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Linear Solutions by Wood-Mode.


Reflect Your Own Personal Style Whatever your inspiration, the experienced design professionals in a Wood-Mode showroom can help you create the exact look you’ve always wanted for your home. Visit your nearest Wood-Mode Showroom.

Bellevue Refined Woodworks, Inc. 10203 Main Street 425-289-0389 www.refined-woodworks.com

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Mount Vernon Riverside Kitchen Center 2025 Riverside Drive 360-424-0884 www.riversidekitchens.com

Seattle Rainier Cabinetry & Design, Inc. 2901 N.E. Blakeley Street, Ste. 3A 206-632-7929 www.rainiercabinetry.com

Seattle Refined Woodworks, Inc. 5701 6th Avenue South, Suite 121 206-762-2603 www.refined-woodworks.com

For your home. For your life. For our environment.

©2009 Wood-Mode, Inc.


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

sept.oct.09

72 HOME 50 A PERFECT FIT A sleek Belltown condo beautifully accommodates a family of three.

68 WELL-SCRIPTED A lakeside Sammamish kitchen gets a digitally inspired update.

77 REAL ESTATE What’s selling in the city? Why certain urban projects rise above the rest.

56 GLOBAL FUSION A household of globe-trotters agree there is no place like their Bellevue condo home.

72 KITCHEN OF THE YEAR Seattle Homes & Lifestyles’ Kitchen of the Year is a northeast Seattle kitchen designed by Susan Marinello …. Plus, great design details from our finalists.

80 ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT

62 CROWN JEWEL An overgrown garden in Magnolia is transformed into a serenely elegant showpiece.

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For more life, style and home, visit SeattleHomesMag.com.


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

sept.oct.09

21

12 15 16 79

UP FRONT CONTRIBUTORS OUT & ABOUT RESOURCES

STYLE 21 TREND WATCH Join the industrial revolution with salvaged style.

26 “Living in cities is an art, and we need the vocabulary of art, of style, to describe the peculiar relationship between man and material ...”

26 SHOPPING Outfit your kitchen with stylish new hoods, tile and more. 28 GOING TO MARKET What’s new from the High Point Market in North Carolina and the International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York.

35

LIFE 35 IN GOOD TASTE Randy Altig shares his recipe and serving suggestions for a classic San Francisco seafood stew … Plus, everything you need to enjoy cioppino at home. 42 CALENDAR Our calendar of events for September and October is full of seasonal fun, including harvest festivals, plant sales and the start of a new theater season.

—JONATHAN RABAN, BRITISH WRITER

{ 40

ON THE COVER: Interior designer Lena Fomichev created this stylish condo for her Bellevue clients (see page 56). Photograph by David Papazian. For more life, style and home, visit SeattleHomesMag.com.

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SEPT.OCT.09 | upfront

Join the CONVERSATION! Seattle Homes & Lifestyles on the Web gives you unparalleled access to local design

SH&L Online

SeattleHomesMag.com Your one-stop design source. Find a designer and discover new shops and showrooms. Explore hundreds of beautiful rooms for design inspiration.

Digital Edition

book: On Face e Day th Room of Sign up for our wee kly e-newsletters

ARE YOU IN THE LOOP?

e-Newsletter Don’t end the week without our e-newsletter. More than 5,000 of Seattle’s most discriminating consumers receive our weekly e-newsletter every Wednesday. Sign up for yours at SeattleHomesMag.com.

global fusion WRITTEN BY ANGELA CABOTAJE PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID PAPAZIAN

THE LIVING ROOM BALANCES PARED-DOWN MODERN DESIGN AND EUROPEAN ELEGANCE TO STUNNING EFFECT. INTERIOR DESIGNER LENA FOMICHEV SELECTED THIS BOYD CRYSTAL-BEAD LIGHT FIXTURE (AT LEFT) BECAUSE IT REMINDED HER OF RAINDROPS.

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“Flip” through the pages of our Digital Edition at SeattleHomesMag.com

Facebook

Facebook.com/SeattleHomesMag Become a Design Insider and join the Seattle Homes & Lifestyles Fan Page, where you can mingle with local design enthusiasts like yourself. With regular updates from our editors, you’ll be the first in the know.

Twitter

@seattlehomesmag On Tw itte design r: Breaking n finds a e nd mor ws, e

m: ag.co omesMd products H le t t n a On Se st trends a te The la

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For an all-access pass to see where our editorial and creative teams have been and what they’re doing—right now—join us on Twitter. From photo shoots to selecting covers, see what it’s like inside SH&L.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: DAVID PAPAZIAN; JOHN GRANEN; DAVID PAPAZIAN; SHAWN WILLIAMS; HANK DREW

DON’T MISS A THING JOIN US ONLINE!

You’ve got to see it to believe it. Log on to our Web site to see our Digital Edition, which allows you to virtually “flip” through every single page of the magazine online. Click on a page and it will directly link you to local services and products. Talk about interactive!


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SEPT.OCT.09 | upfront

kitchens that

ALEX HAYDEN

imp

THIS YEAR’S SEATTLE HOMES & LIFESTYLES Kitchen of the Year contest—our third—drew the most entries and the highest quality of design of any previous contest. This meant that the task we assigned to our three esteemed judges was particularly challenging. Luckily, Marie Lail Blackburn, Tyler Engle and Becky Selengut were up to the task. Fortified with coffee and French pastries from our neighborhood bakery, Le Fournil, they tackled the job with gusto. The judging criteria, on which judges ranked each entry with a score from 1 to 5, included aesthetics and visual appeal, functionality and space planning, quality of workmanship, use of materials, originality and photographic appeal. Despite this qualitative approach, we make no pretense of the contest being purely objective. After all, what makes a room worthy of the title “Kitchen of the Year” is really a hard-to-define “wow” factor. Ultimately, the winning kitchen (see page 72) was the one that met all of the contest rules, scored highest across the board and most impressed our judges. We hope you’ll be wowed too.

GISELLE SMITH, Editor gisellesmith@seattlehomesmag.com

MEET OUR JUDGES: Award-winning architect Tyler Engle (left) has an impressive portfolio containing projects in New York and Spain as well as an SH&L 2008 Bath of the Year winner. A past Northwest Design Award winner, a juror for architectural design at Northwest schools and an SH&L Seattle Design 100+ honoree, he strives to unite the disciplines of architecture, interior design and landscape architecture. Certified Kitchen Designer and Certified Bath Designer Marie Lail Blackburn (center), well known for her insights on industry trends and processes, has served as a judge for local and national design competitions, including national Kitchen and Bath Association contests. With more than 20 years’ industry experience, Blackburn has seen her own award-winning work featured in local and national publications.

