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Holocaust Education Week 2017

Pivotal Moments

World Gathering of Holocaust Survivors, Jerusalem, 1981.

This year’s Holocaust Education Week examines the post-Holocaust period, specifically the key events and moments that have shaped our understanding of the Shoah since the end of the Second World War. As time moves forward, new memoirs are written, geo-political dynamics shift and access to historical records improves; we recognize our knowledge of, and relationship to, the Shoah is both complicated and fluid. Over the course of HEW 2017, panelists, speakers, Neuberger staff and guests will help illuminate key moments over the past 70-plus year-period and examine why these moments were so significant in shaping our knowledge of the Holocaust. They may be seminal films, television programs, museums, newsworthy events such as the trials of former Nazis, major incidents of Holocaust denial and art restitution claims and recovery.

journey from survivor to Holocaust educator was not an easy one as not only was it emotionally difficult to share their stories, but the readiness of the community to listen only developed after time. Without their early commitment to “Never Forget,” generations of students would not have had the powerful experience of hearing first-hand Holocaust testimony and learning about the richness of Jewish life before the war.

For Toronto’s Jewish community, a major pivotal moment was the opening of the (now called) Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre at the Lipa Green Centre in 1985. The Centre has its roots in a Toronto-based group of Polish immigrants that formed in the 1940s to help Jews in Europe. By the 1950s and 60s, they began organizing commemorative events to honour the victims of the Holocaust and by the 1970s their mandate had been expanded to teach Holocaust education, working with school boards and other community groups. By 1985, the museum at Lipa Green was built and school visits with survivor speakers who were committed to sharing their stories became its core activity. In fact, the Neuberger was one of the earliest organizations in North America to record and preserve the testimonies of Holocaust survivors.

The photo above represents another remarkable moment in the post-Holocaust era—the World Gathering of Holocaust Survivors in Jerusalem in June 1981. Toronto Holocaust survivor and cofounder of the Neuberger, Gerda Frieberg, recalls travelling to Israel with her adult children for this momentous occasion and marching with 10,000 other survivors and their families towards the Kotel (the Wailing Wall). There, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin declared in Yiddish, “Mir zayned do.” We are here.

Photo courtesy of Gerda Frieberg.

That same year, our community experienced another major turning point with the highly publicized trial of Holocaust denier Ernst Zündel. This was a watershed moment for many survivors who appeared in court and subsequently felt the urgency to tell their stories to counter such denial. Today, we are fortunate to have the privilege of working with survivor speakers who remain committed to sharing their stories with thousands of students each year at the Neuberger. The

As we approach yet another pivotal moment in the post-Holocaust period—when survivors are no longer here to share their powerful voices—the Neuberger remains committed to developing new ways to provide meaningful Holocaust education. We will continue to explore inspiring new developments across disciplines —history, science, technology and culture—that will shape our understanding and remembrance of the Holocaust in the years to come. Dara Solomon

Executive Director, Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre UJA Federation of Greater Toronto


Sponsors

We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of our sponsors whose support ensures that Neuberger HEW can present more than 100 outstanding free educational programs to thousands of community members in cultural, educational, spiritual and community centres throughout the GTA and surrounding regions.

Presenting Sponsor

Lead Sponsors

Malka & Harry Rosenbaum honey & barry sherman

Media Sponsors

Publication Sponsor

Lawrence & Judith Tanenbaum Family Foundation

Opening Night Sponsor

Closing Night Sponsors

Testimony & Technology Sponsor

Myra & Joel York

The Glick and Glicksman families

Janette & Michael Diamond

Consular Sponsors

Magyarország Főkonzulátusa Toronto

Student Symposium Sponsor

Professional Development Seminar Sponsor

May & Fred z”l Karp and family

Tammy & Jerry Balitsky

Scholar-in-Residence Sponsor

Educator-in-Residence Sponsor

Cohen Family Charitable Trust

Robin & Eran Hayeems


Sponsors

We gratefully acknowledge the following sponsors who made their generous contributions to the 2017 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week in honour or in memory of loved ones. Sponsors who made donations in support of specific programs have tribute wording listed at the individual program.

Malka & Harry Rosenbaum and family in memory of the Borenstein, Posmantier, Rosenbaum and Segal families who perished in the Shoah. Lawrence & Judith Tanenbaum Family Foundation in honour of Esther Fairbloom, for her dedicated work in Holocaust education and inspiration to all who know her; and David Fairbloom, for his dedication to the Jewish community, both in Toronto and Israel. Keynote Programs Sponsors The David and Rose Brown Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation

Survivor Testimony Sponsors

Dialogue for DescendAnts Symposium

Church, Library & School Program Sponsors

The Axler, Glazer and Lang families

Lead Sponsor Honey & Barry Sherman, Apotex Foundation

Gail & Aubrie Appel and Charlotte & Ken Tessis

Beck Taxi Penelope Bell Binah Charitable Foundation, Julia & Henry Koschitzky Dori & Ari Ekstein and Michele & Leon Rawa and families Tamara Glied & Robert Beliak Ernest & Barbara Goldberger Endowment Fund Lisa Richman & Steven Kelman Sharon & Norman Gottlieb Stephen Greenberg

Reception Sponsor Marilyn & Stephen Sinclair Speakers Sponsors Gail & Stanley Debow

Erika Biro Phyllis & Jack Chisvin Circle of Care Anita Ekstein

Marika & Bill Glied, Sherry Glied & Richard Briffault, Tammy Glied & Robert Beliak, Michelle Glied-Goldstein & Allan Goldstein and families

Nili & Paul Ekstein and Shelley & Steven Ekstein

The Gottdenker Family Trust

Zelda Korenblum and family

Sonshine Family Foundation

Peri-Anne & Charles Magerman Ellen & Shawn Marr

The Frankel Family Foundation Donna & Richard Holbrook

Lillian & Rick Ekstein

Janice & Howard Langer Fund

Workshops Sponsors Dori & Ari Ekstein and family

The Sam & Gitta Ganz Family Foundation

Leboff Family Charitable Foundation

Marlene Brickman

Annette Metz-Pivnick & Richard Pivnick

Edna & David Magder

Chenstochover Aid Society

Sharon & Mark Pearlstein

Bonnie & Larry Moncik and Eleanor & George Getzler

The Lillian and Norman Glowinsky Family Foundation

Danny Pivnick

Alan & Lorraine Sandler

The Gottesman family

Doris & Rammy Rochman

Anne & Jeffrey Schwartz

Felicia & David Posluns, Nelly & Barry Zagdanski and Sara & Ian Zagdanski

Aida & Avron Seetner

Supporters Faye Minuk

Stacey Shein & Mayeer Pearl

Naomi Rifkind Mansell & David Mansell and Joyce & Aaron Rifkind Eleanor & Martin Maxwell and Scotiabank Bathurst and Sheppard Branch Rochelle Rubinstein

Reesa & Avrom Sud

The Gerald Schwartz & Heather Reisman Foundation

Nanci & Philip Turk

Art & Cinema Sponsors Ruth Ekstein & Alan Lechem and Stella & Peter Ekstein The Greenbaum Family Rhonda Silverstone & Nathan Rapoport Helen Stollar Frieda & Larry Torkin and family Sally & Mark Zigler

Rosie Uster, Phyllis Gould and Sandra Srebrolow Wendy & Richard Wengle

The Rash family

Mary Seldon and family

Sylvia & Zanvel Stern

The Nathan & Lily Silver Family Foundation

Dorothy Tessis and family

Guido Smit Carole & Jay Sterling

Legacy Symposium Sponsors Lead Sponsor Honey & Barry Sherman, Apotex Foundation Reception Sponsors Sylvia & Edward Fisch Dorothy & Pinchas Gutter Workshops Sponsors Eleanor & Martin Maxwell

Celine Szoges Susan Weltman & Seymour Hershenfeld Max & Beatrice Wolfe Foundation


Letters

It is with great solemnity that I join Canadians in observing Holocaust Education Week. This week, we remember the millions of Jews and many others who were murdered by the Nazi regime during the Holocaust. It is a time to stand together and redouble our efforts to combat hate and bigotry in any form and resolve to never let such a heinous act happen again. As we commemorate the victims of the Holocaust, it is important that we learn from our past and ensure that future generations continue to engage with the lessons of the Holocaust. It is thanks to initiatives such as this—which critically examine the way in which we come to understand the Holocaust—that the important work of teaching, learning, and comprehension will continue. Thank you to the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre for organizing this important initiative. Please accept my best wishes for a productive and illuminating Holocaust Education Week.

Justin Trudeau Prime Minister Canada

On behalf of the Government of Ontario, I am honoured to extend warm wishes to everyone taking part in the 37th Holocaust Education Week, an event organized by the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. I commend the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre for the vital role it plays in fostering a greater understanding of the Shoah, and for facilitating dialogue that strengthens and informs the culture of inclusion and respect that we are building here in Ontario. Elie Wiesel once wrote that “the opposite of love is not hate, it’s indifference.” Elie’s words embody the spirit of Holocaust Education Week; we must continue as a society to study the Shoah, to teach contemporary audiences not just about the genocide at places such as Auschwitz-Birkenau, Majdanek, Dachau, but of the Jewish life and culture destroyed throughout Europe. Last year, I was deeply moved to visit Yad Vashem during my visit to Israel. Walking through the Museum to the Hall of Names, and then emerging out onto the balcony into the golden hills of Jerusalem, gave me a sense of the resoluteness of the Jewish people in the face of the Shoah. It was an experience I will carry with me for the rest of my life. As we come together to reflect on the post-Holocaust period, and the specific events that have shaped our understanding of one of the darkest and most tragic times in human history, we are reminded of our collective and personal obligation to learn from the lessons of our history, to reject every form of intolerance and hatred—and to embrace the diversity that gives us our strength as a province and nation. I offer my sincere best wishes for a meaningful and memorable Holocaust Education Week.

Kathleen Wynne Premier Ontario

4 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

It is my pleasure to extend greetings and a warm welcome to everyone attending Holocaust Education Week hosted by The Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre and UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. Toronto is one of the world’s most multicultural cities and home to people from all over the world. The valued contributions of multicultural communities strengthen our society and contribute to our city’s motto “Diversity Our Strength.” Events like these celebrate the rich cultures and the traditions that make our city so unique, and are essential to prosperous, vital and livable Toronto. On behalf of Toronto City Council, please accept my best wishes for a memorable event and continued success. Yours truly,

John Tory Mayor Toronto


Letters

On behalf of UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, we are honoured to welcome you to the 37th Annual Holocaust Education Week, the signature program of UJA’s Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. We are proud to support Holocaust Education Week (HEW) and to participate in this robust week of programming. HEW is a multifaceted event recognized worldwide for excellence. Each year, it attracts more than 35,000 diverse individuals from across the GTA and builds upon the mission of its founders in teaching the history and legacy of the Shoah to new generations, in innovative and engaging ways. The theme this year, Pivotal Moments, examines the key events that have shaped our understanding of the Holocaust in the years following this tragic episode in our history. As a community very much shaped by the Holocaust, we look forward to these programs that will illuminate the various voices and moments that have influenced our understanding of who we are. As we move further away from the Shoah, we recognize the significance of continuing to make these stories relevant and engaging to the next generation. This year’s offerings include multiple programs designed for this important part of our community. Additionally, this year’s event includes more than 40 programs featuring survivor speakers. We are proud to present a program with such an incredible range of community partners and participants committed to Holocaust learning. We invite you and your families to join us. Sincerely,

Bruce Leboff

Chair of the Board

Adam Minsky

President & CEO UJA Federation of Greater Toronto

As Chair of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA), I extend my warmest regards to the participants of the 37th annual Holocaust Education Week. On reading that the theme for Holocaust Education Week this year was Pivotal Moments, I immediately thought of the Stockholm International Forum on the Holocaust which took place in January 2000 and was the founding meeting of the IHRA. The IHRA is an intergovernmental organization of 31 Member Countries which unites governments and experts to strengthen, advance and promote Holocaust education, research and remembrance and to uphold the commitments to the 2000 Stockholm Declaration. On that day in the year 2000, Swedish Prime Minister Göran Persson gathered the representatives of 46 governments including 23 Heads of State or Prime Ministers and 14 Deputy Prime Ministers or Ministers together with educators and survivors to discuss the Holocaust as an international, political issue. The outcome of the Conference was the Stockholm Declaration, the founding document of the IHRA and a symbol of the commitment of governments to cooperate internationally to commemorate, research and educate on the topic of the Shoah. The Stockholm Forum was and remains unprecedented in bringing such highlevel political representation to discuss Holocaust-related issues. Therefore, the Stockholm Forum and the genesis of the IHRA itself marks a pivotal moment in the perception of the Holocaust in the post-war political sphere. In an interview held with Göran Persson in 2005, he was asked what he would say to those who claim that conferences like the Stockholm Forum are just words. I, like Persson did, would very much refute such claims. Words matter. International political cooperation needs an organization like the IHRA. Political will does not spring from itself alone. Yours faithfully,

Ambassador Benno Baettig

2017 Chair, Switzerland International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance

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hew greetings

As we move further away from the Shoah and the world around us changes, the dialogue inspired by our programs at HEW become more important than ever. This year’s programs will examine pivotal moments that have shaped our understanding of the Holocaust. Two events stand out as personal pivotal moments that have profoundly affected me. The first is learning, while attending the 70th anniversary liberation ceremony at Dachau, that my grandfather was actually liberated from there. The second is uncovering the true story of what happened to my mother’s sister Esther who was born while my grandparents were in hiding in Stachov. These discoveries have further strengthened my commitment to Holocaust education and remembrance. The theme Pivotal Moments resonates quite strongly as I appreciate that our knowledge of this darkest moment in our history continues to evolve and is even being shaped by global events currently unfolding. The Neuberger is grateful for our sustaining partner UJA Federation of Greater Toronto; and for the generosity of our presenting sponsor The Azrieli Foundation; our publication sponsors Judy & Larry Tanenbaum and family; our lead sponsors Honey & Barry Sherman and Malka & Harry Rosenbaum; and to our opening and closing night sponsors Myra & Joel York and the Glick and Glicksman families. Their commitment to Holocaust education allows the Neuberger to present meaningful Holocaust programming across the GTA to new and diverse audiences. I would like to acknowledge Janette and Michael Diamond for their generous donation in support of the Neuberger’s presentation of USC Shoah Foundation’s New Dimensions in Testimony. Special recognition goes to HEW co-chairs Ken Bernkopf and Lisa Richman. We are privileged to benefit from professional and advisory colleagues including the Neuberger staff and Marilyn Sinclair. I look forward to seeing you at HEW 2017.

Shael Rosenbaum

Chair, Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, UJA Federation

On behalf of our dedicated volunteer committee, loyal partners and sponsors, we are proud to welcome you to the 37th annual Holocaust Education Week, presented by the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.  The theme this year is Pivotal Moments in the post-Holocaust era. We look forward to seeing you at our programs as we explore specific events in history, film, and literature, in addition to personal survivor testimonies that have impacted and shaped our understanding of the Holocaust. The Neuberger has brought together a range of experts in various fields to examine how we have come to understand the Holocaust and how our understanding of this watershed event continues to shift over time.  We acknowledge and thank our committee of volunteers for their hard work, time and contributions to HEW 2017. We are also grateful to our community partners and generous sponsors for their continued support of HEW. We would like to extend our deep gratitude to the Holocaust survivor speakers who founded this event in 1980 and who continue to inspire audiences throughout the city. Their tireless commitment to Holocaust education is critical for future generations. HEW serves as a forum for discussion about the need to speak out against human injustices, and to become active members of society to combat racism and intolerance. We want to thank the Neuberger’s Chair Shael Rosenbaum for his leadership and strong commitment to the Centre and Holocaust education. HEW would not be possible without the tireless work of the Neuberger staff. Our heartfelt appreciation goes to Executive Director Dara Solomon, Managing Director Carson Phillips and colleagues Mary Siklos, Michelle Fishman, Emma Hoffman, Paula Carabeo, Anna Skorupsky, Andreas Mayer and Rachel Libman. Neuberger HEW 2017 offers you an outstanding selection of compelling and timely programs at venues across our city and region. Please join us for this very important and meaningful week.

Lisa Richman Ken Bernknopf

2017 HEW Co-Chairs

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contents

1945

Rose Lipszyc with children at Crystal Beach, Ontario, c. 1960.

8 Opening Night A son’s condemnation of his father’s role in the Holocaust.

1945 image courtesy of Katapultfilm. Canada 150 photo courtesy of Rose Lipszyc. Labyrinth of Lies photo by Heike Ullrich, courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics. Portrait of Dr. Danielle Spera by Peter Rigaud, courtesy of Jewish Museum Vienna.

10 Closing Night Jewish continuity in the city of Theodore Herzl, Sigmund Freud and Maria Altmann.

12 Scholar-in-Residence Considering Holocaust memory, testimonies and media culture in the digital era.

14 Featured Programs Exploring this year’s theme from multiple perspectives with distinguished experts. featured films | Page 22

canada 150 | Page 34

22 Featured Films Enhancing our understanding of the visual representation of the Holocaust and history through screen culture.

27 Young Professional Programs Dynamic and engaging opportunities designed by and for individuals in their 20s and 30s.

28 Educator-in-Residence Sharing interactive methods to enrich teaching and learning.

30 Educator Workshop and Student Symposium Inspiring, educating and engaging: pedagogy for the 21st century.

31 Testimony and Technology Experience the future of remembrance and oral history, today.

32 Canadian Collections

closing night | Page 10

Cover Image: This strong visual image from the film Labyrinth of Lies (2014) aptly demonstrates the complex task of exploring the past and how seemingly innocuous happenings can become pivotal moments. It depicts the film’s protagonist, public prosecutor Johann Radmann, entering the archives of the U.S. Army Document Center in Germany. A repository for the records of approximately 600,000 men, it required painstaking research efforts to find evidence linked to potential Nazi perpetrators. Labyrinth of Lies offers viewers a glimpse into the efforts of the prosecutors involved in the Frankfurt Auschwitz trials of the 1960s. This defining moment led to the prosecution of 20 midlevel SS officers. Consequently, everyday Germans were confronted with the reality of the Holocaust.

Discover 1200+ oral histories collected in Canada and preserved in perpetuity.

34 Canada 150 There is no place like home! Holocaust survivors reflect on Canada.

36 Library Programs 39 Interfaith Programs 41 Closed School Programs 42 Community Programs 50 Calendar

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opening night

In The Shadow of The Reich: Reflections on a Familial Legacy Thursday, 2 November, 7:30 PM Adath Israel Synagogue 37 Southbourne Avenue, Toronto 416–635–5340 In a thought provoking discussion, Niklas Frank, son of the notorious Governor General of Nazi-occupied Poland, Hans Frank (1900–1946), reveals his thoughts on his father’s guilt and responsibility in the Holocaust. He speaks openly and candidly about his father’s involvement in the crimes as well as his mother Brigitte Frank’s embrace of the power and privilege. Hans Frank was the personal lawyer to Adolf Hitler and subsequently appointed to accomplish the Nazi regime’s goals in occupied Poland. He was responsible for the mass relocation of the Polish Jewish population to ghettos as well as their deportation to concentration camps. Found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity at the Nuremberg Trials, on October 1, 1946; Hans Frank was executed by hanging fifteen days later. In conversation with broadcast journalist Caryn Lieberman, Niklas Frank explores the pivotal moments in coming to terms with a familial past that is intertwined with the crimes of National Socialism. Niklas Frank was a young child when Hitler appointed his father Governor-General of Nazi-occupied Poland. He was seven years old when his father was found guilty and executed in 1946. Following a distinguished career in Germany as a journalist, Niklas set out to uncover, and reveal the truth about his father’s role in the Holocaust. Using primary source material including his father’s diaries, archival material, witness testimonies as well as his personal memories, Niklas Frank authored several books dealing with his familial past including In the Shadow of the Reich (1991) and was the subject of the documentary What Our Father’s Did: A Nazi Legacy (2015), an intimate and haunting account of two families’ attempts to deal with their past. As part of the HEW 2017 Featured Film Series, the Neuberger will screen What Our Father’s Did. See page 26 for details. Caryn Lieberman is the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors with a deep and abiding commitment to increasing awareness and knowledge about the Shoah. In 2011, Caryn was awarded the Adrienne Clarkson Award for Diversity for her one-hour special on CP24 that featured Neuberger Holocaust Education Week. Caryn currently works at Global News Toronto. Opening Night is generously sponsored by Joel & Myra York and family in loving memory of Sarah and Chaim Neuberger z”l.

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Brigitte Frank and her five children in Kressendorf (today Kreszowice, Poland) in 1944. Niklas Frank is seated next to his sister.

Image courtesy of Niklas Frank.


Visitors in front of Jewish Museum Vienna Caption during an evening event.

