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Linear Solutions by Wood-Mode.


Reflect Your Own Personal Style Whatever your inspiration, the experienced design professionals in a Wood-Mode showroom can help you create the exact look you’ve always wanted for your home. Visit your nearest Wood-Mode Showroom.

Bellevue Refined Woodworks, Inc. 10203 Main Street 425-289-0389 www.refined-woodworks.com

Bellingham Bellingham Millwork Supply 3879 Hannegan Road 360-734-5700 www.bellinghammillwork.com

Mount Vernon Riverside Kitchen Center 2025 Riverside Drive 360-424-0884 www.riversidekitchens.com

Seattle Rainier Cabinetry & Design, Inc. 2901 N.E. Blakeley Street, Ste. 3A 206-632-7929 www.rainiercabinetry.com

Seattle Refined Woodworks, Inc. 5701 6th Avenue South, Suite 121 206-762-2603 www.refined-woodworks.com

For your home. For your life. For our environment.

©2009 Wood-Mode, Inc.


Quality Furniture Lasts for Generations

3INCE THE-ASINFAMILY HASBEENSERVINGTHE0ACIlC .ORTHWEST OFFERINGTHEMOST BEAUTIFULFURNITUREINAVARIETY OFSTYLES FROMTRADITIONALTO #RAFTSMANTOCONTEMPORARY #OMEVISITUSSOONANDLETONE OFOURTALENTEDDESIGNERSHELP WITHYOURPLANSFORYOURHOME

Baker Councill Guy Chaddock Hancock & Moore Henkel Harris Stickley


Why is Masins in a class by itself? s4HEMOSTBEAUTIFULFURNITUREINTHE .ORTHWEST WITHMANYBRANDSEXCLUSIVETO -ASINS DISPLAYEDINTHREEEXQUISITE SHOWROOMS s4ALENTED AWARD WINNINGDESIGNERSWHO HAVECREATEDSOMEOFTHEMOSTSTRIKING INTERIORSINTHEAREA s/UREIGHTDECADEREPUTATIONFOREXCELLENT SERVICE BEFOREANDAFTERTHESALE WHETHER YOUAREINTERESTEDINASINGLEPIECEORARE INTERESTEDINDOINGYOURENTIREHOME Come visit us soon. You’ll see what we mean. 4 generations represented by Ben, Bob, Dave & Grant Masin

2 2 0 2 n d Av e n u e S o u t h , S e a t t l e | 2 0 6 . 6 2 2 . 5 6 0 6 10708 Main Street, Bellevue | 425.450.9999 w w w. m a s i n s . c o m


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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM


You could simply find art to hang in your home. But Gaspar’s family of designers and builders can create art that actually is your home. Whether you want to remodel a bathroom or renovate your entire condo or house, Gaspar’s can help you create and construct a stylish design that’s as unique as you are – so your home can become your favorite work of art.

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

5


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building s quality s relationships


RESIDENTIAL REMODELS s CUSTOM HOMES

www.loganshammer.com 206.718.4008


Surround yourself with Miele. If you’re known by the company you keep, why not surround yourself with those celebrated for their sophistication, savvy and expertise. Miele’s award-winning suite of cooking, cooling and cleaning appliances offers you the finest of companionship. Flaunting flawless craftsmanship, seamless design lines and intelligent, task-driven controls… you’re sure to be in good company with Miele. Explore further at:

Monday - Friday, 9am - 7pm Saturday, 9am - 5pm G Sunday, 11am - 5pm

EST.1939

©2009 Miele, Inc.

Seattle: 1476 Elliott Avenue W. 206-282-2110 Southcenter: 404 Strander Boulevard 206-433-1110 Lynnwood: 18620 33rd Avenue W. 425-670-1110 Bellevue: 1038 116th Avenue NE. 425-451-1110 www.albertleeappliance.com


Visit Your Premier KOHLER速 Showroom Redmond Showroom Seattle Showroom 18317 N.E. 76th Street 3209 17th Avenue (425) 885-4736 (206) 270-4727 www.kellersupply.com


vintage style Give

JOIN US FOR A COMPLIMENTARY DECORATING CLASS ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29TH & DECEMBER 6TH AT 10AM

HOLIDAY DECORATING & ENTERTAINING CO-SPONSORED BY

CALL THE BELLEVUE SQUARE STORE TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY 425.451.0097


& LIFESTYLES Design and Architecture for Northwest Living

DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS >>

32

76

28

HOME

88

OF THE

YEAR>> 44

60

16

departments

features

18 22 28 32 40 70 74 76 78 81 82 86 88

44

HOME FOR CHRISTMAS

50

SIMPLY TIMELESS

HELLO STYLE TREND TALENT AT THE TABLE BEFORE & AFTER GREEN LIVING DETAILS EVENTS SCENE REAL ESTATE SOURCES RIGHT NOW

NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

56

A designer’s Mercer Island house is our choice for this year’s holiday home.

An elegantly traditional home shares the best of old and new.

60

HOME OF THE YEAR

68

GARDEN PARTY A private courtyard in Mount Baker wins

This year’s winning home is a Queen Anne house that celebrates indoor-outdoor living.

SH&L’s Publisher’s Choice Award in the 2009 Northwest Design Awards.

ALL THE RIGHT HUES Color expert Leatrice Eiseman invites us into her lush Bainbridge garden.

ON THE COVER

Interior designer Susan Marinello creates a winter wonderland at home (see page 44). WRITTEN BY ANGELA CABOTAJE PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEX HAYDEN


sh&l HELLO

SH&L’S ANGELA CABOTAJE, SHAWN WILLIAMS AND GISELLE SMITH PONDER POSSIBILITIES AS WE WORK ON THE REDESIGN.

our new

l~~ª

N

ow that Seattle Homes & Lifest¥les is a teenager (October 2009 marked 13 years of continuous publication), we decided it’s time for a new look. Since its launch in September 1996, the magazine has undergone just one significant redesign, in October 2003. Six years later, we felt it was due for another remodel—to refresh the things we love in the magazine and to add a few new features.

Art director Shawn Williams explains that her goals were to update the look of the magazine, making it “fresh, friendly and upbeat—yet still exuding a sleek, clean, sophisticated presence that reflects our brand and the region’s design sensibility.” Of course, the magazine remains fully dedicated to home design and living well at home. We’ve kept many of your favorite parts of the magazine—our beautiful home features with multiple spreads of gorgeous homes throughout the greater Seattle area—and added some new departments that focus on specific aspects of great design. With the magazine’s new look and some new departments, we’re recommitted to great design: architecture, interior design and outdoor living solutions uniquely suited to the Northwest environment. Check out these departments: TALENT, with profiles of regional designers, architects, artisans or craftspeople (in this issue, we feature the 2009 Design Achievement Award honorees, page 32); AT THE TABLE, where we share food, wine or entertaining ideas (try our holiday cocktails, page 40); BEFORE & AFTER, a staff and reader favorite, formerly known as “Room for Improvement,” which features an original view of a living space and then what the homeowners and design pros did to make it fabulous (page 70); GREEN LIVING, focusing on sustainable design, whether of

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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

products or homes (in this issue, we spotlight a North Cascades vacation home, page 74); DETAILS, in which we focus on specific ideas, products or workmanship that make a project sing (page 76); and RIGHT NOW, with photographs of products or ideas that magazine staffers and featured designers love right now (page 88). SCENE includes snapshots from community and industry events (page 81). And our SOURCES page tells you how to contact the professionals who worked on our featured homes (page 86). We’ve also added some new staff members: publishing director Suzie Osterloh (sosterloh@seattlehomesmag.com), and account executives Maile Wolf (mwolf@seattlehomesmag.com) and Sarah Filicetti (sfilicetti@seattlehomesmag.com). Please join us in welcoming them. We hope you enjoy our fresh new look and home design–rich content, and I invite you to share your thoughts with me or anyone else on staff. (Learn how to find us online on page 21.) We’d love to hear what you think the next 13 years can bring.

GISELLE SMITH, Editor-in-Chief gisellesmith@seattlehomesmag.com


n~.

104 ™

Publishing Director: Suzie Osterloh Editor-in-Chief: Giselle Smith Art Director: Shawn Williams Assistant Editor: Angela Cabotaje Market Editor: Stacy Kendall Market Adviser: Linda Humphrey Copy Editor: Kris Fulsaas Proofreader: Jenifer Kooiman Contributing Editors: Lisa Kennedy, Allison Lind, Debra Prinzing, Kathryn Renner, Lindsey Roberts Contributors: Julia Chang, Nancy Clark, Michelle Cristalli, Andrew Drake, Hank Drew, John Granen, Alex Hayden, Steve Keating, Aaron Moncivaiz, Michael Skott, Lara Swimmer Senior Account Executives: Denise Peterson, Shirley Sax

featuring

mattaliano

Claire Floor Lamp Tritan Dining Table

Account Executives: Sarah Filicetti, Maile Wolf Marketing Coordinator: Robinson Fralick FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: (800) 368-5938

SEATTLE HOMES & LIFESTYLES™ 3240 Eastlake Ave. E., Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98102 (206) 322-6699 • (206) 322-2799 Fax Web site: SeattleHomesMag.com Advertising inquiries: sosterloh@seattlehomesmag.com Editorial inquiries: gsmith@seattlehomesmag.com

Visit us online at SeattleHomesMag.com

President, Home Design Division: Adam Japko Senior Vice President, Operations: Stuart Christian Director of Publishing Operations: Rick Higgins Production Director: Cheryl Jock Production Manager: Shannon McKelvey Circulation Manager: Kurt Coey Newsstand Manager: Bob Moenster

Visit the showroom to browse an exquisite array of fine interior & exterior furnishings. 5701 sixth avenue south, no. 288 seattle design center seattle wa 98108 t 206-763-4100 hours mon-fri 9 am to 5 pm terrisdraheim.com

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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

Chairman & CEO: Daniel McCarthy CFO: Gerry Parker General Counsel: Susan Deese


find us online HERE’S HOW TO CONNECT WITH SEATTLE HOMES & LIFESTYLES ON THE INTERNET: Our Web site: www.SeattleHomesMag.com Our digital edition: www.SeattleHomesMag.com/Digital Our blog: Blog.SeattleHomesMag.com On Twitter: www.twitter.com/seattlehomesmag On Facebook: www.facebook.com/seattlehomesmag + Sign up for our free weekly e-newsletters at SeattleHomesMag.com

AND HERE’S HOW TO REACH OUR STAFF: Publishing Director SUZIE OSTERLOH e-mail: sosterloh@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/suzie.osterloh Twitter: www.twitter.com/suzieoster Editor-in-Chief GISELLE SMITH e-mail: gsmith@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/gisellesmith Twitter: www.twitter.com/gisellesmith Art Director SHAWN WILLIAMS e-mail: swilliams@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/swilliams3 Twitter: www.twitter.com/shawnmwilliams

featuring

sara wise

Union Round Dining Table Union Rectangle & Union Oval also available

Assistant Editor ANGELA CABOTAJE e-mail: acabotaje@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/angelacabotaje Twitter: www.twitter.com/angelacabotaje Market Editor STACY KENDALL e-mail: market@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/shlmarketeditor Twitter: www.twitter.com/shlmarketeditor Senior Account Executives DENISE PETERSON e-mail: dpeterson@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/denisepeterson7 Twitter: www.twitter.com/denisempeterson SHIRLEY SAX e-mail: ssax@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/shirleysax Twitter: www.twitter.com/shirleysax Account Executives SARAH FILICETTI e-mail: sfilicetti@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/sarahfilicetti Twitter: www.twitter.com/sarahfilicetti MAILE WOLF e-mail: mwolf@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/mailewolf Twitter: www.twitter.com/mailewolf Marketing Coordinator ROBINSON FRALICK e-mail: rfralick@SeattleHomesMag.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/robinsonfralick Twitter: www.twitter.com/robinsonfralick

Visit the showroom to browse an exquisite array of fine interior & exterior furnishings. 5701 sixth avenue south, no. 288 seattle design center seattle wa 98108 t 206-763-4100 hours mon-fri 9 am to 5 pm terrisdraheim.com

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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sh&l STYLE

choose key colors:

a>e em~ti~nally “Pe~pleattracted to certain colors. so surround yourself in what you love, and it will always make you happy.”

—CHRISTINE ARCHER

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NOV. & DEC. 2009


home office

in°pi>ati~n° WRITTEN BY STACY KENDALL PHOTOGRAPHS BY HANK DREW AND JOHN GRANEN

This may be a frightening prospect for some people, but it could be said that the home office is one of the most defining rooms in the house when it comes to personal style.

ANY GREAT INTERIOR DESIGNER WILL TELL YOU that getting to know the client plays a critical role in the creative process—which often involves months of considering color choices, style preferences and living habits. A year ago, interior designer Christine Archer took on a home-office project for perhaps her most discerning client: herself. Archer finds it essential for her office to be welcoming and tidy for meetings with colleagues and clients. And because she’s an interior designer, it’s vital that the room reflect her taste and her ability to transform a space into something special. She sees the home office as the most overlooked room in the house as far as design is concerned. “When you go to people’s homes, they will say [about the office], ‘Oh, don’t look in there,’ ” Archer observes. “But people work harder and longer these days, so spending time in the office should be enjoyable.” Archer’s own office is a bold study in contrast and color. In the center of the room, her desk is an elegantly shaped wood table that faces French doors. Two Granny Smith–apple green leather cubes in front of the desk serve as tables or extra seating. Between the desk and large windows are armchairs upholstered in rich chocolate brown. The designer identifies her “style” as transitional, but for her office, she was moved to incorporate some modern elements. “These lamps inspired the whole room,” she says, gesturing to two chic lamps on top of the file cabinet behind her desk that flank a white-framed mirror. “The [mirror] wall is the first thing you see when you walk through the doors, and it carries the whole room,” Archer says. She painted the walls Benjamin Moore’s Mink, one of her favorite shades of brown, and accented with furniture and accessories in crisp apple green and white. The color scheme livens up the room without distracting from its function. “This room inspires me daily, and most importantly, it makes me happy,” Archer says. “Nobody walks out of here without a smile on their face.”

opposite: ARCHER STANDS IN FRONT OF THE DESK THAT SHE PLACED FACING THE DOOR SO SHE CAN ALWAYS WELCOME GUESTS AND CLIENTS. right, top to bottom: ARCHER FOUND—AND FELL IN LOVE WITH—TWO ITALIANESQUE MOD VASES AND TRANSFORMED THEM INTO LAMPS BY ADDING CUSTOM WHITE SHADES; A CONTEMPORARY CHAIR CONTRASTS IN STYLE AND IN COLOR WITH THE PAINTED WOOD DESK, ACHIEVING A BALANCED LOOK; CHOCOLATE BROWN ARMCHAIRS ARE ACCENTED WITH A GREEN SIDE TABLE AND PILLOWS.