FIND US ONLINE

Here’s how to connect with Seattle Homes & Lifestyles on the Internet:

Becky Selengut (right) is a private chef, educator and writer who has worked in the kitchens at The Herbfarm and Osteria la Spiga. She has taught cooking classes at Puget Consumers Co-op and the Seattle Culinary Academy at Seattle Central Community College, and she is author of Washington Local & Seasonal Cookbook (Lone Pine, 2008). SH&L featured Selengut’s kitchen in October 2008.

❋ Our Web site: SeattleHomesMag.com ❋ Our digital edition: SeattleHomesMag.com/Digital ❋ Our blog: Blog.SeattleHomesMag.com ❋ On Twitter: Twitter.com/seattlehomesmag ❋ On Facebook: Facebook.com/seattlehomesmag

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Seattle Homes & Lifestyles, a Network Communications publication (206) 322-6699 | 3240 Eastlake Ave. E., Ste. 200, Seattle, WA 98102 | SeattleHomesMag.com


PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Suzie Osterloh EDITOR Giselle Smith ART DIRECTOR Shawn Williams ASSISTANT EDITOR Angela Cabotaje MARKET EDITOR Stacy Kendall CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Lisa Kennedy, Allison Lind, Andy Perdue, Debra Prinzing, Kathryn Renner, Lindsey Roberts MARKET ADVISER Linda Humphrey COPY EDITOR Kris Fulsaas PROOFREADER Lisa Gordanier SALES MANAGER Shirley Sax ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Denise Peterson INTERNS Julia Chang, Nancy Clark, Robinson Fralick, Aislyn Greene, Shannon Jones, Kimberly Leinstock CONTRIBUTORS Randy Altig, Andrew Drake, Hank Drew, Alex Hayden, David Papazian, Marty Wingate

FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: (800) 368-5938

SEATTLE HOMES & LIFESTYLES™ 3240 Eastlake Ave. E., Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98102 (206) 322-6699 • (206) 322-2799 Fax Web site: SeattleHomesMag.com Advertising inquiries: sosterloh@nci.com Editorial inquiries: gsmith@seattlehomesmag.com

Visit us online at SeattleHomesMag.com

PRESIDENT, HOME DESIGN DIVISION Adam Japko SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Stuart Christian DIRECTOR OF PUBLISHING OPERATIONS Rick Higgins PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Cheryl Jock

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PHOTOS: ANDREW BUCHANAN AND STOCK & HILL

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SEPT.OCT.09 contributors

Between the pages with SH&L

contributors

WRITTEN BY KIMBERLY LEINSTOCK

“I like writing because it’s the sharing of ideas between people,” says contributing editor Lindsey Roberts. While working on her story about a Sammamish kitchen (page 68), Roberts fell in love with the teak wood tiles that the designers and homeowners chose, instead of ceramic or glass, for the counter top. “I love learning new things that are outside the box,” Roberts says of this idea that adds subtle elegance to the kitchen. “I have never seen anything like this before.”

excellence in design and renovation

Photographer Alex Hayden has been working behind the camera since 1995. For this issue, Hayden and his camera were kept busy photographing a Seattle condo (page 50), a Sammamish kitchen (page 68), our Kitchen of the Year (page 72) and Room For Improvement (page 80). “The best part is meeting the homeowners,” Hayden says. “Most are really nice, and it’s interesting to hear their stories about their kids, dogs and why they did what they did.”

“I am fascinated by the level of craftsmanship, amount of care and detail [designers show],” says contributing writer Aislyn Greene. In this issue, Greene describes stunning features from three Kitchen of the Year finalists (page 76). While Greene admired all of the projects, she was particularly taken with the elements in a bright and colorful kitchen on Lopez Island, such as the interesting use of fiberboard and mix of rustic and modern elements. “You can look and constantly see something more,” Greene says.

Kitchen & Bath Design

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SeattleHomesMag.com

SEPT.OCT 2009

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PROMOTION | out & about

2 3

1

4 67

5 SEATTLE HOMES & LIFESTYLES’

JULY 17 AT KIRKLAND UNCORKED, HONORED NEW ADDITIONS TO OUR LIST OF PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS THAT DEFINE SEATTLE DESIGN.

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Kirkland Uncorked featured wine, food, art, music and SH&L’s Grand Salon with furnishings and décor provided by Wood-Mode and Refined Woodworks, Lambert Gray, J.P. Landscape, Windows Doors & More, Marvin Windows, Nanawall, Cutting Edge Design, Inc., Seattle Design Center, Fixture Universe, Andonian Rugs, Trammell-Gagné, Ralph Hays Contemporary Designs and Terris Draheim Exterior. 1. Party sponsor Windows Doors &

More’s Ken Hall welcomes guests and honorees to the kickoff event. 2. 2009 Seattle Design 100+ honorees John Wells and Seth Meyer of Meyer Wells. 3. John Hoedemaker, of Seattle Design 100+ honoree Schuchart Dow, with SH&L’s Giselle Smith and Carlos Breton. 4. Brian Parker of Refined Woodworks. 5. 2009 Seattle Design 100+ honoree Jane Weed of Jane Piper Reid & Co., with interior designer Randall Thomas and Jerry Weed. 6. SH&L’s Shawn Williams with Reeb Millwork’s Keith Church. 7. Keri Sue Kliemann, Crystal Polacek and Graciela Valeriano of J.P. Landscape.

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8. WiPliance’s Lee Travis, SH&L’s Jill Mogen and Bob Masin of Seattle Design 100+ honoree Masins Fine Furnishings & Interior Design. 9. Michael Andonian of Andonian Rugs. 10. Caleb Foster of Buty Winery, who poured wines for party guests. 11. SH&L’s Shirley Sax, Jane Malbon and Craig Lundgren of Lundgren Adams. 12. Architect Bob Swain with Marc Vassallo and Paul Vassallo of 2009 Seattle Design 100+ honoree Schultz Miller. 13. Exhibitors Chris Ford of Refined Woodworks and Larry Stenlund of Wood-Mode visit with Seattle Design 100+ honoree interior designer Stephen Hensel.

