Richard Purden (Bliss Lifestyler) and Alasdair McDowall (Necky Blunt) left on Boxing Day for the long journey to the town of Karamea. We left at 8am and got to Karamea at midnight and free camped at the get out spot. En route we stopped at Murchison for a bite to eat. Craig decided to be adventurous and ordered some special coffee, which arrived, to his amazement, in a tiny half filled cup. Amongst all the jokes about his two teaspoon coffee mug he lost half of it across the table! Whatever it was, it kept him wide-awake for the 3-hour drive to Karamea. We had our first battle with the West Coast Sand Fly First Battalion the next morning. It was a rush to pack up camp, jump in the car and get driving as quickly as possible to flush out the sand flies that had managed to get into the car. Surprisingly, breakfast in Karamea Township only 5 kilometers away was sand fly free. We met the chopper at the get out spot where the pilot decided he could take us all in one trip. The chopper strained its way up the river valley and made a make-or-break landing at Venus Creek hut. It was a great feeling seeing the chopper leave, knowing the only way out was down river. The first day was a 4-hour paddle through 3- boulder garden rapids to Leslie Hut. Richard, Craig and Quinn tried their luck at trout fishing in one of the many deep clear pools, but no joy. The second day was a short paddle to Roaring Lion hut with only a few rapids. By the time we got there the weather had taken a turn for the worst so we were stuck in the hut with 2 trout fisherman. The hut has been refurbished and can now sleep 8. That night there was a ferocious thunderstorm with a few lighting strikes directly overhead shaking the hut We awoke to see the Roaring Lion and Beautiful tributaries in flood. We had planned on doing a tramp on the third day but were stuck in the hut for most of the day. Richard ventured out for some trout fishing and to everyone’s surprise returned with a 4lb brown trout. Craig, Quinn and Alasdair took a wet walk to see the flow on the Karamea River. The rapid we had run the day before was submerged! That night the stories flowed on what awaited us the next day. There was even talk of hitching a ride on the chopper which was picking up the trout fishermen the next day. There were still showers of rain for most of the fourth day but the Roaring Lion and Beautiful tributaries had dropped a bit overnight so we recited our last wills and testaments to our hut mates and ventured down river. As expected the Roaring Lion rapid, about 2 km’s from the hut, was raging. We “cheat” chuted various sections of the rapid, except Richard who “cheat” chuted most of the rapid. In the top of the middle section he had planned a death defying river centre route but fortunately he rolled in a boil just before his planned route and ended up doing plan B down river left which was a much safer option. It took us about an hour to paddle, portage and scout the 400-meter rapid. Quinn and Alasdair were reliving the past memories of their previous trip and had hoped to get the river at lower flows this time to see the normal character of the river. Maybe this is normal? We bobbed our way down the rest of the river avoiding terminal holes that would hold a truck and finding chutes down the sides of most of the main rapids. The river was brown, the sky grey and all the large boulders were creating monstrous holes. It took us 6 hours of mixed emotions to reach the get out. Our adrenalin reserves were drained by the end. The gauge level was 2.1, which equates to 360 cumecs but we suspect it had been dropping through the day. Another great feeling knowing we had survived a day of serious boating We paddled the Glen Roy River and Matakitaki earthquake section and spent an awesome New Years Eve in Murchison on the way back. It’s a great atmosphere in Murchison on New Years Eve with the campsite packed with kayakers. We even took a drive to Muriara falls with Craig contemplating a first descent following instructions from Richard .The flow however was too high. Next trip the West coast. Alasdair McDowall


Editorial Well the weather has settled and I trust your paddles have been flashing in the sunshine.

contents karamea trip Editorial

3

4

abel tasman

5

seven green bottles

6

takapuna to tauranga

8

great places

14

the duck gang

14

sea kayaking in alaska

16

kinloch to kuratau

18

speight’s coast to coast

20

subscribe and win

23

mizone endurazone

24

Southern traverse

25

“Stand Up” is my pet phrase this year and it is all about each of us making a difference. It started with Tony organising a clean up at our local beach and has been the topic of conversation at meetings, staff training and around home. The concept is simple, when you decide on a course of action “Stand Up” and start doing it. In staff training it came about because of the need to lead by example when on company and club activities and to remove your rubbish became

“pick up other’s rubbish too”. Why is this important? Well to me it is much more compelling to see some one taking a stand and it makes me more aware of the issue and much more inclined to follow the lead. At a recent meeting with professional outdoor instructors we talked about the amount of time instructors spend with their students showing their passion for the outdoors and infecting their students with this passion. This is achieved by taking a stand (Standing Up) on many issues concerning looking after the outdoors and each other and, you guessed it the students follow. So if something is close to your heart or you feel strongly about an issue “Stand Up” and make a difference. Peter Townend

New Zealand Recreational Canoeing Association Inc. It’s easy to take for granted our right to paddle New Zealand’s rivers and lakes when and where we choose, without any problems with access or opportunity. But did you know that many of our very important rivers are at risk from proposed hydro-generation, irrigation schemes, and restrictions on helicopter access? The New Zealand Recreational Canoeing Association (successor to the New Zealand Canoeing Association) is staffed by paddlers working voluntarily on these very issues on behalf of recreational kayakers and canoeists. The purpose of the Association is to “preserve New Zealand’s white water resources and to enhance opportunities to enjoy them safely,” and this is exactly what this very active group of white water enthusiasts has been doing. Whether it is writing submissions on the Rangitata National Water Conservation Order, the prospect of jet boats on the Dogleg section of the Kawarau River, or preparing to go to court to save the Clarence River from Tranzrail’s bulldozers, the NZRCA maintains a remarkable presence on the conservation scene. The NZRCA is also signatory to recreational release agreements for rivers otherwise lost to hydrogeneration, including the , Mangahao, Mangaore Stream, Waikareteheke, Pukaki and the Tekapo. These agreed releases often take years of meetings to negotiate; a current example is the ongoing discussion regarding the Tongiraro Power Development Scheme. The Association also troubleshoots access issues on behalf of kayakers, and has recently been working to maintain helicopter access to the Karamea and other rivers on the West Coast. The NZRCA promotes safety and education in kayaking by subsidising its members to attend River Safety and River Rescue courses (with support from the Water Safety Council). Following last summer’s drownings on the Nevis and Hokitika rivers the NZRCA has strengthened links with the Maritime Safety Authority (MSA) and obtained an agreement to ensure the use of recognised expert kayakers to assist future MSA investigations. The NZRCA also provides a website www.rivers.org.nz a resource for kayakers or anyone interested in river conservation and access. Packed with news, reviews, images, boat info and the buy/sell/swap forum, the website keeps members up to date with the latest white water developments.

six and a gal - mokau

26

PRODUCT CATALOGUE

27

KAYAK INSTRUCTION

34

Member

KAYAK TOURS

38

benefits of the

Members of the NZRCA include a diverse range of canoe clubs, individuals and organisations who are committed to enjoying, exploring and preserving New Zealand’s lakes and rivers. You can join through your local canoe club (check they are affiliated) or as an individual member.

NZRCA Members of the NZRCA receive copies of the association’s magazine NZ Canoeing produced three times per year (pictured), eligibility for a Water Safety Subsidy of $45 for River Safety and River Rescue

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• EDIT ORIAL S UBMI SSI O NS email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz please forward to the publisher at the above address

opinions expressed by contributors are their own and not necessarily endorsed by the publisher. • New zealand kayak magazine is copyright © Canoe & Kayak ltd, and no part may be reproduced without the specific written permission of the publisher.


KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING

Kayak the lonely A b e l T asman If you fancy a paddling holiday that avoids the crowds and offers some open water challenge, check out Ocean River’s new two-day guided tour along the northern and less explored section of the Abel Tasman Coastline.

Nelson’s Abel Tasman National Park has become a Mecca for kayakers over the past decade, and Ocean River still has plenty of interest in standard guided day and overnight trips up the beautiful coastline from its Marahau base. Many holiday makers drawn to Nelson by the multiple attractions of sun, beaches, galleries, crafts, wineries and cafes are just looking for a day or two of easy paddling and a look at the scenery that has made the Abel Tasman an icon of New Zealand tourism. However, Ocean River manager Simon Bannock says the new Northern Expedition will cater to those who want a little more adventure and are prepared to paddle for it. “This part of the Abel Tasman is rarely visited by other sea kayakers, and we are the first company to offer a guided tour here,” he said. “We’ve set up a base in Takaka as the departure and return trip for the tour, which traverses the remote and quiet northern coastline from Tata Beach in Golden Bay

to Totaranui.” The two-day trip will run twice a week. On the other days the kayaks will be available for one day guided trips to the Westhaven Marine Reserve and other parts of the Golden Bay coastline. “The new tours are in waters more exposed to the open sea, and offer paddling conditions better suited to kayakers of an intermediate level,” Simon said. “Highlights of the tour will include the exposed rugged granite coastline at Separation Point and the seal colony there, sea caves and granite arches, a visit to the abandoned Taupo

Pa - the site of Abel Tasman’s bloody encounter with the Maori in 1642, and an overnight camp on a beach front where there will be very few other kayakers.” Ocean River will supply camping and cooking equipment and utensils, but the trip is self catered, with plenty of room for fresh fruit and gourmet meals in the kayaks. Departs: Departs 8:30am, Thursday & Sunday from Ocean River’s Takaka base (main street, opposite Mobil petrol station).

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING

seven

green bottles by Ruth E. Henderson

N.Z. Herald – the big read, in a big wind. ‘catch the heading!’