Photo by Sonja Bachmayer. Courtesy of Jewish Museum Vienna.


closing night

Jewish Museum vienna: A Conduit for Jewish Life Thursday, 9 November, 7:30 PM Beth Torah Synagogue 47 Glenbrook Avenue, Toronto 416–782–4495 Holocaust Education Week 2017 officially closes with a presentation by Dr. Danielle Spera, Director of the Jewish Museum Vienna. With two locations, the Palais Eskeles as well as the Judenplatz, the Museum provides visitors from around the world with a historical overview of the Viennese Jewish community. As a guardian of this history and also the record keeper of the small but vibrant Jewish community in Vienna, Spera explains the unique role the Museum plays in the cultural life of the city, and how the formation of the institution serves as a pivotal moment helping make accessible a rich history of grave importance to civil society in Austria. In a city that was brutalized by the Kristallnacht pogrom, and whose Jewish community was decimated by the Holocaust, Danielle Spera discusses how her work at the Jewish Museum Vienna seeks to raise awareness of Jewish history, religion and culture. Closing Night of Holocaust Education Week will include a commemorative program and candle lighting marking the 79th anniversary of the Kristallnacht pogrom. Danielle Spera studied journalism and political science in Vienna and received her PhD from the University of Vienna. Danielle enjoyed a successful career with the Austrian national public television broadcaster ORF. She worked as a reporter and a foreign correspondent before she became anchor of Austria’s most influential news program Zeit im Bild. Spera authored several texts on Jewish topics such as, Displaced (2017), Lessing presents Lessing (2015), A Good Day (2014), Jewish Geniuses. Warhol´s Jews (2012), Hermann Nitsch— Leben und Arbeit (1999), and is the co-founder of the Jewish cultural magazine, NU. She serves on the boards of the Medical University Innsbruck MUI, on the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute VWI and is a member of the advisory board of the broadcast stations arte and ORFIII. Danielle has been the Director of the Jewish Museum Vienna since 2010. Closing Night is generously co-sponsored by Marilyn & David Glick, Susan & Eddie Glick, Shirley & Martin Glick, Marsha & Harry Glicksman, Lisa & Sender Herschorn, Amnon Altschuler, Sherri & Daniel Glassberg, Deborah Glassberg and Aviva & Ryan Altschuler and all their families, honouring the memories of Rose & Morris Glick and Gutta & Max Glicksman, Holocaust survivors. Additional support by Eleanor & Martin Maxwell in memory of his sisters, Josephine and Erna Meisels who died in the Holocaust; and by Scotiabank Bathurst & Sheppard Branch.

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Genocide Imagined: Dramatizing the Holocaust on American Media During the second half of the twentieth century, the Holocaust became a prominent fixture of North American public culture. This is a remarkable phenomenon, given that the great majority of people in Canada and the United States have no direct connection to this genocide. Indeed, no other event of modern history looms so large in the moral landscape of these nations that did not either take place there or involve large numbers of their populations abroad. Rather, almost all North Americans have always encountered the Holocaust through some kind of representation. Film and broadcast dramas have not only presented the Holocaust to the largest number of North Americans but also played leading roles in shaping how these audiences engage this subject through their imaginations.

12 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

In the first postwar decades, several film and television dramas integrated the Holocaust into American narratives. Original television dramas aired in the 1950s on such series as Playhouse 90 and Studio One portrayed Americans encountering Nazi antisemitism in Europe or the struggles of Holocaust survivors building new lives in the United States. The 1965 film The Pawnbroker offered a disturbing portrait of a Holocaust survivor living in New York, haunted by the torments of wartime experiences. Some American films and telecasts about the Holocaust became widely influential internationally: The Diary of Anne Frank (1959); Judgment at Nuremberg (1961); the Holocaust miniseries (1978); Schindler’s List (1993). They imported distinctively American visions of the Holocaust to other countries, including those where it took place. The Holocaust’s appearance as a “guest” subject on episodes of many American television series has made the genocide a familiar element of the nation’s repertoire of moral issues. Occasionally these works engendered a contentious debate on representing the Holocaust through popular media. A widespread discussion attended the premiere of the Holocaust miniseries. Many opined that television was inherently incapable of dealing with a subject understood as testing the limits of representation, including Elie Wiesel, who asserted that “Art and Theriesienstadt were perhaps compatible in Theresienstadt, but not . . . in a television studio.”¹ Such concerns did not discourage American broadcasters and filmmakers from approaching the Holocaust; rather, new films and telecasts on the subject have burgeoned since then, though they often provoke discussions of their appropriateness. Sometimes, the debates surrounding these media works overwhelmed their reception—for example,


scholar-in-residence

the controversy around casting anti-Zionist activist Vanessa Redgrave as Auschwitz inmate Fania Fénelon in the 1980 teleplay Playing for Time. A spate of Holocaust comedies on film in the 1990s—including the 1999 American remake of Jacob the Liar—prompted discussions of the appropriateness of humor to engage this forbidding subject.

of Holocaust survivors is assailed). These developments reflect diverging trends: on one hand, an extension of Holocaust education in North America, primarily to inform the moral consciousness of young people; on the other hand, increasing scrutiny of how the Holocaust is remembered, including through works that are surreally outrageous or trenchantly comic.

Perhaps no other American work of Holocaust media generated such extensive epiphenomena as Schindler’s List. Its widely publicized premiere prompted ABC News Nightline to proclaim 1993 “the year of the Holocaust.”² The film’s debut abroad also received exceptional attention in Israel, Poland, and Germany, and controversy ensued when the film was banned in Islamic nations.³ American reactions to Schindler’s List also became newsworthy, especially following a screening in Oakland, California, on Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, when a group of students, most of them African Americans, were evicted from the cinema after laughing during a scene of a German officer shooting a Jewish prisoner. The awe with which so many Americans approached Schindler’s List was lampooned in a 1994 episode of the sitcom Seinfeld, in which the title character and his girlfriend create a scandal after they are caught necking while watching the film. Since the film’s release, Spielberg extended his commitment to Holocaust remembrance by establishing the Shoah Visual History Archive, which has placed online video interviews with tens of thousands of Holocaust survivors. Spielberg may now be America’s most widely recognized living figure associated with the Holocaust, suggesting a larger shift in Holocaust remembrance from centering on survivors of the genocide to focuing on creators of Holocaust representations.

Holocaust films and telecasts in North America continue to evolve. New works on this subject respond to innovations in media technologies and, moreover, to the dynamics of culture, especially changes in what motivates people to strive to imagine this most disturbing chapter of modern history.

The advent of the digital age at the turn of the millennium, bringing signal shifts in media technologies and practices, has had a considerable impact on Holocaust remembrance, especially the Internet’s capacity to disseminate information on an unprecedented scale. There is both a wealth of resources on websites by authoritative Holocaust research institutes and an array of individual creative engagements with the subject, such as hundreds of Anne Frank “tribute videos,” most made by adolescent girls who compile clips from various dramas and documentaries to express their personal attachment to Anne’s life and work.⁴ Films and telecasts continue to address the Holocaust, engaging an increasingly global audience. In addition to works that revisit familiar subjects—such as the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and Nazi war crimes trials—are noteworthy developments in these media, including film adaptations of works of Holocaust literature for young readers, such as The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (2008) and The Book Thief (2013). Also, irreverent portrayals of the Holocaust —or, rather, of its remembrance—have appeared on film (the 2009 revenge fantasy Inglorious Basterds) and television (a 2004 episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm, in which the singular stature

Jeffrey Shandler

Dr. Jeffrey Shandler is Professor of Jewish Studies at Rutgers University, where he teaches courses on Holocaust memory, Yiddish literature and modern Jewish culture. His research focuses on Jewish cultural encounters with modernity, examining a wide range of practices among diaspora Jews, primarily in North America and Eastern Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. He is the author of several books including While America Watches: Televising the Holocaust (1999); Jews, God, and Videotape: Religion and Media in America (2009); and coauthor of Anne Frank Unbound: Media, Imagination, Memory (2012). Professor Shandler’s most recent publication, Holocaust Memory in the Digital Age: Survivors’ Stories and New Media Practices (2017), explores the nexus of new media and memory practices in the largest collection of videotaped interviews with survivors and other witnesses to the Holocaust. HEW 2017 Scholar-in-Residence is generously sponsored by the Cohen Family Charitable Trust.

1 Elie Wiesel, “Trivializing the Holocaust: Semi-Fact and Semi-Fiction,” New York Times, 16 April 1978, sec. 2, pp. 1, 29. 2 “America Remembers the Holocaust,” ABC News Nightline, 28 December 1993. 3 See, e.g., essays by Lilianne Weissberg (Germany) and Haim Bresheeth (Israel) in Yosefa Loshitzky, ed., Spielberg’s Holocaust: Critical Perspectives on “Schindler’s List” (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997); Bernard Weinraub, “Islamic Nations Move to Keep Out ‘Schindler’s List,’” New York Times, 7 April 1994, p. C15. 4 See Leshu Torchin, “Anne Frank’s Moving Images,” in Anne Frank Unbound: Media, Imagination, Memory, ed. Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett and Jeffrey Shandler (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2012), 93–134.

Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 13 


Neo-Nazis Ernst ZĂźndel and others taunt demonstrators at an anti-Nazi rally, Carlton St., Toronto, 31 May 1981.

The Neuberger is proud to present a thoughtfully curated selection of featured programs exploring Pivotal Moments that have shaped our understanding of the Holocaust. Please note that due to the high volume of interest, we have implemented free advanced online registration for a selection of programs. To avoid disappointment, we recommend registering early. The registration information can be found below the applicable program.

Photo by Ben Lechtman, courtesy of Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, item 3078.

Featured Programs


Featured Programs

An artist’s rendering of the Holocaust exhibit at the soon-to-be-opened Amud Aish Memorial Museum in Brooklyn, NY.

Kori Street, USC Shoah Foundation’s Senior Director of Programs and Operations shows a young student how to use the Institute’s IWitness educational platform.

Amud Aish image courtesy of Amud Aish Memorial Museum, 2017. Kori Street photo courtesy of USC Shoah Foundation.

Providing Transformative Learning Tools for Today’s Learners

Built to Remember: The Holocaust Museums of Today and Tomorrow Over the past 40 years, there has been a phenomenal rise in the number of Holocaust museums, from comprehensive large-scale institutions to community-based commemorative and educational spaces. This proliferation can be seen as a pivotal moment in the post-Holocaust era as multiple generations’ understanding of the Shoah has been shaped by the narratives presented by these institutions. This exhibit examines 14 Holocaust museums, exploring the different ways they have chosen to develop the narrative of this watershed moment in history. Whose voices dominate? Whose are left out? How does the narrative change for a Jewish audience, a younger audience, a multicultural audience? What is the future of these museums and the role they play as we approach an era when Holocaust survivors are no longer with us to share their experiences? Exhibition curated by the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. 2–29 November Monday–Friday 9:00 AM–9:00 PM; Saturday–Sunday 9:00 AM–7:00 PM Miles Nadal JCC | The Gallery at the J 750 Spadina Avenue | Toronto | 416–924–6211

Join HEW 2017 Educator-in-Residence Dr. Kori Street (see bio page 29) as she shares insights into the USC Shoah Foundation’s innovative developments in using recorded Holocaust survivor testimonies to engage new generations of learners. Examining such tools as the IWitness platform, New Dimensions in Testimony, the Canadian Collection of the Visual History Archive and other projects, Kori discusses how the ongoing partnership with the Neuberger offers students and teachers unprecedented access not only to leading edge technology, but to pedagogically effective methods. Keynote will be followed by an interactive Q & A. Light lunch provided; kashruth observed. This program is designed for Jewish community professionals and educators; open to the general public (adults). Attendance by advance registration only: please call 416–635–2883 × 5153 or email neuberger@ujafed.org. Limited space available. HEW 2017 Educator-in-Residence is generously sponsored by Robin & Eran Hayeems. FRIDAY, 3 NOVEMBER | 12:30 PM Prosserman JCC | Room 123 4588 Bathurst Street | Toronto 416–635–2883 × 5153

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Featured Programs

Two-Volume Critical Edition of Mein Kampf

Neuberger Lunch & Learn

Why Publish a Critical Edition of Mein Kampf?

Light lunch provided. Space is limited. Registration required. RSVP to Kaley Green at kgreen@foglers.com. Without registration admission will not be permitted. Friday, 3 November | 12:00 PM Fogler, Rubinoff LLP TD Centre North Tower | Suite 3000 77 King Street West | Toronto

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Press photo of Leo Hurwitz, Milton Fruchtman and crew in the Eichmann trial control room (detail).

Living Room Witnesses: The Holocaust on American Television Over the course of the second half of the 20th century, the Holocaust became a powerful presence in the North American moral landscape. Perhaps more than any other source, television has played a leading role in forging this remarkable relationship, given both the scope of the medium’s many presentations on this subject to mass audiences and the distinctive nature of how people watch television. Illustrated with clips from American telecasts that originally aired between the 1950s to the 1990s, HEW 2017 Scholar-in-Residence Professor Jeffrey Shandler (see bio page 13) considers the different ways that the medium of television has enabled people in North America to feel that they are morally charged witnesses to one of the most disturbing chapters of history. Examples include excerpts from early documentaries, popular weekly drama series and news reports. After his lecture, Shandler is joined by Adam Nayman, film critic at The Globe and Mail and documentary film instructor at Ryerson’s School of Journalism, to discuss the nuances of visualizing the Holocaust. Advanced registration strongly recommended. Reserve your spots at livingroomwitnesseshew2017.eventbrite.ca. HEW 2017 Scholar-in-Residence is generously sponsored by the Cohen Family Charitable Trust. SATURDAY, 4 NOVEMBER | 7:30 PM Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre | Al Green Theatre 750 Spadina Avenue | Toronto | 416–924–6211

Mein Kampf image courtesy of Institut für Zeitgeschichte. Eichmann trial control room image courtesy of the George Eastman Museum.

In October 1945, in front of news cameras, American military officials melted down the lead type used to print Mein Kampf (1925), Adolf Hitler’s antisemitic manifesto. In a symbolic gesture, the metal was recast to produce page plates for the first postwar German newspaper printed in the U.S. occupation zone. At midnight on December 31, 2015, Mein Kampf’s international copyright expired and the text entered the public domain. Dr. Roman Töppel was co-editor of the German-language scholarly edition of Mein Kampf (2017), developed by the Institut für Zeitgeschichte (Institute for Contemporary History) in response. German scholars and politicians faced a pivotal moment in coming to terms with the country’s past— how to deal with one of the foundational texts of National Socialism now that Hitler’s antisemitic writing was no longer restricted by copyright laws. Töppel dispels the myths and misconceptions behind the original text and describes the process behind creating a critical edition.


Featured Programs

Workshops Growing up as Children of Holocaust Survivors Moderated discussion session Myths and Misconceptions about the Holocaust Presentation by Dr. Doris Bergen, Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor in Holocaust Studies at University of Toronto Intergenerational Transmission of Trauma Presentation by psychotherapist Pearl Goodman Who Do We Think We Are? Researching Our Roots Featuring family historian and author Stanley M. Diamond

Secrets of Survival. Malka Rosenbaum (née Posmantier) with her parents Bina and Chaim, 1975.

Dialogue for Descendants: “D4D” Symposium for Children of Holocaust Survivors

Secrets of Survival image courtesy of Malka Rosenbaum. REFUGEE image courtesy of Rochelle Rubinstein.

The second annual symposium exclusively for children of Holocaust survivors (and/or their partners) is a forum for education, discussion and engagement. From childhood into adulthood, the children of survivors continue to experience pivotal moments in exploring their personal narratives in response to this shared tragic history. Featuring two keynote speakers, lectures, workshops and discussion sessions, participants will consider different perspectives on their experiences as the children of those who survived the Holocaust. The symposium opens with a keynote address from Martin Himel, television director, producer and senior correspondent. Martin Himel has produced television series, ground-breaking documentaries and news coverage for major national and international broadcasters. He illustrates his talk with short clips from his most recent documentary, Secrets of Survival (2017) (PG 25).

The Holocaust and Antisemitism Today Featuring Bernie M. Farber former CEO of the Canadian Jewish Congress; current CEO of the Mosaic Institute Participants choose two of six sessions/ workshops during online registration— first come, first served. Attendance at this symposium is limited to children of Holocaust survivors (and/or their partners)—no exceptions. Includes light breakfast, lunch, snacks, dessert reception, free parking and printed materials. Kashruth observed.

REFUGEE (detail), life size woodblock printed, painted and quilted fabric figures, 2009.

The program concludes with a presentation from Helen Epstein, author of several books of literary non-fiction, including the ground-breaking Children of the Holocaust (1979), one of the first books to examine the inter-generational transmission of trauma. It was a pivotal moment for children of survivors who finally had text to validate their own experiences. Its sequel, Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History (1997), reconstructs her own matrilineal history across two centuries and an extinct civilization. Now a grandmother, she will look back over 50 years of research and thinking about issues pertinent to the children of Holocaust survivors. Cost: $54 (includes all program fees). Advance registration required at d4dhew2017.eventbrite.ca. Registration deadline: October 27. Sunday, 5 November | 9:00 AM–4:00 PM Joe and Wolf Lebovic Jewish Community Campus Leo & Sala Goldhar Conference & Celebration Centre 9600 Bathurst Street | Vaughan | 416–635–2883 × 5301 (information only)

The Dialogue for Descendants’ Symposium is generously sponsored by Honey & Barry Sherman, Apotex Foundation. They are proud to support the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in their important work towards making the world a better place. For a complete list of all symposium supporters, see page 3.

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Featured Programs

Anti-Zündel rally in front of Old City Hall, 19 Jan. 1984.

The Quest for Justice: Postwar Nazi Trials At one of the Neuberger’s signature Lunch & Learn programs, University of Toronto’s Professor Rebecca Wittmann will discuss the evolution of postwar justice from the pivotal moment of the Nuremberg Trials (1945–1946) to the ongoing quest for justice. Between December 1946 and April 1949, under the aegis of the International Military Tribunal, the US military conducted 12 additional trials of high ranking German officials at Nuremberg. US prosecutors tried 177 persons and won convictions of 97 defendants. Professor Wittmann, whose research focuses on German legal history, trials of Nazi perpetrators and postwar Germany, engages the audience in the nuances of these historical proceedings. Light lunch provided. Registration required. RSVP to Dora Moreira 905–326–5336 × 73237 or dora.moreira@pwc.com. Priority registration reserved for professionals in the downtown core. Co-sponsored by PwC Canada and Aird & Berlis LLP. Monday, 6 November | 11:45 AM Address provided upon registration

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Confronting Holocaust Denial: A Canadian Experience Just over thirty years ago, the infamous Holocaust denier and rabble rouser Ernst Zündel (1939–2017) published and disseminated pamphlets promoting Holocaust denial from his home in Cabbagetown, Toronto. Zündel was eventually charged under the Canadian Criminal Code, section 181, of spreading false news through his notorious publications. The lengthy and complex legal proceedings of the 1980s galvanized the Canadian Jewish community and defined an era characterized by social justice, an increased awareness of Holocaust education and the fight for the truth. To explore this pivotal moment in Canadian history, the Neuberger in partnership with the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) presents a panel of esteemed speakers who witnessed these events unfold and were part of the history-making process. Panel moderator Bernie M. Farber, former CEO of the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) was at the forefront of fighting Holocaust denial in Canada and is a recognized expert on hate crime. Among his many publications is, From Marches to Modems: A Report on Organized Hate in Metropolitan Toronto (1997), a seminal work on the changing landscape of Holocaust denial in Toronto. Panelists include Gerda Frieberg, Holocaust survivor, business woman, activist and former chair of the CJC’s Ontario Region; Warren Kinsella a Toronto-based journalist, political adviser and commentator; and Bill Dunphy a veteran investigative journalist who extensively covered the trials. Free. Advance registration required at rom.on.ca/whatson. ROM admission not included. Monday, 6 November Doors open 6:30 PM; Program begins 7:00 PM Royal Ontario Museum Signy and Cléophée Eaton Theatre | Level 1B 100 Queen’s Park | Toronto 416–586–5797 | programs@rom.on.ca

Photo by Graphic Artists. Courtesy of Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2013-8-2.

Neuberger Lunch & Learn


Featured Programs

Reading the Holocaust: From The Diary of Anne Frank to The Diary of Molly Applebaum Anne Frank’s diary is arguably the most well known Holocaust writing to date. The diary compels us to understand the Shoah through the eyes of a young girl exposed to the horrors of National Socialism. The publication of and widespread attention to Anne’s tragic story has proven to be a pivotal moment, shaping generations’ understandings of the Holocaust and foregrounding the genre of Holocaust survivor memoirs that followed. In partnership with The Azrieli Foundation the Neuberger proudly presents a panel of esteemed experts moderated by Professor Sara R. Horowitz. As an accomplished literary and Judaic Studies scholar Dr. Horowitz contextualises the global and unprecedented relevance of Anne’s diary while panelists illustrate the connection it has to memoirs that came after, including the pivotal moment created by the establishment of The Azrieli Series of Holocaust Survivor Memoirs.