SeattleHomesMag.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY LORIE BUOB

SEATTLE DESIGN 100+ VIP PARTY,

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PROMOTION | out & about

Local companies win

RECOGNITION

1

SAVE THE DATE

in building and design competitions.

September 18 | The Harvest Hoe Down gala auction benefits the Bellevue Botanical Garden Society. Tickets are $100. Details: (425) 451-3755 or bellevuebotanical.org.

Association Puget Sound’s 2009 design competition named winners in seven categories. Local NKBA officers Brandelle McIntosh of Gateway Appliance Distributing, designer Paula Kennedy, and Wayne Martin, AKBD, Selden’s Home Furnishings, enjoyed the June gala at The Ruins. The Master Builders Association’s 2009 REX Awards honored remodeling excellence in 21 categories. 2. Jeff Svik of Berg’s Landscaping, with MBA’s Julie Applegate, picked up the DesignLandscaping award. 3. The People’s Choice Award and award for Major Remodel $300,000–$600,000 went to Weitzel Construction, Inc. for a home designed by architect Lane Williams of Coop 15.

September 25 | Seattle Men’s Chorus and Seattle Women’s Chorus host the Just Art Auction & Cocktail Party. Tickets are $75. Details: (206) 285-5175 or flyinghouse.org.

2

October 2 | The Elevate 2009 fashion show, staged by Karan Dannenberg, benefits Olive Crest. Tickets are $150. Details: (206) 8536524 or elevateseattle.org.

3 This year’s American Heart Association Heart Ball at Sheraton Seattle featured local wineries showcasing their best wines. More than 300 people attended the event, raising $331,000 to support the fight against heart disease.

SACSHA TODA-PETERS FOR TPNW

1. COURTESY PAULA KENNEDY; 2. ALEXIS WELCH FOR MBA; 3. GREGG KROGSTAD

1. The National Kitchen and Bath

The Coombs family shared the story of two-year-old Victoria Rose, who was born with a heart defect, shown here with Mom Silke, big brother Max, and Dad Mike.

NEW IN TOWN Two local companies opened new showrooms in July. 1. Kitchen and bath remodeling experts Lambert Gray celebrated the grand opening of their new showroom in Marysville, featuring cabinet, counter top and tile displays. Shown here: Marcus Lambert, Shawn Haverfield, Sr., Dennis Lambert, Beverly Lambert, Kevin Johnson and Chad Lambert.

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SEPT.OCT 2009

October 3 | Proceeds from PONCHO’s Grow Art Fine Art Auction, benefit local arts organizations. Tickets are $200– $3,000. Details: (206) 623-6233 or poncho.org. October 6 | The International Interior Design Association Northern Pacific Chapter’s INAwards celebrate innovation in interior design. Tickets are TBD. Details: (206) 762-6471 or iida-northern.pacific.org. October 9 | The Signature Chefs Auction features unique culinary experiences and benefits March of Dimes Washington Chapter. Tickets are $250. Details: (206) 624-1373 or marchofdimes.com/washington. October 14 | U.S. Sen. John Edwards speaks at Plymouth Housing Group’s Key to Hope luncheon. Tickets are $150–$1,500. Details: (206) 374-9409 or plymouthhousing.org.

1

October 3 | Pilchuck Glass School’s Auction Gala Event features works by emerging and established artists. Tickets are $250. Details: (206) 6218422 or pilchuck.com. October 29 | The Susan G. Komen Power of a Promise Luncheon raises funds to further breast-cancer awareness. Tickets are $150. Details: (206) 633-0303 or komenpugetsound.org.

2. The grand opening party for

American Slate’s new design center in south Seattle attracted 100 revelers. The showroom was designed by Kelli Patch, an architectural–design representative, and features a water wall, tile mosaics and more.

October 3 | Fund cardiovascular research and raise community awareness on the Start! Puget Sound Heart Walk. Details: (206) 632-6881 or pugetsoundheart walk.org.

2

For more upcoming events, visit SeattleHomesMag.com.

SeattleHomesMag.com


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Where designers shop for

luxury flooring. Associated Designers Showroom: 580 South Lucile St., Seattle | 206.763.2537 | associatedinc.net Monday – Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or call for an evening or weekend appointment

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STYLE trend watch | shopping | going to market

A INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION WRITTEN AND COMPILED BY STACY KENDALL

}

We’re getting back to basics with our love of raw materials and salvaged style

B A. Vintage Voltage | This chrome chameleon blends in beautifully with a modern or traditional setting. Dentist Lamp, $3,500 at Anthropologie, two Seattle locations, anthropologie.com. B. Steel the Spotlight | Modern with a hint of industrial, this console dazzles us with its quiet elegance. Punch Collection console by Established & Sons, $5,370 through Ornamo, 301 Occidental Ave. S., (206) 859-6492, ornamo.com.

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STYLE | trend watch

In design, honesty is always the best policy, and nothing captures straightforward style like furniture that’s tough enough to work on the factory floor. Forget fancy finishes; it’s all about the nitty-gritty. The imperfections— dings, scratches, flaking paint—give each object a personality and dynamism that work well in a contemporary setting. >>

STOOL Bar stool, $390 at Liberty 123,

123 Park Lane, Kirkland, (425) 822-1232, liberty123.com. CART Factory Cart (bottom), $910 at Restoration Hardware, two Seattle locations, restorationhardware.com. TABLE, LAMP Gustave Side Table and Table Lamp, $490 and $545, at Area 51, 401 E. Pine St., (206) 568-4782, area51seattle.com. BOWL Metal bowl, $79 at BoConcept, 901 Western Ave., (206) 464-9999, boconcept.com. BASKET Vintage metal basket, $90 at

Watson Kennedy, two Seattle locations, watsonkennedy.com.

PHOTOGRAPH BY HANK DREW

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STYLE | trend watch

Some of modern design’s most enduring

forms have industrial roots: Emeco’s Navy Chair, the Tolomeo desk lamp and anything from the Bauhaus movement. And with salvaged pieces, the stories behind each one can be as interesting as the items themselves. Chairs, tables and lighting taken from old factories evoke an awareness of history and utility; we find sincere beauty in something that is pure in form and function.

featuring

Livin’ Large Oversized signage lends a playful touch to any room. Vintage road-sign letters, $125 each at Great Stuff, 5517 Airport Way S., (206) 762-3899, greatstuff seattle.com.

mattaliano

Capucci Nightstand Elba Desk

Visit the showroom to browse an exquisite array of fine interior & exterior furnishings.