The pre trip blurb went like this “ Papaaroha is about 10 mins drive north of Coromandel…with nice lattes and food…accommodation will be basic …tent …we want easterlies…two hour paddle to nearby islands. Be there or be square.” The Metservice recreational forecast was “easterly 20 knots rising to northeast gusting to 35 with seas becoming rough and occasional rain with poor visibility.” Enough attraction for eleven ‘keen-ish’ kayakers to crawl away from Auckland’s rain and wind and eternal traffic queue to join up by cellphone and in person along the way. Kayaks being rather conspicuous there was no need for precise rendezvous: Thames’s ‘Pack and Save’ for the essential milk and bread and the non-resistible chocolate rolos, pistachios, kettle sticks, Camembert…Coromandel’s ‘Fish and Chip Shop’ … and finally Papaaroha’s camping ground where an early bird was ensconced saving us waterfront possies.

Dawn revelation – pup tents and roof racks form a queue at Papaaroha camp ground.

With just enough light left, pup tents and roof racks formed a different queue before we congregated in and around Charlie’s van for the odd tipple and nibble before bed. Dawn was wet, misty and too miserable for three fair weather folk and back they went. Down to eight. After more deliberation and more rain the toss up between antique shops and lattés, or coastline exploration, we dropped to seven.

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Coromandel cuppa … in a sheltered bay.

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING After all that…some trouped into Coromandel for window-shopping or was it the lattes? Others battled with the NZ Herald in the wind or snoozed the time away before the next main event. Predinner drinkies. And eats. Once more we crowded into Charlie’s van, or should I say Café? There was Brie, corn chips, salsa, guacamole, and salami spread out on an upturned gear bin. Even without a couple of Cabernets, a girl could be forgiven for wondering where she was and which group she was with. The ‘Cappuchino Crowd’, the ‘Café Kayakers’, Cuisine Canoers’? No, the Yakkity Yak club.

Tenacious pohutukawa

Our reward was a wee spot of sun, up close and personal views of some amazingly tenacious pohutakawa in full flower, and a shared hot cuppa in a sheltered bay as we inspected Charlie’s Scottish friend’s fancy craft with retractable centreboards. Back to base, a few lusty squalls tried to ferry a few “less coast hugging than we ought to have been paddlers” across the Firth of Thames. They put paid to revised plans to go island hopping. Food now took precedence. Lunch in the dry comfort of the campground kitchen was an eye opener to this museli bar, and dry cracker cruncher. Fresh green salad with tuna on the side; crackers layered with Camembert, tomato slices, lightly dusted with salt and pepper; Roses chocolates.

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I questioned the stayers why, considering the weather, they were still happy to stay put with soggy surroundings and slithers of foam to sleep on, when at home they had soft beds, warm dry kitchens and lovers. The general consensus was that just getting AWAY for the weekend - the ESCAPE was everything, even if the weather was unkind, the kayaking limited and the tent whacked you repeatedly on the face all night. Or an appropriate analogy for this particular weekend would be “just because a cake doesn’t rise, doesn’t mean its a total flop, or inedible.” Ps. I recommend French toast and bacon with maple syrup as a Sunday brunch!

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING The greyness of dawn didn’t colour our enthusiasm as we prepared to cross the Firth of Thames. The weather looked encouraging, the vhf weather channel agreed, and blisters seemed under control. This 10 nm stretch of open water had always been a psychological (as well as a physical) barrier, as it can build up a daunting sea quickly. Perhaps it was going to be easy after all. Fantail Bay tonight, with a bit of luck! We aimed to lunch at Elephant Cove on Happy Jack Island – almost the most northerly of the islands off the Coromandel coast. Although this added some distance to the day’s route, it seemed a good compromise. We would have somewhere to stretch our legs and it would allow us to rethink our plan in case of trouble. We paddled away from Waiheke’s Kauri Point indulging in a few mental gymnastics about tidal flow, breeze strength and the compass course.

From left - Tony, Sue, Steve, Paul - prepared for almost anything.

Takapuna to by Paul Haywood

Tauranga

Careful preparation doesn’t guarantee a great trip – it helps to have good companions and good weather. A support vehicle for the heavy supplies (the wine cellar) is also a definite plus. Luckily, we managed to get it all together – after many planning meetings which set the standard for great food and good humour. Indeed the trip could almost have been an anti-climax, except that the coastline of the Coromandel makes that impossible. We were to leave from Takapuna on the Friday night – Tony, Steve & Sue followed the plan and I got it wrong. The threesome enjoyed a fine night paddle and the company of a number of other Yakity Yak Club members, overnighting at Home Bay on Mototapu. Fortunately for me, they were happy to relax on the following morning – giving him time to catch up. So, bright and early, I walked the heavily-laden skua down to the beach – stopping briefly to chat with another Yakiti Yak Club member out for a morning constitutional. What joy to be able to answer the inevitable question with “oh, just to Tauranga… can’t stop, the others are waiting !”. It fully made up for the night’s desperate struggle to reduce the cargo to get it all to fit into the hull. Off Mototapu, my vhf crackled into life with a welcome from the nearby hilltop – the group was now together. The skua joined the sea bear and the two albatrosses on the beach. We stopped for photos and a leg-stretch and we launched off towards Waiheke. Blue skies and a friendly breeze made the varied coastline of caves and vineyards a delightful paddle. At Garden Cove, a perfect little beach, we met a worried yacht skipper who’d come in over the entry reef and couldn’t get out. Hurrah for the tiny draft of a kayak. The afternoon wound down as we turned the corner by gannet rock. Muscles complained when we met the wind head-on for the last mile into camp. The tents went up quickly and the evening meal was washed down with a well-deserved bottle of wine. We were 30 nm on the way and feeling fine.

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Soon splitting into two pairs, our tracks diverged – so that by the end of three hours we were well out of voice contact. Since we were supposedly heading for the same island, each pair was convinced that the other had seriously lost the plot – and/or the identity of the target. A few brief discussions on vhf channel 6 only increased the confusion: “You said it was the northernmost island…” “No, it’s the island that looks like an elephant!” “They all look like bloody elephants!” After a few more helpful navigational exchanges, our courses converged and we fought our way through a strong tidal rip – into the serenity of Elephant Cove. This is definitely one of Hauraki’s charmed lunch spots. It looks like a photo from a holiday brochure. We landed shortly after high water, so a leisurely lunch and swim left us facing the relaunch over a daunting strip of oyster debris. Thinking laterally, we cheated and made a 50m portage onto the other side of the cove’s eastern arm and launched from a nice sandy beach. The coast of the Coromandel was scenic and happy. We had the tough part of the day behind us and Fantail Bay was within easy reach. Tony’s advance planning had promised a strong outgoing tide – to help us up the coast of the Firth, and so it proved. We paddled due north, making excellent progress “over the ground”. What we hadn’t counted on was a noticeable eddy current as we got closer to shore. It seemed to swirl back into the Firth. Deciding that the near view of the coastline was worth it, we pressed on. Fantail Bay is the first of five doc campsites, spaced around the tip of the Coromandel. We made use of three of them - all very pretty and well worth returning to for more careful exploration. Fantail Bay has a pebbly landing with a short & sandy route to the campsite, which is just across the road. There is also a tiny little side channel,

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING just a few metres south of the main bay (around a rocky point) it is the nearest thing to a natural boat-ramp I’ve ever seen. Ideal for kayaks. We celebrated the successful day and the safe arrival of both the kayak team and the trusty support vehicle – piloted by Ian. A vacuum-pack of steaks and a bottle of red wine seemed appropriate and none was wasted. Our on-board provisions were quite adequate for sustaining life throughout the trip, but there is no doubt that occasional treats from the land – supplemented by some very impressive fresh fish – were a welcome addition to rice & pasta. We had made such good time on days one & two and now poised on the brink of the least-visited portion of our coastal passage, we determined to have an unhurried day stopping to smell the maritime flowers. The weather gods continued to be kind and we had a day of blue sky, minimal breeze and just a big gentle swell to remind us of what the tip of the Coromandel is capable. Goat Bay is around the corner from Fantail – and on cue, a number of the surefooted beasts gazed down on us from the fractured rock face. We cruised into rock gardens, explored a few caves and admired some mighty rock pinnacles paddling through a day in kayak heaven. We bypassed Port Jackson’s Bay where the swell was running up the beach. We saluted Channel Island – the tiny bump off the Coromandel tip that can just be seen from Auckland’s North Shore on a clear day. We stopped for lunch at Fletcher’s Bay – a lovely doc site with potable water and what must be the loneliest WW2 concrete blockhouse in the gulf. By the end of the afternoon, the stream behind the doc campsite at Stony Bay offered a welcome change from salt water. Everything and everybody got a delicious fresh-water rinse and we enjoyed a relaxing evening around the campsite’s big stone table. Over a few beers and the odd glass of ‘Bundy’, we all agreed that the weather arrangements – made with C&K’s Steve Knowles – couldn’t have been improved upon. We’d been blessed with perfect conditions for rounding the Coromandel –

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING along a coast not known for its calm waters. We raised a toast to Steve’s fantastic influence with the weather gods. Aware that such perfect weather was not going to last for ever, we decided to make the best possible progress towards our ultimate goal – Tauranga. We hoped to reach Whangapoua for a night in a friend’s seaside bach. This meant more miles than on the previous day – indeed, more before lunch than on the whole of the previous day. We paddled from cape to cape across Port Charles, Potiki Bay, Waikawau Bay and, in the afternoon, Kennedy Bay reducing the distance substantially. This meant leaving some very enticing coastline to be explored in better detail in the future – but I think we all knew that we’d be coming back to revisit this coast. Luckily, the weather held and we made good time to a lunch stop at a small and sheltered bay next to Waikawau. After two nights in the nearwilderness of doc campsites, the few baches in Little Bay were almost suburban.