Chief prosecutor Benjamin Ferencz presents documents as evidence at the Einsatzgruppen Trial.

Justice: Nuremberg and Beyond

Photo: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Benjamin Ferencz.

On December 17, 1942, the leaders of the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union issued their first joint declaration officially noting the mass murder of European Jews and resolving to prosecute the perpetrators responsible. The immediate postwar Nuremberg Trials transformed the concept of international criminal justice for future war crimes and crimes against humanity. The trials serve as a pivotal moment that have shaped our global understanding of the Holocaust and justice. To date, the Federal Republic of Germany has held a total of 925 proceedings trying defendants of National Socialist era crimes. The German proceedings have been criticized, particularly those held in the 1960s and 1970s, for passing light sentences to ageing defendants as many perpetrators returned to their normal lives and professions in German society. The program will begin with a special Neuberger–commissioned film featuring Ben Ferencz, the last living prosecutor from the Nuremberg Trials, where he tried 22 members of the Einsatszgruppen Nazi death squads. He was instrumental in the establishment of the International Criminal Court and remains a vocal advocate for peace. At age 97, Ferencz reflects on the legacy of these trials. Panelists Professors Valerie Hébert and Rebecca Wittmann will respond to Ferencz’s reflections while highlighting key Nazi trials and the challenges prosecutors faced. Providing an historical overview of the period, Hébert and Wittmann explore the complexities of bringing war criminals to justice. Former war crimes prosecutor Eliott Behar will connect the ongoing quest for justice to contemporary cases of genocide. Advanced registration strongly recommended. Reserve your spots at nurembergandbeyondhew2017.eventbrite.ca

The experts will discuss the role of literature and its genres in shaping our understanding of the Holocaust. Professor Jan Grabowski, University of Ottawa, will provide insightful analysis of the recently published literary work Buried Words (2017) which juxtaposes the haunting diary of a hidden child in Poland with the reflective tone of her postwar memoirs. Professor Julia Creet, York University, will illustrate the concepts of voice and silence by reflecting on the choices authors make to include or exclude certain events from diaries and memoirs. Professor Belarie Zatzman, York University, will discuss the integration and applicability of these types of works into modern theatre studies and how they contribute to the remembrance and representation of the Holocaust for today’s youth. Advanced registration strongly recommended. Reserve your spots at hew2017-readingtheholocaust.eventbrite.ca. Generously sponsored and presented by The Azrieli Foundation. Tuesday, 7 November 12:00 PM: Light refreshments 12:30 PM: Program begins Munk School of Global Affairs Campbell Conference Facility University of Toronto 1 Devonshire Place | Toronto 416–631–5689

Tuesday, 7 November | 8:00 PM Law Society of Upper Canada Convocation Hall | 130 Queen Street West Toronto | 416–631–5689

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Featured Programs

Max Stern in Germany, c. 1925.

Reclamation and Restitution of Nazi Looted Art

In the two decades since the conference, paintings have been recovered and museums have adopted policies and made commitments to ongoing provenance research. However, thousands of paintings remain lost or caught in the tangled web of complex international policies. The Neuberger’s panel brings together a variety of perspectives from claimants to institutional representatives who are committed, in different ways, to Holocaust-era art restitution. Panelists include: Donald S. Burris, Managing Partner at Burris, Schoenberg & Walden LLP in Los Angeles, worked in the successful pursuit of art works and other assets stolen by the Nazi authorities including the return of Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer (aka The Woman in Gold) by the Austrian Government to Maria Altmann. Tobi Bruce, Director of Exhibitions and Collections and Senior Curator of the Art Gallery of Hamilton, worked on the recovery and return of

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17th century Dutch artist Johannes Verspronck’s Portrait of a Lady to the Solmssen family in 2014. Clarence Epstein, Executive Director of the Max and Iris Stern Foundation, leads research and recovery efforts of the art collection of the late Montreal dealer Max Stern. Prior to immigrating to Canada and running the Dominion Gallery, Dr. Stern owned the Galerie Julius Stern in Dusseldorf— the contents of which were sold by force in the 1930s. Danielle Spera, Director of the Jewish Museum Vienna, will provide the European perspective and explain her institution’s response to Vienna’s tumultuous art restitution history. The panel will be moderated by Sara Angel, Founder and Executive Director of the Art Canada Institute at Massey College, University of Toronto. Angel has written extensively on Nazi-looted art and its restitution. Advanced registration strongly recommended. Reserve your spots at reclamationandrestitutionhew2017.eventbrite.ca Generously sponsored by Rochelle Rubinstein in memory of her parents, Judith & Bill Rubinstein. Wednesday, 8 November | 7:30 PM George Ignatieff Theatre University of Toronto 15 Devonshire Place | Toronto

Image courtesy of the National Gallery of Canada, Library and Archives, Fonds Max Stern

Following the Washington Conference on Holocaust-Era Assets in 1998, 44 governments endorsed a series of principles for addressing Nazi-looted art. These included identifying confiscated works of art, the opening of archives and a commitment from museums to research provenance gaps in their collections. Additionally, pre-war owners and their heirs were encouraged to make claims to art stolen by the Nazis. The conference proved to be a pivotal moment in the post-Holocaust era as the activities precipitated by it, illuminated not only how the Nazis carried out their systematic looting but also how many European countries neglected to respond to restitution claims.


Featured Programs

Student reading Holocaust survivor memoir from the Azrieli series.

Labels from the original Semer Records vinyl record issue.

Ashkenaz Foundation Presents

Semer Ensemble

Germany’s Semer Ensemble brings back to life the eclectic Jewish music captured on historic recordings made in Berlin between 1933–1938 on the Semer Records label. This short-lived record label served as a “musical Noah’s Ark” at a time when Jewish artists were banned by the Nazis from participation in the mainstream music industry. In five short years, the label recorded a vast array of artists and styles, including Yiddish folk and theatre songs, Berlin Cabaret, Russian and Ukrainian folk songs, operatic arias, and cantorial music. This precious musical time capsule of a world facing annihilation was thought lost for decades following the destruction of the Semer store and all its master recordings on Kristallnacht, November 9, 1938. But 60 years later, ethnomusicologist Rainer Lots scoured the world in a heroic mission to track down vinyl copies of the entire catalog.

Photo by Michael Rajzman for the Neuberger. Semer Ensemble images courtesy of Semer Ensemble.

Why Should Young People Read Holocaust Literature, Anyway? Award-winning author Anne Dublin discusses the popularity of Holocaust literature among young people. Why does this genre hold such fascination for many adolescents? Anne will discuss three types of Holocaust literature: historical novels, memoirs and diaries; and how they relate to the developmental tasks of teenagers. She examines this literature in the context of important adolescent developmental stages: achieving independence, coming to terms with their bodies, establishing new relations with age-mates, gaining social and economic status and acquiring self-confidence and a values system. Co-presented by the Neuberger’s Frank and Anita Ekstein Holocaust Resource Library; the Association of Jewish Libraries, Ontario Chapter; and PJ Library. Wednesday, 8 November | 7:30 PM Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre Ekstein Resource Library | 4th Floor 4600 Bathurst Street | Toronto 416–635–2883 × 5266

Now, joined by an all-star cast, New Jewish Music pioneer Alan Bern (Brave Old World, Other Europeans) directs a live concert program based on these recordings, creating fresh interpretations and provocative, contemporary arrangements of repertoire from the original Semer Records catalog. This moving concert experience re-creates a golden age of Jewish music, opening a time tunnel between prewar Berlin and today’s vibrant Jewish Music scene. Also featuring Lorin Sklamberg, Sasha Lurje, Daniel Kahn, Fabian Shnedler, Paul Brody, Mark Kovnatsky and Martin Lilich. This event follows in the tradition of previous Ashkenaz HEW presentations of the Ger Mandolin Orchestra and Muzsikás, in which Holocaust remembrance is explored through the living culture and rich musical traditions of pre-Second World War European Jewry. Ashkenaz has received the generous support of Effi Gold and Molly Shainfarber for this program. Tickets $40 (+ service charges). To purchase tickets call Ticketmaster toll-free 1–855–985–2787 or buy online at www.ticketmaster.ca (service charges apply). To avoid service charges, buy tickets in person at the Toronto Centre for the Arts Box office, Tuesday–Saturday 1:00 PM–6:00 PM. This program is generously co-sponsored by Ruth Ekstein & Alan Lechem and Stella & Peter Ekstein with love and in honour of their mother Anita Ekstein for her extraordinary contribution to Holocaust education; and Helen Stollar in memory of all the children killed in the Holocaust. Wednesday, 8 November | 8:00 PM Toronto Centre for the Arts | George Weston Recital Hall 5040 Yonge Street | North York 416–979–9901 | ashkenaz.ca/event/semer-ensemble

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The genre also creates an experience that we might choose to share with hundreds of others in a movie theatre, or with family and friends at home; once again shaping our perception of the film’s topic. With the flexibility of new digital versions, we can now choose to watch films when and where we want—on televisions, computers, or devices. More than ever, the cinematic genre seems destined to play an integral role in how we conceptualise the Holocaust.

Featured FilmS

This year’s theme, Pivotal Moments, is perfectly suited to the cinematic sphere. Arguably, films— whether documentaries, television or feature film productions, have shaped and informed our understanding of the Holocaust like no other genre. This may be partially attributed to the medium itself—large screen, visual representations of the events of the Holocaust have an enormous impact and we remember specific scenes long after the movie is over. My own impressions of the German cities of Berlin and Nuremberg were shaped by the films A Foreign Affair (1948) and Judgement at Nuremberg (1961). Such films have the incredible advantage of allowing viewers to immerse themselves in the subtleties of the genre—imagining colours and textures, interpreting the meaning of shadows created for visual effect and even associating music with specific scenes. Films that appeal to our visual and auditory senses inform our knowledge and our understanding of the themes they portray. 22 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

Our film series consists of seven films which have been instrumental in shaping our understanding of the Holocaust. This septology, opens with the multi award-winning Schindler’s List (1993), shot mainly in black and white. In this sweeping three-hour narrative complex events are revealed through bold cinematography, enveloping the viewer and shaping our understanding of how the Holocaust unfolded. Long after the film is over, people remember and recognise the haunting musical theme performed by Itzhak Perlman. In contrast, the 91-minute Hungarian film 1945 (2017), also shot primarily in black and white, depicts the violent aftermath of the Holocaust. Hungarian villagers are forced to confront their own choices and behaviours, when they encounter Jews returning from concentration camps. Two of our films deal with important judicial events of the postwar era. The People vs Fritz Bauer (2015) reveals the complicated circumstances surrounding the first attempts to bring Nazi war criminals to justice. The award-winning Labyrinth of Lies (2014) depicts the conspiracy of silence that enveloped German institutions intent on concealing the crimes of National Socialism. The final three films in our series offer nuanced perspectives, not only on the historiography of the Holocaust, but also on its trans-generation and trans-national effects. In Defiant Requiem (2012) we encounter a new understanding of the term ‘spiritual resistance.’ Secrets of Survival (2017) reveals very personal, pivotal moments of familial histories as descendants seek to uncover the unspoken past. In What our Fathers Did (2015), we dramatically encounter how the legacy of being Nazi perpetrator descendants shapes and informs the protagonists’ lives. Of course, there are many other important cinematic moments that could not be included in our film series. We hope that these programs, like all the components of HEW 2017, will inspire you to seek out other films and contributions that add to our collective understanding of the Holocaust, an event that continues to challenge the very foundation of our civilisation. Dr. Carson Phillips is Managing Director of the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. All films in the Neuberger Featured Film Series are free and registration is required.


Featured FilmS

Photograph by Lenke Szilagyi. Courtesy of Katapultfilm.

Photo still from scene in 1945


Featured FilmS

Schindler’s List (1993, 185 minutes)

Steven Spielberg’s epic film garnered seven Oscars in 1994 and a bevy of other awards upon its release. Frequently cited by media specialists as one of the most influential films in bringing the subject of the Holocaust into the public sphere, Schindler’s List has become a classic with audiences around the world. Shot almost entirely in black and white, a dramatic stylistic decision, it ushered in a new era of Holocaust representation in cinema culture. It shaped public conceptualisation of the Holocaust across generations and continents. Following the critical and box office success of the film, Spielberg founded the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation with the goal of recording as many testimonies of Holocaust survivors as possible. Now known as the USC Shoah Foundation, it is a leader not only in archiving and preserving oral testimony but also in pioneering digital technologies to ensure the use of recorded testimony far into the future.

Labyrinth of Lies (Im Labyrinth des Schweigens) (2014, 124 minutes)

Set in Germany, 15 years after the end of the Second World War, a young public prosecutor encounters a conspiracy of silence as he attempts to uncover the truth about Auschwitz, and the extent to which ordinary Germans were involved. Only the Prosecutor General, Fritz Bauer, encourages the young prosecutor in his quest to bring Nazi war criminals to justice. This award-winning film directed by Giulio Ricciarelli is riveting in its portrayal of the complexities of life in postwar West Germany, a pivotal period in coming to terms with the National Socialist past. Dr. Carolyn Kay, professor of modern German History at Trent University, will contextualise the film and answer questions. Advanced registration required at hew2017-labyrinthoflies.eventbrite.ca.

The film will include a short introduction by a member of the Neuberger education team.

This program is generously sponsored by Naomi Rifkind Mansell & David Mansell and family in honour and recognition of Joyce Rifkind.

Light refreshments will be served; kashruth observed. Advanced registration required at schindlerslisthew2017.eventbrite.ca.

MONDAY, 6 NOVEMBER | 1:00 PM CINEPLEX ODEON | Canada Square 2190 Yonge Street | Toronto | 416–631–5689

This program is generously sponsored by Frieda & Larry Torkin and family in memory of Jennie & Frank Krystal. MONDAY, 30 OCTOBER | 1:00 PM NEUBERGER HOLOCAUST EDUCATION CENTRE 4600 BATHURST STREET 4TH FLOOR | TORONTO | 416–631–5689

Defiant Requiem: Voices Of Resistance (2012, 85 minutes)

Murry Sidlin is the creator/conductor of Defiant Requiem: The Live Performance, which inspired the documentary. He introduces the film and contextualises the circumstances surrounding its creation. Advanced registration required at hew2017-defiantrequiem.eventbrite.ca or by calling 905–771–5526. Co-presented by Beit Rayim Synagogue in partnership with Town of Richmond Hill. This program is generously sponsored by The David and Rose Brown Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation. SUNDAY, 5 NOVEMBER | 7:30 PM RICHMOND HILL CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 10268 YONGE STREET | RICHMOND HILL

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Image courtesy of Partisan Pictures and The Defiant Requiem Foundation.

Murry Sidlin’s poignant documentary re-imagines the way in which resistance and resiliency are understood. He deftly and sensitively recounts the story of how Rafael Schächter, a talented Czech-Jewish musician deported to Theresienstadt, worked to lead a performance of Verdi’s Requiem inside the camp. For the 150 concentration camp inmates who performed the Requiem 16 times between 1943 and 1944, music was an act of spiritual resistance to the degradation thrust upon them by the Nazis. Maestro Sidlin’s inspired documentary memorialises Rafael Schächter and his choir, ensuring that subsequent generations understand the power of the arts and music to inspire humanity during the darkest of times.


Featured FilmS

Burghart Klaussner as Dr. Fritz Bauer in The People vs Fritz Bauer.

Secrets Of Survival (2017, 60 minutes)

The heartfelt account of two families whose quests to discover the truth behind closely guarded family secrets leads them on journeys across continents. Malka Rosenbaum’s parents survived the Holocaust in hiding in Poland. As a university student growing up in Toronto, she learned that she was not truly an only child; her parents had a daughter before the Holocaust. Jürgen Ulloth discovers that his father, a German veteran of the Second World War, is not his biological father. The discovery of these familial secrets reflects a deeper understanding not only about oneself but also about the reverberations of the Holocaust and the Second World War across generations and across continents. Following the screening, Martin Himel and Malka Rosenbaum will discuss their roles in the production of the film. Advanced registration required at secretsofsurvivalhew2017.eventbrite.ca. Photo courtesy of Cohen Media Group.

This program is generously sponsored by the Rapoport and Rosenthal families in honour of Mania Rapoport and in memory of Jack Rapoport, both Holocaust survivors. MONDAY, 6 NOVEMBER | 7:30 PM BETH DAVID SYNAGOGUE 55 YEOMANS ROAD | TORONTO 416–633–5500

The People Vs Fritz Bauer (Der Staat gegen Fritz Bauer) (2015, 105 minutes)

This multi-award winning historical drama directed by Lars Kraume details the story of Fritz Bauer, the man who brought high-ranking German Nazi criminal Adolf Eichmann to justice. Based on real people and events, the film explores the challenges that Bauer, a German Jew, serving as an attorney general in West Germany in 1957 encountered. Tasked with tracking down former Nazi officials, he is increasingly thwarted by those around him who are still sympathetic to National Socialism. Among the host of awards the film received are six German Film Awards, a German Screen Actors Award, and the Audience Award at the 2016 Philadelphia Jewish Film Festival. Following the screening, Dr. Rebecca Wittmann, Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto, will conduct a talk back with the audience. Advanced registration required at thepeoplevsfritzbauerhew2017.eventbrite.ca. This program is generously sponsored by Sally & Mark Zigler in honour of their parents Fanny & Bernard Dov Laufer and Etty & Salo Zigler. TUESDAY, 7 NOVEMBER | 1:00 PM TIFF BELL LIGHTBOX 350 KING STREET WEST | TORONTO 416–631–5689

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Featured FilmS

What Our Fathers Did

1945

(2017, 91 minutes)

Hungarian film director Ferenc Török received the Béla Balázs Award, a state recognition for outstanding achievement in filmmaking. Török is a member of the European Film Academy. He will introduce the film and be available to answer questions post-screening. Advanced registration required at 1945filmhew2017.eventbrite.ca. This program is generously sponsored by the Consulate General of Hungary in Toronto; by Morris, Louis and Garry Greenbaum and family; and by Joyce & Aaron Rifkind and family. TUESDAY, 7 NOVEMBER | 7:30 PM BETH TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE 3080 BAYVIEW AVENUE | TORONTO 416–221–3433

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What Our Fathers Did: A Nazi Legacy (2015, 96 minutes)

Niklas Frank and Horst von Wächter, each the son of high ranking Nazi officers, are the focus of this haunting documentary directed by David Evans. Their attempts to reconcile their fathers’ complicity in the Holocaust, each of whom was directly involved in the mass murders of Jews, is explored in discussion with Franco-British human rights lawyer Philippe Sands. The film was the recipient of the Avner Shalev Yad Vashem Chairman’s Award at the 2015 Jerusalem Film Festival. Dr. Paula Draper will introduce the film and be available to answer questions after the screening. HEW will officially launch on November 2 in conversation with Niklas Frank. See page 8 for more information. Advanced registration required at whatourfathersdidhew2017.eventbrite.ca. Generously sponsored by the Sam & Gitta Ganz Family Foundation, proud supporters of the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre and the important work being done towards making the world a better place. WEDNESDAY, 8 NOVEMBER | 1:00 PM BARBARA FRUM LIBRARY 20 COVINGTON ROAD | TORONTO 416–395–5440

Photo by Sam Hardy. Courtesy of What Our Fathers Did and Wildgaze Films.

The cinematic adaptation of Gábor T Szántó’s short story Homecoming is co-produced by the Hungarian Film Fund and by the Claims Conference (New York). Award-winning director Ferenc Török poignantly captures a pivotal moment in the history of the Holocaust in Hungary when villagers must confront their past actions during the Second World War. As the narrative unfolds, the return of two Orthodox Jewish men upsets the order of the village with far reaching consequences. Some villagers fear that more survivors will return, while others fear they will have to return property and items from Jewish homes. Filmed in black and white, the result is a haunting account of the immediate postwar period in Hungary that also played out in other parts of Europe.


Young Professional Programs

Engaging, dynamic programs for young adults in their 20s and 30s around topics relevant to this generation’s understanding of the Holocaust. Become part of our community through participation in programs and discover what it means to be an active leader for this ongoing legacy.