On a Roll This no-fuss design gets the job done in style. Quovis Worktable, $1,500 through Design Within Reach, Seattle and Kirkland locations, dwr.com.

VL[WKDYHQXHVRXWKQR VHDWWOHGHVLJQFHQWHUVHDWWOHZD W   KRXUV PRQIUL DP  WR   SP WHUULVGUDKHLPFRP

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Works Wonders Shop style is in style with factory-inspired dĂŠcor. Screw Table by Tom Dixon, $1,700 through Inform Interiors, 2032 Eighth Ave., (206) 622-1608, informseattle.com.

christian grevstad

featuring

Marka Small Bedside Table Boulevard Desk Romi Side Chair

Sleek and Chic A dose of classic style is just what the doctor ordered. Vintageinspired Enzo Lamp, $398 at Anthropologie, two Seattle locations, anthropologie.com.

Visit the showroom to browse an exquisite array of fine interior & exterior furnishings. VL[WKDYHQXHVRXWKQR VHDWWOHGHVLJQFHQWHUVHDWWOHZD W   KRXUV PRQIUL DP  WR   SP WHUULVGUDKHLPFRP

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STYLE | shopping

sizzling kitchen ideas COMPILED BY NANCY CLARK

Chandelier, vent hood and task light are all rolled into one show-stopping piece with the Star hood by Elica. Slaving over a hot stove will never be the same. $3,750 through Unique Distributing, 5114 Point Fosdick Drive N.W., PMB 266, Gig Harbor, (360) 895-3688.

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CaesarStone’s Motivo Crocodile quartz surface shows that “green” can also be stunning. Available to the trade through Refined Woodworks, Inc., Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-121, (206) 762-2603, refinedwoodworks.com.

1

2

The kitchen is the hardest working room in the house. It has to be functional and organized for preparing meals yet stylish and welcoming for family dinners and entertaining. Give your kitchen a break with these elegant-yet-practical products that bring a new level of sophistication to your home. 1. Make sure your kitchen is timeless with the Kallista One Pull-Down Kitchen Faucet in nickel silver. $992 through Best Plumbing, 4129 Stone Way N., (206) 633-1700, bestplumbing.com.

3

2. Bring your wine collection to new heights with the Viking 30-inch Full-Height Wine Cellar, which stores up to 150 bottles and boasts TriTemp technology to keep your whites, reds and long-term wines at the perfect temperatures. $6,997 through Albert Lee Appliance, 1476 Elliott Ave. W., (206) 282-2110, albertleeappliance.com.

4

3. Circle designs transform this apron-front sink into a work of art. Kohler Cursive design on Alcott undercounter sink. $1,400 through Ferguson Bath & Kitchen Gallery, 4100 W. Marginal Way S.W., (206) 767-7700, ferguson.com. 4. The Onda Barstool mimics the body’s curves, bringing comfort and style together. $298–$368 at Design Within Reach, Seattle and Kirkland locations, dwr.com.

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STYLE | going to market

LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP ROW: The Silhouettes

Chair and Gentry Chair are pieces that can be customized in Hickory Chair’s new upholstery program; MIDDLE ROW: At High Point Market, Councill debuted smaller scale pieces, such as the Mason Tuxedo Sofa (left); Calvin Klein’s walnut daybed (right) adheres to a minimalist style with clean lines and an ebony finish; LEFT TO RIGHT, BOTTOM ROW: The Calvin Klein canopy bed and armless occasional chair are two more examples of that minimalist style.

urban living from

w yk

to north carolina

WRITTEN BY NANCY CLARK

High Point Market April 25–30, 2009 High Point, North Carolina Thousands gathered in North Carolina to celebrate the centennial anniversary of High Point Market, the premier industry show for highend home furnishings in the United States, now featuring more than 2,000 exhibitors. Seattle-area attendees included Bob and Dave Masin of Masins Fine Furnishings & Interior Design (masins.com). The father-and-son duo, who say twice-yearly High Point Market is the “hub of the furniture world,� use the show as their primary resource for merchandise. This year, Bob and Dave both noticed the size, mood and focus of the market were affected by the economy. “It was by far the least

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SEPT.OCT 2009

attended market in the last 20 years,� Bob notes. He also noticed that the economic changes in the industry have led to a refocused agenda, “from creating new and different products to refining existing product lines.� Still, a few new lines stood out, including furniture from Calvin Klein with a retro feel and clean lines. Bob noticed Hickory Chair’s new custom upholstery program, which can ship within 30 days. Dave observed a switch to small-scale furniture options, which he attributes to downsizing and migration into the urban market. Some of Dave’s favorite petite sofa options came from the furniture company Councill.

SeattleHomesMag.com


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Any full size Sub-Zero Refrigerator and a Wolf Cooktop or Rangetop and Wolf Wall Oven

BONUS REBATES Purchase any of the above packages and qualify for additional rebates. $200

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Warming Drawer

Microwave Oven

Ventilation Hood

Double Oven

Single Oven

*On select Sub-Zero and Wolf models. Not applicable on prior sales and can not be combined with other offers. Units must be purchased between July 1, 2009 and December 31, 2009 and delivered by February 1, 2010. See Claim Form for details.

Almvig's 6407 12th Avenue NE Seattle, WA 98115

BRADLEE

Arnold's Appliance 1625 132nd Avenue NE Bellevue, WA 98005

| 1400 Elliott Ave West

Crossroads Appliance 15625 NE 8th Street Bellevue, WA 98008

| Seattle, WA 98119 | 206-284-8400 SeattleHomesMag.com

| www.bradlee.net SEPT.OCT 2009 |

29


STYLE | going to market

International Contemporary Furniture Fair May 16–19, 2009 Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York City Companies from 34 countries were present at the 21st annual International Contemporary Furniture Fair, which features the newest creations from the modern design world. The fair was open to the public for one of its four days. Seattle-area exhibitors included Darin Montgomery, founder of Urbancase (urbancase.com)—a Seattlebased furniture design-build firm—and Ryan Grey Smith, president and artistic director of lighting company 3form Light Art (3-form.com/lightart), which received the Gold award for Best of NeoCon2009 for an 8-foottall chandelier. Montgomery, a three-time attendee, unveiled new Urbancase products, including the Melli Compact Lounge, a wall-mounted bar storage unit that garnered much attention. Montgomery, who has a design sensibility that focuses on providing urban-living solutions, is a believer in creating the smallest environmental footprint possible, and he noticed a trend toward smaller spaces and urban living. A five-time exhibitor, Smith enjoyed being immersed in the energy of the New York market. “It shows different and unique products with aesthetics closer to those seen at European design shows,” he says.