“Big Point”

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many points of interest – majestic and rich in rocky detail. A keen competition arose amongst the fishing members of the party, who displayed some sizable Kawhai on deck. Later examination of the catch revealed that the two largest were identical to within fractions of a millimetre. (Since we had somehow omitted to pack any scales, we were reduced to judging by length…) this, of course, led to accusations of fish-stretching – a novel concept. They all ate well, regardless. At Whangapoua we had our first taste of a surf beach at the end of the afternoon. Ian, the faithful driver of our support vehicle, identified the target bach for us by standing on its seaward deck and semaphoring enthusiastically. Closer in we could see the bottle of Bundeberg and understood his enthusiasm. During the trip, we always attempted to maintain a safe level of fluid intake.

After lunch, we had the beginnings of a more active northerly swell behind us.

We dragged ourselves and the kayaks up the beach - again remarking that Steve & Sue’s boat’s seemed to weigh at least 40 kg less than mine and Tony’s – while still holding the necessities of life - ain’t kevlar wonderful ?

Even without exploring the bays, there were

A fresh-water rinse of all the gear, followed by a

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING hot shower and a cold beer, somehow reconciled us to a night away from canvas. After dinner, we discussed our plans for the following day. The weather was still good, but the wind and sea were building. Checking the weather forecast on vhf radio confirmed that a shift to the east was likely – just what we didn’t need for the long easterly stretch along the beaches of Matarangi, Kuaotunu, Otama and around the corner into Opito Bay. There was nothing for it, we would need to get an early start and use the still hours of the early morning to do as much of the 11 nautical miles as possible. Taking advantage of the night’s “easy campsite”, we were on the water shortly after dawn. The ploy worked, and we rounded the corner by 10am. Just as the breeze started to build. With only a few more miles to go before lunch, we could slow down and enjoy the amazing rock formations in Red Bay and on Motukoranga Island – just off Humbug Bay and Devil’s Point. Somebody loved this bit of coast ! Lunch at Matapaua Bay allowed a welcome stretch – it had been a long morning. This small and deserted sandy beach is just a couple of km pg12

Crossing Kennedy Bay with a small following sea.

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SEA KAYAKING on. The weather forecasts indicated slightly wild but stable conditions – which, if not as pleasant as at the start of the trip, seemed within our capabilities. Sue & Steve stayed on to give us a welcome hand with our launch off the beach the next morning. This was exciting, with rain squalls coming through and more surf than we had experienced so far. The differences between the two kayaks’ behaviour was interesting. Coming off the beach, my skua was quite happy burrowing through the waves – while Tony’s sea bear was determined to climb over everything. We all thought that he was setting up for a backwards end-over roll at one stage. Don’t try that one at home…

One of many arches at Motukoranga Island

over the hill from Opito township. It’s not an easy road. Back on the water, we set a direct course for Hot Water Beach. After a tiring morning, it was another 9 nm and the wind was building. However, it wasn’t a headwind and we still felt strong. We had considered all of the many possible camp sites within Mercury Bay and finally decided on the attractions of the irresistible muscle-soothing soak offered by Hot Water Beach’s campground. If the weather deteriorated further, as seemed very likely from the vhf forecasts, Hot Water Beach was quite a reasonable spot to sit out the storm – in some warmth ! Sit it out we did. The following day presented us with the expected rainy squalls and we decided that we all deserved a “lay” day. In fact, it progressed into a “food” day as we emptied the support vehicle and used it to explore a number of local cafés. Happily, they all had something worth eating. We congratulated ourselves on having undertaken such rigorous pre-trip training – which now allowed us to enjoy the Coromandel’s possibilities to the full. What is it they say ? Any latté in a storm.

A challenging day’s paddle brought us past Tairua/ Pauanui on the one side and the Shoe & Slipper Islands on the other. Although attracted by reports of an extra good camp on Slipper, we agreed that we’d be happier on the mainland. Wind and sea conditions kept us on our ‘toes’ as we practised a variety of bracing skills and plain old prayer… We stopped for a brief rest at the northern end of a wild and deserted Opoutere Beach. Coming ashore just below the northern headland – congratulating ourselves on spotting the flatter surf at this spot. We learned the ‘downside’ of this bit of cleverness a few minutes later, when we worked our way back into the surf. Being so close to the headland, the reflected waves were nearly as big as the primary ones – so whichever direction we tried to establish the bow was quickly knocked askew by a wave at an angle. Always something to learn… Eventually, after half a dozen restarts, it seems

that you can sneak a moment where the waves let you claw your way out. The effort to paddle against the suck of the ‘slack’ water makes me glad of all the sprinting practice in kayak polo. Still, the shoulders do get sore in a hurry. We decided to run into the Wharekawa Harbour (south end of Opoutere Beach) and here met the trip’s most exciting challenge – with the tide running out and the wind blowing in – the entry is a surfer’s dream. It must be time for one of Sue’s famous energy bars… Holding our mouths as ‘right’ as we knew how, pumping adrenalin like mad, we survived the experience – although not without rapidly revising our route through the entry ! A pleasant night at a deserted campground behind Opoutere Beach saw us keen to be on our way again in the morning. At 8, the waves were flat – by 9 they were building again. From the campground, we took a short cut through the woods to the beach – cunningly avoiding the harbour mouth. A fine morning gave us a hard paddle nevertheless, as the wind was turning down below east – to give us more of a headwind. We forged on past Whangamata, past a long coastline of steep shores and little habitation. A few lonely and remote houses must have been dropped in by helicopter – splendid isolation . This stretch of coast has few beaches with anything like a welcome in an easterly. It’s a bit Richard Dukes story and photos bleak. Whiritoa Beach provided a good lunch spot – again with an exciting surf landing and a difficult relaunch. The beach is nice and sandy – but is so steep that it looks like a wall coming in and gives you almost no water to get afloat in – before the surf hits you. I butted my way out through the biggest wave, with my forehead pressed to the foredeck, quite

A useful tip for Hot Water Beach is ‘land at the end of the beach south of the stream’ this brings you into the beach carpark. From here, it’s a short and level walk to the campsite. When I had stayed here before, I had struggled over the stream & dunes from the campsite’s own beachfront. This is possible, but it’s much harder. The uninviting weather and the opportunity of an easy lift home along with a pressing social engagement conspired to cause Steve & Sue to cut short their expedition. Tony & I decided to press

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Tony enjoys a respite from the cockpit on Opoutere Beach.

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING Inside, through the inner harbour, there was protection from the wind but potential trouble with the tidal flow and the water depth (even for a kayak). Outside, it’s more straightforward – but probably physically more difficult. In the end, we decided to keep an open mind and look at the options when we reached the northern entry point of the harbour – Bowentown Heads.

Tony, Ian and Sue

Cuppa joe

convinced that if my head still protrudes above my shoulders (which I rather doubt) my hat brim will have been torn off and will now be round my neck like a necklace. Funnily enough, I survived, as did the hat.

when we’re about 100 m offshore, as these last few metres can bring you under a land mass that blocks the line-of-sight transmission.

Pressing on down the coast, we strove to make Waihi Beach. Slowly we neared the goal. Finally, almost imperceptibly, it came into sight. That little black lump on the horizon was Mount Maunganui. Waihi Beach was slow in arriving. It had been a long 20 nm day into hard conditions – we knew that we’d sleep well tonight. That, however, was getting to be a bit of a problem. The exact location of the campground is not apparent from the sea. Our expected chat with Ian, to locate it, was not working. He seemed to have gone missing. The light was fading and felt tired. The vhf presented another opportunity. All through the trip, we have been careful to contact the coastguard to give them a trip report – always in the morning & evening and often at lunchtime. They have been their usual wonderful selves – competent, cheerful and helpful. Tony and I have felt richly rewarded for the efforts we made to get our vhf licences (and the radios) for the trip. Quite simply, it wouldn’t be sensible to attempt it without them. It has been our practice to call up the coastguard

So now, floating rather aimlessly down the long Waihi Beach, it was time to close out the day’s trip report with the Waihi coastguard. At the end of the brief interchange, I tentatively asked the operator if she could indulge me in a rather bizarre request, and give me the benefit of her local knowledge on campgrounds. After a startled response and a short multi-voiced conference in the background, she came back with guidance for us to recognise the best landing spot for the best campground – which is indeed invisible from the sea. Relieved, we reversed course, yes we’d overshot the campground, of course – and now we saw Ian frantically waving from the target landing spot. He’d just made it onto the beach and his vhf batteries had let him down. All’s well that ends well. We did indeed sleep well that night, although it is strange to be back in a mostly residential campground, with tents pitched almost on top of each other. In the morning we had only about 20 nm to reach our goal. Although there was still a strong headwind, we’ve conquered as much already. From Waihi beach, there is a choice to make, to go inside or outside Matakana Island.