The Memory Kitchen: Exploring the Post-Holocaust Period through Food and Memory Holocaust survivors arrived in Canada with little more than their memories. Upon building new lives in Toronto, cooking and baking recipes learned before the Holocaust tied survivors to their lost families while providing meaningful connections for their children. Join us for a conversation between food writer Emma Waverman and Holocaust survivor Rose Lipszyc about the power of food and memory with a short cooking demonstration. Rose Lipszyc grew up in Lublin, Poland and vividly remembers the succulent dishes her mother lovingly prepared for Shabbat and the holidays. She graciously shares her family recipes with the audience. Through this personal encounter with Jewish food, Rose connects us to the timelessness of the power of food to invoke memories of pre-Holocaust Jewish life, the family hearth and to the fact that the Holocaust did not, and could not break the spirit of the Jewish tradition. Emma Waverman is a writer, reporter and author. She is the food columnist on CBC Radio Here and Now where she talks food trends, stories and recipes. She shares the family love of food with a column in the Globe and Mail that she coauthors with her mother Lucy Waverman. Emma is well-known for her opinionated writing and sense of humour, as well as her solid reporting and interview skills. Her work covers food and food culture, lifestyle, travel and parenting. Registration required. Register online at thememorykitchenhew2017.eventbrite.ca. Thursday, 16 November | 6:30 PM Chef Maxine Knight’s Food Studio 510 Eglinton Avenue West | Toronto | 416–635–2883 × 5107

Bay Street Breakfast for Young Professionals

Mein Kampf in the Public Domain

Image by Michael Rajzman for the Neuberger.

In response to Mein Kampf (1925) entering the public domain, Munich’s Institute for Contemporary History produced a 2,000-page, two volume critical edition to dispel the myth and counteract the antisemitic contents of the original version. The resulting text contains approximately 3,500 annotations and is intended to lend criticism and context to the edition. Join Dr. Roman Töppel, co-editor of the scholarly edition, for an insightful look into how and why this new publication came about, and what it means to counteract one of the most notorious texts in the public domain. RSVP to Stikeman Elliott Events at SEvents@stikeman.com. Space is limited for this event. Upon registering, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with the location and final details of the event. If you have not registered for the event ahead of time, nor received an e-mail confirmation, you will unfortunately not be granted access to the event. Friday, 3 November | 7:30 AM Address provided upon confirmation of registration.

Legacy Symposium 2016.

Legacy Symposium for Young Professionals The eighth annual symposium features engaging workshops that invite participants in their 20s and 30s to explore different pivotal moments that have shaped this generation’s understanding of the Holocaust. Sessions will address the topic by presenting innovative research, thoughtprovoking discussions, survivor engagement and new media. Presenters include HEW 2017 Scholar–in–Residence Professor Jeffrey Shandler, Dr. Roman Töppel, Matthew Shoychet director of the documentary The Last Nazi Trials (2018), Lakehead University’s Professor Valerie Hébert and more special guests. In honour of Canada 150, this year’s Legacy Symposium keynote presentation will explore the experiences of individuals who fled war-torn countries to find refuge in Toronto. Panelists include a Holocaust survivor, a survivor of the Rwandan Genocide and a recently-arrived Syrian refugee. They will discuss their immigration and integration into Canadian society sharing challenges, successes and achievements. Through these themes, the audience will gain a more fulsome understanding of how Canada has transformed since the late 1940s into the diverse multicultural country it is today. Now, more than ever, it is important to hear these messages of hope and positivity as their stories compel us to reflect on our roles as active Canadian citizens. A symposium for people in their 20s and 30s. The program is free of charge. Light lunch will be served; Kashruth observed. Registration required. Register online at legacysymposiumhew2017.eventbrite.ca. The Legacy Symposium is generously sponsored by Honey & Barry Sherman, Apotex Foundation. They are proud to support the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in their important work towards making the world a better place. The reception is generously sponsored by Sylvia & Edward Fisch in honour of their children and grandchildren: Sherri, Darryl, Michelle, Randall, Adam, Marla, Zackary, Rachel, Aaron and Sidra; and Dorothy & Pinchas Gutter in memory of his twin sister, Sabina. The workshops are generously sponsored by Eleanor & Martin Maxwell in memory of his sisters, Josephine and Erna Meisels who died in the Holocaust. Additional support is provided in memory of Cesia & Carl Mahler by their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. SUNDAY, 5 NOVEMBER | 11:00 AM Ryerson University Oakham House | 55 Gould Street | Toronto | 416–631–5689

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“it’s so important to remember that hate, unlike other feelings or dispositions, does not need much to grow” The Neuberger’s Managing Director Dr. Carson Phillips sat down with HEW 2017 Educator-inResidence Dr. Kori Street to explore the innovative educational programming being carried out by Kori’s team at the USC Shoah Foundation, the evolution of oral testimony in Holocaust education and how recorded testimony can inspire future generations of learners to make a difference in the world. The Neuberger is proud to support the USC Shoah Foundation’s work in the field of preserving survivor testimony through our partnerships with the Canadian Collections and New Dimensions in Testimony. Carson Phillips: Kori, you’ve had a remarkable career in education—nationally and internationally. How did you become the Senior Director of Programs at the USC Shoah Foundation? Kori Street: My staff might answer that with: A lot of sleepless nights and more than my fair share of Diet Cokes. I left a wonderful job at a university in Calgary to take on the role of the Director of Education at USC Shoah Foundation not because I wanted to avoid snow shoveling, but because as a scholar of teaching and learning I was blown away by the potential for testimony-based education to make an impact on students’ attitudes and behaviours. As an historian, I was a trained skeptic and when I was shown the deep research they were

28 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

doing I was convinced by the evidence. We don’t just say we are changing students, we demonstrate it. And when I got to California (where the temperature was 19 above when I had just left 19 below) I found myself among a staff of committed, bright educators who were innovating, challenging, learning, teaching and above all making a difference. In short, I found an intellectual and administrative home. CP: One of your educational priorities has been the development of the IWitness platform—an activity- based digital resource for students with accesses to over 1,500 video testimonies. Can you tell us why it is such an important resource for teachers and students? KS: The goal of IWitness is to motivate students, through the use of testimonies from the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive to act responsibly and ultimately to help them uphold important values. These include justice, equality, diversity, tolerance and how best to counter attitudes and acts of hatred. And we’ve seen through our evaluation efforts that the power of first person audiovisual resources does have tremendous impact on students. In this current political climate, it’s so important to remember that hate, unlike other feelings or dispositions, does not need much to grow; something that we are learning too well in every locale we are working. Ignorance, fear and opportunity provide marvelous conditions for it to take root and spread. In the 30s in Germany, the Communists and the Socialists were so busy fighting each other that they missed the real threat that the rise of the Nazis posed. One might suggest that a similar dynamic is taking shape as our political leaders vie for power, oblivious to—or even exploitive of—the growing resentment between groups of people on the ground. In both cases, the result was and is a prolifera-


educator-in-residence

tion of fear, hate and a loss of democracy and decency. We are in danger of falling into the same trap when we set up a dynamic of “us” and “them.” CP: IWitness has an international reach, being used in Australia, Hungary, and Poland. What makes it so popular with teachers and students? KS: At the core of its international popularity is the universal nature and power of testimony. The voices in the archive were taken in dozens of countries in dozens of languages. There is such rich content from so many different voices that it makes sense that teachers around the globe can see the opportunities of having a platform like this at their fingertips. Secondly, the flexibility of the site truly offers teachers and students so many engaging ways to make meaning of these voices from the past. Whether a literature teacher wishes to teach about poetry, or a freshman seminar educator is looking for a service learning project for students, there are activities on the Activity Library ‘shelf’ that can be easily adapted for their local context with the tools on the site. CP: As educators, we are increasingly being asked to demonstrate the effectiveness/impact of our programs. How have you measured the impact of IWitness? KS: To date, we have evaluated IWitness’ impact with over 1,200 students around the world. But we are also lucky enough to see the changes in individual students that reinforce what the data is telling us. Evaluation findings show that IWitness helps students become responsible citizens contributing to positive social change, which posits that through engagement with testimony, students will develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes that make them more committed to becoming responsible participants in society. That manifests in individual students in different ways—demonstrating their civic creativity by organizing groups at their schools that are based on respect and countering hatred; some of the amazing student work we see in IWitness, or shared through social media; talking to teachers and parents who believe that working with these testimonies in IWitness is changing their kid’s lives. CP: Can you share with us what you are working on next for educators? KS: This is the first time we are offering virtual reality (VR) educational resources. Through our space in IWitness called, IWitness360, we are bringing together individual testimonies and virtual reality films to promote empathy, among other positive educational outcomes. Emerging VR research points to VR films as having the potential to increase empathy, so it seems like a natural extension to start seeing how each of these might work together. New IWitness360 activities are being developed to explore the combined power of testimony and VR to increase

empathy and achieve other Social Emotional Learning outcomes. You also know and have experienced first-hand our program, New Dimensions in Testimony. That will soon be coming into IWitness360 space as well. This cutting-edge interactive testimony project that allows viewers to have a conversation with a recorded image of a Holocaust survivor will soon be available for educators to access with their students, alongside supporting educator scaffolds and classroom resources. CP: Finally, as a Canadian living in the US, is there anything that you miss about Canada particularly? KS: I introduced my colleagues to a number of Canadian delicacies and linguistic nuances and they might tell you that it must be the easy access to Nanaimo Bars that I miss the most! There is much that I miss about Canada and I actually listen to CBC radio in the morning when I wake up—which can really get confusing with the weather reports depending on which station I stream. It reminds me how important it is to think about different perspectives—about the importance of cooperation and multilateralism. It is a foundation of our educational methodology. And the costs of not thinking about other’s perspectives and not working together is so strongly evidenced in the 54,000 voices in the Visual History Archive. And I miss the beer. Mill Street Organic and Steamwhistle to be precise.

Dr. Kori Street is the Senior Director of Programs and Operations at USC Shoah Foundation—The Institute for Visual History and Education. She provides strategic leadership on the institute’s testimony based programming, including the award-winning IWitness. Kori is dedicated to finding ways to use the power of the testimonies to effectively develop in young people the knowledge, skills, capacities and disposition to change the world by inspiring their civic curiosity, courage and commitment to act. She is the executive producer and pedagogical director of Lala, a testimony-based animated VR project. After completing a Masters in the History of Education and Gender/Feminism at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education/University of Toronto, Kori received her PhD in history from the University of Victoria in 2001. She served as a Canadian delegate to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, and is currently a board member of the Association of Holocaust Organizations. HEW 2017 Educator-in-Residence is generously sponsored by Robin & Eran Hayeems.

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Educator Workshop and Student Symposium

Educators explore resources at the 2016 Professional Development Seminar.

The Neuberger’s Annual Professional Development Seminar for Educators

Students speak with Holocaust survivor at 2016 symposium.

Join us for this unique opportunity to further develop your Holocaust education knowledge and inquiry-based learning skills with Educatorin-Residence Dr. Kori Street and the Neuberger’s Education Coordinator Michelle Fishman.

Exploring the Evidence: Bearing witness to the greatest crime ever committed by architects

As the Senior Director of Programs with the USC Shoah Foundation, Kori develops innovative educational resources and programming designed to effectively use recorded testimony with students and teachers. Michelle Fishman has worked extensively with first-person and recorded testimony to engage students in thinking critically about the complex issues of the Holocaust. The seminar is open to middle school, high school and community college educators. Participants will receive complimentary resources. Breakfast and lunch included. Advance registration required. Free. Registration required at holocaustcentre.com/EducatorsStudents/Educator-Development Generously sponsored by Tammy & Jerry Balitsky in memory of their parents, Holocaust survivors Esther & Philip Balitsky and Luba & Icek Muskat. HEW 2017 Educatorin-Residence is generously sponsored by Robin & Eran Hayeems. Wednesday, 1 November 9:00 AM–3:30 PM | Lipa Green Centre Tamari Hall | 4600 Bathurst Street Toronto | 416–631–5689

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37th Annual Student Symposium on the Holocaust

This year’s annual High School Student Symposium on the Holocaust features a comprehensive exploration of The Evidence Room exhibit currently on view at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM). The installation at the ROM was co-curated by a team from the University of Waterloo School of Architecture including O’Donovan Director Anne Bordeleau, architecture professors Donald McKay and Robert Jan van Pelt, Waterloo alumna and project manager Piper Bernbaum and students. The exhibit consists of lifesized reconstructions and casts of key pieces of architectural evidence (a gas column and a gas-tight hatch, a gas chamber door, blueprints, architects’ letters, contractors’ bills and photographs). The exhibit provides irrefutable evidence of the deadly role that architects played in enabling the Holocaust. A keynote presentation will contextualise the role of Auschwitz-Birkenau in the Holocaust and prepare students to engage with this historically significant exhibition. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to discover, uncover and explore the history of Holocaust through first-person accounts and primary sources in specialized, interactive workshops. Reserve online at holocaustcentre.com/Educators-Students/Student-Symposium. Teachers who register will be emailed pre-visit materials and receive resource materials at the symposium. To avoid disappointment, register early. Generously supported by May & Fred z”l Karp and family. They have been long-time, dedicated supporters of the Neuberger’s signature student symposium. A forum to educate current and future generations on the history and legacy of the Holocaust, it continues to be a meaningful experience for the Karp family. Fred Karp passed away on December 10, 2016. He attended last year’s symposium and found the program extremely moving. Fred’s children and wife, along with the Neuberger would like to honour Fred’s memory by dedicating the 2017 Student Symposium to him. Choose between November 21, November 23, OR 28 Registration at 9:00 AM | Program from 9:30 AM–2:30 PM Royal Ontario Museum | 100 Queen’s Park 416–631–5689 | Toronto

Professional Development Seminar image courtesy of Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. 2016 Student Symposium image by Michael Rajzman for the Neuberger.

In cooperation with the USC Shoah Foundation, the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre presents a one-day professional development seminar that equips teachers with valuable digital literacy skills to incorporate testimony into their curriculum and provides new resources for students in the classroom.


Testimony and technology USC Shoah Foundation’s New Dimensions in Testimony Returns to the Neuberger Discover the future of Holocaust survivor testimony today. The Neuberger presents its second pilot of New Dimensions in Testimony, groundbreaking technology that allows visitors to converse with Holocaust survivors, now and into the future. Visitors will now have the opportunity to access four survivor testimonies. Visit the Neuberger to engage with this exciting and innovative form of Holocaust remembrance and education. Beginning September 2017. Book your visit today or contact the Neuberger for more information: neuberger@ujafed.org or 416–631–5689. The Canadian Collections. Visit the Neuberger’s Frank and Anita Ekstein Holocaust Resource Library to access over 54,000 Holocaust survivor testimonies from the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive including the newly added Canadian Collections featuring over 1,200 Canadian Holocaust survivor testimonies. Access select theme based clips from the Canadian Collections on the Neuberger’s latest online educational resource: intheirownwords.net.

New Dimensions in Testimony at the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre is made possible by the generous support of Michael & Janette Diamond. “The work being done at the Neuberger is outstanding, and will only get better with the introduction of new technology and the build-out of its space. This work has always been critical, and even more so now, as we sadly reflect on the passing of many of our remaining survivors. The continuation of their stories, properly digitized and accessible in many new formats via new technology, in partnership with the USC Shoah Foundation which is leading the world in this area, is so worthy of our investment and brings us both satisfaction and some degree of pride at contributing to this initiative. We are so pleased to be honouring the memories of Janette’s parents, Mila and Jack Penn, in this important investment in the Neuberger.” —Michael and Janette Diamond

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“While the project is truly national in scope, it also represents a new milestone in making accessible some of the earliest recorded testimonies in Canada”

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In 2016, the Neuberger launched the Canadian Collection of Holocaust survivor testimonies in partnership with the Montreal Holocaust Museum, and the USC Shoah Foundation. At the core of the Neuberger’s mandate is ensuring the accessibility of first-person Holocaust narratives now, and into the future. By incorporating this collection into the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive, the Neuberger has reached a milestone in preserving recorded testimony of survivors in our local and national community for future generations. The Neuberger’s Education Coordinator, Michelle Fishman, sat down with the project principals—Alice Herscovitch, Executive Director of the Montreal Holocaust Museum and Dr. Carson Phillips, Managing Director of the Neuberger, to discuss the genesis of this project and its implications for Holocaust education in Canada.

Michelle Fishman: How did this project come about and what made you decide to work together? Alice Herscovitch: We first spoke seriously about embarking on this project in summer 2012. We proposed it as the signature project for Canada’s International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) Chairmanship year. The project entailed many steps: acquiring funding (in two phases from the Government of Canada, from private donors), building partnerships across the country, negotiating with the USC Shoah Foundation, developing clear goals, defining tools and a timeline, and then actually doing the work. It has been a pleasure, very rewarding and much more impactful in terms of quality and reach, to work with the Neuberger. Carson Phillips: Right from the beginning, there was a very natural synergy between our centres. As stewards of this remarkable collection of recordings, there was a sense of urgency to preserve and make them accessible for educational purposes as they represent the diversity of experiences in the Holocaust. The Canadian Chair year of IHRA was the perfect catalyst to achieve this goal. MF: In addition to Montreal, Toronto and Los Angeles, what is the actual scope of this project? AH: We were able to develop partnerships with collection holders or Holocaust education centres in Ottawa, Winnipeg, Calgary, and Edmonton, in addition to the three Montreal collection holders and the two in Toronto! We wanted to develop a truly Canadian collection so we reached out to all organizations that had recorded oral histories. Ultimately, the testimonies span Canada in its entirety, from Newfoundland to B.C. as the recordings from the Alex Dworkin Canadian Jewish Archives (in Montreal) were conducted from coast to coast. CP: While the project is truly national in scope, it also represents a new milestone in making accessible some of the earliest recorded testimonies in Canada. The Neuberger’s own collection was recorded between the mid 1980s to the early 1990s under the guidance of historian Dr. Paula Draper. For some people who recorded, it was the first time they were describing their experi-


Canadian Collections

ences during the Holocaust, and the testimonies are rich in detail and poignantly recounted. MF: So how long did the project take- from start to finish? AH: It seems strange to consider, but it took a full five years. CP: And of course now that the collection has officially launched, we will continue to explore new ways of working with it; for teachers, students and the general public. MF: Why was this project important to carry out? AH: Well, before 2012, at the Montreal Holocaust Museum, we had determined that we had a very precious legacy in our hands. Recorded survivor testimony is a remarkable means to reach and educate people. In telling their life stories, Holocaust survivors are able to communicate the consequences of genocide on human beings, on communities, on a way of life and culture. Holocaust education which includes both a historical and clearly pedagogical component, as well as the emotional and engaging interaction of hearing a witness, is much more complete and impactful. As the survivor community decreases in size, and as survivors age, we are able through digital means, knowledge of the collections, editing and inclusion of pedagogical materials, to ensure that this legacy will educate and reach hundreds of thousands now, and in future generations. CP: The collection represents the individuals who painstakingly told of their experiences during the Holocaust, and the incredible amount of work carried out by Dr. Draper and the dedicated team of volunteers who conducted the interviews that make up the Toronto collection. Now their voices, their experiences are accessible through the access portal at the Ekstein Library at the Neuberger and in vignettes online at our micro-site intheirownwords.net. Partnering with the USC Shoah Foundation, the international leader in digital preservation and accessibility ensures that this Canadian Collection will remain available in perpetuity. MF: What opportunities does the collection hold for education? AH: We have created an unparalleled resource of Canadian Holocaust survivor oral history. The project and its outcomes are national in scope and global in bringing together all possible collections. Together, we elevated the remarkable educational potential of this precious legacy. We have increased the relevance and universal appreciation of Canadian Holocaust survivor oral history.

AH: We have already begun to harness the potential of this digital content by creating new educational tools, a responsive website dedicated to oral history, video clips on our (Montreal and Toronto) websites, the potential to create mass appeal video clips and disseminate through Social Media—all these have enormous educational impact and reach. The Canadian collection is a model for other communities struggling with the issues of transmission of memory and public history, as the survivor community is less able to speak. It will inspire youth and adults to act in the face of antisemitism, denial, prejudice, hate, racism and state persecution. MF: In working with the collection over this time period, what did you learn about it and about the people who chose to record their experiences? AH: The collection is incredibly rich and diverse. The resiliency of these individuals to cope with great tragedy, and then rebuild their lives in Canada is certainly evident in their testimonies. There are also commonalities such as their commitment to combat prejudice and hate in all forms. CP: Absolutely. Each testimony enriches our understanding. The wealth of experiences in relation to arriving in Canada, integrating into Canadian civil society and learning English or French adds tremendously to our collective knowledge. And it has proven to be extremely popular with newcomers to Canada who share common understandings of what it is like to begin a new life in Canada. AH: The guidelines for use of oral history and the classroom activities we have created are new, and will be used for decades to come. Public access to Canadians is incredible. MF: So, what’s next for the Canadian Collection? Does the partnership continue beyond the launch of this project? AH: I think it does, and I think it has. Working together closely, respecting our different strengths and combined expertise, has led Montreal and Toronto to partner on other programs. There will be other initiatives! CP: We are developing new opportunities to further enhance the partnership between our two centres. Contributing to effective Holocaust education is a hallmark of both our centres and I am looking forward to future endeavours.

CP: The unified collection serves to perpetuate Holocaust remembrance, enriches historical knowledge and comprehension through the human component of history, fosters understanding of its tragic consequences on individual lives, families and communities and serves to educate future generations of Canadians both about the link with Canadian history, and with more contemporary experiences of genocide and crimes against humanity.