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SEPT.OCT 2009

3form Light Art creates sculptural light fixtures (above) from an ecoresin material; The slimly discreet Melli Compact Lounge (above, left) from Urbancase borrows its name from the bar in Berlin’s Tempelhof Airport and is perfect for an impromptu happy hour.

SeattleHomesMag.com


SeattleHomesMag.com

SEPT.OCT 2009

| 31


*65:0:;,5;3@ (465.+,*69 4(.(A05,»: ;67

Because Life Takes Place in the Kitchen.

From sharing the morning paper to chatting about your day over dinner, chances are your family gathers in the kitchen. When it’s time to redesign, turn your kitchen into a comfortable, inviting hangout with the impressive style of DeWils custom cabinetry. The beautiful, timeless craftsmanship and distinct design of DeWils will make your kitchen more than just a place to cook – it’ll be the heart of your home.

dewils.com

EILEEN SCHOENER DESIGN, INC. 1449 130TH AVE NE, BELLEVUE, WA 98005 1.866.450.9055 or 425.450.9055 | SEPT.OCTPhone: 2009 SeattleHomesMag.com Email: dsgnr2@aol.com www.esddesign.com

ESD 32

See the fabulous features of DeWils Cabinets at our Showroom, or go to esddesign.com for more information.


LUXURY MARKETPLACE

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To advertise in this section call 206.322.6699

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mary davis

v i n t a g e

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SEPT.OCT 2009

| 33


WHAT INSPIRES YOU? Maybe it’s an extraordinary view. Maybe it’s the kitchen that really cooks. Maybe it’s a home that is the launching pad for an active life. Maybe it’s a thought about legacy. Are you looking for a home that blends with its site and your lifestyle, features the elemental pleasure of crafted timber and incorporates sustainable materials and technologies? The team at Cascade Joinery combines thoughtful design and expressive craft with your inspiration to create a timeless, soul-satisfying home that will shelter and sustain you and your family for years to come.

CASCADE JOINERY, INC. (360) 527-0119 (425) 212-2219 cascadejoinery.com Memberships: TFG/TFBC, Built Green Awards: NWAIA Award winner

One of the Northwest’s oldest timber frame specialists, Cascade Joinery’s experience is both broad and deep, but each project starts fresh. We listen to you. We walk through your site with you. We collaborate with you— and we aspire to delight you. Design and Craft. Inspiration and Expression. Cascade Joinery. Architecture • Crafted Timberwork

ARCHITECTS & DESIGNERS IN DEMAND

To learn more, give us a call or attend one of our series of home tours and seminars.

AWARD-WINNING INTERIOR DESIGN & REMODELING Holly Van Biene 2000 124th Ave. N.E., Ste. B-102, Bellevue, WA 98005 T: 425.646.9009 hvbinteriors.com

Gelotte Hommas Architecture 3025 112th Ave. N.E., Suite 110, Bellevue, WA 98004 T: 425.828.3081 gelottehommas.com

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SEPT.OCT 2009

SeattleHomesMag.com


LIFE in good taste | calendar

dive in catch  perfec t di



n i r d p a  r f t y r u o y f

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SEPT.OCT 2009

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LIFE | in good taste

RANDY ALTIG’S CIOPPINO RECIPE STARTS WITH VEGETABLES AND GARLIC SAUTÉED IN EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL, FROM WHICH HE CREATES A RICH BROTH BY ADDING TOMATOES, WHITE WINE AND FRESH HERBS. THE HEART OF THIS WELL-LOVED DISH IS PIECES OF DUNGENESS CRAB, FLAKY CHUNKS OF HALIBUT, PLUMP PRAWNS, AND CLAMS AND MUSSELS STILL IN THEIR SHELLS. RANDY ALWAYS BUYS HIS FISH AT TIM’S SEAFOOD IN KIRKLAND. RECIPE IS ON PAGE 39.

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SEPT.OCT 2009

SeattleHomesMag.com


chipping in italian style WRITTEN BY RANDY ALTIG PHOTOGRAPHS BY HANK DREW

{

If someone had told me this would be my year to travel the globe, I wouldn’t have believed it. But that’s just what I’ve done. From hiking in Hawaii and shopping in Paris to designing in Shanghai, cooking in Tuscany and walking Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco, this has been a memorable year. As I think back on its highlights, however, one summer day in San Francisco, eating fresh cioppino from warm sourdough bread bowls with my family, definitely stands out. Walking along the wharf, I was awestruck by the bounty and beauty of the gifts of the sea. Just off the boats, the catch of the day—fresh fish both large and small, and many varieties of shellfish—lay in ice wagons, glittering in the sun like precious jewels. At that moment, I realized I was in the American motherland of cioppino, the popular Italian soup made from a perfect mixture of fresh chard, onions, tomatoes, fish and wine. >>

SeattleHomesMag.com

} SEPT.OCT 2009

| 37


LIFE | in good taste

“I ized I was in  Arican moand of cioppino,  popular Itian soup ma fr a perfect mixture of f chard, onions, tomatoes, fi and wine.â€?

tabletop {tips}

1.

Roll shiny silverware in white napkins, then garnish them with sprigs of rosemary and lavender.