PHOTOGRAPHS THIS SPREAD BY HANK DREW

Other rooms often get credit for establishing our taste in décor, but how we work says a lot about who we are. Even sequestered behind closed doors, home offices reveal how we live when we think nobody’s looking.

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

23


THE SOFT NEUTRALS, BRIGHT JEWEL TONES, GLAMOROUS OBJECTS AND MIX OF STYLES IN HEATHER CHRISTOTHOULOU’S OFFICE CREATE AN ATMOSPHERE THAT IS BOTH COMFORTABLE AND CHIC.

consider the desk:

the loo√ “ofwethewanted partner des√—

two people on both sides. floating the desk is elegant instead of utilitarian, and the modern edge is made inviting by the two upholstered chairs.

—CARRIE HAYDEN

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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM


go big:

“each office space has to have that

amazing piece

that is the point of reference for the whole room. it could be a great antique mirror, or a beautiful settee or a gorgeous bookcase that softens the practical function of the room.

PHOTOGRAPHS THIS SPREAD BY JOHN GRANEN

—CARRIE HAYDEN

HEATHER CHRISTOTHOULOU’S HOME OFFICE is a mélange of styles, based on striking a balance and creating visual interest rather than demonstrating a rigid adherence to one look. The eclectic combination includes feminine accessories, such as pink Lucite benches and a crystal ship chandelier over her desk, as well as masculine pieces, such as metal-andwood bookshelves and an espresso-hued desk. The resulting tension of silhouettes creates a visual dynamism that keeps Christothoulou thinking creatively. For Christothoulou, nurturing the creative spark is serious business. As a classically trained chef, she inspires others with her food and lifestyle blog, heatherchristo.com, where she shares her favorite recipes and details menus and décor ideas for special occasions. In designing her home-office space—with the help of interior designer Carrie Hayden of Great Jones Home—Christothoulou made sure that the things that inspire her creatively would always be only a glance or an arm’s length away. “I wanted a space that would really be my own— feminine and glamorous,” she says. The ship chandelier, for instance, was pure indulgence in her longtime love of the whimsical design. “My husband thought it was a little crazy, but this was my way of keeping things lighthearted and having a sense of humor,” Christothoulou explains. It was Hayden who planned one of the homeowner’s favorite office furnishings: the custom linen-covered bulletin board with a decorative gold frame. “It’s my inspiration board, and I fill it with clippings and photos—all the things that I PERSONAL TOUCHES ON THE DESK, SUCH AS A want to keep fresh in my mind,” Christothoulou DISPLAY OF HAND-WRITTEN RECIPES AND FLOWERS says. “Most people would look at it and see chaos, FROM THE GARDEN, FOSTER AN INTIMATE SETTING. but I’m continually swapping things out for new inspiration. Especially when I need to sit down and write a recipe or come up with ideas for parties, I come to my office,” she says. “I never know what’s going to jump out at me.” The bookcases opposite the desk showcase Christothoulou’s vintage art and fashion books, pieces from her seashell collection, family photos and pictures of her husband and young daughter, Pia. Along with the family dog, a St. Bernard named Henry, Pia is a constant companion for Christothoulou while she works, so Hayden chose a soft rug for under the chair and desk. “Heather is really surrounded by the things she loves in this room,” Hayden says. “The colors—yellow, gray and pink—are her favorites; the souvenirs gathered on their world travels and fresh-cut flowers from her garden all make it a great escape for her.” Whatever your work or design style, don’t hide your home office: Highlight it by creating a personal retreat in which your best ideas can be inspired by the most well-designed surroundings.

WORK AT HOME BEAUTIFULLY THE INTERIOR DESIGNERS IN OUR STORY SHARE THEIR ADVICE ON HOW TO MAKE WORKING AT HOME WONDERFUL CHRISTINE ARCHER PUT FUNCTIONALITY FIRST:

“Think about the things you have to use: a laptop or a desktop computer? Lots of wires are distracting, so they need to be hidden.” STAY NEAT:

“In the office, having lots of drawer space puts clutter out of sight but still easily accessible. Though everyone works differently, things need to be within reach but be able to be put away at the end of the day.” CONSIDER MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS:

“I’m working with a client right now who’s in the wine business, and we have discussed putting a small tasting bar in his home office that can be covered up with a decorative screen when he’s not hosting clients.” FOLLOW THE RULE OF THREE:

“People don’t realize how dark their space is. One of the most important things is having a lighting triangle— overhead, natural and task lighting.” CARRIE HAYDEN: CARRIE HAYDEN LET THE CREATIVITY FLOW:

“In Heather’s office, being surrounded by the objects she loves creates visual reminders for her that serve as inspiration. The office is a great place to put personal items.” MIX UP THE LIGHTING:

“Especially in Seattle with our winters, it’s important to have a desk lamp to create a cozy feel. It should be a fun object, and with a combination of lighting you can vary the ambience of the room.” KEEP SOME THINGS OUT OF SIGHT:

“You have to get creative with storage. In Heather’s office, a closet holds all of the electronics, and her files are in the built-in bookshelves. It’s important to disguise those things so they don’t weigh the space down visually.”

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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1

pare it

down 3

2

Do you swoon for sleek style? Minimal lines still make for mega visual impact. For many people, out of sight doesn’t mean out of mind when it comes to office organization. As a result, it’s important that visual clutter is kept at bay. We found some crisp designs that look sharp in a modern space. 1. With up-to-the-minute style, this clock keeps us on time and in vogue. Piro Clock, $9.99 at IKEA, 601 S.W. 41st St., Renton, (425) 656-2980, ikea.com.

4

MIX MODERN DESIGN CLASSICS WITH TRADITION FOR A LUXE LAYERED LOOK.

5

2. We love this light for its sophisticated stature; it’s surely destined to become a classic. Tab Light by Flos, $295 at Inform Interiors, 2032 Eighth Ave., (206) 622-1608, www.informseattle.com. 3. Make a serious statement with a bright color and bold styling. AC 4 task chair by Vitra, $1,480 and up through Design Within Reach, 126 Central Way, Ste. 100, Kirkland, (425) 828-0280, dwr.com. 4. With good looks, this wastebasket overfloweth. Mesh Garbino Can designed by Karim Rashid for Umbra, $12.99 at The Container Store, 700 Bellevue Way N.E., Ste. 120, Bellevue, (425) 453-7120, containerstore.com. 5. For designs that will stand the test of time, less is more. Villa Rose desk, $2,425 at Ligne Roset, 55 University St., (206) 341-9990, ligne-roset-usa.com.

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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM


mercer island

isle of man

Is your life bigger than your bank? HSBC Group is fluent in banking worldwide. And now we’re adding Mercer Island to our network of more than 9,500 offices in over 85 countries and territories. Come learn about HSBC Premier, the service that seamlessly connects you to global opportunities and ideas. Or HSBC Business Banking, where a dedicated relationship manager will help you navigate today’s business world. Start a new Premier1 or Business Banking2 relationship with a qualifying initial deposit of $50,000 in new money and choose from a $500 gift card from Apple,® a $500 Travelocity® Hotel Gift Card, or a $500 gift card from Dell.™ To take advantage of this special offer, visit our newest location: Mercer Island 2630 77th Avenue SE Suite 110 206.926.1180 Coming Soon: Redmond 15946 Redmond Way Suite 101

Other area location: Seattle 523 Union Street 206.224.9961

us.hsbc.com/newbranches

Mercer Island, WA Branch Opening: September 8, 2009. Offer(s) available at the foregoing branch(es) only on qualifying accounts opened with a minimum deposit of $50,000 in new money within 120 days of the branch opening date. For these offer(s) new money is defined as funds or positions not previously held by any member of the HSBC Group over the past consecutive six months and must be in addition to existing deposit balances. Qualified customers will be notified via mail within 90 days of opening an account; notification will include instructions for redeeming the gift of choice. Any gift not redeemed within 180 days of branch opening will be forfeited. This offer cannot be combined with any other offers or promotions, is nontransferable, good while supplies last. The cost of the gift will be reported on IRS Form 1099 (not applicable to tax exempt businesses). 1: Offer valid when you begin a new Premier relationship. Offer not valid on Retirement (IRA) Brokerage Accounts or for existing U.S. deposit customers of HSBC. To qualify for HSBC Premier, you must open a Premier Checking account and maintain $100,000 in combined U.S. personal deposit and investment balances. Business owners may use their commercial balances to qualify for personal Premier status but these balances cannot be used to meet the new money requirements. A monthly maintenance fee of $50 will be incurred if minimum balance requirements are not maintained. You have up to 90 days after account opening to meet the full $100,000 balance requirements. The Annual Percentage Yield (APY) and balance for a Premier Checking Account which is accurate as of publication date is 0.01% APY on balances of $5.00 or more. APY is variable and subject to change after opening. Charges and fees may reduce earnings. Limit one gift per customer. Premier relationship must remain open for a minimum of six months or value of gift will be deducted from account proceeds at closing. 2: Offer valid when you open a new ExtraVantage ® for Business, BusinessSmart SM for Professionals or Analyzed Checking Account. Limit of one nontransferable premium per business customer or business group. Apple ® is a trademark of Apple Inc.; Travelocity ® is a trademark of Travelocity.com LP and is used here under license; Dell ™ is a registered trademark of Dell Inc.; Dell Gift Card: Terms and conditions apply. For complete terms visit Dell.com/giftcard; None of the gift card companies are in any way related to HSBC Premier and are not a participant or sponsor of this promotion. HSBC reserves the right to substitute gift card offers without notification. Deposit products offered in the United States by HSBC Bank USA, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2009 HSBC Bank USA, N.A.


sh&l TREND

jewel tones

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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM


{

ALL THAT GLITTERS IS GOLD, RASPBERRY AND OYSTER GRAY WRITTEN BY STACY KENDALL PHOTOGRAPH BY HANK DREW

LATE FALL AND THE ONSET OF WINTER is a fabulous time for color, and this season we’re glamming it up with a rich palette of raspberry, oyster gray and gold. Gray is still the reigning neutral, but now it’s a warm hue instead of the dark charcoal of two years ago. And gold has successfully established itself as the hot accent for the trend conscious. Raspberry is the It Girl, so to speak, but this pink trend runs the gamut from pale rose to deep red. “I started seeing the pinks as a trend in Europe,” says artist Lauren Sloan, owner of Ravenna’s Lauren Sloan Designs boutique. “I think we’ve gone through the cool colors, and now designers want to spice things up with the deeply saturated jewel tones.” This palette truly dazzles during the holidays, so we can’t wait to cozy up to these colors this season. For inspiration, we drew from this scintillating trio to create a traditional room warmed by candlelight and ready for a romantic holiday evening.

❮❮ Products shown on this page were borrowed from Seattle-area showrooms and retailers including Lauren Sloan Designs, Polly McArthur & Associates, Andonian Rugs, Lighting Universe, and Masins Fine Furnishings & Interior Design. Our model, Nancy Clark, is wearing a Shipley & Halmos tank dress and Christian Louboutin pumps from Barney’s New York. For complete resource information, turn to Sources, page 86.

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

29


sh&l TREND

{

“Metallics are cyclical—it’s been all about silver, and now gold is making a big comeback. The oyster color as a neutral is very sophisticated, and it complements the golds and pinks.” —Lauren Sloan

} 3

2

1

4

COLORFUL ACCENTS FOR YOUR HOME 1. Constantine stool, $735 through Revival Home & Garden, 1517 12th Ave., (206) 763-3886, revivalhomeandgarden.com. 2. Garden Gild Lamp, $248 at Anthropologie, two Seattle locations, anthropologie.com. 3. Paint sample in Blushing Red by Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. 4. 3-D Ruffle Palmetto Harvest Pillow by Ankasa, $340 through G.R. Hedges, Seattle Design

Center, Ste. P-262, (206) 763-4884, grhedges.com. Wallpaper on page 29: Sylvana Damask Fabric by Nina Campbell, color no. 5, available to the trade through The Joan Lockwood Collections Inc., Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-203, (206) 763-1912, joanlockwoodcollections.com.

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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM


2VBMJUZ1SPEVDUTBU &WFSZ1SJDF-FWFM

Decorative Plumbing Door Hardware Cabinet Hardware Steam/Bathtub Bathroom Cabinets Bath Accessories

Oregon Showroom 333 N.W. 16th Avenue Portland, Oregon 800-452-7634

Washington Showroom 12001 N.E. 12th St. #38 Bellevue, Washington 800-574-4312

www.chown.com

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

31


sh&l TALENT

Judging Panel SHOWN BELOW, LEFT TO RIGHT:

Peter Conard, Brent Markee, Maryika Byskiniewicz, Jennifer Randall, Barbara Swift, Jane Weed

Each year, Seattle Homes & Lifest¥les and Seattle Design Center

team up to present the Design Achievement Awards, a celebration of four local designers who are defining (or redefining) their industry. The honorees are nominated and chosen by an exclusive panel, which changes each year but is always composed of past winners and notable local design professionals. Panelists submit nominations in four categories of design (architecture, interior design, landscape design and an open category), then meet over lunch to discuss the relative merits of each nominee and to agree on criteria for the year’s honors. Discussions lead to debate—and sometimes even arguments—but no one leaves until consensus is reached. For this, our seventh annual awards, our panelists chose to honor designers whose many varied contributions to

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their disciplines make them worthy of lifetime achievement awards. But what earned them this award, our judges stressed, was that despite lengthy and illustrious careers that might logically lead them to comfortably retire, all of these designers are still actively producing new and innovative work. This year’s selection panel included three 2008 DAA honorees—interior designer Maryika Byskiniewicz, landscape architect Barbara Swift and lighting designer Brent Markee—as well as architect Peter Conard, principal of Sullivan Conard Architects, interior designer Jennifer Randall and Jane Weed, owner of Jane Piper Reid & Co.


achievement awards 2009

Hunziker is heralded for contributing to the

Pacific Northwest’s signature organic-plus-contemporary look.