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It’s a free country where one can live a peaceful and a modern life. One need not compromise one’s principles. Elly Gotz

A country where you can breathe freedom, to me it’s only Canada. Pinchas Gutter

I love Canada very much because I was in a free country finally. Judy Lysy

Canada is the greatest country in the world . . . It’s been good to me. It’s helped me in every way I can possibly think of. Edward Fisch

In celebration of Canada 150, the Neuberger is proud to honour Canadian Holocaust survivors for their contributions to this great country and share their feelings towards the place they are grateful to call home. In the decade that followed the end of the Second World War, Canada opened its doors to nearly 40,000 Holocaust survivors. Fleeing war-torn Europe, some sought refuge, while others came to be closer to family. For those who had experienced such devastating loss, starting over presented a number of challenges including learning English, finding work and adapting to a new way of life. Despite these difficulties, the postwar immigration of Holocaust survivors became a watershed moment in Canadian Jewish history. In cities and towns across the country, Holocaust survivors rebuilt their lives and contributed to the rich fabric of Canadian society.

I love this country. It embraced me. It let me develop . . . I am very grateful to this country that I am able to live in freedom and in peace. Rose Lipszyc

Slowly, slowly, we became part of the Canadian society, with all its trials and tribulations and wonderful aspects. Judy Weissenberg Cohen

We are grateful to Canada for the opportunity to live and prosper in freedom. Let us never take it for granted, and let us be on guard against the forces that threaten it. Miriam Frankel

While celebrating 150 years of the birth of a nation my heart is filled with gratitude. Canada gave me a place to rebuild my life and follow my dreams. Gerda Frieberg

Canada is wonderful and the best country to live in. As hardworking immigrants, we have achieved and contributed our talents to further improve the desirability to be proud Canadians, especially on this very important anniversary. Howard Chandler

I love Canada and we are very grateful for the opportunity that we had here. Magda Hilf

Every time I am away I am happy to come home because no place is as good as Canada. Anita Ekstein

When I speak to young people I start with the fact that they should pray every day that they live in this country because it is absolutely the best in the world. Alexander Eisen

We arrived as a family of three, now there are 26 of us. Give back to Canada more than you take. Thank you Canada. Edith Gelbard

I’m happy to live in Canada, a land of opportunities. I am happy that my children and grandchildren have all the opportunities to be unafraid. We proudly live as Jews. Esther Fairbloom

I am an 86-year-old Holocaust survivor, living in Canada for nearly 60 years. I am grateful to be a Canadian because this beautiful and safe country gave me the opportunity to rebuild my life in a free society.

Best thing I did was to give Canada to my children. A country where I am not afraid to say: I am a Jew.

Felicia Carmelly

Canada is a wonderful country and I was able to resume a normal life. I am a proud Canadian citizen.

Sally Rosen

Denise Hans

Mark Lane

I thank G-d every day that I could come to Canada, raise my family and build a career. Canada, the magnificent nation that opened its arms to the war-torn orphan that I was, and offered freedom. Hedy Bohm

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canada 150

I’m very fortunate that I decided to come here, because I have a family. I have my kids, my five grandchildren. Sally Eisner

I raised my children very nicely and beautifully; they are all professionals. I gave them everything my heart could give. I have all my pleasure from it. I thank Canada that I had those conditions, that I could do it. George Fox

How can I ever forget the May 5th when the Canadians liberated Holland in 1945; the happiest day of my life. Thank you Canada for giving me freedom twice. I’m a proud Canadian citizen. Claire Baum

Canada gave us the opportunity to pursue our dreams and raise our family in freedom. I’m happy to be Canadian. Eva Meisels

Canada is a country of hope and possibility where everyone can live in real freedom, free from hatred and discrimination. Leslie Meisels

We will forever be grateful to Canada for giving us the opportunity to rebuild our lives in this wonderful country. LOU (LEIZER) HOFFER

I arrived in Canada at age 14 not knowing the meaning of freedom. At age 75 I give lectures about it because I am a proud Canadian. Andy Réti

Life in Canada has been good. Shary Marmor Fine

I think we are very fortunate to live in this country. I have traveled all over the world and it surely is the best. Martin Maxwell

We became Canadian citizens and we have a wonderful life in Canada.

Lenka Weksberg

I had a very, very good life [in Canada]. Joseph Leinburd

It is a country where I can feel free . . . there is no other country like Canada. We need to stand up and guard this freedom we have here. Max Eisen

When we sing at a gathering ‘O Canada,’ my voice is the loudest . . . I am very grateful for Canada for giving us new life. Faigie Libman

When I look around a room it is all colours of the rainbow and all religions. I hope that Canada will be able to maintain that in the future. Gershon Willinger

In the beginning our new life in Canada was difficult for us . . . We were young and healthy and determined to start a new life in this peaceful country far from the troubled world we had experienced.

Canada presents a unique picture as a country where people of countless nationalities and origins strive to create a better future for themselves in a rare display of civil harmony. That impresses me enormously. Leonard Vis

I love Canada because it gave me a new life with opportunities I wouldn’t have had in Europe, especially sending my children to university. Roman Zeigler

Canada is a very good country. People of all different nationalities came to Canada with nothing and built themselves up. Jewish families and Holocaust survivors settled in Toronto with nothing and in many cases, built successful new lives. Manny Langer

Nate Leipciger

I have the opportunity now to speak to many kids about Canada and I keep on saying to them that they should kiss the ground they stand on because this is one of the greatest countries and I am very happy and proud to be living here. Bill Glied

I was orphaned at an early age. I came to Canada, and it was because of that that I was able to fulfill my goals. Mel Goldberg

We will forever be grateful to Canada for allowing us the chance to reestablish ourselves, raise our family and build a happy, successful life in this wonderful country. Nancy and Howard Kleinberg

Canada was a haven for us. We raised three fine kids with university degrees and my husband became a successful businessman. I hope Canada stays the way it is. Helen Yermus

IN MEMORIAM 2016–17 Amek Adler was born in Lublin, Poland in 1928 and grew up in Łódź. After the Nazi occupation in 1939, his family escaped to Warsaw and then to Radom. In 1943, Amek was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau, and from there was eventually deported to Dachau, where his father and one brother perished. He was liberated on April 28, 1945. Amek worked with the Israeli Irgun Tzvai Leumi to help illegal immigrants into Palestine and immigrated to Canada in 1954. His memoir entitled Six Lost Years was published by the Azrieli Foundation in 2017. Amek passed away on April 25, 2017. Chava Kwinta was born in Sosnowiec, Poland in 1930. She survived Wienergraben, GrossRosen and Bergen-Belsen concentration camps along with her sister and aunts. After the Holocaust, Chava moved to Sweden for rehabilitation and then made her way to Israel. She married Mike Kwinta in Israel at the age of 21. In 1963, Chava and Mike immigrated to Toronto to be closer to family. She worked as a nurse at Baycrest, became a Jewish history teacher, and authored her autobiography I’m Still Living (1974). She passed away on November 9, 2016.

We were very happy and very fortunate to come to Canada. Vera Schiff

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Library Programs

Today’s generation will be among the last to experience in-person accounts from those who survived the Holocaust. Central to the educational mandate of Neuberger HEW is access to first-person Holocaust survivor testimony for as long as possible. Neuberger HEW is proud to offer presentations by Holocaust survivor speakers at public libraries across the city. Additionally, we feature authors, films and special guest presenters at our partner venues. Our signature library programs draw audiences from local communities and schools to ensure students and members of the public from across the GTA have access to Holocaust education. Everyone is encouraged to attend these library programs. The Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre gratefully acknowledges members of its Survivor Speakers’ Bureau for their inspired contributions to Holocaust education. For a complete listing of programs with Holocaust survivor testimony and biographies, visit holocausteducationweek.com.

Programs featuring Holocaust survivor authors published by the Azrieli Foundation will include free copies of their memoirs. The Holocaust Survivor Memoirs Program was established by the Azrieli Foundation in 2005 to collect, preserve and share the memoirs and diaries written by survivors of the twentieth-century Nazi genocide of the Jews of Europe who later made their way to Canada. Azrieli published authors include: Nate Leipciger, Eva Meisels, Leslie Meisels, Andy Réti and Kitty Salsberg.

Holocaust survivor Kitty Salsberg will discuss her personal experiences surviving the Budapest Ghetto. Kitty was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1932. She immigrated to Canada in 1948. Wednesday, 1 November | 10:30 AM Maria A. Shchuka Library 1745 Eglinton Avenue West | Toronto 416–394–1000

Holocaust survivor Magda Hilf will speak about her personal experiences surviving forced slave labour and concentration camps, including Auschwitz– Birkenau. Magda was born in Maly Kevesd, Czechoslovakia in 1921. She immigrated to Canada in 1953. Generously sponsored by Wendy & Richard Wengle. Wednesday, 1 November | 1:00 PM Cedarbrae Library 545 Markham Road | Toronto 416–396–8850

Exhibit: The 40 Days of Musa Dagh: Resistance during the Armenian Genocide

Generously sponsored by Sharon & Norman Gottlieb in loving memory of their dear parents Pauline & Josef Krystal. Thursday, 2 November | 10:30 AM Thornhill Community Centre & Library North-Centre Hall | 7755 Bayview Avenue Markham | 905–513–7977 × 7177

Holocaust survivor Pola Goldhar will speak about her experience surviving forced slave labour and concentration camps. Pola was born in Kielce, Poland in 1924. She immigrated to Canada in 1947. Thursday, 2 November | 1:30 PM Don Mills Library 888 Lawrence Avenue East | Toronto 416–395–5710

Children of the Holocaust (2014, 30 minutes)

Based on Franz Werfel’s historical novel The 40 Days of Musa Dagh, this exhibit recounts the acts of resistance of more than 4,000 Armenians against the Ottoman army during the Armenian Genocide. It examines the fate of the Armenian resistance fighters and their descendants. A short documentary film is included in the exhibit.

Join us for a special screening of Children of the Holocaust animated short documentary films created by BBC Learning and Fettle Animation. A Q&A session following the screening will be moderated by Andreas Mayer, the Neuberger’s Austrian Holocaust Memorial Intern (Gedenkdiener, Austrian Service Abroad).

Co-presented by Sara Corning Centre for Genocide Education and the Armenian Genocide Centennial Committee of Canada.

Friday, 3 November | 10:00 AM York Woods Library 1785 Finch Avenue West | Toronto 416–395–5980

Wednesday, November 1: Exhibit opening 6:30 PM On display November 1–9: Monday–Friday 9:00 AM–8:30 PM, Saturday 9:00 AM–5:00 PM, Sunday 1:30 PM–5:00 PM Toronto Reference Library | 3rd Floor 789 Yonge Street | Toronto 416–395–5577

Holocaust survivor Andy Réti will speak about his personal experiences surviving in the Budapest Ghetto. Andy was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1942. In 1956, he immigrated to Canada. Thursday, 2 November | 10:00 AM Caledon Public Library | Caledon East Branch/rFHall Catholic Secondary School | 6500 Old Church Road Caledon East | 905–584–1456

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Holocaust survivor Gerda Frieberg will speak about her personal experiences surviving slave labour and concentration camps. Gerda was born in Upper Silesia, Poland in 1925. She immigrated to Canada in 1953.

Holocaust survivor Edward Fisch will speak about his experiences surviving the Holocaust in Swiss protected homes. Edward was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1933. He immigrated to Canada in 1948. Friday, 3 November | 10:00 AM Beaches Library 2161 Queen Street East | Toronto 416–393–7703

Holocaust survivor Faigie Libman will speak about her personal experiences surviving the Kovno Ghetto, as well as concentration, and slave labour camps. Faigie was born in Kovno, Lithuania in 1934. She and her mother immigrated to Canada in 1948. Friday, 3 November | 11:00 AM Maple Library | 10190 Keele Street Maple | 905–653–7323


Library Programs

Hidden Gold Author Ella Burakowski discusses the riveting story behind her discovery of how her family courageously survived the Second World War and her journey to writing Hidden Gold: A True Story of the Holocaust (2015). Books will be available for purchase and signing following the program. Generously sponsored by Lisa Richman & Steven Kelman in loving memory of her father Joseph Richman, a Hungarian Holocaust survivor. Friday, 3 November | 2:00 PM Riverdale Library 370 Broadview Avenue | Toronto 416–393–7720

Holocaust survivor Alexander Eisen will speak about his experience in the Budapest Ghetto and in hiding. Alexander was born in Vienna, Austria in 1929. He immigrated to Canada in 1952. Sunday, 5 November | 1:30 PM Bathurst Clark Resource Library 900 Clark Avenue West | Thornhill 905–653–7323

Holocaust survivor Howard Chandler will speak about his experience in forced labour and concentration camps. Howard was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1928. He immigrated to Canada in 1947 from England as a war-orphan. Generously sponsored by Stephen Greenberg in honour of Elsa & Howard Chandler and family. Monday, 6 November | 10:00 AM Annette Street Library 145 Annette Street | Toronto 416–393–7692

Holocaust survivor Miriam Frankel will speak about her personal experiences surviving a ghetto and the Auschwitz–Birkenau death camp. Miriam was born in Dunajska Streda, Czechoslovakia in 1927 and raised in Italy. She immigrated to Canada in 1948. Monday, 6 November | 11:00AM Fort York Library 190 Fort York Boulevard | Toronto 416–393–6240

Holocaust survivor Eva Meisels will speak about her experiences surviving a ghetto, in hiding and living under false papers. Eva was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1939. She immigrated to Canada in 1956. Generously sponsored by Carole & Jay Sterling in memory of Ralph F. Dankner. Monday, 6 November | 1:30 PM Locke Public Library 3083 Yonge Street | Toronto 416–393–7730

Holocaust survivor Rose Lipszyc will speak about her experiences surviving under false papers and working in a labour factory. Rose was born in Lublin, Poland in 1929. She immigrated to Canada in 1952. Monday, 6 November | 2:00 PM Lillian H. Smith Library 239 College Street | Toronto 416–393–7746

Holocaust survivor Edith Gelbard will speak about her experiences hiding in an orphanage in France. Edith was born in Vienna, Austria in 1932. She immigrated to Canada in 1958. This program will be conducted in French.

My Story Matters: The Power of Story

Tuesday, 7 November | 10:00 AM Toronto Reference Library Hinton Theatre 789 Yonge Street | Toronto | 416–395–5577

HEW 2017 Educator-in-Residence Dr. Kori Street demonstrates how the recorded testimonies of Holocaust survivors have the power to strengthen our human connection and inspire us to make the world better. Through listening to personal stories told by survivors and witnesses of genocide, students will deepen their understanding of how testimony counters stories of hate that isolate and dehumanize.

Holocaust survivor Leslie Meisels will speak about his personal experiences surviving ghettos, slave labour and concentration camps. Leslie was born in Nádudvar, Hungary in 1927. He immigrated to Canada in 1967.

HEW 2017 Educator-in-Residence is generously sponsored by Robin & Eran Hayeems.

Andy Réti will speak about his personal experiences surviving the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 36. Tuesday, 7 November | 1:00 PM Runnymede Library 2178 Bloor Street West | Toronto 416–393–7697

The Short Life of Anne Frank (2001, 30 minutes)

Incorporating quotes from her diary, historical photographs and excerpts from rare archival film, this short documentary poignantly recounts the life of Anne Frank. Told in the context of the Second World War and the Holocaust, it includes the only known film recording of Anne taken in Amsterdam in 1941. For students who have, or are currently reading Anne Frank’s diary, this film provides concise historical context. Generously sponsored by Aubrie Appel and Charlotte Tessis in memory of their mother Renee Appel, their grandparents Selma and Oscar Lang, their uncle Siegfried Lang (Holocaust survivors) and their father Charles Appel (Holocaust liberator); by Gail Appel in memory of her parents Sylvia and Robert Leach; and by Ken Tessis in memory of his parents Dena and Joseph Tessis. Tuesday, 7 November | 1:30 PM College/Shaw Library 766 College Street | Toronto 416–393–7668

Holocaust survivor Gerda Frieberg will speak about her personal experiences surviving slave labour and concentration camps. Gerda was born in Upper Silesia, Poland in 1925. She immigrated to Canada in 1953. Generously sponsored by Reesa & Avrom Sud in memory of David Sud whose family perished in the Holocaust and in memory of Louis Hotz. Tuesday, 7 November | 1:30 PM Oakwood Village Library 341 Oakwood Avenue | Toronto 416–394–1040

Tuesday, 7 November | 1:00 PM Dufferin Clark Library 1441 Clark Avenue West | Thornhill 905–653–7323

Monday, 6 November | 10:30 AM Sanderson Public Library 327 Bathurst Street | Toronto 416–393–7653

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Library Programs

Holocaust survivor Denise Hans will speak about her experiences in hiding. Denise was born in Paris, France in 1938. She immigrated to Canada in 1956. Wednesday, 8 November | 10:30 AM Brentwood Library 36 Brentwood Road North | Toronto 416–394–5240

Holocaust survivor Hedy Bohm will speak about her experience surviving a ghetto, forced slave labour and concentration camps. Hedy was born in Oradea, Romania in 1928. In 1948, Hedy and her husband immigrated to Canada. Wednesday, 8 November | 1:00 PM Ansley Grove Public Library 350 Ansley Grove Road | Woodbridge 905–653–7323

Porraimos: Europe’s Gypsies in the Holocaust (2002, 56 minutes)

In this documentary director Alexandra Isles chronicles the persecution of the Roma community during the Holocaust; also known as Porraimos or “the devouring.” It exposes how eugenics was used to persecute the Roma, resulting in their segregation, sterilization and murder. Presented by Facing History and Ourselves. Wednesday, 8 November | 1:00 PM Flemingdon Park Library 29 St. Dennis Drive | Toronto 416–395–5820

Responsibility and Witness for the Future Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service (AHMS) is a recognized alternative to Austria’s compulsory national military service and was founded in 1992. In Austria, all young men must serve a mandatory 6-month period in the military. However, some forms of alternative service may be substituted. Each year, 40-50 young men go abroad to work at Holocaust education centres. Andreas Mayer will discuss his reason for choosing Holocaust memorial service. Generously sponsored by Shawn, Ellen, Alexa and Jordan Marr in loving memory of Gerard Marr, Ina & Bernard Gurofsky and Murray Albert. Always in our thoughts and hearts. Wednesday, 8 November | 1:00 PM Jane/Dundas Library 620 Jane Street | Toronto 416–394–1014

38 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

In the Presence of my Neighbours

(2012, English and Greek, with subtitles, 47 minutes) This documentary explores the history of Greece’s Jews honouring those who perished, the survivors and their rescuers. It explores the complex realities of communities that existed since classical times. The film looks critically at anti-Jewish sentiments in Greece, past and present. Director George Gedeon will be present for Q&A after the screening. Registration in branch or by calling 416–393–7727. Wednesday, 8 November | 6:00 PM Pape/Danforth Library | 701 Pape Avenue Toronto | 416–393–7727

Double Threat: Canadian Jews, the Military, and World War II Author and journalist Ellin Bessner will discuss her new book, Double Threat: Canadian Jews, the Military, and World War II (2017). It reveals how 17,000 Canadian Jews donned a uniform in the Second World War. They fought and died in all the major battles, and they had a double reason to enlist: they weren’t only fighting for freedom and democracy, but were also trying to save the Jews of Europe from Hitler’s Final Solution. Registration required at www.rhpl.richmondhill.on.ca. Generously sponsored by Doris & Rammy Rochman in memory of the victims of the Holocaust. Wednesday, 8 November | 7:00 PM Richmond Hill Central Library 1 Atkinson Street | Richmond Hill 905–884–9288

Pola Goldhar will speak about her experience surviving the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 36. Thursday, 9 November | 1:00 PM Downsview Library 2793 Keele Street | Toronto 416–395–5720

Holocaust survivor Vera Schiff will speak about her experience interned in a concentration camp. Vera was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1926. She immigrated to Canada in 1961. Generously sponsored by the David and Rose Brown Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation. Thursday, 9 November | 1:30 PM Deer Park Library 40 St. Clair Avenue East | Toronto 416–393–7657

Holocaust survivor Howard Kleinberg will speak about his experience surviving forced labour and concentration camps. Howard was born in the village of Wierzbnik, Poland in 1925. He immigrated to Canada in 1947. Thursday, 9 November | 1:30 PM Gerrard/Ashdale Library 1432 Gerrard Street East | Toronto 416–393–7717

Holocaust survivor Judy Lysy will speak about her personal experience surviving various slave labour camps and concentration camps. Judy was born in Kosice, Czechoslovakia in 1928. She immigrated to Canada from Venezuela in 1952. Thursday, 9 November | 1:30 PM Palmerston Library 560 Palmerston Avenue | Toronto 416–393–7680

The Ship to Nowhere Published by Second Story Press, The Ship to Nowhere (2016) was designated a Notable Book for Older Children in the 2017 Sydney Taylor Book Awards. Rachel Landesman is 11-years-old when she, her mother and sister are crammed on board the Exodus, a dilapidated vessel smuggling 4500 Jewish refugees risking their lives to reach Palestine, their biblical homeland. Despite all they had suffered during the Holocaust, Jewish refugees are still not wanted in many countries. Author Rona Arato will discuss her recent publication with the audience. Generously sponsored by Lisa Richman & Steven Kelman in loving memory of her father Joseph Richman, a Hungarian Holocaust survivor. Thursday, 9 November | 2:00 PM Danforth/Coxwell Library 1675 Danforth Avenue | Toronto 416–393–7783


Interfaith Programs

During HEW 2017, the Neuberger is proud to extend Holocaust education programming to multicultural institutions through partnerships with faith communities across the GTA. Working together, we put into action the words of the Stockholm Declaration of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance which states: “With humanity still scarred by genocide, ethnic cleansing, racism, antisemitism and xenophobia, the international community shares a solemn responsibility to fight those evils. Together we must uphold the terrible truth of the Holocaust against those who deny it. We must strengthen the moral commitment of our peoples, and the political commitment of our governments, to ensure that future generations can understand the causes of the Holocaust and reflect upon its consequences.” We are grateful to our interfaith partners for their commitment to Holocaust education.