After a really stiff paddle into a headwind, we found that the northern entry was really not a safe option. The bar from the headland angles out to sea at least 1 or 2 miles and was breaking heavily. Neither of us liked the look of it. We took the safe option to paddle a dog-leg offshore and then proceed down the coast of the island. There was a strong surf breaking on the shoreline, but we felt that we could get ashore if we had to. However, today’s lunch stop will be held offshore! Seven hours of steady paddling, with your goal always in sight, is fairly character-building. I rapidly decide that it’s something to be enjoyed sparingly in the future. Finally, the long day drew to an end. After a chat with some disbelieving fisherman anchored well offshore, a short stop for lunch, and keeping a close watch on the vhf ship-to-harbour traffic, we crept into the harbour entry. Narrow and heavily trafficked, we were right on slack water at the top of the tide. We had managed to time it right; but we had no time to spare if we didn’t want to fight our way in against the ebb. Time for another energy bar… A quick dash across the traffic lane and we worked our way into the harbour, hugging the rocky shore of the ‘Mount’. It’s definitely more interesting close-up than it was 20 miles away. Finally, we fell out of the kayaks and Ian was there with a lifesaving cold beer - worthy of the moment.

Stoney Bays elevated and tranquil campsite - a steep climb, but worth it!

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING

Great Places to go Sea Lake Waikaremoana, (From the Q-Kayaks Penguin Hand Book)

Set in Te Urewera National Park, this natural lake can only be accessed by State Highway 38, which links Murupara and Wairoa. The Lake Waikaremoana walking track follows the shoreline for most of the lake from Onepoto to Hopuruahine Bridge. Four of the five huts on this track are easily accessible to kayakers, and have fresh water, toilets, heating stoves, benches, and bunks with mattresses. Tickets to stay in these huts can be purchased at Lake Waikaremoana

Motor Camp, along with fishing licences, petrol and food supplies. Lake Waikaremoana is suitable to kayak all year round, and is most suitable for three to five day trips. Besides the huts there are many campsites suitable for pitching tents. Care should be taken to avoid camping on private land. Wind direction based on cloud movement is not always the same on water as there are many landforms, which seem to turn the wind in all directions at times. This is a very beautiful lake surrounded by 650 types of native plants and many of our native birds live in the forest, e.g., kaka, kakariki, N.Z. robin and falcon, and brown kiwi. For further information about Lake Waikaremoana, write or phone the Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre, Te Urewera National Park, Private Bag 2213, Wairoa. Phone/ fax 06 837 3803.

The Duck G ang a tta ck s Ka ya k In s tru ctor

WARNING VISITORS T O

THE

B LUE

LAKE S

All ended well with Rob millward surviving the attack of the duck gang, by paying their demands of one peanutbutter

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SEA KAYAKING

Kayaking in New Zealand photo by Dianne Austin

This is a great destination for the experienced paddler if the conditions are suitable. The crossing from Kuaotunu Beach takes about 2 to 3 hours. At the southern end of the island there are several beautiful small-secluded beaches. Surrounded by pohutukawa trees, they are ideal for swimming, fishing and scuba diving. There is a settlement/ marina at Huruhi Harbour, and it is worth a visit! For the more adventurous, continuing on to the other islands and Red Mercury Island is a good challenging paddle. These islands are DOC owned and landing is not permitted. If you plan to camp on Mercury Island, you must obtain permission from the owners beforehand.

Mercury Island, Coromandel Peninsula (From the Q-Kayaks Penguin Hand Book)

A K YAK A E S F IJI

Fijian village adventures 3, 7 or 10-day expeditions Experience Fijian culture and fun Overnight accomodation in traditional thatched bures Authentic Chief kava ceremony Fully catered meals and drinks Safari Lodge Ellington Wharf PO Box 939 Raki Raki, Fiji Tel ❀ 679 69 3333 Fax ❀ 679 69 3366 safarilodge@is.com.fj

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❀ ❀❀

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING

Living a Dream

by Paul Cantell

- Sea Kayaking in Alaska You are paddling along the Alaskan Coast in another world of beautiful surroundings, snow capped mountains in every direction. You are in paradise.

National Park is a very remote wild place in south central Alaska. The park covers over 1000 square miles of landmass but is only accessible by water or light aircraft.

Suddenly you hear a blow. A massive black dorsal fin rises out of the water. Your heart pounds, it’s a killer whale. Gracefully it disappears. You sit gob smacked. Excited, you don’t move. Somewhere below you is this massive creature! Then, over to your right four more Orcas break the surface for air. It’s mum and the kids! Now you’re super excited. A pod of Orcas have come to check you out. For the next hour these incredible creatures dance and play around you, like it’s a special show put on for eyes’ only. In your little sea kayak you feel so small and vulnerable compared to these wild animals in search of their next meal. You will never forget that special feeling when eye contact was made with this beautiful, wild and super intelligent creature of the ocean. To experience something so beautiful, something so wild is the most incredible and unforgettable experience you’ll ever have.

My mission was to explore the Kenai Peninsula, check out glaciers, paddle amongst icebergs and experience wild life, living my dream to sea kayak in Alaska.

For a sea kayaker in Alaska, with over 70,000 km of coastline, millions of islands, fiords, lakes and rivers to explore, this country is a dream. There is a lifetime of exploration to be had from a sea kayak. One of the great places I was to explore in my sea kayak was the Kenai Peninsula. Kenai Fiord

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We chartered a 42-foot boat from Seward, a small tourist-fishing town, to drop us off at Aialik Bay, a remote part of the national park. Here we would be exploring for the next week, along fiords of many bays, coves, and smaller fiords. For 5 hours we chugged along, relaxing and enjoying the scenery, and then landed with all our gear on a sandy beach. The boat left and we were alone. Peace and quiet, great! We set up camp, had some lunch and then headed for Holgate Glacier, a tidal water glacier lay, about 10 kilometres away. We paddled amongst chunks of ice the size of houses, each iceberg was a unique shape with intense colours of blue. Some had tunnels, which we could paddle through, others rolled over as they melted and broke up. As we approached the glacier we realized its true size and enormity. It stood about 400 metres high and a several kilometres across. We felt so small in our sea kayaks. It is hard to imagine that for millions of years this piece of ice has

been carving the landscape. Looking at the glacier you really get a feeling of time, history, power and creation. Since at any second a massive chunk of ice could carve off and cause a tidal wave, we did not get too close! We took photos, explored and admired this creation before heading back to camp for a meal and a good night’s sleep. After four hours of darkness we awoke to another beautiful day. We packed up camp and headed for Pederson Glacier. We crossed the fiord and then paddled the coastline for about 8 kilometres. Pederson Glacier has a terminal moraine across the entrance making the entry difficult. Low tide forced a portage of 100metres across a shingle bed. This glacier was even more impressive. It was just breath taking how massive, how incredible this place is, with its massive chunks of ice each one a crazy shape of nature’s beauty. A huge crack, rumble and bang as a house size chunk of ice broke off the face of the glacier and created a small tidal wave. We found a rocky island and made camp amongst the icebergs. All night we slept to the sound of ice cracking and shattering. It was freezing cold, but what a place! The next day we paddled around the bergs, and I attempted standing on top of one. I parked my kayak on a low piece of ice, climbed out and tried to stand up. Hmm. Maybe not such a good idea. I slipped and skated into the water. Since I was wearing a dry suit I only died of laughter! I climbed

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING

back into my boat. That night we again pitched our tents amongst the chunks of ice, on a small beach beside the glacier. Relaxed and watching the day turn into night, we heard a rattle amongst our gear. A brown bear was having a little look around camp. We chased him away using pots and pans as drums and blew our foghorn. We had heard stories about bears, but to be face to face with one was another story. We moved the camp to the terminal moraine and spent a very nervous night’s sleep thinking about uncle Grizz. Over the next few days we explored Kenai Fiord and two other tidal water glaciers. The second was Bear Glacier. In its lagoon hundreds of curious seals surrounded us. I wasn’t sure who was checking out who. One chewed on the end of my paddle, pushed the kayak around in circles for a while and tried to climb onto the back deck. If it wasn’t for the fact he was going to pull me over in the process I would have let him continue. Another really intense wild life moment! After a week of exploring, with incredible wild experiences, the Stellar Sunrise came for us and ended our dream of sea kayaking in Alaska. We spent the next few hours enjoying the cruise back to Seward and civilisation. Visiting Alaska The best time to visit Alaska is in the summer months of June, July and August, when days are long. At other times the weather is very extreme, cold and wild. From the USA fly to Anchorage, the hub of Alaska and the main city, with over 40% of Alaska’s population.

Anchorage offers; buses, trains and rental cars to reach Seward, a fantastic three-hour journey down the Seward Highway. Anchorage is the best place for groceries and supplies. A couple of really good outdoor stores supply those extra bits and pieces. In Seward the national park office provides maps, permits and info. About 6 outfitters around town rent out kayaks. Options range from fully guided catered trips to independent rentals. I would use the Internet beforehand to work this out. Many boat charter companies will take you to the Kenai Peninsula with salmon or halibut fishing and some wild life viewing on the way. The fishing is easy. Even a non-fisherman like me found hooking dinner as easy as one, two, three. The water temperature is very cold. So be prepared for all conditions. A good raincoat and warm clothes are a must. Regular cold water paddling gear is all you need unless you intend immersion, then a good wet or dry suit is recommended. With lots of accessible beaches low impact camping is very easy. But remember this is Grizzly Bear Country so follow the rules. Cook away from where you sleep. Hang all food in the trees, even if you are just leaving camp for a short time. A foghorn and a can of bear spray is recommended for defence. The bugs are a challenge but don’t let the little buggers get you down, they are all part of the experience! Don’t forget lots of film to record this amazing place of beauty, magic and paradise.

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING

Kinloch to Kuratau Auckland Anniversary Weekend, 2002 Eight members of the local Yakity Yak club gathered at the Taupo Canoe and Kayak shop for the paddle from Kinloch (west of Taupo) to Kuratau (north west of Turangi). We met two

The plan was to spend two and a half days cruising the western side of Lake Taupo. We had some camp spots in mind but were flexible depending on the progress made.

nights before the paddle started, with Brian

Day one finished up at Waihaha.