Founder, Terry Hunziker, 208 Third Ave., (206) 467-1144

terry hunzike®

interior design

Fickle trends and specific styles don’t faze interior designer Terry Hunziker. Throughout his career, he’s been interested in only how a room feels: “To me a space feels right when many elements, such as scale, texture, color and concise selection of furniture styles come together in a balanced, restrained way,” he says. “Restraint and editing are key factors.” In 1985, after working under local design great Jean Jongeward for 13 years, Hunziker began an eponymous firm that has steadily powered interior design forward ever since. Since his career began, the interior designer’s eye has been concurrently on furniture design: Outdoor furniture company Sutherland has asked him to do nine lines so far. At the moment, Hunziker is working on homes in Austin, New Zealand, Laguna Beach and Cabo, as well as scouting for more furniture and materials resources. Though he pays little attention to trends, Hunziker is heralded for contributing to the Pacific Northwest’s signature organic-plus-contemporary look, and in the future, we expect him to continue to define and refine the best of Northwest interiors. “The quality of work is so high-end—at the highest level throughout,” raves interior designer Maryika Byskiniewicz. —LINDSEY ROBERTS top and left: “WHEN YOU DESIGN FURNITURE, IT INDIVIDUALIZES EACH INTERIOR AND YOU CAN CONTROL EVERYTHING ABOUT IT: THE COLOR, THE SIZE, THE SCALE,” HUNZIKER SAYS. THE SAME COULD BE SAID OF HIS INTERIORS: EACH PIECE IS DELIBERATELY CHOSEN, EACH ITEM STRATEGICALLY PLACED, THE COLORS A COHESIVE PALETTE.

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achievement awards 2009

Founder, Suyama Peterson Deguchi Architects, and co-founder, Suyama Space, 2324 Second Ave., (206) 256-0809, s-pd.com and s-pd.com/art

george suyama

architecture

his work blurs the line between

art and architecture. 34

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The founder of Suyama Peterson Deguchi Architects and a tireless advocate of public art, George Suyama does not merely construct; he crafts. His work—often described as minimalist, transparent and contemporary—blurs the line between art and architecture. Since founding George Suyama Architects in 1971, Suyama has won numerous awards and accolades, including the American Institute of Architects 2009 Medal of Honor. With his business partners, Ric Peterson and Jay Deguchi, who joined the firm in 1983 and 2002, respectively, he focuses on the future, not merely past successes. “I love the challenge of a new project,” Suyama says. “Each one seems to be the one you’re most excited about, which is natural.” In 1998 Suyama embarked on another creative venture. With curator Beth Sellars, he founded Suyama Space as a nonprofit gallery to inspire and educate through its installations. It suggests Suyama’s vision of a mutually influential relationship between art and architecture. Suyama is currently most excited about a sod-roof project, nestled in a creek bed, surrounded by cedar and fir trees— in an urban setting. This kind of innovation makes Suyama one of the Northwest’s most iconic designers. “He continues to invent. He is versatile,” panelist Jennifer Randall says. “Suyama Space is really defining,” adds panelist Jane Weed. “[He] is an inspiration in design and has contributed so much to the Northwest.” —JULIA CHANG above and left: THESE TWO SUYAMA-DESIGNED HOMES WON AIA SEATTLE HONOR AWARDS AND AIA NORTHWEST + PACIFIC HONOR AWARDS. THE WEST SEATTLE RESIDENCE (TOP) IN 2003 AND 2004, AND THE BROADMOOR (LEFT) IN 2005 AND 2006.


Sustainable Designs Landscape Construction Stone Work Garden Carpentry Inspired Plantings

425 803.9881 www.envconst.com

NEED AN ARCHITECT? AIA Seattle can help. Use FOLIO, our architecture firm directory, to narrow your search by project type, by firm, by project budget and more.

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No project is too small. Involve an architect early to help make your dream home or remodel a reality. A Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (206) 448-4938 info@aiaseattle.org

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Laden with awards from the United States, Britain and France, local landscape architect Kathryn Gustafson can have her choice of projects. This freedom to do what she loves is the best part of her job, she says. And the projects she chooses are as impressive as her talent and as grand in range: the Rights of Man Square in Evry, France; a milelong park in Singapore; a desert park in Abu Dhabi; and multiple Seattle-area projects, including McCaw Hall and the Seattle Civic Center. Appropriately, the visions for her work come out of the land itself: “I call it the emergence of the soul of the site,” she says. “We try to make the essential qualities—the essence—of the site emerge. These qualities can be natural, historical or cultural.” Barbara Swift, a fellow landscape architect, calls Gustafson’s visions extraordinary: “I absolutely adore the sort of very elegant, simple use of form and volume and her very profound use of materials antithetical to the usual superficial use of materials.” Gustafson’s career has evolved over time, from the 1970s, when she designed clothes, to the ’80s, when she planned parks in Paris. In the ’90s, she started winning serious awards for her work. Today, she thinks about sustainability and landscaping for urbanites. “We are trying to find ways that we can live healthily, be in the city and be good stewards to our environments,” she says. New ideas for Gustafson mean new directions, and her latest notable project is designing the landscape for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. —L.R.

achievement awards 2009

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Landscape Architect, Principal, Gustafson Guthrie Nichol Ltd., Pier 55, Floor 3, 1101 Alaskan Way, (206) 903-6802, ggnltd.com

kathryn gustafson

landscape design

the visions for her work come out of the land itself.

NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

top: GUSTAFSON WON A DESIGN EXCELLENCE AWARD FROM THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS AND AN AIA SEATTLE HONOR AWARD FOR THE KREIELSHELMER PROMENADE AT MCCAW HALL. left: SHE DESIGNED THE RIGHTS OF MAN SQUARE IN EVRY, FRANCE, IN 1991. “IT’S LIKE HAVING CHILDREN, THEY ALL HAVE DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES AND QUIRKS,” GUSTAFSON SAYS ABOUT HER MANY PROJECTS. “THEY ALL HAVE THEIR WONDERFUL COMPLEXITIES.”


Techline: Right-Sized Home Furnishings

FURNITURE INTERIORS CELEBRATING -5400 Phone (425) 46280 YEARS Open Every Day of the Week 10308 NE 10th St., Bellevue (2 blocks north of Bellevue Square)

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achievement awards 2009

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Owner, Souvenir, 5325 Ballard Ave. N.W., (206) 297-7116, curtissteiner.com

curtis steine®

open category

Curtis Steiner is a living kaleidoscope of artistic talent, a true aesthete living in our utilitarian midst. He has explored new mediums and ideas in design since he was a teenage entrepreneur designing greeting cards: In the 1980s, he designed fabric for Concord Textiles; in the mid-1990s, his hand-painted greeting cards were sold at Neiman Marcus; in 1999, he opened Souvenir in Ballard, a shop curated like a gallery. In 2008 he made a portrait out of chocolate truffles for Fran’s Chocolates. His biggest artistic accomplishment so far, however, might be his 2004 design of a set of 1,000 identical black-and-beige blocks—each of the six sides a different pattern—arranged to make 100 composed images. The blocks are now a permanent exhibit at Seattle Art Museum. Steiner laments that people can’t interact with today’s art, but viewers of 1,000 Blocks are invited to make their own patterns.

NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

“I like to encourage people to touch and feel, to experience and move,” he says. Souvenir itself is an art exhibit, from which customers can take home a found object, greeting card or antique. Recently, Steiner has started thinking about calligraphicinspired artwork. “I love that Curtis is still a young man and has so much yet to create,” Jane Weed says. “He is like a musician who can play all instruments well or a linguist who can speak in any tongue. The question is not what he has done for the Seattle art scene, but rather how long before the rest of the world discovers his gift.”—L.R. top: PROBABLY STEINER’S FAVORITE PROJECT, VISUAL POETRY WAS PART OF A 2005 SEATTLE ART MUSEUM EXHIBIT ABOUT THE STORIES BEHIND OBJECTS. HIS “BAROQUE EXPLOSION,” AS THE EXHIBIT NOTES DESCRIBE IT, IS FULL OF SEEMINGLY RANDOM OBJECTS COMBINED˜MUCH LIKE HIS SHOP, SOUVENIR. bottom left: A PORTRAIT IN CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES. bottom right: STEINER TRANSFORMED THIS ANTIQUE BOOK INTO A SCULPTURAL OBJECT BY FOLDING ALL OF THE PAGES.

“he is like a musician who can play all instruments well.” —Jane Weed


, O U R VOCA B U L A R Y B OR EDOM ISN T IN OU In its 74th winter season, the resort that pioneered the chairlift stays on the cutting edge with its new Roundhouse Gondola. Skiers and boarders now have comfortable access to Baldy’s legendary runs, which have been the training grounds for Olympic champions for generations. Plus, with our new 400-foot superpipe and terrain park, you’ll never run out of ways to enjoy the snow. But just in case you do, our one-of-a-kind Lift Ticket Exchange Program lets you trade in some ski time for the endless excitement and entertainment available off the mountain.

Sun Valley Resort Info.

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1-800-786-8259

www.resortquestsunvalley.com

www.sunvalley.com


sh&l

holiday splashes

AT THE TABLE

POMEGRANATE DREAM SERVES 1

2 orange slices 1 ounce pomegranate syrup ½ ounce Yazi Ginger Flavored Vodka 1 ounce Grand Marnier 1 ounce prosecco Pomegranate seeds Mint sprig In a cocktail shaker, muddle the orange with ice, then add pomegranate syrup, vodka and Grand Marnier and shake. Pour over ice in a collins glass and float with prosecco. Garnish with pomegranate seeds and a mint sprig. Note: For large parties, all of the ingredients—excluding the prosecco and garnish—can be premixed in a pitcher in the same ratio, poured over ice as guests arrive, and topped with the prosecco and garnish.

TEXT BY AARON MONCIVAIZ PHOTOGRAPH BY HANK DREW RECIPES BY DAN HUTCHINSON

Get-togethers with loved ones and a cozy chair by the fire can warm our hearts during the holidays, but nothing fends off winter’s chill better than a little holiday spirits. Raise your glass to good health, good friends and good cheer with these flavorful seasonal cocktails.

Recipes courtes¥ DAN HUTCHINSON, EXECUTIVE CHEF, IL FIASCO RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR

SPICED PEAR MARTINI SERVES 1

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5 mint leaves 1 lime wedge 1 ounce Captain Morgan’s Spiced Rum ½ ounce Clear Creek Oregon Pear Brandy

1 ounce sweetened pear juice or purée Fresh-grated nutmeg 1 cinnamon stick Fresh pear slice

In a cocktail shaker, muddle the mint and lime with ice, add all the liquid and shake. Strain into a martini glass and garnish with a quick grate of nutmeg, a cinnamon stick and a slice of pear.


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sh&l FEATURES

New t>aditi~n°

In this redesigned issue of Seattle Homes & Lifestyles, we celebrate both old and new. This year’s elegant holiday home (page 44) on Mercer Island was decorated for the 2008 season by interior designer Susan Marinello. A Clyde Hill home (page 50) demonstrates the beauty and enduring nature of a traditional home but is actually new, designed by Stuart Silk Architects. Not surprisingly, color expert Leatrice Eiseman’s Bainbridge Island garden (page 56) positively overflows with colorful blooms and foliage. New ideas are the focus of our 2009 Home of the Year (page 60) as well as the winning entry of the first Northwest Design Awards’ Publisher’s Choice Award (page 68). Whatever your style preference, you’ll find plenty to love in this issue’s home and landscape designs.

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WHEN DECORATING FOR THE HOLIDAYS, INTERIOR DESIGNER SUSAN MARINELLO KEEPS IN MIND THE TRUE MEANING OF THE SEASON. INSTEAD OF SANTA CLAUS IMAGES, SHE OPTS FOR FAMILY KEEPSAKES AND NATURE-INSPIRED DÉCOR. THE RESULT IS A SERENELY ELEGANT HOME THAT’S PERFECT FOR GATHERINGS WITH CLOSE FRIENDS AND FAMILY.

HOME FOR

CHRISTMAS AN INTERIOR DESIGNER MAKES DECORATING FOR THE HOLIDAYS A FAMILY AFFAIR WRITTEN BY ANGELA CABOTAJE PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX HAYDEN

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“THE FOUNDATION IS ALWAYS NATURAL GREENS,” MARINELLO SAYS OF HER DECORATING APPROACH. SHE DRAPED A HOMEMADE GARLAND OVER THE FIREPLACE MANTEL AND PLACED WHITE LIGHTS IN THE SHRUBS OUTSIDE THE LIVING-ROOM WINDOW, MIRRORING THE ILLUMINATED CHRISTMAS TREE INSIDE.

T

he Marinello family has a special Christmas tradition.

Every year, Susan Marinello and her daughter, now 10, deck out their home for the holidays. They shop for the perfect ornaments, each decorates her own Christmas tree, and they make wreaths on the front porch. The Marinello men—husband Dan and their teenage son—prefer to spend their time in front of the TV watching basketball. “They’re pretty content to let us do the work,” Marinello says with a laugh.