Rescue in Belgium Historian Jan Maes discusses the roles of bystanders, victims and perpetrators involved in an informal network of Protestants who tried to rescue Jews in Belgium between 1942 and 1944. Their stories explore the complexities of how the Holocaust unfolded in this area. Co-presented by Shomer (Guardians of Israel/CUFI) and Canada Christian College. Thursday, 2 November | 2:00 PM Terrace Gardens 3705 Bathurst Street | North York 416-789-7670

Presented by Forest Hill United Church. Friday, 3 November | 11:00 AM Forest Hill United Church 2 Wembley Road | Toronto 416–783–0879

In Conversation with Eva Meisels

Restoring Memories: The Shanghai Ghetto

Eva Meisels will speak about her experiences surviving the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 37.

Artist Ian Leventhal recounts his 10–year–long project ‘The Gift of Friendship,’ to preserve the urban fabric of the original ghetto area in Shanghai, China. It encompasses the Ohel Moshe Synagogue, the Yiddish Theatre, and the antique brownstones that housed Jewish refugees during the Holocaust. In 2001, Leventhal visited the remnants of the Jewish community, where the idea for the project was born.

Co-presented by the International Christian Embassy Jerusalem. Saturday, 4 November | 7:00 PM Friends of Jesus Christ Canada 181 Nugget Avenue | Scarborough 416–335–8829

In Conversation with Theodore Bogosian and Joe Berlinger Presenting a selection of excerpts from landmark documentaries, acclaimed filmmakers Joe Berlinger and Theodore Bogosian discuss some of the iconic cinematic moments that have dramatically altered how we frame and commemorate the Holocaust, the Armenian Genocide, the Rwandan Genocide and the Cambodian Genocide. Together, Berlinger and Bogosian provide a platform for inquiry into the cultural and political impact of seminal films, posing questions on contemporary human rights violations and the systemic failure to prevent genocide. Presented by The Zoryan Institute. Saturday, 4 November | 7:30 PM Toronto French School 306 Lawrence Avenue East | North York 416–484–6533

Free Men

(2011, French & Arabic, 100 minutes) Free Men, directed by Ismaël Ferroukhi, recounts the largely untold story of the role that Algerian and other North African Muslims in Paris played in the French resistance, and as rescuers of Jews, during the German occupation. Jews and members of the resistance were hidden in the cellars of Paris’ principal mosque while at ground level, Nazi occupiers were admiring Islamic art. The protagonist, a young Algerian black-marketeer, is gradually drawn into taking side against the Nazis.

Generously sponsored by Bonnie & Larry Moncik and Eleanor & George Getzler and their families in loving memory of their parents Ida & Abraham Moncik. Saturday, 4 November | 7:30 PM St. Ansgar Lutheran Church 1498 Avenue Road | Toronto 416–783–3570

In Conversation with Edward Fisch Edward Fisch will speak about his experiences surviving the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 36. Sunday, 5 November | 10:00 AM Thorncliffe Park United Church 16 Thorncliffe Park Drive | Toronto 416–425–4950

In Conversation with Kitty Salsberg Kitty Salsberg will speak about her experiences surviving the the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 36. Co-presented by International Christian Embassy Jerusalem. Generously sponsored by the Holbrook family in loving memory of their infant son Jeremy. Sunday, 5 November | 2:00 PM Catch The Fire Ministries–Airport Fellowship Campus 272 Attwell Drive | Toronto 416–674–8463

Saturday, 4 November | 7:30 PM Noor Cultural Centre 123 Wynford Drive | Toronto 416–444–7148

Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 39 


Interfaith Programs

Sufi Reflections on the Holocaust

In Conversation with Gerda Frieberg

The Rescue: A Live Film–Concerto

Shaykh Tevfik Adoner of the (Muslim) Jerrahi Sufi Order of Canada explains the significance of the Holocaust highlighting the changing moments in Muslim-Jewish relations. Raheel Raza, President of Muslims Facing Tomorrow and Salim Mansur, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Western Ontario, participate in a panel discussion. Seating limited to 50. RSVP required by phone 416–505–1613 or e-mail razzaz55@gmail.com. Modest dress code suggested.

Gerda Frieberg will speak about her personal experiences surviving the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 37.

José Arturo Castellanos, Consul General of El Salvador in Geneva during the Second World War, saved thousands of lives by issuing Salvadoran visas and nationality papers to victims of the Nazis. Grandsons of Consul Castellanos, Alvaro and Boris Castellanos, will screen the documentary The Rescue (2016) along with a live musical performance of the soundtrack.

Co-presented by Muslims Facing Tomorrow. Sunday, 5 November | 5:00 PM Jerrahi Sufi Centre | 270 Birmingham Street Etobicoke | 416–505–1613

Why I Chose Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service is a recognized alternative to Austria’s compulsory military service. Through this program, young Austrians can contribute to the reappraisal of Austria’s role in the Second World War and the Holocaust. Andreas Mayer, who is completing his memorial service (Gedenkdienst) at the Neuberger, discusses the pivotal moments in Austria’s understanding of its history and his role contributing to this dialogue. Generously sponsored by the Janice & Howard Langer Fund in honour of their children and grandchildren. Sunday, 5 November | 6:00 PM Melrose Community Church 375 Melrose Avenue | Toronto | 416–785–1980

Hate is a Failure of Imagination: A Literary Collage Gregorij von Leïtis, Artistic Director of Elysium recites texts reflecting the power of imagination and profound love and humanity of the artists who were imprisoned in Theresienstadt. They illuminate the unshakable hope that human decency will prevail and that humanity is stronger than all the attempts to crush it. The repertoire includes texts from Alice HerzSommer, Georg Kafka, Leo Straus, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber. Michael Lahr, Program and Concept Director of Elysium provides contextual commentary. Presented by the Goethe-Institut Toronto. Sunday, 5 November | 7:00 PM Martin Luther Evangelical Lutheran Church | 2379 Lake shore Boulevard West Toronto | 416–251–8293

40 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

Co-presented by Shaarei Beth El. Wednesday, 8 November | 6:00 PM Al Falah Mosque 391 Burnhamthorpe Road East | Oakville 905–257–4262

In Conversation with Helen Yermus Holocaust survivor Helen Yermus will speak about her personal experiences surviving a ghetto and Stutthof concentration camp. Helen was born in Kovno, Lithuania in 1932. She immigrated to Canada in 1948. Presented by Hamilton Jewish Federation and sponsored by Circle of Care. Wednesday, 8 November | 7:00 PM People’s Church Hamilton 510 Mohawk Road West | Hamilton 905–574–3900

In Conversation with Faigie Libman Faigie Libman will speak about her personal experiences surviving the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 36.

General Admission: $10. Admission and CD soundtrack of the film: $18 Generously sponsored by Lillian & Rick Ekstein in honour of Boris and Alvaro Castellanos, who dedicate their lives to sharing their grandfather’s legacy. Saturday, 11 November 8:00 PM (Doors open at 7:30 PM) Grace Church on–the-Hill 300 Lonsdale Road | Toronto 416–488–7884

In Conversation with Nate Leipciger Holocaust survivor Nate Leipciger will speak about his experiences surviving ghettos, concentration and death camps. Nate was born in Chorzów, Poland in 1928. He immigrated to Canada in 1948 with his father. Sunday, 12 November | 11:00 AM Hallelujah Fellowship Baptist Church 425 Pacific Avenue | Toronto 416–762–6427

Presented by the Aurora United Church. Thursday, 9 November | 7:00 PM Trinity Anglican Church 79 Victoria Street | Aurora 905–727–1935

In Conversation with Martin Maxwell Holocaust survivor Martin Maxwell will speak about his personal experiences being rescued by the Kindertransport and returning to fight with the British forces. Martin was born in Vienna, Austria in 1924. He immigrated to Canada in 1952. Presented by C3 Toronto Church. Saturday, 11 November | 7:00 PM New Hope Fellowship Church 455 Huron Street | Toronto newhopefellowship.ca

In Conversation with Faigie Libman Faigie Libman will speak about her personal experiences surviving the Holocaust. For short bio see PG 36. Generously sponsored by Susan Weltman & Seymour Hershenfeld and family in honour of Edzia Weltman, a Holocaust survivor; in memory of Leon Weltman, a Holocaust survivor; and in memory of Freda & Sam Hershenfeld. Sunday, 12 November | 3:00 PM Community of Christ Scarborough Congregation 10 Eppleworth Road | Scarborough 416–267–3372


Closed School Programs

The Neuberger gratefully acknowledges the participation of GTA schools from diverse school boards and backgrounds during Holocaust Education Week. We thank them for their ongoing commitment to Holocaust education for students. Many of these programs feature firstperson Holocaust survivor testimony from a speaker in the In Conversation dialogue format, designed for students. These programs are not open to the public.

Greenwood College School In Conversation with Hedy Bohm Generously sponsored by Lorraine & Alan Sandler in memory of one and a half million Jewish children murdered by the Nazis.

Stephen Lewis Secondary School In Conversation with Eva Meisels

Kenton Learning Centre In Conversation with Martin Maxwell Generously sponsored by the Rash family.

Thornhill Woods Public School In Conversation with Rose Lipszyc Generously sponsored by the Axler, Glazer and Lang families in memory of Feiga and Mozes Glazer, both Holocaust survivors.

Anne Frank Public School In Conversation with Pinchas Gutter

The Leo Baeck School—North Campus In Conversation with Bill Glied Generously sponsored by Tamara Glied & Robert Beliak and family in honour of Bill Glied; and by Guido Smit in tribute to Jan Smit, Righteous Among the Nations.

A.Y Jackson Secondary School In Conversation with Shary Marmor Fine Generously sponsored by Aida & Avron Seetner in memory of Anne & Hy Katz. Bakersfield Public School In Conversation with Miriam Frankel Bialik Hebrew Day School In Conversation with Martin Maxwell Generously sponsored by Zelda Korenblum and family in loving memory of her husband Henry Korenblum who survived the Holocaust with his parents Dvora and Pesach Korenblum; and in memory of Henry’s murdered family members, brothers Moshe Reuven, Mordechai, David and Sziya and sister Esther Raizel Edelman and her son Moshe; and sister Chana Mandelbaum and her daughter, Chava. Blessed Cardinal Newman Catholic High School Program featuring Dr. Kori Street HEW 2017 Educator-in-Residence is generously sponsored by Robin & Eran Hayeems. Branksome Hall In Conversation with Max Eisen Generously sponsored by Lorraine & Alan Sandler in memory of the one and a half million Jewish children murdered by the Nazis. Cedarvale Community School In Conversation with Edith Gelbard Generously sponsored by Mary Seldon and family in memory of all their family killed in the Holocaust. Crescent School In Conversation with Elly Gotz Generously sponsored by Rosie Uster, Phyllis Gould and Sandra Srebrolow in memory of their beloved parents Helen & Mayer Fogel. Glenforest Secondary School In Conversation with Anita Ekstein Generously sponsored by Danny Pivnick. Goodwin Learning Centre Student program

King’s Christian College Children’s Film: Another Story

The Leo Baeck Day School—South Campus Presentation by historian Jan Maes Generously sponsored by Celine Szoges in memory of her grandparents Johan Spitznagl and Elizabeth Schwartz of Budapest, Hungary. The Linden School In Conversation with Andy Réti Generously sponsored by Phyllis & Jack Chisvin in honour of Joshua Chisvin and Stacey Walman on the occasion of their engagement. Maple High School In Conversation with Howard Chandler Netivot HaTorah Day School In Conversation with Martin Maxwell Nile Academy/Intercultural Dialogue Institute Presentation by Andreas Mayer, Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service Northern Secondary School In Conversation with Nate Leipciger and Gershon Willinger Generously sponsored by Anita Ekstein in loving Memory of Frank Ekstein. People’s Christian Academy In Conversation with Leslie Meisels Royal St. George’s College In Conversation with Manny Langer Generously sponsored by Edna & David Magder in memory of her grandmother Reisl Chana Brodi and grandfather Marc Weissman who were murdered in the Holocaust. Sacred Heart Catholic High School In Conversation with Shary Marmor Fine Sir Richard Scott Catholic Elementary School In Conversation with Esther Fairbloom St. Mother Teresa Catholic Elementary School In Conversation with Esther Fairbloom

Stouffville Christian School In Conversation with Kitty Salsberg

Toronto French School In Conversation with Denise Hans and Bill Glied Generously sponsored by Erika Biro in memory of George Biro. Tyndale University College and Seminary In Conversation with Mark Lane Ulpanat Orot (Bnei Akiva Schools) Program featuring Dr. Danielle Spera Generously sponsored by Nili & Paul Ekstein and Shelley & Steven Ekstein in memory of Hilda & Mordechai Stern and members of their family; and by the Frankel Family Foundation in loving memory of Miriam Frankel’s parents, sisters and brother. Upper Canada College In Conversation with Nate Leipciger Generously sponsored by Annette Metz Pivnick & Richard Pivnick and family in honour of George Metz, who survived the Holocaust, and in memory of his sister Cesia and all who perished in the Holocaust. Vaughan Secondary School In Conversation with Judy Lysy Westmount Collegiate Institute In Conversation with Leslie Meisels and Gershon Willinger Generously sponsored by Dori & Ari Ekstein and Michele & Leon Rawa and families in loving memory of David Rawa, Auschwitz Holocaust survivor, and his family who perished in the Holocaust. William Lyon Mackenzie Collegiate Institute In Conversation with Claire Baum Educators can contact the Neuberger at neuberger@ujafed.org if you would like to receive complimentary pre and post HEW program educational resources. These materials have been specially designed to help prepare your students for our programming. Contact us to find out more about our print and online resources for teaching the Holocaust in the classroom and to sign-up for our educator e-newsletter.

Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 41 


Anne Frank (1929–1945) writing at her desk in her house at Merwedeplein, Amsterdam, c. 1941.

Image courtesy of Anne Frank Fonds—Basel/Anne Frank House/Premium Archive/Getty.

Community Programs


Community Programs

One of the greatest strengths of Neuberger HEW is the citywide participation in presenting and attending community programs. The Neuberger is grateful for this broad commitment to Holocaust Education Week and is pleased to list these independent programs on the following pages of the HEW printed program and online guide. The views expressed by any presenter are their own and do not represent the views of the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, its funders, or UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.

Exhibit: Exploring the Holocaust through Different Forms of Remembrance On November 2 George Brown College will display a timeline depicting fundamental moments that shaped our understanding of the history of the Holocaust to explore how people understand the subject today. On November 7 clips from In Their Own Words will be shown to highlight the experiences of Canadian survivors. On November 8 The Diary of Anne Frank (2009) will be broadcast in the main lobby, and on November 9 a map documenting genocide and oppression globally will be on display to connect with diverse student populations. 2–9 November George Brown College Waterfront Campus | Main Lobby 51 Dockside Drive | Toronto 416–415–2000

Broken Glass—Theatre Performance Arthur Miller’s 1994 play, Broken Glass, reflects back to the darkest time in Jewish history. In doing so, he offers a vista into the complex marital relationship between Philip and Sylvia Gellburg, a Jewish couple living in Brooklyn, New York in 1938. Their troubled marriage and Sylvia’s paralysis becomes a metaphor for the violence that sweeps across Germany during the Kristallnacht pogrom. How both of the Gellburgs respond to being Jewish at this unsympathetic time in history provides a pivotal moment in understanding self-identification. Directed by Ari Weisberg, the performance emphasizes the importance of theatre in recounting individual narratives from the Holocaust undoubtedly shaping our understanding of the events. Show times and ticket prices vary by date. To purchase tickets visit tocentre.com or call 1–855–985–2787. Special price for groups of 10 or more, call 416–733–0545. Presented by TEATRON Toronto Jewish Theatre. November 8 & 15 | 1:30 PM | $36 November 9–18 | 7:30 PM | $48 Toronto Centre for the Arts Studio Theatre | 5040 Yonge Street Toronto | 416–733–9388

Sacred Conversations: The Importance of Dialogue post Holocaust–A Belgium Narrative While exploring her roots in Belgium, Kitty Tepperman met historian Jan Maes, at the Kazerne Dossin Holocaust Memorial and Museum. Jan’s passion is to document the stories of Belgian Jewry. Temple Sinai members Kitty Tepperman and her granddaughter Hailey Appel, will continue their conversation with him. They will speak to the value of testimony in fostering pivotal moments for Holocaust education. For more information contact: programs@templesinai.net or 416–487–4161. Sunday, 29 October | 10:15 AM Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto 210 Wilson Avenue | North York 416–487–4161

We Can Never Deny! The Pivotal Moment When Technology met Holocaust Denial Polish Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter discusses his involvement with New Dimensions in Testimony (NDT), a collaborative project between the USC Shoah Foundation and the USC Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT), in partnership with concept developer Conscience Display. NDT allows individuals to partake in a conversation with Holocaust survivors using pre–recorded testimony designed to make it feel as though the survivor is in the room with you. This innovative project keeps the voices of the Holocaust survivors alive and relevant for future generations. This memorial program includes a candle lighting ceremony. Co-presented by the Wierzbniker Society. Sunday, 29 October | 2:00 PM Bialik Hebrew Day School 2760 Bathurst Street | North York 416–783–3346

Disclosure, Denial and Demands for Justice: Pivotal Moments Following the Asia-Pacific War Presenters from ALPHA Education examine pivotal moments of disclosure following the Asia-Pacific war. Excerpts from the documentary, The Apology (2016), illustrate how lost histories of the Second World War have been unveiled through testimony, research, and human rights activists. Alongside such disclosures are revisionist narratives of wartime atrocities and their kinship with Holocaust denial will be addressed and contextualized. Student researchers will present their findings, illustrating how academic efforts support the ongoing search for justice. To RSVP or for more information, contact info@alphaeducation.org or 416–299–0111. Co-presented by ALPHA Education and the Equity Studies Program at New College, University of Toronto. Thursday, 2 November | 12:00 PM New College | William Doo Auditorium University of Toronto 45 Willcocks Street | Toronto 416–299–0111

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Community Programs

Antisemitism, Islamophobia and Racism in the Trump Era—Truth vs. Post-Truth, Fact vs AltFact With antisemitism and Holocaust denial on the rise, it is crucial to explore the intersections of historical facts with mass media distortion and propaganda. This session will include dynamic speakers with expertise in anti-racism and human rights who will expose and confront the distortions in the current discourse, and set the tone for an important discussion on how to enhance social justice education in a truly inclusive way during this pivotal time in our history. Presented by OISE, Antisemitism and Holocaust Studies Working Group: Enhancing Social Justice Education. Thursday, 2 November | 4:30 PM OISE Peace Lounge | 7th Floor 252 Bloor Street West | Toronto 416–978–0005

Telling the Story When the Storyteller is No Longer with Us Rose A. Weinberg will speak about the personal pivotal moment that made her father, Holocaust survivor Amek Adler z”l, begin speaking about his experiences in the Shoah. Amek spent the last 11 years educating students about his personal experiences during the Holocaust. His memoir, Six Lost Years (2017), published by The Azrieli Foundation will be given out to attendees. The program is presented as part of the Friday night service. Dessert reception to follow lecture. Friday, 3 November | 7:30 PM Temple Kol Ami 36 Atkinson Avenue | Thornhill 905–709–2620

Pinchas Gutter: Recording the Holocaust for Future Generations Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter was featured in a Virtual Reality project titled The Last Goodbye (2017). In this VR film, he takes audiences with him on a visit to the Majdanek concentration camp where his parents and sister were murdered during the Holocaust. Pinchas will discuss his recent work and the importance of recording these experiences for posterity. Saturday, 4 November | 1:30 PM First Narayever Congregation 187 Brunswick Avenue | Toronto 416–487–4200