Neville as the leader, to plan a few things. Firstly it

Heading out of Kinloch we picked up a 15-knot almost-tail wind. Brian Penfold finally got his sail up, and proved to his wife that it didn’t in fact have a built-in head wind. We had a quick lunch at Boat Harbour, before heading to Otupoto Falls. The falls must be about 7 metres high, falling straight into the lake. We then carried on around the lake to Waihaha, keeping well clear of land, as the lake was getting messy with waves reflecting off the cliffs. Waihaha was to be home for the night, but the paddling wasn’t over just yet. (See David Crystal at Waihaha for a tent site and to pay a minimal fee – no booking necessary, although please note it can be very busy on public holidays). After claiming some turf for the tents and getting some fuel down us, we headed up the Waihaha River to see the Tieke falls. It was great to get out of the wind. The river wound its way through cicada filled bush and past the odd trout. It took us about an hour to get there and was worth the effort – perhaps not as high as Otupoto falls, but much more volume. It was a much quicker trip down the river and back to camp. It was nearing 8:00pm by the time we got back and were greeted by the lovely greasy, salty smell of a BBQ. It was most disappointing to find the barbie belonged to one of several boaties there, that all Brian had was creamed rice, not hot, and that he had eaten it. Bugger.

was decided to go from north to south, as a strong northeast wind was forecast. Brian next talked about food for the trip as several kayakers had little experience in multi-day trips. His advice was ‘bring lots of cans’. This was to provide a lot of laughs in the next few days as Brian produced at least 6 cans of creamed rice and numerous cans of baked beans and pineapple! I asked about water for the trip – where were we to stock up etc? Two long time locals, Mike and Brian, looked at me like I was stupid before telling me that, despite last year’s water shortage, there was still some water in Lake Taupo, and that traces of two-stroke oil were actually good for you. I’m still here, and have suffered no ill side

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Meanwhile Mike and Antoinette Beck pulled out a couple of great camping chairs (now on my shopping list) as most of us sat or lay on the hard ground beneath them. They sat around like royalty! The other item to generate some envy was Rob Scotts mini ‘Thermorest’ that he sat on whilst paddling – no numb

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bum! That was the end of the first day. Most satisfactory! Day two finished up at Te Hapua Bay.

Richard and Co.

Brian, Cheryl and Mike near Cherry Bay

Day two dawned nice and calm. The wind had dropped away and there was barely a ripple on the lake. I was keen to get on before the wind picked up. I needn’t have bothered though. The lake got even calmer as the day went on. We were right amongst the cliffs of Western Bay. It was awesome to be able to paddle under the cliffs, often just a paddle length away from them, as they towered up into the sky. Shags (the birds) were common, and herons and kingfishers were also spotted, as well as the odd trout. We passed Whanganui Bay (famous for its rock climbing), numerous interesting cave and rock formations, and headed on to Cherry Bay for lunch, stopping for the occasional swim. We then continued to Te Hapua Bay, arriving about 5.00pm. The few boats there left not long after we arrived – possibly because they forgot their creamed rice! We pretty much had the spot to ourselves. The northeaster still hadn’t arrived as forecast, but it no longer mattered as we were past the point where it would have any major impact on the trip. It did however pick up a bit that night – a good thing we had tied the kayaks up. Not so good though for Rob and Brian who had decided to sleep very near the lake and were kept awake by the constant breaking of small waves (sounding like big waves at night and with some imagination!). Day three finished up finishing. Come morning the only evidence of the wind picking up over night was a higher flotsam line (it looked like the tide had come in!). Again it was glassy conditions for the final leg to Kuratau. About 30 minutes out of Kuratau we stopped briefly at Whareroa for lunch and a swim. But it couldn’t stop the inevitable – on to Kuratau and then Taupo and back to reality! All up a great paddle. It could have been done quicker but it was well worthwhile taking our time, exploring all the nooks and crannies, and having a holiday! One thing does bother me though, and that is what Brian Neville had for dinner at home that night? Richard Dukes

Mike Beck

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MULTISPORT

SPEIGHT’S

COAST to COAST 2

0

0

2

C

ongratulations to the competitors in this year’s Speight’s Coast to Coast what a great race.

We thought that some insights as to why people get involved in the Speight’s Coast to Coast and what the biggest challenges were, along with the personal change that resulted, would be enlightening and fun. So we picked a few keen racers and asked them some questions about their race and the build up to it

Photos by Pauls Image Centre - Christchurch. Email: imagecentre@paulscamera.co.nz

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MULTISPORT

Neil Gellatly (pictured left)

Background – started Multisport competing in the Mountains to Sea in 1995 and dabbled in Du-athalon and Tri. My first Coast To Coast in 1997 and this year is my 6th time.

Why – “to win”

Hardest Part – Working to pay of the Debt

Biggest Challenge – Nor-easterly wind during the kayak and on the cycle over the Canterbury Plains.

Easiest Part – Running up the debt on the credit card (pre race)

High – Finishing Low – Finishing second

Race Number: 204 Section: Individual One Day Age: 29

Photos by Pauls Image Centre - Christchurch. Email: imagecentre@paulscamera.co.nz

Marcelle Foster Background

– Physiotherapist. No multisport background. A couple of half marathons. Kayaked at school, flat water only. Never been on a road cycle before.

Why – Support crewed for little sister last year

and had lots of fun. Decided I could probably do it if she could, then made the mistake of telling too many people. Too late to pull out once dollars started flowing.

Biggest

Challenge – White water

kayaking mid winter.

High – Met loads of really neat people who were as mad as me.

Low – Knee injury that kept bugging me despite excellent physio treatment. Cured by the race itself, as the knee knew I’d ignore it if it

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complained!

Hardest Part – Getting legs running after blowing them out on first bike leg. Easiest Part – Kayak turned out to be easiest after all the excellent courses – Thanks Guys Race Number: 266 Section: Individual Two Day Age: 33

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MULTISPORT

Photos by Pauls Image Centre - Christchurch. Email: imagecentre@paulscamera.co.nz

Geoff Parkin Background – Having raced off road motorcycles for 6 years it was time for real challenge. I was invited to be part of a team for my first Coast to Coast in 2001 and, as the t-shirt says “once is never enough”. Why – Because it is hard and for personal satisfaction of finishing in a reasonable time.

I

f your’ve decided to challenge yourself next year and enter the Coast to Coast, we can help with the kayaking and a personal coach like Mark Sutherland or Jon Ackland from Performance Lab can help with the personal training and programmes.

For over ten years we at Canoe & Kayak have been training Kiwis to paddle the kayak section of the Speight’s Coast to Coast and during this period we have developed a course programme that is allows the racers not only to complete the river section but to enjoy it, and in many cases to be in the top of the pack to boot. The secret to enjoying the paddling section is

A/ several weekends of quality instruction on the basics of paddling a kayak on a river B/ more weekends of white water paddling to

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Biggest Challenge – For me the biggest

Low – Dealing with leg cramps from the bike

challenge was the kayaking section. The prospect of 67 kilometres of the Waimakariri after a two hour cycle and four hour run the day before was pretty daunting. Keeping your balance when you are already fatigued is definitely challenging. My goal was to get down the river with no swims at a steady pace.

ride as I headed into the mountain run section.

High – Finishing the mountain section still running and running up the finish chute at Sumner Beach – Yahoo I finished! And my overall result – 16th of 300 2 day competitors. I will be trying to better it next year.

Hardest Part – For 2002 definitely the cycle leg into Sumner. Having got out of the river in a really good time and early in the bunch there was nobody to draft with in the extremely strong headwind. The wind and no bunch added about 25 minutes onto my time compared to last year. Easiest Part – THE DECISION TO ENTER Race number: 305 Section: Individual Two Day Age: 40

develop and cement skills and confidence.

Weekend and evening option;

C/ a familiarisation paddle on the race river. D/ a comprehensive Grade Two Certificate

Two weekends and 4 evenings of instruction to get you started.

assessment, on a similar river in the racing kayak you are going to use.

Extra training trips thoughout the year as needed to cement your skills and confidence,

E/ Coaching. Many athletes like Geoff Parkin

A comprehensive assessment.

have hired the professional services of a personal coach, Mark Sutherland according to Geoff has been one of the key factors in his achievement. Increasing your paddle fitness will increase your speed. However any amount of fitness without covering these basics, will only increase your time taken and the very real chance of not finishing the race at all.

“Grade

Two

Certificate”

Personal training; For the busy ones among us, who cannot fit into the above time frames we will organise training to suit your time schedule.

The service we offer at Canoe & Kayak is both comprehensive and yet flexible to suit your busy lifestyle.

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

MULTISPORT Below is the checklist of skills a Canoe & Kayak Instructor will assess on to give you the best advantage in your race.