Not that decorating her own house is work for this successful interior designer of high-end homes and commercial spaces. In fact, her Christmas tradition might more accurately be called a relaxing labor of love. Founded in 1996, her firm, Susan Marinello Interiors, is known for its signature style: easy, understated elegance. The firm’s work has been featured in local and national publications, including Traditional Home, Renovation Style and Sunset. Recently, Marinello won Seattle Homes & Lifestyles’ 2009 Kitchen of the Year contest for a timeless kitchen she designed in northeast Seattle. With her busy work schedule and active family life, the last thing Marinello wants is for her holidays to become a production. “I never spend more than two days decorating,” she says. “I want it to be simple.”

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To keep things stress free, she doesn’t take any serious action until after Thanksgiving. She spends the weeks before it in “brain thought,” mulling over ideas and taking mental notes. Then right after the Thanksgiving weekend, Marinello goes on a field trip for inspiration. She stops at her favorite shops and garden stores, buying whatever catches her eye before heading home to spread it all out on the livingroom table. From there, the Marinello women get busy cutting fir boughs, holly and juniper from their garden and creating garland upon garland of greenery. While the décor varies from year to year, Marinello’s design theme is always connected to the outdoors. “I work with anything that celebrates our natural world: trees, snowflakes, stars,” Marinello says.


HOLIDAY DECORATING IDEAS FROM SUSAN MARINELLO SCENTED NIGHT Create a lovely fragrance in your

home to match the beautiful holiday décor. Rather than using scented candles, Marinello boils cider with cloves and cinnamon sticks. “It smells really fresh and wonderful.” SILVER BALLS For a quick and easy centerpiece, Marinello suggests stacking 30 silver ball ornaments in a large glass bowl. DECK THE HALLS Don’t overlook what’s in your backyard—literally. Marinello first heads to neighborhood nurseries (her local favorites are Wells Medina Nursery and Bellevue Nursery) and then clips boughs and greenery from her own garden. With a little floral wire and ribbon, she makes wreaths and garlands. LIGHT CHRISTMAS “You can never have enough candles,” Marinello says. For an ethereal glow, gather 50–100 white tea lights and place them in clusters throughout the home. “It makes such a difference.”


For 2008, birds played the starring role in a winter wonderland of soft white, silver and green. In the living room, white dove ornaments perched on the frosted branches of a Christmas tree. A garland-draped mantel displayed a row of antiqued vases, which held white roses, sprigs of dusty miller and clusters of silver pinecones. Lush textures— smooth satin ribbon and soft velvet—added the right amount of layered coziness. More exotic friends took up residence in the family room, where peacock ornaments with long feather plumes found a home in a 3-foot-tall Christmas tree. In the dining room, Marinello set the table for the family’s formal Christmas dinner with a holiday centerpiece of fir boughs and white blooms below a stunning teardrop chandelier that conjures up images of icicles. The view was equally impressive outside, where trees and hedges glowed, wrapped in strings of white lights. Against the pure-white backdrop left by last December’s snowstorm, the lights had an even more dramatic effect. “Snow makes it even more beautiful because it reflects,” Marinello says. “It’s a really beautiful winter wonderland.” For 2009, Marinello is making an abrupt change from last year’s understated white theme. “I’m taking my daughter’s advice, and we’re most likely going to do bright reds and burnt oranges,” Marinello says. “She thought it was always too much of a white Christmas and would say, ‘Mom, does it have to be white?’ So this year, she’s the lead designer.” Like mother, like daughter. For resource information, see Sources, page 86.

“i work with anything that celebrates our natural world: trees, snowflakes, stars.” —SUSAN MARINELLO

THE MARINELLOS HAVE SEVERAL HOLIDAY TRADITIONS. THE WEEK BEFORE CHRISTMAS, THEY HOST A GET-TOGETHER FOR A DOZEN OR SO GOOD FRIENDS. THE FAMILY OF FOUR HAS A CASUAL PASTA DINNER ON CHRISTMAS EVE AND A FORMAL DINNER TOGETHER ON CHRISTMAS.

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sh&l GET THE LOOK

This bold showpiece can be dressed up for the holidays with sprigs of holly and ribbon. Limo Mirror, $949 at BoConcept, 901 Western Ave., (206) 464-9999, boconcept.com.

INSPIRATIONS BORROWED FROM SUSAN MARINELLO COMPILED BY ANGELA CABOTAJE

Put your winter floral arrangements in silver vases of different shapes and sizes for a casual but unified look. Round Hammered Vase, $159 at Ethan Allen, Redmond and Tukwila locations, ethanallen.com. Arte Italica Vintage Pewter Large Two-Handled Vase, $1,114 available through Liberty 123, 123 Park Lane, Kirkland, (425) 822-1232, liberty123.com. ▼

▲ The Capri Side Table is a handsome

imitation of Marinello’s striking coal-black coffee table with gold trim. $2,250 through Williams-Sonoma Home, wshome.com.

CREATE YOUR OWN WINTER WONDERLAND WITH NATUREINSPIRED ORNAMENTS AND DECORATIONS Clip-on Nest Ornament and Glitter Dimensional Snowflake Ornament, $11 and $6.50 at Fireworks Gallery, Seattle and Bellevue locations, fire worksgallery.net. Feather Motif Glass Finial Ornament, available through Tableau, 2220 N.W. Market St., (206) 782-5846, tableaugifts.com.

▲ Add texture and color to an otherwise neutral palette with velvet and felt accent pillows. Bennet Olive Pillow, $29.95 at Crate and Barrel, Seattle and Bellevue locations, crateandbarrel.com.

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THE BURNETT HOME EXUDES TRADITION IN EVERY NOOK AND SWIRL OF FABRIC. ARCHITECT STUART SILK AND PROJECT ARCHITECT ANNE ADAMS EMBRACED CLASSIC LINES. LEAVE IT PURE, WITHOUT DILUTING AND CONVOLUTING STYLES, SILK RECOMMENDS. “THIS IS QUIET, NOT RAMBUNCTIOUS, AND TIMELESS,” HE SAYS.

simply timeless A Cl¥de Hill famil¥ surrounds itself with histor¥ and roots NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM 50 WRITTEN BY KATHRYN RENNER PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICHAEL SKOTT


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a

bove a marble-topped antique buffet in David and Tricia Burnett’s entryway hangs a dramatic oil painting of the Capitol Building in Washington, DC. That vignette says a lot about this family. The buffet was placed there with care and pride because it was handed down from David’s grandmother. And the painting speaks to an interest in American history, rekindled when the couple lived in Virginia while David attended law school. Living and working on Thomas Jefferson’s turf went straight to their hearts—as did homes with Federal and Georgian bones.

Still, there was no question they would eventually return to the Northwest. Roots run deep here. A fourth-generation Seattleite, David met Tricia when they both attended Seattle Pacific University. But after returning in 1998, they learned that a DC-style home in this Washington was hard to find. The couple soon realized if they wanted this dream house, they’d have to build it. In 2002, they bought a dated Clyde Hill rambler on nearly an acre and rented it for two years before they demolished the old place and launched construction. Through referrals and word-of-mouth, the perfect design team evolved. Explaining their vision to Seattle architect Stuart Silk was effortless, David recalls. “We were rambling on, trying to describe our ideas when he reached for a book.”

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Silk had opened Creating a New Old House by Russell Versaci that features a residence he designed. “Something like this?” he asked the couple, paging through the photos in the book. Exactly. So Silk and project architect Anne Adams began to render a home for David, Tricia and their three (now four) young children. “We didn’t want anything trendy that would date the home,” David says. They had no interest in loft-like “great rooms,” or spiral staircases open two floors high. There’s no Zen water feature outside, but there is a swing on a rope hanging from an old tree. Home is tradition. This house, completed in 2006, is airy, fresh and au courant based on timeless forms and principles. Silk and Adams share a proclivity for beautiful pediments, moldings and the stately


above: THE BURNETTS

CONGREGATE AROUND THE LARGE, HICKORY-TOPPED KITCHEN ISLAND. COUNTER TOPS ARE CHOCOLATE-COLORED HONED MARBLE. THE GRACEFUL HOME, BUILT IN 2005, LOOKS AS IF IT HAS BEEN HERE FOREVER. left: THE ENTRY PULLS YOU INTO THE HOUSE “WITH COMFORT, CLARITY AND ORGANIZATION,” NOTES ARCHITECT ANNE ADAMS.

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symmetry hallowed by traditional style. Elegance trumps pretension. “Formal” is tamed to be livable, even with tots afoot. Spaces flow into each other off a central hallway. “The symmetry of the floor plan orients you,” Adams explains. “You intuitively know where to go. The house has clarity, stability.” Interior designer Patricia Schlapp shared the new-old house mindset, using textures and fabrics to give each room an aged patina. When Schlapp came on board, Tricia had already purchased a dining table with tall chairs with a swirl of celery and pink upholstery. The entry looks into this room so that’s the first thing you see. The colors weren’t the easiest choice to work around, Tricia admits. “Rather than carrying the pink into other rooms, I tied in soft corals,” Schlapp recalls. A rug of coral, pink and neutrals anchors the living room and provides a visual segue. “Tricia and David wanted warm, comfortable sophistication, but it had to be kid-proof and be able to survive large gatherings,” she says. “David has a big family.” Consequently, fabrics aren’t too delicate or precious. The custom coffee table has built-in drawers for crayons and books. Ottomans around the table are kid-sized. By virtue of architectural grace and soft English floral drapes and accents, rooms are refined, yet they hardily multitask. Even though most furnishings are new, they don’t look matched. “We wanted it to look like a collection of pieces gathered over time,” Tricia says. With antiques and silver inherited from grandparents woven throughout, the home is a gallery of all this family holds dear—traditions old and new. Kathr¥n Renner writes about homes old and new for local and national publications from her home in Kirkland.

For resource information, see Sources, page 86.

INTERIOR DESIGNER PATRICIA SCHLAPP UNDERSCORED THE HOME’S WARM SOPHISTICATION WITH SUBTLE ENGLISH AND FRENCH FLORAL FABRICS. EVEN NEW FURNISHINGS OFFER AN AGED PANACHE. KID-FRIENDLINESS AND EASY CARE WERE PARAMOUNT CONCERNS. THE HOME BUSTLES WITH FAMILY.

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all the

>ight hue째 A leading color expert finds inspiration in her Bainbridge garden

WRITTEN BY KATHRYN RENNER PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDREW DRAKE


EISEMAN IS HUMBLED BY THE HUES; A COLOR EXPERT KNOWS THAT NOTHING COMPETES WITH A ROSE OR DAHLIA IN FULL BLOOM. “GARDENS GIVE US A BUFFER FROM OUR OTHER WORLDS,” SAYS COLOR EXPERT LEATRICE EISEMAN. HER HOME WORLD IS DELIGHTFULLY BUFFERED BY VIVID ECHINACEA TIKI TORCH (OPPOSITE), AND— CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT—A BEVY OF HYDRANGEAS, RED SPIRE POLYGONATUM, HEBE MCKEAN, SEDUMS AND DAY LILY STELLA DE ORO. SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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left to right: A VIVID PINK DAHLIA IS A POLKA DOT OF COLOR IN THIS GARDEN LOVINGLY TENDED BY JOY HARTLEY; EVERGREEN CLEMATIS SCALES THE TRELLIS WITH DEEP BLUE SALVIA ON EITHER SIDE; AND THE PORCH MELTS INTO A COZY BANK OF HYDRANGEA, HARDY GERANIUMS, CAMPANULA GLOMERATA AND BASKETS OF FUCHSIAS. “I HAVE FAMILY SIZES OF FUCHSIAS, ON UP TO THE GRANDMOTHER,” EISEMAN QUIPS.

W

hen the phone rings at this Bainbridge Island farmhouse, the caller could be a designer from Milan, Amsterdam or New York. They ask for color consultant and specialist Leatrice Eiseman, author of seven books on color and one of the top 10 business decision-makers, as named by Fortune magazine. Next year’s “it” color is forever on their minds. What shade will best influence, flatter and sell? The answer, Eiseman says, is complex—underpinned by technology, politics and global and cultural drift. When the annual “it” color is announced, it’s to full press hoopla—and as a consultant to the über–color company Pantone, Eiseman is instrumental in that decision. So going to see her garden, one can’t help but speculate: Will there be a precise color wheel of annuals? Will there be plats of petals planted in the current “it” color? (For 2009 it was Mimosa Pantone #14-0848.) Not far from the ferry landing, on two and a half acres of pastoral slopes and woodlands, sits a stylish red-with-white-trim house, inspired by the angles and charm of a barn, and the home office of Eiseman Center for Color Information and Training. When Eiseman and her husband, Herb, moved here 12 years ago, only trees and the tentacles of pesky vines reigned. With the help of Seabeck gardener Joy Hartley, a hearty berth of primroses, white lobelia, coneflowers and tassel ferns now hugs the home’s circumference. Colorful pots of coleus and geraniums—“polka dots of texture and color,” Eiseman calls them—line steps and border the sunroom. A fence defends roses and the vegetable garden from insatiable deer. As urbane as she is, Eiseman quickly quells a visitor’s fear of failing Color 101 and puts her garden philosophy straight. “There are no rigid rules in the garden,” she says. “You can’t improve on Mother Nature.”

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So her garden remains delightfully blue-jeans-and-work-shirt casual— a source of wonder, still, to the Eisemans since they relocated to the Northwest in 1990 from Los Angeles, where Herb worked at Twentieth Century Fox. “Not a hydrangea in sight there,” Leatrice rues of L.A. But here, hydrangeas, Eiseman’s favorite flowering plant, look as indigenous to the Bainbridge property as Noodles, the resident Labradoodle. The Eisemans remain charmed by this garden zone and its wily microclimates. They can be mesmerized by flowers on racks outside Ace Hardware as well as seedlings at fine nurseries. “We have a proclivity for falling in love at the same time,” Eiseman says, recalling when she and Herb first laid eyes on a red Japanese maple and had to bring it home. It’s now full, thriving and visible from her office. “There’s a different vantage point of the garden from every window,” she says. Even among the shaded woodlands, contrasting yellow-green leaves of Sun Goddess hydrangea or Himalayan honeysuckle offer natural dioramas of layered color and texture. Eiseman strolls the garden as if she’s walking among friends. This cutting came from a neighbor’s garden, she says, and launches the tale. “That prehistoric-looking hydrangea (H. aspera gigantica) was a spindly little stick when we brought it home.” She is humbled by the hues; a color expert knows that nothing competes with a rose or dahlia in full bloom. She recently took a photo of her dahlias to a color-forecasting meeting in Amsterdam. “For inspiration,” she avows. Perhaps the world’s next “it” color will be rooted from the image of one vivacious blossom, face pressed to the sun in a Bainbridge garden. For resource information, see Sources, page 86.