The soup gained fame here in the late 1800s, when Italian fishermen who had settled in the North Beach neighborhood used recipes from their homeland—and the day’s leftovers—to make extra money by feeding the fishermen and local residents. In California, some thought the name derived from the heavily Italian-accented cry of San Francisco’s wharf cooks as they asked fishermen to “chip in� some of their catch to the collective soup pot at the end of the day. But the name actually comes from ciuppin—meaning “to chop� in the Ligurian dialect of the Italian port city of Genoa—which describes the stew-making process. Fishermen cut up various fish and shellfish and threw them in a pot with fresh vegetables such as carrots, peppers and onions. Whatever the origin of its name, cioppino has evolved into a seafood-lovers’ favorite dish. When making this fisherman’s classic, I like to cook the seafood in a broth made of extra virgin olive oil, diced tomatoes and white wine. I leave most of the shellfish in their shells, including the crab, which I serve halved or quartered. As a result, the dish requires not just a spoon but also a crab fork and crackers. Fresh halibut cut into cubes is always my standard, but you can personalize your recipe by adding your favorite fish. 38 |

SEPT.OCT 2009

2.

Set the table with mismatched wine glasses and put bread sticks in vases.

3.

Fill antique jars with fragrant late-season herbs—fennel, sage, lavender and rosemary.

Whether dishing it up for a small group or a crowd, I like to serve cioppino family style. I place the pot in the middle of the table and ladle generous portions into large white bowls, where the shellfish (in their shells), vegetables and tomato-based stock make for beautiful color and high visual drama at the table. When I was in Italy earlier this year, I noticed that most fine restaurant tables were dressed with perfectly pressed cloths, usually of starched linen in pale green or pink instead of traditional white, but for this meal I like my table to look a little more relaxed. So I use a big red-and-whitechecked cloth consistent with the looks sported by most of Italy’s trattorias. I roll shiny silverware in white napkins and tie them with twine, then set the table with mismatched wine glasses and put bread sticks in vases or thickly sliced artisan bread in small baskets. For a decorative way to add to the anticipation of the meal, I fill antique jars with my favorite late-season fresh herbs—rosemary, fennel, lavender and sage—and casually place them on the table with votive candles in red, green and white (the colors of the Italian flag). Then I light the candles, pour the wine and serve the cioppino— and in no time, my guests feel the magic of la bella Italia. Rand¼ Altig aππears weekl¼ after the Q13 FOX Morning News on Maximum Living With Randy.

SeattleHomesMag.com


the cipe RANDY’S MAXIMUM-LIVING CIOPPINO MAKES 4 OR 5 SERVINGS, BUT FEEL FREE TO DOUBLE THE RECIPE FOR BIG APPETITES OR A LARGER CROWD.

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 green pepper, seeded and chopped 1 carrot, cut into thin strips 1 large clove garlic, minced or pressed 11/2 cups tomatoes, peeled and chopped (canned, diced tomatoes work fine) 11/2 cups dry white wine (or use a full bottle for more broth) 1 teaspoon fresh basil leaves 1 teaspoon fresh marjoram leaves 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves 1/2 teaspoon dried chili pepper flakes 1 bay leaf Salt to taste 2 cups chopped Swiss chard 1 pound fresh crab, in the shell, rinsed and cut in quarters 1 pound firm, white fish (such as halibut) fillets, cut into l-inch cubes 12 hard-shell clams, cleaned * 12 mussels (beards removed) * 1/2 pound medium-sized raw prawns, shelled and deveined 1/3 cup chopped parsley * Scrub shellfish with a stiff-bristled brush under cold, running water. Discard any clams or mussels that are not tightly closed. 1. Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat; add onion, green pepper, carrot and garlic and sauté, stirring occasionally, until soft (about five minutes). Transfer to a large pot with a tight-fitting lid. 2. Add tomatoes, wine, basil, marjoram, thyme, chili pepper, bay leaf and salt, and simmer over medium-low heat for 30 minutes. 3. Add Swiss chard, crab, fish, clams and mussels. Cover and simmer five minutes. 4. Add shrimp and parsley. Cover and simmer four minutes or until shrimp turns pink. 5. Serve in large bowls with hot sourdough or Italian-style bread—and enjoy!

ciuppin

—meaning “to chop” in the Ligurian dialect of the Italian port city of Genoa—which describes the stew-making process

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SEPT.OCT 2009

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LIFE | in good taste

sea of beauty WRITTEN AND COMPILED BY AISLYN GREENE

2

WHEN PRESENTING a flavorful and visually appealing dish such as cioppino, chefs need equally impressive tableware at the ready. We envision a whimsical yet functional table with large, deep soup bowls, a token sea creature (or two) and a few local wines to round out the evening. Bon appétit! 1. We love the teardrop-shaped base of this elegant flatware. Iittala Mango Five-Piece Set, $70 at Velocity Art and Design, 251 Yale Ave. N., (206) 7499575, velocityartanddesign.com.

1

2. This traditional white Bordeaux blend pairs well with seafood in a light broth. 2007 Buty Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle, $32 at 12th and Olive Wine Company, 1125 E. Olive St., (206) 329-2399, 12thandolive.com.

3

3. Savor your soup in style with these handmade ceramic bowls. Perch O Bowl, $48 at Urbanweeds, 4302 Fremont Ave. N., (206) 632-7680, urbanweeds.com.

4 4. You won’t have to fish for

compliments with these gems on your table. Jonathan Adler Fish Salt and Pepper Shakers, $48 through Velocity Art and Design, 251 Yale Ave. N., (206) 749-9575, velocityartanddesign.com. 5. Your soup will happily stew in this

sunny pot. Le Creuset Round French Oven, 5.5–quart in Dijon, $310 at Mrs. Cooks, 2685 N.E. Village Lane, (206) 525-5008, mrscooks.com.

5

40 |

SEPT.OCT 2009

SeattleHomesMag.com


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| 41


LIFE | calendar

Can’t-miss events for

sept. oct.09 COMPILED BY AISLYN GREENE AND KIMBERLY LEINSTOCK

EXPERIENCE THE ROMANCE OF SHAKESPEARE’S CLASSIC ROMEO ET JULIETTE (LEFT) AT PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET, SEPTEMBER 24–OCTOBER 4. UNTITLED #168 (RIGHT) BY TIM RODA IS ON DISPLAY AT GREG KUCERA GALLERY, OCTOBER 1–NOVEMBER 14.

EVENTS

September 3–13 | See The Greatest Show on Earth as Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus comes to Kent, September 3–7, and Everett, September 10–13. Tickets are $15–$75. Details: (877) 840-0457 or ringling.com.

September 11–13 | The Skagit–Island Counties Builders Association Home Tour features the newest in home technology, construction and design, highlighting builders throughout both counties. Tickets are $7. Details: (360) 757-6916 or sicba.org.