Canoe & Kayak Ltd GRADE TWO CERTIFICATE TEST

Customer: Kayak Type: Date:

WIN

a seven day Sea Kayaking adventure with Safari Lodge in beautiful Fiji. Package value at over

$1900.00

In discussion with the Assessor the candidate should show a good understanding and knowledge and the ability to demonstrate the following skills in Grade Two White Water. General Knowledge / Show instructor

Pass

Knowledge Requiring more work

Pass

Skills Requiring more work

(Airfares not included)

Show the instructor a full set of polyprop to be worn. A first aid kit, food, a spare set of polyprop, a survival blanket and repair tape in a dry bag and a throw rope. Equipment required for rescues of kayakers and their equipment. River grading system describe grade one to six. Potential hazards. The reason for warm up preparation. Prior responsibilities to rescue services. Recognition and treatment of Hypothermia. Paddling Skills in Grade Two White Water Completed over a half day river paddle. Capsize and swim 50 m with kayak and paddle to safe eddy and then empty and re-enter kayak. (Without undue delay) Entry and exit between kayak and bank Forward paddling Reverse paddling Forward and Backward Sweeps both sides Low braces both sides (spay skirts getting wet)

Just subscribe to New Zealand Kayak

Eddy turns both sides Forward Ferry Glides

Magazine by phoning

Reverse Ferry Glides

0508 529 2569 or send a cheque with your

Throw rope use (3 out of 5 ten metre accurate throws over instructors outstretched arms)

details to New Zealand Kayak Magazine. PO Box 100-493, NSMC, Auckland

Rescue a kayaker and their equipment (x rescue) Combat swim a 75 metre Grade Two Rapid achieving designated eddy's.

Current Subscribers included in prize draw on the 10th June 2002

Rescue a kayaker and paddle a Grade Two Rapid (stern Deck Carry) River Reading skills which enable the candidate to lead down Grade Two rapids Candidate passed by Assesor

Signed

SAFARI LODGE - Tel: 679 69 3333 Fax: 679 69 3366, email: safarilodge@is.com.fj www.safarilodge.com.fj

Multi sport

DISCOVER ANOTHER WORLD

Gold Medal Performance Coaching & Training With Mark Sutherland - Olympic & World Champion Gold Medal Coach

Gold Medal Reference “Under Mark’s coaching Ian Ferguson and myself won four World Championships medals

and three Olympic medals. I have nothing but respect for Mark and his abilities. His personal drive and commitment is equal to that of any Olympic champion.” Paul MacDonald MBE. Olympic Champion Canoeist.

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TELEPHONE MARK ON: 09-483 2186

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MULTISPORT photo by Rob Crawford - Action Shotz

MIZONE ENDURAZONE T

he recent Mizone Endurazone generated enormous public interest. I have found I am regularly hit up by the sports minded, keen to know just what the hell it was like. Truth is, it’s difficult to decide what to say and when to stop as I have so many great memories. Here is a selection of my memorable highlights from the race up the length of NZ. They are sure to bring back a lifetime of personal memories for those who competed, and I hope convince others to have the balls to take up the challenge next time around. I thoroughly recommend the event. Day 1 Getting a right bollocking form a certain not to be named leading woman for not doing enough work at the front of the bunch on the first huge road ride from Bluff. Day 3 Being profusely apologized to by the same leading woman sitting on my wheel though the latter stage of the massive MTB to Lake Wakatipu that day. End of any more grilling... funny that! Day 4 An incredible MTB though the guts of Otago high country from Arrowtown to Wanaka which saw the introduction of some real river crossings and the invention of the Carlyon Km (the race directors’ approximation of true distance). Day 5 Reaching 96.1 km/hr on the long road bike whist descending Haast Pass and jumping cattle stops with Craig Stevens, chasing down a break by Hayden Keys and Tane Humphrey’s. Day 6 Turning side on and squeezing shoulder to shoulder against the ice, though a deep crevasse on the big Franz Josef Glacier run. Then breaking all written rules of crampon use by sprinting down past a mountaineering class, jaw struck. Day 7 Climbing Mammoth Mountain on the road bike like I had rockets. Paddling the famous glass lake waters of the Mainland Cheese ad. Running aground on the apparently in flood Hokitika River and to top things off, being caught with my pants down running along the beach taking a piss (all day busting and the sight of the Tasman sea was too much!!). Day 9 One massive 50 km run though the Southern Alps from Jacksons to Lake Sumner where I grovelled through a tough patch for an hour testing my will power to a new point. Day 10 Begin the new definition of MTB’ing = Mt Running with MTB as compulsory equipment to be carried. The day that started with a cool waist deep wade though a swift icy river, followed by a nice hour and a half MTB carry. We just happened to pass the Army on a exercise, and ya got to certainly wonder what must have gone though their minds as competitors came from nowhere and flew past with MTB on shoulder, miles from anywhere. The ride was full of everything and finished with what I considered the hardest thing of the race - a 20m MTB carry across a wire suspension bridge above a gorge to Popular Station. Day 11 I will never forget the way Tane shouted four 4 lettered words out when he punctured that day on the reverse Rainbow MTB ride from Hamner Springs to St Arnaud. Day 12 Having fun sprinting for prems on a ride where the bunch averaged 43 km/hr for the first 100km towards Picton.

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Day 15 Gave myself mild concussion knocking my head on an overhead thick tree branch, then proceeded to lose the track for a while on the big run to Otaki Forks. Saw a rare swim from Craig after rubbing shoulders with a bluff further downstream on the river. Day 16

Was shown-up by Kristina Penny-Strode on a gnarly technical downhill during the infamous MTB outside Palmerston North, which saw over a third of the field taking some dubious routes.

Day 20 Successfully paddling the Full James rapid on the Waikato River in my multisport boat. But it was the rapid upstream which proved to be the toughest to negotiate. Day 21 Using a deck mounted compass heading to head off all but Keith Murray across Lake Rotorua in the low cloud and persistent driving rain. Day 22 Portaging my sea kayak over the mud flats at low tide behind Matakana Island on way to north. Successfully pissed on the bike thanks to Hayden Key leading by example (as it turned out, we preferred different legs.... he filled his left shoe, me my right). Day 23 Short bit of caving during the Mt run to Coromandel on a day that was made more memorable by my win. Day 25 Getting my ass kicked by a chick on the final paddle leg from Waiheke to Auckland. Day 26 Sprinting down Queen Street at dawn then later that day a wee 25km MTB push though the mud in Riverhead Forest. Day 27 Another wicked MTB carry and finishing at Whangarei that day with a road bike that looked worse off than the MTB after a 2km stretch of road works. Day 28 A road sign was the first real indication that Cape Reinga was near. The bunch joked that the sign pointing in the other direction should read Bluff. Was amused at the end of the day in Pahia, watching the later competitors paddle in on the swells and try to ride the dumping waves onto the beach. Day 29 Caught a good ride on the wake of a small fishing boat on the way into Kerikeri Harbour. Finished the MTB with Hayden and Tim Pearson looking like we all used the same sun block - mud! Day 30 - Shared the crystal clear waters of Rangaunu Harbour with masses of big Sting Rays as we paddled north. Was literally bowled by a wave when MTB’ing up East Beach and then provided great entertainment for onlookers at the end of the ride when I was assisted across a somewhat deep river at Houhora Heads by my support crew Troy. Picture this... I held my MTB on the back of a sit on top kayak Troy had hastily hired, and whilst he paddled like a demon, I kicked like an outboard motor off the back.... bloody awesome crossing I must tell you. Finished the day (and the race) running up 90 Mile Beach with Hayden and Craig... took in some truly breathtaking scenery and a dip or two in the Tasman Sea to keep cool on the way to the Cape. What a day, what a race. Article by Neil Gellatly.

www.KayakNZ.co.nz


KAYAK MAGAZINE

MULTISPORT

SOUTHERN TRAVERSE HEADS TO WINE COUNTRY FOR 2002 The Southern Traverse Race director Geoff Hunt says Marlborough will provide a beautiful and scenic backdrop for this year’s 6-day adventure challenge on the 18th - 24th of November 2002

is not a walk in the park. Therefore we have standards that need to be mett in order to allow teams to race,” says event manager Pascale Lorre.

Considered one of the toughest and most enduring adventure races in the world, the Southern Traverse will accept only sixty, four person teams to compete in this year’s event. Remaining true to the real sport of adventuring, all teams must first prove they are worthy to take up the challenge.

“ Each year we see more and more well prepared teams who go out and really enjoy both the competitive nature of the event and the wilderness experience which for many is a life altering experience. We expect to have some of the very best teams in the world compete in Marlborough.”

“ As most racers will know, the Southern Traverse

Last year’s Southern Traverse attracted 30

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international teams from the USA, Italy, France, UK, Australia, Canada, Argentina and Hong Kong with 28 New Zealand teams making up the field. New Zealand team, Edge Orienteering, led by Paul Rogers eventually won the coveted first place prize including a complimentary entry into the 2003 World Championship Adventure Race. Entry for the Southern Traverse 2002 will open at 9am on the 1st of March (NZ standard time) and team registrations can be made on line at www.southerntraverse.com or by contacting the Southern Traverse office directly.

NOW!