WHIMSICAL TOUCHES IN THE GARDEN INCLUDE GLOVE MOLDS MOUNTED ON WOOD BASES THAT MIMIC HANDS WAVING HELLO AND GOODBYE AT EITHER END OF THE CIRCULAR DRIVE. THE BIRDBATH IS PAINTED PURPLE (“REALLY, MORE AUBERGINE,” LEATRICE EISEMAN MUSES). CERAMIC EYES AND MOUTHS AFFIXED TO TREE TRUNKS ADD A SPOT OF TOLKIEN FANTASY— SOME LOOK LIKE GRUMPY OLD MEN.

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sh&l HOME OF THE

YEAR

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WINNING DESIGN

WRITTEN BY GISELLE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX HAYDEN STYLING BY MICHELLE CRISTALLI

MANY OF THE FURNISHINGS HAVE SPECIAL MEANINGS FOR THE COUPLE. THE PENDANT LAMP ABOVE THE DINING TABLE (OPPOSITE) IS REMINISCENT OF THE KEROSENE LAMPS BOTH JEN AND LEE’S GRANDMOTHERS HAD IN THEIR HOMES; THE HANS WEGNER CHAIRS IN THE LIVING ROOM (ABOVE) REMIND THEM OF THEIR HONEYMOON IN DENMARK.

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FLEXIBILITY IS THE KEY IN THIS SPACE- AND ENERGYEFFICIENT FAMILY HOME

S

eattle Homes & Lifestyles’ 2009 Home of the Year is a space-efficient house atop Queen Anne hill that combines elements of contemporary and traditional architecture to blend into an older urban neighborhood. Architect Rik Adams, of Adams Mohler Ghillino Architects, designed the residence to fit the lives and lifestyle of his clients, Lee and Jen Falck— and their 2-year-old son, Samuel. Lee first met Adams in 2002, when he and his business partner hired Adams Mohler Ghillino to design their company’s furniture showroom at Chicago’s Merchandise Mart for the NeoCon trade show. During the design process for the project—which won the IIDA “Best in Show, New Showroom” award at NeoCon in 2003—client and architect discovered a shared approach to design and problem solving that grew into a friendship. When Lee and his wife, Jen, were thinking about remodeling their 1904 cottage in 2007, of course they called Adams. The Falcks loved their neighborhood, but at just 810 square feet, their single-story house wasn’t big enough for two—let alone three. Initially Lee and Jen wanted to put an addition on the house, but conversations with Adams eventually led to the decision to rebuild. “We spent hours and days and weeks thinking about how we use the space,” Lee says of the design process. “It’s really about opening your life up—how you live, what’s important to you—before thinking about aesthetics.” The result is a supremely flexible space. Private areas—three bedrooms, two baths and a media room—are on the second floor, while the first floor is primarily one large volume that houses the living room, open kitchen and dining room. A cedar-clad wall separates the living areas on the south side of the home from the “service” areas—entry, powder room,

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pantry and stairs—on the other. Slide-fold Nana Wall doors at the east and west ends of the living space open up to the back courtyard and front yard respectively, blurring the line between interior and exterior. Across the courtyard is a new detached, multipurpose accessory structure. The approximately 500-square-foot space includes a bathroom and workshop, and will house relatives when they come to visit. “The studio was expressly designed to be a true living space—or a crazy place for a ton of kids,” Lee says. “The flexibility of the space was really important,” Adams says, explaining how the home was designed to be a series of indoor and outdoor rooms. Materials such as the black concrete floor and wood wall are “fairly indestructible,” Lee notes. The design includes large, easily accessible cabinets and a sculptural EcoSmart alcohol-burning fireplace built into the living room cabinets. When not in use, the fireplace can be covered with cushions for completely kid-safe extra seating. “We can clean this place up in five minutes … it’s a Big Wheel track during the day and an adult space in the evening,” Lee says. “We want to play in every space, so the whole house is accessible and a part of our child’s life” A small patio off the front of the house becomes a porch when the Falcks slide open the front wall of their living room. After Samuel goes to bed, Lee and Jen can turn their chairs out to the street and join the neighborhood conversation. Inside, they can pull down the privacy shades, or opt for what Lee calls a “blanket-wrapped feeling” by drawing the soft-gray sheer drapes. “The space can house a large party, but it can be very intimate,” he says.


opposite: HOMEOWNERS JEN, LEE AND SAMUEL FALCK DEVELOPED A FRIENDSHIP WITH ARCHITECT RIK ADAMS, WHOSE FAMILY OFTEN VISITS. top: AN ECOSMART BURNER ONE STAINLESS STEEL, DENATURED ALCOHOL FIREPLACE PROVIDES A FOCAL POINT IN THE LIVING ROOM. left: A CLEAR-FINISHED TIGHT-KNOT CEDAR FEATURE WALL SEPARATES THE LIVING AND “SERVICE” PARTS OF THE MAIN FLOOR. above: THE KITCHEN FEATURES WHITE OAK/LAMINATE CABINETS BY HENRYBUILT AND CAMBRIAN BLACK SATIN GRANITE COUNTER TOPS.

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above left: “IVY” COAT HOOKS BY COOPER HEWITT SERVE AS FUNCTIONAL ARTWORK IN THE ENTRYWAY; VITRA STOOLS BY ULMER HOCKER PROVIDE EASY SEATING FOR TAKING OFF—OR PUTTING ON—LITTLE SHOES. above right: THE POWDER ROOM, ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE MAIN FLOOR, HAS A SLIDING POCKET DOOR; THE SINK AND FAUCET ARE BY KOHLER. below: THE FLOOR PLAN SHOWS HOW THE HOUSE IS DESIGNED AS A SERIES OF ROOMS, BOTH INDOOR AND OUTDOOR. opposite: NANA WALL SLIDE-FOLD DOORS ACROSS THE FRONT OF THE HOUSE OPEN TO THE STREET TO CREATE A “FRONT PORCH” FEELING.

SECOND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

1. ENTRY 2. POWDER ROOM

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3. PANTRY/MECHANICAL ROOM 4. LIVING ROOM

NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

5. KITCHEN 6. DINING ROOM

7. PATIO 8. STUDIO/GARAGE

9. STORAGE 10. BATHROOMS

11. BEDROOMS 12. MEDIA ROOM


“We try to give clients as many options as possible,” Adams notes. “The house is designed so they have a ton of control over how they want to live in it. The openness of the house changes when the doors are open or closed, when the curtains are open or closed and whether it’s day or night.”

DURING CONSTRUCTION, neighbors and passersby often pressed their noses against the front windows for a glimpse inside, and they asked questions whenever the architect was around. Adams marvels at one neighbor who told him, “Typically I don’t like modern architecture, and I keep trying to figure out why I like this house so much.” The reason might be the scale of the home. At just 1,900 square feet, the two-story house doesn’t overpower the more traditional homes nearby. Or it could be the shed-style roof, which echoes the rooflines on neighboring houses. “Blending into the neighborhood is intentional,” Adams says. “The pitched roof and overhang make good sense in our climate and also fit better in this neighborhood, and Hardiplank siding fits the beveled siding of other houses in the neighborhood.” The Falcks themselves don’t see the house as “modern,” though Lee allows that contemporary architecture lends itself more easily to how they wanted to live in their house. “Our view of it is from the

inside,” he says. “We wanted to use natural materials, [but] if anything our style was rooted in something older.” The Falcks think of the house as traditional because of the materials they chose—natural wood and stone, for example. Sustainability was another value that the architect and homeowners shared. “To make a meaningful difference, with respect to sustainability, we have to move beyond whether one material is more sustainable than another and talk about larger issues such as how big a house we really need,” Adams notes. “A thoughtfully designed 2,000-square-foot house can feel as spacious as a poorly designed 3,000-square-foot house.” Because a previous owner of the original house had given it a new foundation, they opted to build the new house on the old footprint. They hired The Re-Store to do the demolition by hand, recycling as much of the old materials as possible. Energy-efficient features in the new home include gas-fired radiant heating throughout, as well as a solar hot water system. “We wanted to do all these things [to be sustainable], but we wanted it to be very beautiful—simple and elemental,” Lee says, and he and Jen couldn’t be happier with the result. Seattle Homes & Lifestyles may have chosen their house as Home of the Year, but Jen and Lee Falck see it as the home of their lives. For resource information, see Sources, page 86.

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meet the judges Choosing our 2009 Home of the Year was no easy task. Once the entries were cataloged, we removed all identifying information and convened a panel of judges representing various aspects of the home design industry. The criteria on which our judges scored each entry included scale and proportion, color and composition, functional use of space, quality of workmanship, use of materials, originality and photographic appeal. Despite this qualitative approach, we make no pretense of the contest being purely objective. After all, what makes a residence worthy of the title “Home of the Year” is really a hard-to-define “wow” factor. Ultimately, the winning home was the one that met all of the contest rules, scored highest across the board and most impressed our judges. Interior designer Rick Baye is also the owner of Designer Fabric Liquidations, a 2007 Seattle Design 100+ honoree. Over the past 15-plus years, his design projects have spread from Maui to Denver, and his textiles have appeared in interiors ranging from luxury hotels to private aircraft. Architect Scott Hommas has been a partner in Gelotte Hommas Architecture since 1996. The Bellevue firm has won numerous awards and contests, including Seattle Homes & Lifestyles’ 2002 Home of the Year and Professional Builder Magazine’s Best One-of-aKind Custom House award. SH&L market advisor Linda Humphrey is also Seattle City Editor for Metropolitan Home, a position she has held for the past 25 years, in addition to serving as Field Editor for Traditional Home and other publications. Humphrey looks at more than 100 Northwest homes every year.

above: THE STUDIO HAS MULTIPLE USES AS A LIVING SPACE FOR VISITING RELATIVES, A WORKSHOP AND A

PLAYROOM FOR KIDS. SEPARATED FROM THE MAIN HOUSE BY A BRIGHT COURTYARD, IT OFFERS PRIVACY FROM— AS WELL AS CONNECTION TO—THE MAIN HOUSE. MATERIALS, SUCH AS THE CAST-CONCRETE FLOOR AND CLEAR FINISHED TONGUE-AND-GROOVE TIGHT-KNOT CEDAR WALLS, ECHO THOSE IN THE HOUSE.

Landscape architect Chip Ragen is the owner of Seattle’s Ragen & Associates, a 2006 Seattle Design 100+ honoree. For more than 20 years, Ragen and his team have designed and built custom residential gardens in the Seattle area. Ragen also carries a line of outdoor vases and planters, ranging from Vietnamese glazed stoneware to handmade terra-cotta vessels. Marc Vassallo, of 2008 Seattle Design 100+ honoree Schultz Miller, is also an established writer. He is the author of two design books, The Barefoot Home: Dressed-Down Design for Casual Living (Taunton, 2006) and Inside the Not So Big House: Discovering the Details that Bring a Home to Life (Taunton, 2005), with Sarah Susanka. —AARON MONCIVAIZ

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Fire without Compromise With a massive landscape of deep, generous flames among river rocks and white sand, Town & Country has defined the wide screen fireplace category. The huge view of the fire, hypnotic design and venting versatility combine to create a fireplace perfectly suited to both custom-built homes and commercial settings. Shown Here: WS38 Luxury Widescreen in 38” width WS54 model in 54” width is also available

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425-487-1664 www.stockandhill.com STOCKHL077CZ

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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sh&l DESIGN AWARD

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF THE WINNERS OF 2009 NORTHWEST DESIGN AWARDS Scott Cole, Ardeo Design Inc. Garret Cord Werner, Garret Cord Werner, LLC Jody Pene, Lindsey Hendricks and Craig Norman, GBD Architects, Inc. Gretchen Evans, Gretchen Evans Design

LARA SWIMMER, COURTESY TYLER ENGLE ARCHITECTS

Steven Hensel, Hensel Design Studios

THIS AWARD-WINNING OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE FEATURES A A FIREPLACE AND ROOM FOR DINING AND ENTERTAINING.

garden party Every year, Seattle Design Center presents the Northwest Design Awards to winners in a competition that recognizes design excellence in 10 categories. This year, for the first time, Seattle Homes & Lifest¥les presented the Publisher’s Choice Award to one of the first-place-winning projects that has never been published. SH&L chose Tyler Engle Architects’ Mount Baker courtyard project—the first-place winner in the NWDA Outdoor category—for this award. We loved its economy of space, privacy and functionality. Robert McCroskey and Stanley Perryman ‘s strictlyfor-access backyard was “essentially a drainage ditch off an alley” when they came to Engle for help. The architect’s response was to approach the outdoor space in the same way he does houses. “We planned this yard with functional outdoor rooms and cohesive circulation from the alley to the house,” Engle explains. The new outdoor living space features a private patio with a fireplace and room for dining and entertaining, as well as separate areas for a sunken stainlesssteel hot tub and an outdoor shower. New pathways connect the house to the garage and alley and frame the primary outdoor living and dining area. An archi-

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tectural concrete wall offers privacy from the alley, and a heavy timber trellis and wood fence provide warmth and scale. A jog in the concrete wall provides an additional parking space off the alley. The clients asked for a modern space but wanted it to relate to their 1909 house. Engle married old and new by covering the wall that conceals the outdoor shower in siding to match the house and repeated the cedar trellis from the alley wall along the garage next to the house to provide shade for the kitchen. “Our desire for this courtyard was to create a modern sense of introspection that seamlessly coexists with the original house and existing neighborhood,” Engle says. We think he succeeded admirably. It is refreshing to see an outdoor living space truly designed for living— isn’t that the point of beautiful home design?