September 5–7 | This year’s Bumbershoot music and arts festival features musical artists such as Sheryl Crow, Michael Franti, Eric Hutchinson, Modest Mouse and many more. Admission is $50–$420. Details: (206) 281-7788 or bumbershoot.org.

September 13 | AIA Seattle’s Future Shack is a discussion of projects shaping the future of residential architecture in our region. Tickets are $12. Details: (206) 4484938 or aiaseattle.org/futureshack. September 13 | Kirkland Concours d’Elegance features classic automobiles, motorcycles, vintage boats and hydroplanes. The all-volunteer event benefits children who need help paying for health services. Admission is $20. Details: (425) 822-7066 or kirklandconcours.com.

September 18–20 | Kick off fall in the “Center of the Universe” during Fremont Oktoberfest. Admission is $25 for the beer garden, $15 for nondrinkers. Details: (206) 633-0422 or fremontoktoberfest.com. September 20 | Spaces for Urban Living: Downtown Home Tour is a self-guided walking tour that spotlights apartments, condos and other distinctive urban homes in downtown Seattle. Advance tickets are $25, $30 day of event. Details: (206) 7745249 or pikeplacemarketfoundation.org. September 20 & 21 | The sixth annual Great Kitchen & Bath Tour showcases the Northwest’s best professionally designed gourmet kitchens and luxurious bathrooms. Advance tickets are $15, $20 day of tour. Details: (425) 820-1540 or great kitchenandbathtour.org.

Catch The Weave More than 100 artists exhibit a diversity of handcrafted items at this year’s Seattle Weavers’ Guild show and sale (206-264-5496, swg-sale.com), October 22–24. Items range from functional works of art, such as this basket by Judy Zugish (left), to spectacular wearable pieces. Held at St. Mark’s Cathedral, the event includes workshop demonstrations. Admission is free. —KIMBERLY LEINSTOCK

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SEPT.OCT 2009

SeattleHomesMag.com


Landscape Design Construction Maintenance 425.822.1943 ¡ cemlandscapes.com

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SEPT.OCT 2009

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LIFE | calendar

September 21–October 15 | Master Builders Association’s Grand Tour of Homes showcases housing options from starter homes to stately mansions in the greater Seattle area. Admission is free. Details: (425) 451-7920 or mbaks.com. September 24 | The Northwest Design Awards Gala recognizes excellent work by Northwest design professionals. In addition, Seattle Homes & Lifestyles and Seattle Design Center present the 2009 Design Achievement Awards, honoring designers making a significant local impact in their disciplines. Tickets are $25. Details: (206) 762-1200 or seattledesigncenter.com. September 25 & 26 | The Great Wallingford Wurst Festival, an Oktoberfest-style celebration and fund-raiser at St. Benedict School, offers food, games, crafts, a book sale and live entertainment. Admission is free. Details: (206) 633-3375 or stbens.net. September 25–27 | Enjoy authentic Greek food and folk dancing at the St. Demetrios

Greek Festival. Admission is free. Details: (206) 325-4347 or www.seattlegreekfestival.com. September 26 & 27 | Celebrate all things Italian at Festa Italiana. Admission is free. Details: (206) 282-0627 or festaseattle.com. September 26 & 27 | Historic Seattle’s Bungalow Fair celebrates Seattle’s arts and crafts movement, with lectures from antique dealers, architects, interior designers, craftspeople and more. Admission is $10. Details: (206) 622-6952 or historicseattle.org. September 26 & October 17 | AIA Seattle presents two Saturday seminars on How to Select & Work with an Architect. Admission is $15–$20. Details: (206) 448-4938 or aiaseattle.org. October 10 | Artisan Tile Northwest hosts the Handmade Tile Festival, themed “Submerged” and showcasing local talent in traditional and modern styles. Details: (360) 3311295 or artisantilenw.org. October 17 | The 14th annual Northwest

Jewelry and Metals Symposium features works by local artists and presentations by artists who work in contemporary repoussé, goldsmithing and more. Tickets are $85. Details: (425) 788-3687 or seattlemetalsguild.org. October 17 & 18 | Attend the Remodeled Homes Tour, themed “Giving from the Hearth,” for inspiration for remodeling projects. Donations are accepted for local charities chosen by each homeowner. Admission is free. Details: (425) 451-7920 or mbaks.com. October 22–25 | See the latest trends and find new home inspirations, demonstrations and exhibits at this year’s Seattle Home Show 2. Admission is $9. Details: (425) 4670960 or seattlehomeshow.com.

GALLERIES

Now through November 14 | Explore works by four artists using different media at Greg Kucera Gallery. Installations by Mark Calderon and Anne Appleby are on view, through September 26, followed by Drew Daly and

Sustainable Designs Landscape Construction Stone Work Garden Carpentry Inspired Plantings

425 803.9881 envconst.com

44 |

SEPT.OCT 2009

SeattleHomesMag.com


Tim Roda, October 1–November 14. Admission is free. Details: (206) 624-0770 or greg kucera.com. September 5–October 4 | Crawl Space Gallery features visual and digital media artist Brendan Jansen, whose installation explores the interplay between visual truth and one’s knowledge through portraiture and still life. Admission is free. Details: (206) 201-2441 or crawlspacegallery.com. September 20–November 1 | “Agriculture on the Urban Fringe: Farming and Conservation in the Snoqualmie Valley,” by Seattle photographer Roddy Scheer, opens at Novelty Hill · Januik Winery with a party, September 20. Party tickets are $35. Details: (425) 481-5502 or noveltyhilljanuik.com. September 26 & 27 | Visit 93 Whidbey Island painters, sculptors, photographers and potters during the Whidbey Open Studio Tour. Tickets are $10. Details: (360) 221-4121 or whidbeyopenstudiotour.org.

October 7–October 28 | Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery presents “Signs of Life,” featuring artists paired with writers to showcase literature and jewelry art. Admission is free. Details: (206) 624-6768 or facerejewelryart.com.

Now through October 11 | Tacoma’s Museum of Glass presents “Contrasts: A Glass Primer,” a collection of works grouped to illustrate ideas, techniques and styles. Admission is $10. Details: (253) 284-4750 or museumofglass.org.