Contact: Robin Judkins, 56 Clifton Tce, Christchurch Fax: 03-326 7493 Ph: 03-326 5493 Email: judkins@xtra.co.nz

www.KayakNZ.co.nz

7th & 8th February 2003

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KAYAK MAGAZINE

SEA KAYAKING

Six guys & a gal, Leaving my capable wife Bronnie to run the shop, we set off on the arduous task of paddling down the gentle flowing, scenic, Mokau River. We had a bright and early start of 6:30am meeting at the Canoe and Kayak shop in Waitara. Too bright and early for Alasdair McDowall who just managed to finish his breakfast of muesli and milk while paddling down the first few hundred metres after our get in point, just down stream from Totoro Road bridge. Beautiful weather set the scene for the next two days. The river winding through hilly farmland, willows and fairly frequent rapids, made the first day’s 25km pass rather quickly at a leisurely pace. Care had to be taken at the odd rapid with willow outcrops a potential problem. However, once in the native bush, the willows disappeared and instead 3-4 logjams to negotiate. Nick and Katrina, not long back from raft guiding in Japan, enjoyed being back on the end of a canoe paddle, taking the Canadian down the majority of the trip. The four-bed hut at the halfway point proved no temptation for most of us, opting to sleep in tents. Only Trevor stayed inside, braving the mosquitoes and mattresses. Mind you, after chasing eels around with a spear until all hours, he’d sleep through anything! On Sunday the wind slowly came up from behind and as it clouded over with the first few drops of rain, my lovely wife turned up with the van to take us home, ending two great days on the Mokau. MONDIAL fits 95% of all vehicles. The MONDIAL Roof Rack ensures maximum performance as a Water Craft, Bicycle, Ski/Snowboard or Utility Carrier. Also available the MONDIAL Cargo Box for Luggage, Skis etc. Superior strenght, durability and aerodynamic. AVA I L A B L E F R O M C A N O E & K AYA K L I M I T E D

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Others and myself thought it to be more beautiful than the Wanganui but not as long. The bush is full of healthy Nikau Palms and many massive native trees, which missed the axe through the early years. The scenery of the Mokau River blew me away. I’ve been in Taranaki seven years now and this is my first time down that section of the Mokau. The first of many I hope. By Peter van Lith

www.KayakNZ.co.nz


product catalogue We are here to help you...

Purchase Guarantee...

our friendly Canoe & Kayak staff will advise you on all

remember all Canoe & Kayak stores give you 7 days to

aspects of kayaking and the correct selection of equipment

test your equipment after you have purchased it and if it

for your requirements. We also offer a delivery service, roof

does not measure up to your expectations, you can swap

racks, all kayaking accessories and comprehensive tuition.

it for other equipment of the same value. Please note the

Call in and have a chat - you’ll be surprised at the quality

returned equipment must not be damaged on return.

and range of equipment and services a Canoe & Kayak store has to offer.

Finance available

Lay-by

We have easy payment terms available ask at your Canoe &

Only $20 will secure you your kayak. Pop in to your local

Kayak store to see how easy it is to own your own kayak

Canoe & Kayak Store and choose your kayak with the friendly

No Deposit finance available now. Conditions apply.

helpful staff. Pay only $20 and we will hold it for two months, when final payment is due. Conditions apply.

EC O bez h ig

TOO MANY FEATURES TO LIST. GET IN ONE NOW!

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product catalogue

Kayak Sails

by Pacific Action are truly

amazing. They certainly make the paddling in windy conditions entertaining and take out the long distance blues. Now they have almost completed their Double Sail, David Bayly and his Crosswind have been helping with the testing and apparently they almost flew on a windy day last week.

Photo by Jim Young.

Kayak Trolleys Kayak trolleys are amazing. They make getting your kayak and gear from the car to the water a cinch and prevent going back and forth to bring your equipment to the water. You can fully load your kayak beside the car or campsite, and then stroll down to the beach with your kayak on its trolley. When ready to depart, simply dismantle the trolley and store it in your kayak.

All prices are subject to change - GST is included

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product catalogue Nyloprene deck. Very popular for touring or multisport. The deck section is made from stretchy 3mm neoprene whilst the upper is from waterproof and breathable Milair fabric. These are sewn and seam sealed together and shoulder straps help keep the deck snug.

Day Two G

E

A

R

Kiwitea vest. Great for starting out on the water. One size fits all. A very comfortable jacket for beginners onwards. 53N buoyancy

Milair paddle jackets. These jackets are made from waterproof and breathable Milair fabric. They are all seam sealed and feature adjustable 3mm neoprene waist, neck and cuffs

Tri/Sea vest. A proven vest for touring, multisport racing or just messing about on the river. Heaps of pockets. Zip entry or slide over the head. 3 sizes 53N buoyancy.

Multimate vest. A new vest from the Day Two stable. Suitable for touring, whitewater and especially multisport racing. Very comfortable fit with heaps of pockets and removable belt for towing. 53 N buoyancy

Water

T

his book is selling well, lots of positive comments from the paddling community. Support your local kayak shop and the author. Rip on in and buy one you won’t be disappointed.

Safety Bags

allow you to be in touch with your loved ones or the office when you’re out on an expedition and essential for safety. Treat yourself and your cell phone to one.

The MONDIAL roof rack ensures maximum performance as a kayak, bicycle, ski/snowboard or utility carrier. Superior strength, durability and aerodynamics, along with the patented integrated quick-locking and release security system, make MONDIAL the new standard in roof racks.

Roof Rack Systems

It is incredibly easy to install and remove when not in use. All racks are key locked for added security. • The micro-ratchet system with user-friendly release allows for the fast and easy installation and removal of the roof rack. • The non slip, soft rubber pad protects the vehicle’s paint and fits to all types of roof lines. • The hook that secures the roof rack to the car is high strength tempered steel with anti-slip PVC coating. • No drilling, bolting or riveting are required to fit the roof rack. • We can fit a MONDIAL roof rack to 95% of all cars in NZ in a couple of minutes. • A full range of accessories are available, allowing the safe secure transportation of your chosen toys or tools.

All prices are subject to change - GST is included

KI • TAUPO • FREEPHONE: 0508 529 2569 •

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product catalogue SWING

Swing. Flat water cruising, well appointed with gear storage inside and also as an optional extra a pod that detaches, which is great for carrying your fishing gear to your favourite spot and then the pod can be used as a seat. Weight =25kg Width=780mm Length=4.01 metres $945.00

DELTA DOUBLE Delta double. Fun for the whole family at the beach or lake. Plenty of room and great stability. Weight =32kg Width=830mm Length =4.2 metres. $1060.00

SYNCHRO Synchro. A great two person cruising kayak which is stable and fast with storage and great appointments, to make your adventures fun. Weight =34kg Width=840mm Length=4.75 metres $1210.00 Rudder, knee braces and two centre hatches - optional extras not included in price.

CONTOUR Contour. This kayak is designed for day tripping and light overnight expeditions. It’s great fun to paddle and handles easily. With hot features. Weight=26kg Width=640mm Length= 4.70 metres $1579.00

ESCAPEE Escapee. Probably the closest you will come to finding one kayak that does it all. Surfing, fishing, snorkelling, Weight=23kg Width=750mm Length=3.3 metres $690.00

ESCAPADE ESCAPADE Great general purpose kayak for fishing, diving and having fun in the sun. Weight=27kg Width=750mm Length=3.46 metres $790.00

All prices are subject to change - GST is included

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product catalogue DOLPHIN Dolphin. A kayak for the family. Easy paddling, a manoeuvrable kayak that’s fun to paddle and is very stable. It easily takes an adult and a small child. Weight =19kg Width=760mm Length= 2.9metres $625.00

SQUIRT Squirt. A Sit on Top for the family. Able to seat an adult and a small child. It is easy to paddle and is very stable. Easily carried by one adult or two kids. Weight =15kg Width=780mm Length= 2.7metres $375.00

Penguin 2000. Has all the features for multi-day kayaking with ease of handling in all weather conditions. With great manoeuvrability this kayak is suitable for paddlers from beginner to advanced. With 3 options on lay out and construction gives weight options 20kg to 27kg.

PENGUIN

Width=610mm Length=4.8meters Weight 25kg. Std $1995.00

WANDERER Wanderer Excel. A stable fun kayak which is easy to handle. This is an enjoyable kayak for all the family. Width=820mm Length=4.5meters Weight=34kg. $1490.00

TORRENT Torrent Freedom. Great for the surf and the river with great manoeuvrability. Excellent finish. Weight =22.7kg Width=810mm Length=3.12 metres $715.00

SEA BEAR I Sea Bear I. The explorer’s kayak. This is a proven, long distance, offshore tourer that is rough water stable and surf friendly. Length 5.5 m, Width 0.6 m, Storage 212 litres, Weight 18 – 26 kg. Kevlar $3792.00 All prices are subject to change - GST is included

KI • TAUPO • FREEPHONE: 0508 529 2569 •

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product catalogue ACADIA

Acadia. Flat water cruising, well appointed, a great adjustable backrest, an access hatch in the back which is great for carrying your extra gear. Weight=20kg Width=675mm Length=3.7 metres. $925.00 Expedition Model includeds rudder and dry storage $1215.00

WHIZZ Whizz. A great multi-purpose family boat for the big kids and the small kids alike. Lots of fun this summer at the beach. (Hot surfer!) Weight =21kg Width=770mm

EURO-X

EURO-X. A new, faster sea kayak for lighter paddlers who may be interested in open water racing. The deck, developed for the European market, has deeper recesses for fittings. The Neoprene hatch covers are standard (length etc.) Length 5.31 m, Width 0.57 m, Storage 215 litres, Weight 17-23 kg.

TRI BEAR

Tri Bear. Multisport kayak. Will perform in races like the Head 2 Head and Coast to Coast allowing the new paddler to enjoy the paddle even when tired. Number 1 selling Multisport kayak from our stores. Weight =Std 18kg Width=570mm Length=5.3 metres Std $2132.00

ECOBEZHIG

Ecobezhig. This is the latest craft from Perception and has to be paddled to be believed. Huge storage, great features and the most comfortable seat your butt will ever meet. Weight =Std 26kg Width=590mm Length=5.4 metres Std $2500.00

TUI Tui Excel. Latest Sea Kayak from Quality Kayaks. Based on the Penguin design, with the new padddler in mind. A fast straight tracking fun kayak. Weight =Std 22kg Width=610mm Length=4.4 metres Std $1595.00 All prices are subject to change - GST is included

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product catalogue MINNOW ONE Minnow One. Small, light, easy to paddle fun for the whole family. Suitable for all ages. Suits flat water conditions. Weight =17.2kg Width=736mm Length=2.90 metres $692.00

Sprite One. A kayak for the family able to seat an adult and child. Easy paddling, adjustable seat back and clip down hand grabs, paddles well in a straight line and is very stable. Suits flat water conditions.