Barbara Hyde Evans, Hyde Evans Design Jessica Helgerson and Andy Beers, Jessica Helgerson Interior Design Dean Harris, Dennis Dieni and Brooke Prince, JPC Architects Robert Ledingham and Denise Ashmore, Ledingham Design Consultants Lena Fomichev, LF Interior Design Nancy Burfiend, Theresa Benny, Devin Fitzpatrick and My Nguyen, NB Design Group Susan Marinello, Susan Marinello Interiors Sylvia Bolton, Sylvia Bolton Design, Inc. Tyler Engle, AIA, Tyler Engle Architects, PS Holly Van Biene, Van Biene Interiors Eric Lee, VictorEric Design Group Student Winners: Junghwa Suh and Sarah McGovern, Washington State University


ASSOCIATED I N C O R P O R AT E D

Where designers shop for

luxury flooring.

Associated Designers Showroom 580 South Lucile St., Seattle 206.763.2537 | www.associatedinc.net Monday – Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or call for an evening or weekend appointment

SIMPLY PLACED INTERIORS Home Re-Styling and Staging

BREATHING NEW LIFE INTO YOUR HOME Simply Placed Interiors Lisa Fauvre Harris and René Oughton 206.271.1175 and 206.240.1285 www.simplyplacedinteriors.com

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sh&l BEFORE & AFTER

❯❯ The Challenge: When Jeff and Teresa Santerre

purchased their home in 1986, the outdoor shelter in the backyard (right) was little more than a corrugated fiberglass shed roof supported by nearly collapsing steel pipes over a large stone hearth. “It didn’t go with the house, and it wasn’t very inviting,” Teresa recalls.

left: THE GABLE ROOF AND EXTENDED FIREPLACE CREATE A MORE COMFORTABLE INTERIOR, WHILE REDESIGNED COLUMNS BETTER MATCH THE HOUSE.

cozy cabana WRITTEN BY AARON MONCIVAIZ PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX HAYDEN STYLING BY MICHELLE CRISTALLI

The Solution: To turn the shelter into a comfortable spot for relaxing or hosting special events, the Santerres, who own Prestige Custom Builders, redesigned the roof and support columns. Inspired by picnic shelters in nearby Seward Park, Jeff designed a traditional gable roof and expanded the interior space. For continuity between the 1906 Dutch colonial home and the outdoor living space, Jeff created two new support columns for the shelter that match the house’s original front-porch columns. He even included the dagger-with-a-drop-of-blood shape, which echoes the motif on porch columns and wrought-

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iron railings. The river rock used to extend the outdoor fireplace chimney was added elsewhere around the home’s exterior to further connect the structures. By using similar materials in the house and shelter, the Santerres created an outdoor living space that is an extension of their home. Welcoming and spacious, the structure is perfect for cigars around a crackling winter fire or a spring dinner for as many as 18. “It’s wonderful to gather people and create memories,” Teresa says. “It’s my favorite place on the property.” For resource information, see Sources, page 86.

right, top to bottom: A GLOWING FIRE MAKES ANY EVENT SPECIAL; THE CARVED DAGGER MOTIF APPEARS THROUGHOUT THE HOME’S EXTERIOR.


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ARE YOU IN THE LOOP? global fusion WRITTEN BY ANGELA CABOTAJE PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID PAPAZIAN

THE LIVING ROOM BALANCES PARED-DOWN MODERN DESIGN AND EUROPEAN ELEGANCE TO STUNNING EFFECT. INTERIOR DESIGNER LENA FOMICHEV SELECTED THIS BOYD CRYSTAL-BEAD LIGHT FIXTURE (AT LEFT) BECAUSE IT REMINDED HER OF RAINDROPS.

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S ttl H

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SEPT OCT 2009

“Flip” through the pages of our Digital Edition at SeattleHomesMag.com

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Plan. Organize. Results. One session to organized living. Kammie Lisenby, Professional Organizer & Coach T: 206.914.6099 E: Kammie@SimplyEfficient.bz www.SimplyEfficient.bz Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

Christy Romoser Designs 22857 NE 61st Street, Redmond, WA 98053 T: 425.466.1434 www.cromoserdesigns.com

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Gelotte Hommas Architecture 3025 112th Ave. N.E., Suite 110, Bellevue, WA 98004 T: 425.828.3081 www.gelottehommas.com

ARCHITECTS & DESIGNERS IN DEMAND


2009 NORTHWEST DESIGN AWARD FIRST PLACE, BEDROOM CATEGORY

AWARD-WINNING INTERIOR DESIGN & REMODELING Holly Van Biene 2000 124th Ave. N.E., Ste. B-102, Bellevue, WA 98005 T: 425.646.9009 www.hvbinteriors.com

NCIDQ certiямБcate # 12944

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sh&l GREEN LIVING

Isabella Range Wind

keeping climate

Lake

A HOME OVERLOOKING THE METHOW VALLEY WAS BUILT TO PRESERVE THE ENVIRONMENT AS MUCH AS TO ENJOY IT

Mt. Gardner Courtyard

GREEN TIPS

WRITTEN BY AARON MONCIVAIZ PHOTOGRAPHS BY STEVE KEATING PHOTOGRAPHY

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DESIGNERS INCORPORATED THE FOLLOWING ELEMENTS IN THIS ENERGY-EFFICIENT PROJECT:

✽ ✽ ✽ ✽

NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

Drought-tolerant landscaping Insulated concrete form (ICF) walls Radiant floor heating Natural ventilation

✽ ✽ ✽ ✽

Reclaimed wood, inside and out Low-flow faucets Large external sun screens Low-VOC paints and stains

Sawtooth Range Sun


THIS 3,500-SQUARE-FOOT HOUSE, designed by architect Tom Lenchek of Balance Associates (80 Vine St., Ste. 201, 206-322-7737, balanceassociates.com), is protected from the bright sun and the Methow Valley’s strong winds, but it also makes the best of them. With a module design and effective insulation, the home is both heated and cooled by the elements. An architect devoted to energy efficiency since 1980, Lenchek designs homes that answer his clients’ desires for environmental responsibility and architectural sophistication. “The most important elements of efficiency are proper home siting and insulation,” he says. Lenchek designed this Methow Valley house in four parts, orienting each section to a different solar exposure and maximizing the wind as ventilation. The kitchen-and-dining wing faces southwest, toward the Sawtooth Range. The living module, which includes a large screened porch for insect-free summer relaxing, faces west and is vented by winds from the northwest. The sleeping module faces north, and the garage, which includes a guest suite, faces northeast. Insulated concrete form (ICF) walls provide an increased thermal mass, which reduces inside temperature fluctuation. The large thermal mass combined with exterior sun screens eliminates the need for air conditioning. Inside the house, the architect and interior designer Jennifer Randall of Jennifer Randall & Associates (1100 E. Union St., Ste. 1B, 206-323-1520, jradesigns.com) incorporated reclaimed Douglas fir on the exposed cathedral ceilings, interior trim and cabinet doors. Low-VOC paint reduces energy use by decreasing the need for ventilation, and low-flow water fixtures help to conserve water (drawn from an on-site well). Native plants such as bluebunch wheatgrass, aspen and sumac make up the drought-tolerant landscaping—a necessity in this region that gets only 10–15 inches of annual precipitation, much of it as snow. Demonstrating the best of 21st-century efficiency, this home exists in balance with its environment in all seasons—in looks, comfort and energy use.

opposite and top left: THOUGH SNOW FALLS THROUGHOUT THE WINTER IN THE METHOW VALLEY, SUMMER TEMPERATURES REGULARLY CLIMB INTO THE 100s. INSULATED CONCRETE WALLS AND A UNIQUE FLOOR PLAN HELP MODERATE TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION INSIDE THE HOUSE. top right: PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN ELEMENTS SUCH

AS LARGE EXTERIOR SUN SCREENS HELP PROVIDE NATURAL AIR CONDITIONING. above: RECYCLED WOOD IS USED THROUGHOUT

THE INTERIOR, AND LOW-EMISSION PAINTS AND STAINS CREATE A HOME THAT’S HEALTHY FOR ITS INHABITANTS AND FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.

For resource information, see Sources, page 86.

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sh&l DETAILS

delight in the

details WRITTEN BY NANCY CLARK

The true talent of an artist often lies in the particulars. Instead of stepping back to see the big picture, take a step forward and discover the beaut¥ in these carefull¥ crafted small things

❮❮ The Fir Tree by Ferm Living, a Denmark-based company, depicts a modern interpretation of the Scandinavian forests from which the designs were inspired. With rich layering and varied line weight, this wall covering makes it easy to find yourself climbing through the forest, hearing dry branches cracking under your feet … if only for a moment.

Ferm Living wallpaper available in Seattle through Hermitage Is a Home, 1906 E. Prospect St., (206) 328-5550, hermitageisahome.com.

Interior designer Christy Romoser adds “texture and whimsy” to a Lake Washington home by adorning a pillow with this Samuel & Sons trim. Playfully referring to it as “jewelry for the chair,” Romoser says the trim allowed her to transform a pillow into a decorative piece of art. Design by Christy Romoser, Christy Romoser Designs, 22857 N.E. 61st St., Redmond, (425) 466-1434, cromoserdesigns.com.

▲ With his client seeking a “design that

❮❮ Chris Armes and Sharon Khosla, the

speaks to nature,” Mike Sofie of OA&I Design created a marriage between organic materials by juxtaposing heat patterns in black steel with the natural grain of walnut woodworking. Sofie transformed an unimpressive fireplace into what he calls “a formal, timeless statement that serves as an anchor for the living space.”

husband-and-wife duo behind 16th Workshop, drew from a shared background in architecture to create what Armes refers to as “handmade modern” all-wood furniture. By combining modern forms with old-fashioned joinery, they seek to bring back what they call “the origin of modern design [before Bauhaus] when the hand was still evident in the work.” The power of the artisans’ hands is clearly seen in these perfectly contoured hand-cut dovetails.

Custom fireplace designed by Mike Sofie, interior designer and space planner, OA&I Design, 121 Lakeside Ave., Ste. 205, (206) 605-7091.

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STEPHANIE CASTOR, PIX BY STEPH

STADLER STUDIO

ARTFULLY PLACED TRIM DRAWS THE EYE AND ADDS INTEREST

NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

Custom furniture available through 16th Workshop, 353 16th Ave., (206) 905-8662, 16thworkshop.com.


Blue Herons by Wes Snyder 40”H x 66”W Copper Repousse 713 First Street • La Conner, WA 98257 • 360-466-4422 702 Water Street • Port Townsend, WA 98368 • 360-385-0385 www.earthenworksgallery.com earthenworksart@aol.com

mary davis

v i n t a g e

402 morris street • la conner, wa 98257 360.466.3495 www.marydavislighting.com SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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sh&l EVENTS

November 5–December 2

Gordon Woodside/ John Braseth Gallery An exhibition of new works by artist Jared Rue includes modern interpretations of landscapes that lean toward the abstract. Admission is free. Details: (206) 622-7243 or woodsidebrasethgallery.com.

editors’ picª° FOR NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

COMPILED BY AARON MONCIVAIZ

winte® gardening ideas Emery’s Garden winter classes include Get the Garden Winter Ready, November 14, 15 and 18; Thanksgiving Centerpieces, November 21, 22 and 25; Holiday Wreath & Swag Making, November 14, 15, 21, 22, 28 and 29 and December 5, 6, 12, 13, 19 and 20; and Holiday Bow Making, December 5. Details: (425) 743-4555 or emerysgarden.com.

December 8–9

Northwest Builders Show The 2009 show features building and remodeling products, as well as educational sessions, December 8, and The Economic Forecast Luncheon, December 9. The show takes place at Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue. Details: northwestbuilders show.com. ❮❮ November 5–December 8

Seattle Architecture Foundation November and December tours include Design Details, November 7 and December 5, and Modern Skyscrapers, November 21 and December 19. Details: seattlearchitecture.org.

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NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

November 9

aia hono® awards The AIA Seattle Honor Awards, “improv\improve,” celebrates excellence in architecture in the Northwest, with a focus on small projects with big impacts and big projects with small footprints. Award event is held at Benaroya Hall; tickets are $25 or $10 for students. Details: (206) 448-4938 or aiaseattle.org.

November 5

evening of technology Learn how to enhance your home technology at this Wipliance event at Alchemy Collections. Details: wipliance.com.


Now you can…

BUILD YOUR OWN BLUESTAR RANGE! Customize the following to build your one-of-a-kind BlueStar Range: • SIZE • 190 DIFFERENT COLORS • TRIMS • DOORS • BURNER CONFIGURATION

Shown Above: RNB 60" Range, Jet Black with Brass Trim

Visit bluestarcooking.com and select the range and options that fit your cooking needs and your kitchen’s décor. STEP 2: Print out your custom designed range and take it to a BlueStar dealer for assistance in placing your order. STEP 1:

BELLEVUE 425-451-1110

Albert Lee Appliance

BELLEVUE 425-454-7929

Arnold’s Appliance

FIFE 253-941-4522

Couch’s Appliance

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LYNNWOOD 425-670-1110

Albert Lee Appliance

SEATTLE 206-282-2110

Albert Lee Appliance

SOUTHCENTER / TUKWILA 253-445-1110 Albert Lee Appliance

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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SEASONAL EVENTS staff design, bake and construct a village of gingerbread beauties. Admission is free and donations benefit the Northwest Chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Details: (206) 621-9000 or jdrfnorthwest.org. November 29–January 11, 2010

Garden d’Lights

FESTIVAL OF

Poinsettias

Don’t miss this annual event December 7–25 at Molbak’s Nursery in Woodinville, which displays almost 40 different varieties of poinsettia, with roaming carolers and the traditional poinsettia Christmas tree. Details: (425) 483-5000 or molbaks.com.