Poland 1989: The Renaissance Begins As the communist system started to crumble in Europe, the forbidden memory of Jewish Poland began to resurface. In less than 30 years, an unprecedented revival of Jewish life and culture began to unfold in Poland, along with an open dialogue on the complicated subject of Polish-Jewish relations. This program features people who have been creating and witnessing first-hand, that process. Co-presented by the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Toronto, the Konstanty Reynart Chair of Polish Studies at the University of Toronto and March of the Living Canada. Saturday, 4 November | 7:00 PM Munk School of Global Affairs 1 Devonshire Place | Toronto | 416–946–8900

Searching for My Grandmother Edna Magder discusses a pivotal moment in her familial history: how and why her grandmother, Theresia (Reisl) Hanni Brodi (née Lowy) has no grave marker of her own. Her name appears on the grave markers of three family members in three different countries on three different continents. As her only grandchild, Edna wrote this book to document her short life and to pay tribute to her. Saturday, 4 November | 7:30 PM National Council of Jewish Women Canada Toronto Chapter 4700 Bathurst Street | Toronto 416–633–5100

44 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

Dreams of Re-Creation in Jamaica: Holocaust, Internment, Jewish Refugees in Gibraltar Camp, Jamaican Jews and Sephardim Professor Diana Cooper–Clark presents her new book and discusses the connection of the Holocaust to Jamaica, a hitherto unknown part of the Shoah history. She traced Jewish refugees, who escaped Nazi Europe and found safety in Jamaica. Their stories of their escape from Europe, how they got to Jamaica, and what happened afterwards is an important part of the Holocaust narrative. The book also looks at the involvement of Jamaican Jews in the Holocaust and their interrelationship with the refugees. As previously unknown stories about the Holocaust continue to emerge, our understanding of this watershed moment ceaselessly evolves. Books will be available for purchase after the presentation. Co-presented by Adult Education Committee, the Ann Zworth Holocaust Education Fund and the Jamaican Consulate General of Toronto. Saturday, 4 November | 7:30 PM Temple Har Zion 7360 Bayview Avenue | Thornhill 905–889–2252

To Look a Nazi in the Eye: A Teen’s Account of a War Criminal Trial Kathy Kacer’s latest book focuses on one of the most recent attempts to bring Nazi war criminals to justice. It is told from the perspective of Jordana Lebowitz, a nineteen–year–old Torontonian, March of the Living Alumni and granddaughter of Holocaust survivors who travelled to Germany to witness the trial first–hand. Kacer will be joined by survivors who will share their experience of testifying. Co-presented by Second Story Press and March of the Living. Sunday, 5 November | 11:00 AM Congregation Habonim 5 Glen Park Avenue | Toronto 416–782–7125


Community Programs

Contemporary Polish Jews: Transitions and Transformations Making references to key moments in 1946, 1968 and 1989, Rabbi Michael Schudrich, the Chief Rabbi of Poland will explore the transformation and reemergence of Polish Jewry in contemporary times. Through the 1990s Rabbi Schudrich served as Poland Director of the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation, later serving as the Rabbi of Warsaw and Łódź. He has served Polish Jewry for three decades providing a unique wealth of insight and understanding. Sunday, 5 November | 11:00 AM Kehillat Shaarei Torah 2640 Bayview Avenue | Toronto 416–229–2600

Yiddish in Holocaust Films

‫ראך אין ֿפילמען װעגן‬ ַ ‫שפ‬ ּ ‫די ייִדישע‬ ‫דעם חורבן‬

Dr. Rebecca Margolis, professor of Canadian Jewish Studies at the University of Ottawa, will discuss how Holocaust films from 1948 to the present have employed Yiddish in various ways to deal with issues of memory, authenticity and Holocaust representation. Such films as Our Children (2012), The Pin (2013) and Son of Saul (2015) will be examined. Lecture will be in Yiddish. Co-presented by Committee for Yiddish Toronto UJA Federation, Toronto Workmen’s Circle and Friends of Yiddish. Sunday, 5 November | 2:00 PM Prosserman JCC Room 211/211A | 4588 Bathurst Street North York | 416–638–1881

Germans and Jews

Undying Love: True Stories of Courage and Faith

Under the Domim Tree

(2002, 87 minutes)

(1994, Hebrew, 102 minutes)

This award winning documentary directed by Helene Klodawsky explores the healing power of love in the poignant, enduring and miraculous love stories of the Holocaust. The film incorporates interviews with Holocaust survivors, rare archival documentary footage and vintage film clips from Hollywood and Yiddish cinema. It won Best Feature Documentary at the Warsaw Jewish Film Festival, 2003 and Best Documentary Screenplay through the Writer’s Guild of Canada, 2004.

This award-winning film based on Gila Almagor’s 1992 book of the same name poignantly describes the protagonist’s childhood, growing up in 1950s Israel. Under the Domim Tree, directed by Eli Cohen is set in the Oudim boarding school and focuses on the relationships formed between Israeli-born students and children Holocaust survivors starting over in Israel. Free admission; RSVP required.

Sunday, 5 November | 2:30 PM Lodzer Centre Congregation 12 Heaton Street | Toronto 416–636–6665

Sunday, 5 November | 6:00 PM Schwartz Reisman Centre Volunteer Board Room 9600 Bathurst Street | Vaughan 416–638–1881 × 4472 or galyas@srcentre.ca

Bogdan’s Journey

(2016, Polish with English subtitles, 90 minutes) In 1946, 40 Holocaust survivors seeking shelter in Kielce, Poland were murdered by townspeople. For decades Polish authorities suppressed the story. Bogdan’s Journey, directed by Michal Jaskulski and Lawrence Loewinger, documents the Kielce Pogrom and one man’s attempts to persuade people to face their past. Dr. Piotr J. Wróbel, the Konstanty Reynart Chair of Polish Studies at the University of Toronto will contextualise the film. 4:00 PM: Rush seats available at box office 30 minutes before screening. 7:30 PM: Advanced ticket sales at mnjcc.org/bogdansjourney. General Admission $15; Young Adults (age 18–35) $10. Co-presented by the Toronto Jewish Film Society and The Polish Jewish Heritage Foundation. Sunday, 5 November | 4:00 PM & 7:30 PM Miles Nadal JCC | Al Green Theatre 750 Spadina Avenue | Toronto 416–924–6211 × 606

(‫עץ הדומים תפוס‬‎)

Presented by Hamifgash (The Israeli Canadian Project).

The Children Remember the Moments . . . This singular event is a musical and visual journey of Shoah memories, highlighting the significant moments in the Shoah which changed people’s lives forever. Today’s post-Holocaust-era children represent the voices of survivors now looking back. Featuring a children’s choir and starring Cantor Simon Spiro, this poignant program helps us reflect on the Holocaust and its impact on subsequent generations. With Chamber Ensemble and Adult Chorus. Written and directed by Aliza Spiro. Appropriate for ages 8+. Presented by The Song Shul. Sunday, 5 November | 7:00 PM Beth Emeth Bais Yehuda Synagogue 100 Elder Street | Toronto 416–633–3838

(2016, 76 minutes)

Through personal stories, Germans and Jews directed by Janina Quint, explores Germany’s transformation from silence about the Holocaust to facing it headon. What began as a private conversation between a filmmaker and friends grew into a cultural exchange and realization that the two people are inextricably linked through memory of the Holocaust. Presented by Congregation Shir Libeynu. Sunday, 5 November | 2:15 PM Toronto Public Library Northern District 40 Orchard View Boulevard Toronto | 416–393–7610

The Unknown Pages of Holocaust Vita Shtivelman founder of Et Cetera will speak about the Soviet Union during the Second World War, Babi Yar, Drobitski Yar and the Holocaust. She will share reflections of these tragedies as portrayed in arts and literature. Presented by Et Cetera Club. Sunday, 5 November | 6:00 PM Jewish Russian Community Centre 7608 Yonge Street, Unit 3 | Thornhill 416–222–7105

Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 45 


Community Programs

Without Words: Examining the Holocaust and the Experience of First Nations in Canada (2015, 17 minutes)

Without Words focuses on the stories of Pinchas Gutter, a Holocaust survivor and Rita Okimawinninew, a residential school survivor whose paths cross, sparking a journey of healing. Cree director, Jules Koostachin (Rita’s daughter) participated in the 2010 March of Remembrance and Hope, a Holocaust education trip to Germany and Poland, designed to teach students of different backgrounds about the dangers of intolerance. A panel discussion including Holocaust survivors, First Nations representatives and past trip participants will follow the film. Co-presented by March of Remembrance and Hope, March of the Living and Ve’ahavta. Sunday, 5 November | 8:00 PM Congregation Habonim 5 Glen Park Avenue | Toronto 416–782–7125

100 Days to Inspire Respect Educator-in-Residence Dr. Kori Street offers students and teachers unique insight into the impact and scope of the USC Shoah Foundation’s unique educational initiative 100 Days to Inspire Respect. Kori will focus on how innovative use of testimony for teaching and learning across the curriculum engages students around the globe and demonstrates that through testimony, we can create positive change in the world. Using over 100 resources that covered all the genocides represented in USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive, this educational program enhances a variety of skills; from text analysis and conversation skills to art and poetry, across a range of subject areas. Monday, 6 November | 1:00 PM George Brown College | St. James Campus 200 King Street East | toronto 416–415–2000

Art is My Weapon: The Radical Musical Life of Lin Jaldati Dr. Jewlia Eisenberg and Dr. David Shneer present the life and work of singer and activist Lin Jaldati. Two parts passionate music, one part stunning images, one part inspiring story, the program reveals how Jaldati, who was deported to Auschwitz, survived and moved to former East Germany. Along with her husband, Eberhard Rebling, a non-Jewish pianist and musicologist, the couple helped build the socialist phoenix rising from Nazism’s ashes through music.  Presented by the University of Toronto’s Centre for Jewish Studies. Monday, 6 November | 4:00 PM Jackman Humanities Building | Room 100 170 St. George Street | Toronto 416–978–7415

Pivotal Moments in Recognizing Experiences of LGBTQ+ in the Holocaust & Beyond Bringing together Dr. Kori Street, Senior Director of Programs and Operations at the USC Shoah Foundation, Kimahli Powell, Executive Director of Rainbow Railroad and an LBGTQ+ refugee to Canada, this panel will touch on the LGBTQ+ experiences in the Holocaust, which are so rarely discussed, and look at where we are today with the ongoing persecution of LGBTQ+ communities around the world. Presented by Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, Rainbow Railroad, Kulanu and the Miles Nadal JCC. Monday, 6 November | 7:00 PM Miles Nadal JCC | Room 318 750 Spadina Avenue | Toronto 416–638–1991

Berlin Diary: A Play about Remembering and Forgetting In this powerful autobiographical play, playwright Andrea Stolowitz investigates her family’s hidden past through her great-grandmother’s wartime diary. She had always been told that her ancestors managed to escape Germany, but following genealogical trails around the world, Andrea is surprised to discover that she may indeed have lost relatives in the Shoah. Should this make her more connected to her family, her history, her people? With courage and honesty, she attempts to find out. General Admission $15. Purchase tickets at events.srcentre.ca/events/berlin-diary Presented by the Prosserman Jewish Community Centre. Monday, 6 November | 7:00 PM City Playhouse Theatre 1000 New Westminster Drive | Thornhill 416–638–1881 × 4235 | jbrown@ujafed.org

Our Story: The Kleinbergs Although Nancy and Howard Kleinberg were both born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1925, they did not know one another prior to the war. The future husband and wife separately survived ghettos, forced slavelabour and concentration camps. It was only during the liberation of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in April of 1945 that they met for the first time. Together, the Kleinbergs share their personal experiences during the Holocaust and discuss their postwar meeting as the pivotal moment which changed their lives forever. Monday, 6 November | 7:00 PM Kensington Place | 866 Sheppard Avenue W Toronto | 416–636–9555

Holocaust Testimony: The Legacy of Yaffa Eliach Author Gail Benick discusses the life work of the late Yaffa Eliach; historian, author, pioneer in Holocaust studies, and child survivor. Eliach, who died on November 8, 2016, was known for her work memorializing victims of the Holocaust not by recording their deaths but by remembering their lives. Her massive photography collection became a focal point of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and has allowed millions of visitors to connect with victims of the Shoah. Monday, 6 November | 7:30 PM Shaarei Tefillah | Social Hall 3600 Bathurst Street | Toronto 416–787–1631

46 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 


Community Programs

Searching for Your Polish Roots

Performing the Pivotal: Moments that Matter

1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Family historian and author Stanley M. Diamond will outline research techniques and resources available to families of Holocaust survivors searching their relatives’ history. Dramatic stories of discovery and the joy of establishing long–severed family connections, will illustrate how technology has provided innovative opportunities for those who want to discover their familial history for themselves and future generations. Stanley is the founder and executive director of Jewish Records Indexing—Poland and president of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal. He is also a regular contributor to popular TV shows Who Do You Think You Are? and Finding Your Roots.

There are moments of human connection that cause the abstract to snap into focus and suddenly become real. Student performances and commentary—a combination of theatre, music, visual art and the written word—will capture these pivotal moments, exploring students’ personal reflections on the Holocaust and other human tragedies. Audience members will be invited to add to an accompanying display with their own pivotal moments.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly on December 10, 1948, was the result of the experience of the Second World War. With the end of the war, and the creation of the United Nations, the international community vowed to never again allow atrocities like the Holocaust to happen. Dr. Les Jacobs, an expert on human rights at York University, will discuss the events that led to the passing of the 1948 UN Declaration of Human Rights and speak about its relevance as a pivotal moment in a post-Holocaust era.

Monday, 6 November | 7:30 PM Beth Radom Congregation 18 Reiner Road | Toronto 416–636–3451

To Look a Nazi in the Eye: A Teen’s Account of a War Criminal Trial Lunch & Learn program: Kathy Kacer will talk about her new book: the true story of Jordana Lebowitz, who at 19, journeyed to Germany in 2015 to observe the trial of the Nazi war criminal, a 94-year-old, Oskar Gröning (the “Bookkeeper of Auschwitz”—convicted of being complicit in the murder of 300,000 Jews in Auschwitz). Lunch begins at 12:00 PM. Program starts at 12:40 PM. Advance price $20 until November 3, $25 after. Tuesday, 7 November | 12:00 PM Beth Tikvah Synagogue 3080 Bayview Avenue | Toronto 416–221–3433

Co-presented by Centennial College Libraries with School of Advancement and Center for Global Citizenship, Education and Inclusion. Tuesday, 7 November | 1:30 PM Centennial College Event Centre 8th Floor | 939 Progress Avenue Toronto | 416–289–5000 × 5418

To Look a Nazi in the Eye: A teen’s account of the war criminal trial of Oskar Gröning Award-winning author Kathy Kacer officially launches her book, To Look a Nazi in the Eye: A Teen’s Account of a War Criminal Trial (2017). She is joined by Jordana Lebowitz, an observer of the 2015 Oskar Gröning Nazi trial in Lüneburg, Germany, and Holocaust survivor, Max Eisen, a witness at the trial. The trial reflects a pivotal moment for the current generation’s conscious understanding of events related to the Holocaust. Co-presented by Facing History and Ourselves, the March of the Living Canada, Second Story Press and the Equity Studies Program, New College, University of Toronto. Tuesday, 7 November | 7:00 PM William Doo Auditorium | New College University of Toronto 45 Willcocks Street | Toronto 416–537–7850

Co-presented by Amnesty International Aurora Branch and Trinity Anglican Church. Tuesday, 7 November | 7:00 PM Trinity Anglican Church 79 Victoria Street | Aurora 905–727–6101

“Speak the Truth”—But Who Hears It? The Pivotal Moment of Dabru Emet Dabru Emet, meaning ‘speak the truth’ in Hebrew, is widely acknowledged as the first major Jewish response to decades of post-Second World War Jewish-Christian relations. The panelists, Lindsay Ann Cox, PhD student and Rabbi Emma Gottlieb, explore the history leading up to its creation, its current relevance and possible interfaith implications for adherents to both faiths. Audience members will also be welcomed into the live dialogue session. Together they will discuss how Dabru Emet can be considered a pivotal moment of prophecy in responding to the Holocaust. Tuesday, 7 November | 7:00 PM Makom: Creative Downtown Judaism 402 College Street | TORONTO 416–546–6043

Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 47 


Community Programs

In the Name of Humanity: The Secret Deal to End the Holocaust Historian and bestselling author Max Wallace discusses his book In the Name of Humanity: The Secret Deal to End the Holocaust (2017). It details the true story of secret negotiations, by unlikely figures that ended the Holocaust. A veteran interviewer for the USC Shoah Foundation, Wallace draws on an explosive cache of recently declassified documents and an account from the only living eye witness to unravel the mystery. Presented by the Kubes Family Fund. Tuesday, 7 November | 7:30 PM Beth Tzedec Congregation 1700 Bathurst Street | Toronto 416–781–3511

How Bulgaria Saved Its Jews during the Holocaust Dr. Miroslav Marinov discusses the complexities of how Bulgaria prevented the deportation of its Jewish citizens during the Second World War and why this historical episode, which carries enormous moral significance, does not seem to be as well known as other examples of collective rescue. Tuesday, 7 November | 7:30 PM Beth Lida Forest Hill Synagogue 22 Gilgorm Road | Toronto 416–489–2550

From Captain America to Maus: The Influence of Comics on the Second World War and Post-Holocaust Perceptions Gerald Hartman and Alex Hartman illustrate how comic books were used, often by Jewish artists, as propaganda tools to influence public opinion in America prior to the attack of Pearl Harbor and thereafter. The use of comics as a psychological tool by private publishers and the US government is also covered. A focus on Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel Maus (1986) reveals its impact on Holocaust literature and how it functions as a medium for communicating one’s personal story. Tuesday, 7 November | 8:00 PM Beth Avraham Yoseph of Toronto Congregation (BAYT) 613 Clark Avenue West | Thornhill 905–886–3810

48 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

Health and Humanities: How the Arts Deepen our Reflection on the Holocaust and Enable Healing

The Claims Conference 65 Years Later: A “Small Measure of Justice” for Holocaust Survivors

Dr. Allan Peterkin and Dr. Ronald Ruskin, founding editors of Ars Medica, discuss how the visual, literary and cinematic arts have captured pivotal moments in human history. This session will provide examples of visual art, poetry and video testimony that maintain their power now and encourage us to ask what representations of the Holocaust will become, as the living voices of survivors disappear.

The Claims Conference (The Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany) was established in 1952 to provide some measure of restitution to Jewish victims of Nazi persecution. Marilyn Sinclair, Canadian representative to the Claims Conference will discuss how this unprecedented pivotal moment that has provided more than $70 billion to benefit 800,000 Holocaust victims and address questions such as: Who does the Claims Conference help? What is Germany’s continued commitment? What is Canada’s experience with the Claims Conference and how are funds allocated?

Wednesday, 8 November | 12:00 PM Mount Sinai Hospital 18th floor | Ben Sadowski Auditorium 600 University Avenue | Toronto 416–586–4800 × 8690

Music, Cinema and Memory The symphonic scores that are created for movie soundtracks hold tremendous impact. They have the ability to guide and affect our emotional responses, and sometimes, they are so evocative, they are even more memorable than the screen images themselves. French musicians Isabelle Durin (violin) and Michaël Ertzscheid (piano) will perform haunting and iconic theme songs featured in such films as Defiance (2008), Exodus (1960), Schindler’s List (1993), Yentl (1983), The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) and Life is Beautiful (1997). To RSVP for the daytime concert, please call Deanna Di Lello at 416–924–6211 × 250 or email deannad@mnjcc.org. To RSVP for the evening concert, please call the cultural office at Alliance Française Toronto at 416–922–2014 or email culturel@alliance-francaise.ca. Pay what you can—Suggested donation of $10 at the door. Co-presented by the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre. Wednesday, 8 November | 1:00 PM & 7:00 PM Alliance Francaise Toronto Theatre 24 Spadina Road | Toronto 416–922–2014

Wednesday, 8 November | 1:30 PM Bernard Betel Centre for Creative Living 1003 Steeles Avenue West | Toronto 416–225–2112

In Conversation with Mark Lane Holocaust survivor Mark Lane will speak about his personal experiences surviving the Munkacs Ghetto, forced-slave labour and concentration camps including Auschwitz-Birkenau and a death march to Mauthausen in Austria. Mark was born in Olenovo, Czechoslovakia in 1929. He immigrated to Canada in 1951. Open to the general public. Specially recommended for teens and their families. Please register for free at bbyo.ca/hew to confirm your participation. Presented by BBYO and the Schwartz/Reisman Centre. Wednesday, 8 November | 6:30 PM Lebovic Jewish Community Campus 9600 Bathurst Street | Vaughan 416–398–2004 | info@bbyo.ca


Community Programs

Denial

(2016, 109 minutes) Based on Deborah Lipstadt’s book, History on Trial: My Day in Court with a Holocaust Denier (2005), this British-American production, directed by Mick Jackson, dramatizes the events of the court case. Lipstadt emerges from the case victorious in the libel case infamous Holocaust denier David Irving brought against her and her publisher. Presented by the Bradford West Gwillimbury Diversity Action Group. Wednesday, 8 November | 7:00 PM Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library Zima Room | 68 Thomas Sheppard Drive Holland Landing | 905–775–3328

“They Did Not Ask”—Pivotal Moments Revealed When survivors arrived in Canada, many yearned to speak so that the memory of those lost would not be forgotten. Few Canadians wanted to hear their stories. Then, Holocaust denial trials and the uncovering of Nazi war criminals living in Canada compelled many survivors to speak. This talk by Dr. Paula J. Draper, a Holocaust historian specializing in memory history and formerly a lead International Trainer for the USC Shoah Foundation, examines how Canadian survivors found their voice.