SPRITE ONE

Weight =14kg Width=700mm Length=3.0 metres $645.00

Sea Bear II. This double has proved itself to be steady and dependable in all weather conditions. It has smooth lines that make it as fast as you could wish for and yet stable, with huge storage capacity for multi-day trips.

SEA BEAR II

Weight =Std 40kg Kevlar 38kg Width=850mm Length=6 metres Std $4950.00 / Kev $5597.00

Minnow Two. Two person, great for lakes, estuary and any other sheltered water. Excellent stability and straight tracking.

MINNOW TWO

Weight =Std 28kg Width=830mm Length=3.91 metres

POLAR BEAR. (SINGLE) The serious, long-distance paddler’s choice.

POLAR BEAR

Very stable, easily handled, huge storage, fast loaded speeds, this craft has been developed for Graham Charles’ 2001 Antarctic Expedition. Length 5.9 m, Width 0.62 m, Storage 320 litres, Weight 25-35 kg.

SPRITE TWO Sprite Two. Two person cruiser, comes with dry gear storage. Fast, stable and easy to use. Adjustable back rest. Suits flat water conditions. Weight =Std 32kg Width=820mm Length=4.5 metres Std $1050.00 All prices are subject to change - GST is included

KI • TAUPO • FREEPHONE: 0508 529 2569 •

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kayak instruction

Mark Taylor fishing - photo by Pete Townend

Sea Kayaking COURSES WITH SEA KAYAKING STAGE ONE

SEA KAYAKING STAGE TWO

SEA KAYAKING STAGE THREE

SKILLS COURSE

ESKIMO ROLLING

WEATHER & NAVIGATION COURSE

A comprehensive course designed to cover the skills required to become a technically correct and safe paddler. The course progresses so you develop techniques and confidence at an enjoyable pace with great end results. This course is run over a weekend or by request in the evenings.

This course coverers the skills required to become a technically correct Eskimo Roller. You increase your confidence, allowing you to paddle in more challenging conditions. Confidently Eskimo rolling makes you a more competent, safe and capable paddler.

Understanding the weather and the ability to navigate in adverse conditions is vital when venturing into the outdoors. Learn to use charts and compasses and forecast the weather using maps and the clouds.

PROGRAMME

PROGRAMME FOUR EVENINGS SESSIONS

FRIDAY EVENING POOL SESSION

PROGRAMME FOUR EVENINGS COST $150

COST $150

SATURDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM SUNDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM COST $250 All prices are subject to change - GST is included

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kayak instruction SEA KAYAKING STAGE FOUR

SEA KAYAKING STAGE SIX

OCEANS COURSE

RESCUE COURSE

A weekend overnight course on the ocean designed to build reliable personal and team skills. Paddling technique, kayak control, rescues, preparation, planning and decision making are covered in detail

You need rescue skills to look after yourself and your paddling buddies in adverse conditions. This course covers Towing systems, Capsized kayaks, T Rescues, Paddle floats, Stern Deck Carries, Re-enter and Roll.

PROGRAMME

PROGRAMME ONE EVENING

SATURDAY TO SUNDAY

COST $60

COST $299

These courses are available from all Canoe & Kayak Shops so give them a call and get started on the way to safer kayaking adventures

SEA KAYAKING STAGE FIVE KAYAK SURFING COURSE Surfing is heaps of fun when you know how. We will spend the evening starting off in small surf and building up to one and a half metre waves. We will use a range of sit on tops and kayaks to make it fun and easy to learn. Skills to be taught include surfing protocol, paddling out, direction control, tricks and safety PROGRAMME FOUR EVENINGS

TELEPHONE CANOE & KAYAK • Taranaki 06 754 8368 • Taupo 07 378 1003 • Manukau 09 262 0209 • North Shore 09 479 1002

COST $195

YAKITY YAK LOT’S OF GREAT TRIPS! FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

TELEPHONE: 0508 529 2569 All prices are subject to change - GST is included

I • TAUPO • FREEPHONE: 0508 529 2 5 6 9 •

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kayak instruction

Editor at play! - Photo by Dan Sommerhalder

WHITE WATER COURSES WITH

TAUPO These courses are arranged in a progressive manner to allow development of techniques and confidence at an enjoyable pace. These courses may be purchased from all Canoe & Kayak Shops so give them a call and get started on the way to safer White Water kayaking adventures. Remember to book your accommodation at Kayakers Lodge when coming to Taupo.

the skills required to become a technically correct paddler. Starting off in a heated pool and progressing though flat water to moving water, allows you to develop the techniques and your confidence at an enjoyable pace with great end results. PROGRAMME SATURDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM SUNDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM COST $299

WHITE WATER STAGE ONE INTRODUCTION TO WHITE WATER A comprehensive course designed to cover

WHITE WATER STAGE TWO

This course covers the skills required to become a technically correct Eskimo Roller. This will increase your confidence, allowing you to paddle in more challenging conditions. PROGRAMME FOUR EVENINGS SESSIONS COST $150

WHITE WATER STAGE THREE RIVER SKILLS

ESKIMO ROLLING All prices are subject to change - GST is included

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kayak instruction On this course we continue to build on the skills taught and confidence gained on Stage One and Two Courses, developing your skills, technique and confidence on the faster moving white water of the Waikato River and progressing on to a Sunday day trip on the Mohaka River. Includes, eddie turns, ferry gliding, rolling and surfing and building new skills in River Rescue techniques and River Reading. PROGRAMME SATURDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM SUNDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM COST $299

This weekend course is designed to sharpen up your skills in preparation to paddling harder, faster white water and starting to learn simple rodeo moves. Focusing on skills such as river reading, body position and rotation, advanced paddle technique, playing in holes and negotiating higher Grade 3 rapids.

TELEPHONE CANOE & KAYAK • Taranaki 06 754 8368 • Taupo 07 378 1003 • Manukau 09 262 0209 • North Shore 09 479 1002

We recommend you are feeling comfortable on Grade 2+ rapids. Ideally you should already be paddling the mid section of Rangitaiki or equivalent. PROGRAMME SATURDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM SUNDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM COST $299

WHITE WATER STAGE FOUR MULTISPORT During this course we build on the skills gained on the Stage One to Three Courses, by developing your moving water skills, technique and confidence in your Multi Sport Kayak. We start on the Mohaka River on Saturday and progress on to the Whanganui on Sunday for some big water paddling.

WHITE WATER STAGE SIX RIVER RESCUE

River racing competency letters are awarded to those who meet the standard and criteria as out lined on the Grade Two Competency Certificate a copy is available from Canoe & Kayak Shops

This weekend course is designed to cover likely scenarios found on white water rivers. The course is suitable for paddlers that feel comfortable on Grade One to Two. The areas covered are rope skills, muscle techniques, team control, heads up, risk management and combat swimming. These helping to deal with the following situations - entrapments, kayak raps and swimming kayakers and their equipment

PROGRAMME SATURDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM SUNDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM COST $299

PROGRAMME SATURDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM SUNDAY 9.00AM TO 4.00PM COST $299

WHITE WATER STAGE FIVE ADVANCED WHITE WATER COURSE

YAKITY YAK K A Y A K

C L U B

ADRENALIN PUMPING ACTION FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

TEL: 0508 529 2569 All prices are subject to change - GST is included

I • TAUPO • FREEPHONE: 0508 529 2 5 6 9 •

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kayak tours

Okura River

Kayak Hire Company Discover Kayaking with beautiful estuary paddles, romantic twilight trips & paddles to the pub. Only 20 minutes north of the Harbour Bridge. Book your kayaking adventure now with the Okura River Kayak Hire Company A division of Canoe & Kayak Limted -

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Telephone: 09 473 0036

All prices are subject to change - GST is included

• NORTH SHORE • MANUKAU • TARANAKI


kayak tours

All prices are subject to change - GST is included

I • TAUPO • FREEPHONE: 0508 529 2 5 6 9 •

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HEAPS OF GEAR HEAPS OF KNOWLEDGE ...heaps of time!

4 GREAT STORES www.KayakNZ.co.nz

Unit 2, 20 Constellation Drive Mairangi bay, Auckland Telephone: 09-479 1002 Canoe & Kayak Ltd Trading as Canoe & Kayak North Shore

MANUKAU CITY off-ramp

710 Great South Road Manukau Telephone: 09-262 0209 Canoe & Kayak Ltd Trading as Canoe & Kayak Manukau

H.

1

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KU H

SP AR OA D

SOUTHERN MOTORWAY

off-ramp

GREAT SOUTH RD

ASCENSION PLACE

JUNCTION 18 Upper Harbour Highway

WIRI STATION ROAD

NORTH

AU

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M RO

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EET STR

Peter & Bronnie van Lith Trading as Canoe & Kayak Taranaki

CONSTELLATION DRIVE

S.

TOYOTA

BRONCOS

taupo

O ARIR

Cnr McClean st & West Quay Waitara Telephone: 06-754 8368

NORTH

manukau

G TON

McCLEAN STREET RIVER

WEST QUAY

WAITARA

NORTH

north shore NORTHERN MOTORWAY

taranaki

LAKE TERRACE

36 Nukuhau Street, Taupo Telephone: 07-378 1003 Canoe & Kayak Ltd Trading as Canoe & Kayak Taupo

Profile for Canoe & Kayak

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Issue 16