November 1 & 8

November 7

The Salvage Studio Gift Making

Festive Dining: Giving the Holidays a Modern Makeover

Classes offer creative new ideas for quick, inexpensive holiday gifts at PS-Stores in Seattle (November 1) and Redmond (November 8). Cost is $10 and includes a $10 PS-Stores voucher. Details: thesalvagestudio.com. November 6–8

Beautiful Tables Showcase Experience the art of entertaining at Lakewold Gardens’ showcase of professional and novice table designers. Admission is $5 for members, $10 for nonmembers. Details: lakewoldgardens.org.

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Four Seasons Seattle Executive Chef Kerry Sear and interior designer Kevin Bradford demonstrate preparing dishes, decorating the table and other helpful tips on throwing festive parties. Class includes lunch, wine and recipe cards. Tickets are $100, plus tax and gratuity. Details: (206) 7497000 or fourseasons.com/seattle. November 24–January 3, 2010

Gingerbread Village Seattle architects and the Sheraton Seattle Hotel’s culinary

NOV. & DEC. 2009 SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM

Every holiday season, Bellevue Botanical Garden is transformed into a fantasyland for this festival. Twinkling lights are fashioned into flowers and shrubs, as well as critters that children can seek amidst the light display. Admission is free. Details: (425) 452-2750 or bellevuebotanical.org.

Best of the Northwest November 13–15

Northwest Art Alliance’s 21st annual juried fine art and craft show offers opportunities to meet the artists behind the art and support local talent this holiday season. The show of “art made by hands you can shake” takes place at Seattle Center. Admission is $7. Details: (206) 525-5926 or nwartalliance.com.

November 30–December 2

Providence O’Christmas Trees Visit Santa, enjoy live music and bid on decorated Christmas trees at the three events associated with the 2009 celebration: Family Affair Treeview, November 30; Silver Bells Luncheon, December 1; and gala auction, December 2. Auction proceeds benefit Providence Health and Services. The treeview event is free; luncheon tickets are $50; and auction tickets are $275. Details: (206) 938-2788 or providence.org/ long_term_care/O_Trees. December 6

Holidays with HeART This family fun event at the Four Seasons Hotel Seattle features cookie-decorating stations, the Ultimate Holiday Cookie Recipe Showdown and more. Tickets are $35; $25 for children 6–12. A portion of proceeds benefits Treehouse Seattle. Details: (206) 749-7000 or fourseasons.com/seattle.

For more upcoming events, visit SeattleHomesMag.com


sh&l SCENE

1, 2 LORI CALL FOR TPNW ©2009

Out & About with Seattle Homes & Lifest¥les

1

2

3

northwest design awards gala Seattle Homes & Lifestyles and Seattle Design Center’s 2009 Design Achievement Awards were announced and winners of SDC’s 11th annual Northwest Design Awards were revealed at the Northwest Design Awards Gala, September 24. The Design Achievement Awards honor designers who are making a significant local impact in their disciplines (see complete story, page 32). The NWDA contest celebrates the best of regional interior design, this year recognizing design excellence in 10 categories. 1. 2009 Seattle Design 100+ honoree Jane Weed, owner of Jane Piper Reid & Company, with Pierre Frey. 2. Left to right: Design Achievement Awards went to Kathryn Gustafson (whose award was accepted by Jennifer Guthrie), Curtis Steiner, Terry Hunziker and George Suyama. 3. Seattle Homes & Lifestyles Publishing Director Suzie Osterloh (left) and Editor Giselle Smith (right) congratulate Tyler Engle, of Tyler Engle Architects PS, who received the magazine’s first Publisher’s Choice Award at the Northwest Design Awards gala. His Mount Baker project also won first place in the NWDA Outdoor category.

1

2

Auction of Washington Wines The 22nd annual Auction of Washington Wines raised $1.5 million for uncompensated care at Seattle Children’s Hospital and for the Washington Wine Education Foundation. 1. Rich and Cathy Gaspar of Gaspar’s Construction attended the Barrel Auction & Picnic with the Winemakers on the grounds of Chateau Ste. Michelle. 2. Netra Nei of Netra Nei Design with Sara Nadolny and Driscoll Robbins of Driscoll Robbins Fine Carpets.

SEAN AIRHART/NBBJ

1, 2 STEWART HOPKINS FOR TPNW ©2009

PRODUCT RUNWAY

More than 1,000 design lovers attended Interior Design Coalition of Washington’s second annual Product Runway show to see couture garments made from interior finishes and materials head down the runway. The event raised money for Ronald McDonald House Charities in Western Washington and Alaska. above: Members of SkB Architects, Pental Granite & Marble and Luwa celebrate their winning design, made from tiles and vacuum cleaner materials.

secret garden tour Seattle Homes & Lifestyles and Ragen & Associates collaborated for the third year in a row on the Secret Garden Tour. This year, the tour was an auction item in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s 20th Anniversary Dream Gala, March 7, which raised more than $3 million for juvenile diabetes research. Winning bidders Kathy and Ralph Brindley invited their friends to join SH&L and Chip Ragen for a tour of three private residential gardens, designed by Ragen & Associates, on an unseasonably misty day in August. left to right: Keith Kessler; Kathy and Ralph Brindley; Lyn Kessler; A.J. King; Chip Ragen; and Terri King.

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sh&l REAL ESTATE

a view of the top OUR ANNUAL REVIEW OF THE REGION’S 10 MOST EXPENSIVE HOMES COMPILED BY LINDSEY ROBERTS

Extra, extra! Snap up one of these newsworthy beauties while you can. Home sales are predicted to increase in the next year, so the residences on our annual list of Western Washington’s most expensive homes may also find their way onto the most-wanted list. While some real estate values have dropped, prices in this range are holding relatively steady. “They are less affected by interest rates,” says Coldwell Banker Bain’s Wendy Lister. “These luxury properties have strong value retention, without question.” Those who miss the chance to invest in one of these homes now may just have to admire their top-of-theline amenities from afar. Consider what’s included in these homes:

1.

Mercer Island $32 million Everything needed for a royal retreat can be found in this stone-and-stucco manse on Lake Washington: boathouse, dock, hot tub, six-car garage and a 13,636-square-foot house.

(tie) Yarrow Point $25 million This Eastside traditional estate, built in the 1900s and remodeled in 2007, provides a gazebo, dock and gardens designed to be a private oasis from city life.

Contact: Wendy Lister, Coldwell Banker Bain, (425) 450-5206

Contact: Anna Riley, Windermere Real Estate, (425) 822-5100

2.

5.

Contact: Tere Foster, Windermere Real Estate, (206) 200-8373

Contact: Betsy Terry, Ewing & Clark, Inc., (206) 322-2840

Medina $26.8 million This 15,320-square-foot home with a wine cellar may feel like a chateau in the Alps, but it has expansive views of downtown Seattle, Lake Washington, Mount Rainier—and everything in between.

3./4.

(tie) Mercer Island $25 million A Chihuly chandelier sparkles in the entry of this home, but through its atrium, one can see the stars sparkle. This exotic home also has mirrored lagoons, saltwater pools, dinner chambers and a marble salon. Contact: Wendy Lister, Coldwell Banker Bain, (425) 450-5206

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Seattle $14.95 million A tennis player would love the regulation-sized tennis court on this property. The estate also features a detached apartment, covered boathouse, new bulkhead and dock.

6.

Seattle $12.85 million A not-too-ostentatious luxury lakefront home is always classic. This one-story stucco has two kitchens, skylights, a hot tub, a master bedroom fireplace and more. Contact: Kathryn Hughes, Madison House, Ltd., (206) 328-1011

7.

Seattle $10.9 million Marble inlay, burl wood, granite, mahogany and onyx are some of the materials used in this 1930s French Normandy home, reconstructed in 2005, on 0.4 acre. Three adjacent lots are also available for purchase. Contact: Betsy Terry, Ewing & Clark, Inc., (206) 322-2840

8./9.

(tie) Snoqualmie $10.5 million Step out the doors of this 14,400-square-foot log home, and you can wander the grounds to a trout pond, pool, pastoral meadows and gardens—all with Mount Si as a backdrop. Contact: Wendy Lister, Coldwell Banker Bain, (425) 450-5206 (tie) Seattle $10.5 million This shingle-and-stone home is reminiscent of the Hamptons, only the views through the bay windows of Lake Washington and the Cascades are more majestic. The verdant lot has terraces, fruit trees and space for gardening. Contact: Betsy Terry, Ewing & Clark, Inc., (206) 322-2840

10.

Mercer Island $10.3 million Sit in the infinity pool by the outdoor party zone of this 8,900-square-foot mansion and you may feel as if you're actually in Lake Washington. The party continues with full guest quarters, three kitchens and 96 feet of beach. Contact: Wendy Lister, Coldwell Banker Bain, (425) 450-5206


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Seattle Homes & Lifestyles, a Network Communications publication (206) 322-6699 | 3240 Eastlake Ave. E., Ste. 200, Seattle, WA 98102 SeattleHomesMag.com


sh&l TRAVEL PROMO

discover beautiful british columbia Combining energetic cosmopolitan culture with unique, organic detail, British Columbia is alluring during all seasons. The B.C. cities of Vancouver and Victoria represent Pacific Northwest elegance, and both feature a wide range of attractions for visitors in winter. Victoria’s 55-acre Butchart Gardens (butchart gardens.com) sums up the city’s pleasant floral feel. Winter will soon be setting in, but the gardens offer greenhouse tours through November and presents its 23rd annual Magic of Christmas event, December–January 6, 2010. The gardens make a wonderful backdrop for holiday displays with thousands of lights, musical performances and an outdoor skating rink. While visiting the city named for a queen, you can be treated like royalty in the elegant Empress Room at The Fairmont Empress Hotel (Fairmont

.com/Empress). The restaurant’s mahogany ceilings, tapestry-covered walls and candlelit settings create a comfortable mood as you enjoy meals featuring fresh, local ingredients.

THE FIFTH ANNUAL Crème de la Crème (wedding showblog.com) wedding show at Vancouver’s Four Seasons Hotel, November 15, presents trendsetting designs and a showcase of products and services that cater to brides. One of Vancouver’s most important contributions to the sudsy tradition of craft beer is

Granville Island Brewing Company (gib.ca) on Granville Island, across False Creek from downtown Vancouver. The brewery near the popular public market hosts tours and tastings daily. Rain may cause visitors to reach for their umbrellas, but some of Vancouver’s residents are happiest in water. They can be found at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre (vanaqua.org) in Stanley Park. Sharks, sea turtles, sea otters and even Amazonian animals including sloths and caimans are home in the internationally acclaimed aquarium. During the holiday season, Stanley Park hosts Bright Nights (vancouver.ca/PARKS/events/bright nights), November 27–January 2. The park’s miniature railroad rolls through a forest and farmyard decked in more than 1 million holiday lights. —AARON MONCIVAIZ

On the water in the heart of the city ... Come and discover Vancouver’s best kept secret. An island retreat in the city, just minutes from downtown and steps from the famous public market, live theatres, unique shops and exceptional restaurants. A luxurious boutique hotel built on the waters edge with magnificent views of the ocean, city and mountains. It’s easy to get to but hard to leave.

The ideal place for your next getaway!

1-800-663-1840

1253 Johnston Street Vancouver, B.C. Canada V6H 3R9 Tel: (604) 683-7373 • Fax: (604) 683-3061 www.granvilleislandhotel.com email reservations@granvilleislandhotel.com

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Because Life Takes Place in the Kitchen.

From sharing the morning paper to chatting about your day over dinner, chances are your family gathers in the kitchen. When it’s time to redesign, turn your kitchen into a comfortable, inviting hangout with the impressive style of DeWils custom cabinetry. The beautiful, timeless craftsmanship and distinct design of DeWils will make your kitchen more than just a place to cook – it’ll be the heart of your home.

www.dewils.com dewils.com

ESD

EILEEN SCHOENER DESIGN, INC. 1449 130TH AVE NE, BELLEVUE, WA 98005 Phone: 1.866.450.9055 or 425.450.9055 Email: dsgnr2@aol.com www.esddesign.com

See the fabulous features of DeWils Cabinets at our Showroom, or go to www.esddesign.com for more information.

tel. 206.604.0689 fax. 661.244.4477

LUXURY MARKETPLACE

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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sh&l SOURCES

22 STYLE: HOME OFFICE DESIGN Page 22: Interior Designer: Christine Archer Interiors, (425) 898-7789, archerco.com; Desk, cubes, Porter Collector’s Desk and Sullivan Leather Cubes, Pottery Barn, pottery barn.com; office chair, Surf Office Chair, CB2, cb2.com; mirror, Picture Source, 5961 Corson Ave., (206) 767-6100, picturesource.com; lamp bases, Shine Home, Veritables, 10220 Main St., Bellevue, (425) 455-8335, veritablesdecor.com; lamp shades, Laurel Ann Studios, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-367, (206) 767-2711, laurel annstudios.com; side chairs, Emerald Home, emeraldhome.com. Page 24: Interior Designer: Carrie Hayden, Style For Living Interior Design, 1921 Second Ave., (206) 448-9405, greatjoneshome.com; desk, chairs, chandelier, Great Jones Home, 1921 Second Ave., (206) 448-9405, great joneshome.com; rug, therugcompany.info. 28 TREND Settee, shades, votive holders, Custom raspberry settee, $1,800, raspberry shades, $5.99 each, mercury glass votives, $5.50 each, at Lauren Sloan Designs, 2612 N.E. 55th St., (206) 245-8105, laurensloandesigns .com; sequined throw, Bojan fabric by Jakob Schlaepfer, Trammell-Gagné*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-117, (206) 957-6005, tgshow room.com; wallpaper, table, Diva by Graham and Brown, $60 per double roll, and Pumpkin table by De La Espada, $3,745, at Velocity Art and Design, 251 Yale Ave. N., (206) 749-9575, velocityartanddesign.com; chandelier, crystal chandelier, $939.60 at Lighting Universe, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-391, (206) 7627335, lightinguniverse.com; accent rug, cowhide, $495 at Pizzazzz Interiors, 1520 11th Ave. N.W., Issaquah, (425) 369-0480; rug, Afghan Peshawar, $8,895 at Andonian Rugs, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-392, (206) 762-0323, www.andonianrugs.com; mantel, vintage cast iron, $400 at Antique Importers, 620 Alaskan Way, Ste. 100, (206) 628-8905; birds, small mirror, Painted gold peacocks, $95, and vintage gold painted mirror, $175, through Scavenger Vintage, (425) 890-4911, vicariouslylovely.blogspot.com, at Foundry, 13th Avenue S. & S. Bailey Street, (206) 6183731; large mirror, antique Louis Philippe silver gilt mirror, $5,720 at Polly McArthur & Associates, 607 S. Fidalgo St., (206) 768-1964, pollymcarthur.com; fire screen, Star Firescreen, $587 at Masins Fine Furnishings & Interior Design, 220 Second Ave. S., (206) 622-5606, masins.com; wardrobe, Draped Darboven Tank Dress, Shipley & Halmos, $435, Ron Ron pumps, Christian Louboutin, $595, at Barney’s New York, 600 Pine St., (206) 622-6300, barneys.com. 44 HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Interior Designer: Susan Marinello Susan Marinello Interiors, 119 S. Main St., Ste. 300, (206) 344-5551, susanmarinello.com. Architects: Lyle and Meredith Grant Maple Leaf Design, 8057 12th Ave. N.E., (206) 523-6427, mleafdesign.com. Landscape Designer: Bruce Freed Medina Gardening & Landscaping, (425) 864-9811.