Pivotal Moments in a Post-Holocaust World Dr. Doris Bergen, Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor in Holocaust Studies at the University of Toronto, will explore postwar pivotal moments that have shaped individual and global understandings of the Holocaust. Wednesday, 8 November | 7:30 PM Beth Sholom Synagogue 1445 Eglinton Avenue West | Toronto 416–783–6103

Crimes against Humanity and a Semicolon: A Tale from the Nuremberg Trial October 1945: At Nuremberg, the trial of the major German war criminals is only weeks away. Representatives of the United States, Great Britain, the Soviet Union and France discover an apparently tiny discrepancy in the Nuremberg Charter, the founding document of the trial. In Article 6(c), Crimes Against Humanity, the Russian version divides the text with a comma. Other versions use a semicolon. Michael Marrus, the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies at the University of Toronto, presents the resolution of this seemingly insignificant editorial problem as heavy with historical significance.

Wednesday, 8 November | 7:00 PM The Pride of Israel Synagogue 59 Lissom Crescent | Toronto 416–226–0111 × 10

Wednesday, 8 November | 7:30 PM Holy Blossom Temple | 1950 Bathurst Street York | 416–789–3291

Remembering the Holocaust through Film

Complicity and Resistance: Understanding and Forgiveness

Dr. Carolyn Kay, a professor of modern German history and the Holocaust at Trent University, discusses how documentary and feature film have shaped ideas of the Holocaust for educators and students. This talk will address one educator’s experience using films such as Shoah (1985), Schindler’s List (1993), The Pianist (2002) and many others; and will discuss how we create memory through education and film. Co-presented by the Oraynu Congregation for Humanistic Judaism. Wednesday, 8 November | 7:30 PM Don Heights Unitarian Congregation 18 Wynford Drive | Suite 102 | Toronto 416–444–8839

Pivotal Moments: Post-Holocaust Survivor Testimony Scott Masters, Head of Social Studies and History at Crestwood Preparatory College along with his students, highlight some of the uses of the school’s Oral History Project. Over the last decade, this student-led project has brought Holocaust survivors and students together to record, document, and preserve personal testimonies. Presenters will demonstrate themes such as recovery and rebuilding life in Canada using excerpts from the collection. Co-presented by Crestwood Preparatory College. Thursday, 9 November | 2:00 PM Baycrest | Jacob Family Theatre 3560 Bathurst Street | Toronto 416–785–2500 × 2271

Why I Chose Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service Andreas Mayer, who is completing his memorial service (Gedenkdienst) as an intern at the Neuberger, will discuss the pivotal moments in Austria’s understanding of its history and the role he plays in contributing to this dialogue. For a full program description see page 40. Thursday, 16 November | 11:00AM George Brown College Casaloma Campus | ROOM TBA 160 Kendal Avenue | Toronto 416–415–2000

On July 20, 1944 conspirators in a resistance movement attempted to assassinate Adolf Hitler. The novel The Women in the Castle (2017) is set at the end of the Second World War and depicts the German, non-Jewish widows of the conspirators who must deal with the repercussions of war. It explores what it means to survive, love and ultimately forgive in the wake of unimaginable hardship. Dr. Elaine Newton, Professor Emeritus of Humanities at York University, will review the book written by Jessica Shattuck. Registration required. RSVP to reception @templeemanuel.ca. Non-members pay $10 cash at the door. Presented by Temple Emanu-El. Thursday, 9 November Light Refreshments: 1:00 PM Program begins: 1:30 PM Temple Emanu-el | 120 Old Colony Road Toronto | 416–449–3880

Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 49 


calendar

Sunday October 29 10:15 AM | Pg 43 Sacred Conversations: The Importance of Dialogue post Holocaust—A Belgium Narrative 2:00 PM | Pg 43 We Can Never Deny! The Pivotal Moment When Technology met Holocaust Denial

Monday October 30 1:00 PM | Pg 24 Schindler’s List

1:30 PM | Pg 36 In Conversation with Pola Goldhar 2:00 PM | Pg 39 Rescue in Belgium 4:30 PM | Pg 44 Antisemitism, Islamophobia and Racism in the Trump Era—Truth vs. PostTruth, Fact vs. AltFact 7:30 PM | Pg 8 Opening Night In the Shadow of The Reich: Reflections on a Familial Legacy

Friday November 3

Wednesday November 1

7:30 AM | Pg 27 Bay Street Breakfast for Young Professionals: Mein Kampf in the Public Domain

10:30 AM | Pg 36 In Conversation with Kitty Salsberg

10:00 AM | Pg 36 Children of the Holocaust

1:00 PM | Pg 36 In Conversation with Magda Hilf

10:00 AM | Pg 36 In Conversation with Edward Fisch

Thursday November 2 10:00 AM | Pg 36 In Conversation with Andy Reti 10:30 AM | Pg 36 In Conversation with Gerda Frieberg

11:00 AM | Pg 36 In Conversation with Faigie Libman 11:00 AM | Pg 39 Rescue in Belgium 12:00 PM | Pg 16 Why Publish a Critical Edition of Mein Kampf?

12:00 PM | Pg 43 Disclosure, Denial and Demands for Justice: Pivotal Moments Following the Asia-Pacific War

50 Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 

12:30 PM | Pg 15 The USC Shoah Foundation and the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre: Providing Transformative Learning Tools for Today’s Learners 2:00 PM | Pg 37 Hidden Gold 7:30 PM | Pg 44 Telling the Story When the Storyteller is No Longer with Us

Saturday November 4 1:30 PM | Pg 44 Pinchas Gutter: Recording the Holocaust for Future Generations 7:00 PM | Pg 44 Poland 1989: The Renaissance Begins 7:00 PM | Pg 39 In Conversation with Eva Meisels 7:30 PM | Pg 39 Free Men 7:30 PM | Pg 39 Restoring Memories: The Shanghai Ghetto 7:30 PM | Pg 44 Searching for My Grandmother 7:30 PM | Pg 44 Dreams of Re-Creation in Jamaica: Holocaust, Internment, Jewish Refugees in Gibraltar Camp, Jamaican Jews and Sephardim

7:30 PM | Pg 39 In Conversation with Theodore Bogosian and Joe Berlinger 7:30 PM | Pg 16 Living Room Witnesses: The Holocaust on American Television

Sunday November 5 9:00 AM–4:00 PM Pg 17 Dialogue for Descendants: “D4D” Symposium for Children of Holocaust Survivors 10:00 AM | Pg 39 In Conversation with Edward Fisch 11:00 AM | Pg 44 To Look a Nazi in the Eye

2:00 PM | Pg 45 Yiddish in Holocaust Films

11:00 AM | Pg37 In Conversation with Miriam Frankel

2:15 PM | Pg 45 Germans and Jews

11:45 AM | Pg18 The Quest for Justice: Postwar Nazi Trials

2:30 PM | Pg 45 Undying Love: True Stories of Courage and Faith 4:00 PM & 7:30 PM | Pg 45 Bogdan’s Journey 5:00 PM | Pg 40 Sufi Reflections on the Holocaust 6:00 PM | P 45 The Unknown Pages of Holocaust 6:00 PM | Pg 40 Why I Chose Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service 6:00 PM | Pg 45 Under the Domim Tree

11:00 AM | Pg 27 Legacy Symposium for Young Professionals

7:00 PM | Pg 45 The Children Remember the Moments . . .

11:00 AM | Pg 45 Contemporary Polish Jews: Transitions and Transformations

7:00 PM | Pg 40 Hate is a Failure of Imagination: A Literary Collage

1:30 PM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Alexander Eisen

7:30 PM | Pg 24 Defiant Requiem: Voices of Resistance

2:00 PM | Pg 39 In Conversation with Kitty Salsberg

8:00 PM | Pg 46 Without Words

Monday November 6 10:00 AM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Howard Chandler 10:30 AM | Pg 37 My Story Matters: The Power of Story

1:00 PM | Pg24 Labyrinth of Lies 1:00 PM | Pg 46 100 Days to Inspire Respect 1:30 PM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Eva Meisels 2:00 PM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Rose Lipszyc 4:00 PM | Pg 46 Art is My Weapon: The Radical Musical Life of Lin Jaldati 7:00 PM | Pg 46 Berlin Diary: A Play about Remembering and Forgetting 7:00 PM | Pg 46 Our Story: The Kleinbergs 7:00 PM | Pg 46 Pivotal Moments in Recognizing Experiences of LGBTQ+ in the Holocaust & Beyond 7:00 PM | Pg 18 Confronting Holocaust Denial: A Canadian Experience 7:30 PM | Pg 25 Secrets of Survival


calendar

7:30 PM | Pg 47 Searching for Your Polish Roots 7:30PM | Pg 46 Holocaust Testimony: The Legacy of Yaffa Eliach

Tuesday November 7 10:00 AM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Edith Gelbard (French) 12:00 PM | Pg 47 Lunch & Learn: To Look a Nazi in the Eye 12:00 PM | Pg 19 Reading the Holocaust: From The Diary of Anne Frank to The Diary of Molly Applebaum 1:00 PM | Pg 25 The People vs Fritz Bauer 1:00 PM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Leslie Meisels 1:00 PM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Andy Réti 1:30 PM | Pg 47 Performing the Pivotal: Moments that Matter

7:00 PM | Pg 47 “Speak the Truth”— But Who Hears It? The Pivotal Moment of Dabru Emet 7:00 PM | Pg 47 To Look a Nazi in the Eye 7:30 PM | Pg 26 1945 7:30 PM | Pg 48 How Bulgaria Saved Its Jews during the Holocaust 7:30 PM | Pg 48 In the Name of Humanity: The Secret Deal to End the Holocaust

1:00 PM | Pg 38 Porraimos: Europe’s Gypsies in the Holocaust 1:00 PM | Pg 38 Responsibility & Witness for the Future 1:30 PM | Pg 48 The Claims Conference 65 Years Later: A “Small Measure of Justice” for Holocaust Survivors 6:00 PM | Pg 38 In the Presence of my Neighbours

8:00 PM | Pg 19 Justice: Nuremberg and Beyond

6:00 PM | Pg 40 In Conversation with Gerda Frieberg

8:00 PM | Pg 48 From Captain America to Maus: The Influence of Comics on the Second World War and Post-Holocaust Perceptions

6:30 PM | Pg 48 In Conversation with Mark Lane

Wednesday November 8 10:30 AM | Pg 38 In Conversation with Denise Hans

1:30 PM | Pg 37 In Conversation with Gerda Frieberg

12:00 PM | Pg 48 Health and Humanities: How the Arts Deepen our Reflection on the Holocaust and Enable Healing

7:00 PM | Pg 47 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1:00 PM & 7:00 PM | Pg 48 Music, Cinema and Memory

1:30 PM | Pg 37 The Short Life of Anne Frank

1:00 PM | Pg 38 In Conversation with Hedy Bohm

7:00 PM | Pg 40 In Conversation with Helen Yermus 7:00 PM | Pg 49 Denial 7:00 PM | Pg 38 Double Threat: Canadian Jews, the Military, and World War II 7:00 PM | Pg 49 “They Did Not Ask”— Pivotal Moments Revealed 7:30 PM | Pg 20 Reclamation and Restitution of Nazi Looted Art

7:30 PM | Pg 21 Why Should Young People Read Holocaust Literature, Anyway? 7:30 PM | Pg 49 Crimes Against Humanity and a Semicolon: A Tale from the Nuremberg Trial 7:30 PM | Pg49 Pivotal Moments in a Post-Holocaust World 7:30 PM | Pg 49 Remembering the Holocaust through Film 8:00 PM | Pg 21 Ashkenaz Foundation Presents Semer Ensemble

Thursday November 9 1:00 PM | Pg 49 Complicity and Resistance: Understanding and Forgiveness 1:00 PM | Pg 38 In Conversation with Pola Goldhar 1:30 PM | Pg 38 In Conversation with Vera Schiff 1:30 PM | Pg 38 In Conversation with Howard Kleinberg 1:30 PM | Pg 38 In Conversation with Judy Lysy 2:00 PM | Pg 49 Pivotal Moments: Post-Holocaust Survivor Testimony

7:00 PM | Pg 40 In Conversation with Faigie Libman 7:30 PM | Pg 11 Closing Night Jewish Museum Vienna: A Conduit for Jewish Life

Saturday November 11 7:00 PM | Pg 40 In Conversation with Martin Maxwell 8:00 PM | Pg 40 The Rescue: A Live Film–Concerto

Sunday November 12 11:00 AM | Pg 40 In Conversation with Nate Leipciger 3:00 PM | Pg 40 In Conversation with Faigie Libman

Ongoing 2–29 November Pg 15 M-F: 9 AM–9 PM S&S: 9 AM–7 PM Built to Remember: The Holocaust Museums of Today and Tomorrow 1–9 November Pg 36 M–F: 9 AM–8:30 PM Sat: 9 AM–5 PM Sun: 1:30 PM–5 PM Exhibit: The 40 Days of Musa Dagh: Resistance during the Armenian Genocide 8–18 November Pg 43 8 & 15: 1:30 PM 9–18: 7:30 PM Broken Glass Theatre Performance 2–9 November Pg 43 Exhibit: Exploring the Holocaust through Different Forms of Remembrance

Thursday November 16 11:00 AM | Pg 49 Why I Chose Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service 6:30 PM | Pg 27 The Memory Kitchen: Exploring the Post-Holocaust Period through Food and Memory

2:00 PM | Pg 38 The Ship to Nowhere

1:00 PM | Pg 26 What Our Father’s Did: A Nazi Legacy

Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 51 


All programs are free of charge unless otherwise noted. We regret any errors or omissions due to printing deadlines. The views expressed by any presenter during Holocaust Education Week are their own and do not represent the views of the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre or UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. DISCLAIMER: Please be advised that UJA Federation hosted events may be documented through photographs and video. These images may be used by UJA Federation for promotional, advertising, and educational purposes. By participating in our events, both on our premises and off-site, you consent to allow UJA Federation to document and use your image and likeness. However, if you do not want us to use a photo or video of you or your child, please do not hesitate to let us know when you arrive at the event. You are also welcome to contact UJA Federation’s Privacy Officer at privacy.officer@ ujafed.org. SARAH AND CHAIM NEUBERGER HOLOCAUST EDUCATION CENTRE SURVIVOR SPEAKERS’ BUREAU

Claire Baum George Berman Hedy Bohm Felicia Carmelly Howard Chandler Judy Cohen Irene Csillag Anne Eidlitz Alexander Eisen Max Eisen Sally Eisner Anita Ekstein Esther Fairbloom

Shary Marmor Fine Edward Fisch George Fox Miriam Frankel John Freund Gerda Frieberg Edith Gelbard Bill Glied Mel Goldberg Rosalind Goldenberg Pola Goldhar Mendel Good Elly Gotz Pinchas Gutter Denise Hans Magda Hilf Lou (Leizer) Hoffer Jerry Kapelus Nancy & Howard Kleinberg Mark Lane Manny Langer Joe Leinburd Nathan Leipciger Faigie Libman Rose Lipszyc Judy Lysy Martin Maxwell Eva Meisels Leslie Meisels Andy Réti Sally Rosen Vera Schiff Faye Schulman Helen Schwartz George Scott Leonard Vis Lenka Weksberg Gershon Willinger Helen Yermus Roman Ziegler SARAH AND CHAIM NEUBERGER HOLOCAUST EDUCATION CENTRE

Chair Shael Rosenbaum Immediate Past Chair Marilyn Sinclair Executive Director Dara Solomon Managing Director Carson Phillips, Ph.D. Operations Manager Mary Siklos Manager, Public Programs (On Leave) Rachel Libman Education Coordinator & Interim Manager, Public Programs Michelle Fishman

Programs and Education Assistant Emma Hoffmann Librarian Anna Skorupsky Gedenkdiener Andreas Mayer Administrative Assistant Paula Carabeo Summer Intern Leore Zecharia Advisory Committee Howard Driman Dori Ekstein Anita Ekstein Bill Glied Joseph Gottdenker Pinchas Gutter Lily Kim Lisa Richman Joyce Rifkind Doris Rochman Rammy Rochman Honey Sherman Leonard Vis Myra York Honorary Members Max Eisen Gerda Frieberg Elly Gotz Nathan Leipciger Steering Committee Lara Brady Ruth Ekstein Tina Erlich Glennie Lindenberg Rachel Luke Hadassa Pertman Matt Reingold Jonathan Samuel Michael Soberman Zev Steingold UJA FEDERATION OF GREATER TORONTO

Chair of the Board Bruce Leboff Senior Vice Chair Warren Kimel President & CEO Adam Minsky 2017 Holocaust Education Week

Felicia Carmelly Honey Carr Sharon Chodirker Eric Cohen Itka Dalfen Jennifer Daly Dori Ekstein Ellen Gardner Sandra Gitlin Marilyn Goldberg Nicole Greenwood Hartley Hershenhorn Karen Igra Audrey Joseph Sheri Kagan Lily Kim Joy Kohn Karen Lasky Susan Lehner Arla Litwin Roz Lofsky Harriet McCabe Shely Mann Annette Metz-Pivnick Naomi Parness Evan Pilz Hilary Rabie Andy Reti Joyce Rifkind Doris Rochman Rammy Rochman Julia Rowan Barbara Rusch Mary Schneider Joan Shapero Julie Silver Guido Smit Alan Wainer Nita Wexler Ambassadors Steven Albin Gail Avinoam Sally Dale Audrey Diamant Howard Driman Jo-Anne Herr Eileen Jadd Eliane Labendz Martin Maxwell Carol Moscoe Annette Sacks Rita Slapack Risa Solomon Shaindey Starr Celine Szoges Kitty Tepperman Jennifer Walsh Rhonda Wolf

Stephanie Corazza Brenna Singer Ariella Kimmel Leore Zecharia DIALOGUE FOR DESCENDANTS SYMPOSIUM

Co–Chairs Dori Ekstein Marilyn Sinclair Committee Isaac Applebaum Tamara Balitsky Faye Blum Marlene Brickman Annette Filler Michelle Glied Alan Lipszyc Felicia Posluns Honey Sherman Cori Shiff Dorothy Tessis Myra York SPECIAL THANKS

Adam Hummel Jill Reitman CIJA Ariella Kimmel Consulate of the Federal Republic of Germany Tanja Matuszis Karen Thuernau Consulate General of Hungary Dr. Stefania Szabo Goethe-Institut Toronto Uwe Rau International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance Dr. Kathrin Meyer Laura Robertson UJA Donna Bernardo-Ceriz Mariana Catz Robin Gofine USC Shoah Foundation Kia Hayes Karen Jungblut

Co–Chairs Ken Bernknopf Lisa Richman

LEGACY SYMPOSIUM

Brochure Design Lauren Wickware laurenwickware.com

Chair Jessica Pollock

Brochure Printing Raw Brokers

Liaisons Goldie Babarci Robert Buckler Karen Budahazy

Committee Jillian Rodak (Immediate Past Chair) Elizabeth Banks

ISBN 978-0-9811031-6-7

The Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre was founded as the Holocaust Education and Memorial Centre in 1985. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of the dedicated Holocaust survivor educators, who established this museum and worked to fulfill its mission throughout the past 30 years. We continue your work in your names. Z”L

Amek Adler, Bronia Beker, Esther Bem, Marian Domanski, Robert Engel, Mike Englishman, Arnold Friedman, Herb Goldstein, Ibolya Grossman, Elisabeth de Jong, Moishe Kantorowitz, Joseph Kichler, Max Kingston, Bronka Krygier, Chava Kwinta, Wanda Lerek, Alexander Levin, George Lysy, Anita Mayer, Henry Melnick, Fanny Pillersdorf, Robert Rosen, Freda Rosenblatt, Judith Rubinstein, George Salamon, Magda Schullerer, Hanneliese Schusheim-Beigel, Peter Silverman, Yael Spier Cohen, Inge Spitz, Ann Szedlecki, Dennis Urstein, Ernst Weiss, Robert Weiss, Nechemia Wurman, Ada Wynston, Etty Zigler, David Zuckerbrot


Neuberger HEW 2017 Program Guide  

Program Guide for Holocaust Education Week 2017: Pivotal Moments