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Builder: Jeff Jordan JL Jordan Co., 10740 Meridian Ave. N., Ste. 108, (206) 726-9577. Page 44: Ribbon, Midori, PS Stores, 2560 152nd Ave. N.E., Ste. L, Redmond, (425) 8850264, ps-stores.com; mirror above fireplace, Nancy Corzine, (310) 672-6775, nancy corzine.com; silver vases, Smith & Hawken, smithandhawken.com, and Target, target .com; sofas, coffee table, Michael Folks Showroom*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A254, (206) 762-6776, www.michaelfolks.com; rug, Ramri Rugs*, 1407 11th Ave., (206) 8608366, ramrirugs.com; pillows, custom, Susan Marinello Interiors; ornaments, Target, target.com, and Roost Home Furnishings, The Barron Collection Ltd., Pacific Market Center, 6100 Fourth Ave. S., Ste. 432, (206) 763-2779, barroncollection.com. Page 48: Entryway lighting fixture, Imports from Marrakesh Ltd., (212) 675-9700, imports frommarrakesh.com; table, Baker Knapp & Tubbs*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-170, (206) 763-3399, bakerfurniture.com; sofa, side chairs, mirror, custom, Susan Marinello Interiors; coffee table, Baker Knapp & Tubbs*; rug, Andonian Rugs*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-392, (206) 762-0323, www .andonianrugs.com; side tables, lamps, Visual Comfort, (713) 686-5999, visualcomfort.com. 50 SIMPLY TIMELESS Architects: Stuart Silk Architects Anne Adams, project architect, 2400 N. 45th St., Ste. 200, (206) 728-9500, stuartsilk.com. Landscape Architect: Linda Withington Beers Withington Landscape Architecture, 1907 E. Aloha St., (206) 322-3884, beerswithington.com. Contractor: Schultz Miller 822 John St., (206) 281-1234, schultz miller.com. Interior Designer: Patricia Schlapp Earls & Schlapp, 2009 Broadmoor Dr. E., (206) 324-1527. Page 50: Dining table, chairs, Bausman, bausman.net. Page 52: Drapery fabric, Brunswig and Fils, Jartgar 179/01, The Dixon Group, LLC*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-162, (206) 7674454, www.thedixongroup.net; chair, William Switzer, The Dixon Group*, fabric, Quadrille Praz, Jane Piper Reid & Company*, 835 S. Fidalgo St., (206) 621-9290, jprco.com. Page 53: Bar stools, Michael Folks Showroom*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-254, (206) 7626776, www.michaelfolks.com, fabric, Pierre Frey F2374-007, Jane Piper Reid & Company*; draperies, fabric, Pierre Frey, Rubans 178007 in Mozart Bleu 1, Jane Piper Reid & Company*. Page 54: Side chairs, Bausman, bausman.net, fabric, Pierre Frey Mezquita F24998-3, Jane Piper Reid & Company*; sofa, arm chairs, National Upholstery, The Dixon Group, LLC*; chair and sofa fabric, Pierre Frey F24975 cordoba-tabac and Pierre Frey F2347-003,

Jane Piper Reid & Company*; rugs, Andonian Rugs, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-392, (206) 762-0323, www.andonian rugs.com; table (between chairs), Panache, The Dixon Group, LLC*; buttoned back arm chair, Edward Farrell, Michael Folks Showroom*, cover, Fonthill 1923-03, Jane Piper Reid & Company*; leather ottomans, custom, Earls & Schlapp, 2009 Broadmoor Dr. E., (206) 324-1527; drapery fabric, Ralph Lauren Malloy l0308F, The Dixon Group, LLC*.

& Cole, TMM Lamp, Liave, 1205 Western Ave., (206) 364-0748, liave-home.com; side table, Fritz Hansen, Little Friend, Inform Interiors; draperies, Pumice, Wool Challis, Maharam. Page 66: Sofa, Revive, Brandrud Furniture, brandrud.com. 67 GARDEN PARTY Architect: Tyler Engle Tyler Engle Architects, 2126 Westlake Ave., (206) 621-7150, tylerengle.com.

56 ALL THE RIGHT HUES Garden Designer: Joy Hartley Garden of Joy, 18551 Morgan Marsh Lane, Seabeck, (360) 830-5737.

Contractor:

60 HOME OF THE YEAR Architect: Rik Adams Adams Mohler Ghillino Architects, 911 Western Ave., Ste. 550, (206) 709-3070, adamsmohler.com.

70 BEFORE & AFTER Builder: Prestige Custom Builders (206) 722-1540, prestigecustom builders.com.

Interior Designer: Nell Sanger Nell Studio, (206) 915-1150, nellstudio.com.

Thomas Jacobson Construction 2618 Eastlake Ave. E., (206) 720-1800, thomasjacobson.com.

Landscape Architect: Bill Noland Noland Landscape Design, (206) 284-7019.

74 GREEN LIVING Architect: Tom Lenchek Balance Associates, 80 Vine St., Ste. 201, (206) 322-7737, balanceassociates.com.

Bulider: Phoenix Construction 19004 Lago Pl. N.E., Lake Forest Park, (206) 362-2356, myphoenixconstructioninc.com.

Interior Designer: Jennifer Randall Jennifer Randall & Associates, 1100 E. Union St., Ste. 1B, (206) 323-1520, jradesigns.com.

Page 60: Dining table, chairs, bench, Henrybuilt, henrybuilt.com; side chairs, George Nakashima Straight Chair, Knoll, knoll.com; doors, aluminum slide-fold doors, NanaWall, nanawall.com; pendant light, Romeo Moon S1, Philippe Starck, flos.com; kitchen stools, Emeco Counter Stool, duGraf & Associates, 2233 15th Ave. W., (206) 2819366, fabric, Paul Smith Modulating Stripe, Maharam, maharam.com. Page 63: Sofa, Piero Lissoni Alphabet Sofa, Fritz Hansen, Inform Interiors, www.inform seattle.com; coffee table, Jean Prouve Gueridon Bas, Vitra, Inform Interiors; fireplace, Burner One, EcoSmart Fire, Inform Interiors; draperies, Pumice, Wool Challis, Maharam; kitchen backsplash, Modern Dimensions Arctic White, Dal-Tile, 6020 Sixth Ave. S., (206) 763-3004, daltile.com; counter tops, Cambrian Black satin granite, Oregon Tile & Marble, oregontileandmarble.com; cabinets, White Oak/laminate casework, Henrybuilt, 997 Western Ave., (206) 6249270, henrybuilt.com; refrigerator, French door refrigerator, Fisher Paykel, Albert Lee Appliance, albertleeappliance.com; faucet, Talis, Hansgrohe, The Fixture Gallery, thefix turegallery.com; rangehood, built-in ventilation hood, Miele, Albert Lee Appliance. Page 64: Coat hooks, mos Office Ivy, Rare Device, 1845 Market Street, San Francisco, (415) 863-3969, raredevice.net; benches, Vitra, Ulmer Hocker, Inform Interiors; paint, Benjamin Moore, Seattle Paint Supply, seattlepaint.com; powder room sink, Escale wall-mount lavatory, Kohler, kohler.com; faucet, Symbol, Kohler. Page 65: Doors, aluminum slide-fold doors, NanaWall; chair, Fritz Hansen, Hans Wegner Chair 44, Inform Interiors; floor lamp, Santa

General Contractor:

Rhinehart Construction Winthrop, (509) 996-3396. Landscape Designers:

Windy Valley Landscaping (509) 733-1090, windyvalleylandscaping.com.

Methow Natives Nursery (509) 341-4060, methownatives.com. *Available to the trade through architects and designers.

Vol. XIV, No 8 © 2009 by Network Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. Seattle Homes & Lifestyles™ (ISSN 1525-7711) is published bimonthly by Network Communications, Inc., 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 770962-7220. Periodical postage paid at Lawrenceville, GA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Seattle Homes & Lifestyles™ P.O. Box 9002, Maple Shade, NJ 08052. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both zip codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription. Subscriptions, $22.47 for one year; $32.47 for two years. Canada and Mexico add $24.00 per year. Single copy price $3.95. Subscription questions, (800) 368-5938. CPM#40065056. Canada Post PM40063731. Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5


A unique blend of Italian, French and American dishes An award-winning wine list with more than 300 selections

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation 1. Publication Title: Seattle Homes & Lifestyles 2. Publication No.: 017-867 3. Filing Date: 9/21/09 4. Issue Frequency: Jan/Feb, Mar/Apr, May/Jun, Jul/Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec. 5. No. of Issues Published Annually: 6 6. Annual Subscription Price: $22.47. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not Printer): 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043. Contact Person: Kurt Coey, 303-524-6557. 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (not printer): 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Suzie Osterloh, 3240 Eastlake Ave. E., Seattle, WA 98102. Editor: Giselle Smith, 3240 Eastlake Ave. E., Seattle, WA 98102. Managing Editor: N/A. 10. Owner (If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.): Network Communications, Inc. (NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 Gallarus Media Holdings, Inc. (owns 100% of NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: Network Communications, Inc. (NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 Gallarus Media Holdings, Inc. (owns 100% of NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 12. Tax Status: For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months. 13. Publication Title: Seattle Homes & Lifestyles 14. Issue date for circulation data below: Sep/Oct 2009. 15. Extent and nature of circulation: A. Total no. copies (Net Press Run): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 25,600. No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 20,000. B. Legitimate Paid and/or requested distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): 1. Outside-county Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 10,367. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 8,793. 2. In-county Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not Applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 2,116. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 1,451. 4. Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. C. Total paid and/or requested circulation (Sum of 15b(1), (2), (3), and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 12,483. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 10,174. D. Nonrequested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): 1. Outside-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 4,069. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 2,190. 2. In-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 3. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies mailed in excess of 10% Limit mailed at Standard Mail or Package Services Rates): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 4. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms and Other Sources): ): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 2,660. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 3,012. E. Total Nonrequested Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 6,729. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 5,202. F. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and e): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 19,213. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 15,376. G. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4, (page #3): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 6,387. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 4,624. H. Total (Sum of 15f and g): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 25,600. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 20,000. I. Percent paid and/or requested circulation (15C divided by f times 100): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 65%. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 66%.16. Publication of Statement of Ownership for a Requester Publication is required and will be printed in the Nov 09 issue of this publication.17. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

Private Dining and Catering Available Mon – Thurs: 11:30 am – 11 pm Friday: 11:30 am – Midnight Saturday: 5:30 – Midnight Sunday: 5 – 9 pm

BIS ON MAIN 10213 Main St. Bellevue, WA 98004 (425) 455-2033 bisonmain.com

LUXURY MARKETPLACE

SEATTLEHOMESMAG.COM NOV. & DEC. 2009

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1. “I love the way typography—in the hands of a skilled designer—can take the place of photographs or illustration. This would make a great gift for anyone who loves design.” —Giselle Smith, Editor

Type. A Visual History of Typefaces and Graphic Styles, Vol. 1, $59 from Taschen, taschen.com. 2. “I love the historical references in the latest porcelain pattern from Hermès, taken from a motif found in the firm’s original Paris store. The modern feel of the color palette is a lovely contrast with the Classical mosaic.” —Stacy Kendall, Market Editor 1

Mosaïque au 24 Tea Cup and Saucer, $220, through Hermès, The Shops at The Bravern, Ste. 145, Bellevue, hermes.com.

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3. “I love these champagne glasses because they are modern but have a vintage feel. They would be perfect for a friend who enjoys hosting parties and entertaining.” —Michelle Cristalli, Stylist

3

(see pages 60-66 & 70)

Horta Champagne Glass, $12 at Anthropologie, Seattle and Bellevue locations, anthropologie.com

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4. “I love how the Umbra Checkle Checker Board gives a classic game a whole new look. It would be perfect in a den or even out on the living room coffee table.” —Angela Cabotaje, Assistant Editor

l~v◊

Checkle Checker Board from Umbra’s U+ Collection. $230 at Velocity Art and Design, 251 Yale Ave. N., (206) 749-9575, velocityartanddesign.com. 5. “Design doesn’t always have to be so serious. These plates are irresistibly lighthearted and would make a great gift for a fun-loving friend.” —Shawn Williams, Art Director

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Paint-By-Number dessert plates, $12 each at Anthropologie. 5


Profile for Network Communications, Inc.

Seattle Homes & Lifestyles  

November 2009

Seattle Homes & Lifestyles  

November 2009

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