Now through September 13 | Seattle Art Museum’s gallery at TASTE restaurant presents new paintings and monotypes by Betty Merken, who embraces classical geometrical proportions with idiosyncratic elements. Admission is free. Details: (206) 654-3100 or seattleartmuseum.org.

Now through October 18 | Two exhibits at Bellevue Arts Museum feature sculptural and tactile works from multiple artists. “ÜberPortrait,” a collection of more than 30 works from acclaimed artists, expands on the meaning of “portrait,” while “The Miniature Worlds of Bruce Metcalf” focuses on the dark side. Admission is $9. Details: (425) 519-0770 or bellevuearts.org.

Now through October 4 | “Stories that Cover Us” is a collection of quilts at the Northwest African American Museum. The quilts reflect the passionate lives of the women of the Pacific Northwest African American Quilters, an organization dedicated to the preservation of the skill. Admission is $6. Details: (206) 518-6000 or naamnw.org.

Now through January 18, 2010 | Find inspiration at the Museum of History & Industry’s “The Arts and Crafts Movement in the Pacific Northwest.” Enjoy the legacy of regional architecture, furniture, metalwork, stained glass, ceramics, crafts, printing, photography and more. Admission is $8. Details: (206) 622-5444 or seattlehistory.org.

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discover b.c. Make British Columbia your next vacation destination and enjoy exciting fall events such as the Vancouver International Fringe Festival (vancouverfringe.com), featuring more than 500 theater performances; the Victoria Classic Boat Festival (classicboatfestival.ca); and the 2010 Olympic Torch Relay kick-off ceremony, October 30.

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SeattleHomesMag.com

SEPT.OCT 2009

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LIFE | calendar

MUSIC

September 4–12 | Chateau Ste. Michelle’s Summer Concert Series features a diverse lineup of jazz, rock, blues and contemporary artists, including Chris Isaak, September 4; Bonnie Raitt and Taj Mahal, September 6; Pink Martini, September 12; and more. Tickets are $35–$90. Details: (206) 628-0888 or ste-michelle.com. September 4–25 | Fridays, 4–6 p.m., the Bothell Farmers Market hosts live music that ranges from acoustic folk and indie rock to South American jazz. Admission is free. Details: (425) 483-2250 or country villagebothell.com. October 17–November 8 | Earshot Jazz Festival presents the full spectrum of jazz, from high-profile concerts to cuttingedge creations that move the art form ever forward. With more than 60 events in various Seattle venues, the festival features hundreds of the most important artists today. Ticket prices vary. Details: (206) 5476763 or earshot.org.

ON STAGE DESIGN/BUILD REMODELER

An Exceptional Experience From Start to Finis Finish

Now through October 11 | Explore the world of high fashion at Teatro ZinZanni. Tony Award winner Liliane Montevecchi and design house Luly Yang Couture meet under the tent for All Dressed Up with Some Place to Go. Tickets are $104–$140. Details: (206) 802-0015 or zinzanni.org. September 24–October 4 | Romeo et Juliette returns to Pacific Northwest Ballet. Choreographer Jean-Christophe Maillot has received national acclaim for the use of both ballet and modern dance techniques in his adaptation of the Shakespeare classic. Tickets are $25–$160. Details: (206) 441-9411 or pnb.org. September 25–October 18 | Join Seattle Repertory Theatre for The 39 Steps, a comedy based on the Alfred Hitchcock masterpiece. Tickets $15–$20. Details: (206) 443-2222 or seattlerep.org.

CONSIDERING A REMODEL? T Trust your project j to our award d winning i i designers d i and experienced craftsmen #ALLTODAYsPOTTERCONSTRUCTIONCOM

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SEPT.OCT 2009

Est. 1979

SeattleHomesMag.com

September 25–October 24 | Taproot Theatre presents Enchanted April, based on the novel by Elizabeth von Arnim and adapted for the stage by Matthew Barber: a story about two British housewives who are emotionally and spiritually revived by an Italian holiday. Tickets are $20–$33. Details: (206) 781-9707 or taproottheatre.org.


October 2–25 | Bainbridge Performing Arts presents The Producers, an awardwinning story of a get-rich-quick scheme to stage the world’s worst show. Tickets are $24. Details: (206) 842-8569 or bain bridgeperformingarts.org.

Techline: Right-Sized Home Furnishings

October 9–November 15 | Intiman Theater captures the imagination with Abe Lincoln in Illinois, written by Robert Sherwood and directed by Sheila Daniels. Tickets are $37–$52. Details: (206) 2691901 or intiman.org. October 12–18 | Celebrate Puget Sound’s Live Theatre Week, including the popular Free Theatre Night, October 15. This year’s lineup has expanded to include visual and performance artists, dancers and musicians. Tickets are TBD. Details: (206) 7700370 or seattleperforms.com/ltw.

FURNITURE

GARDEN PLANNER

September 5–26 | Sky Nursery’s fall lecture topics include how to prune and renovate an overgrown garden, an odd plant show featuring a seminar on the uses of cacti, and ways to jazz up your garden with a makeover. Admission is free. Details: (206) 546-4851 or skynursery.com. September 12 | Shop for fresh organic produce from local farmers at the Seattle Tilth Harvest Fair. Learn seasonal garden tips; get advice on food prep and storage; meet backyard chickens, goats and bees; and taste local treats. Admission is free. Details: (206) 633-0451 or seattletilth.org.

N

INTERIORS

CELEBRATING 80 YEARS

Phone (425) 462-5400 N Open Every Day of the Week 10308 NE 10th St., Bellevue (2 blocks north of Bellevue Square) www.delteet.com

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September 18 & 19 | The Northwest Horticultural Society presents its Fall Plant Sale at Warren G. Magnuson Park. Admission is free. Details: (206) 557-1794 or northwesthort.org. October 11 | Dunn Gardens hosts the 2009 Fall Foliage Festival with a silent auction, refreshments and garden walks. Admission is TBD. Details: (206) 362-0933 or dunngardens.org. October 14 | The Northwest Horticultural Society presents the lecture “What Is a Garden?” by Georgia native Brooks Garcia. Tickets are $5 for members, $10 for nonmembers. Details: (206) 527-1794 or northwesthort.org.

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Network. Educate. Discover. Register online before September 30 for a free lunch and lower seminar rates!

Seattle’s Conference & Tradeshow for Construction, Renovation, Real Estate Management, Architecture & Interior Design

OCTOBER 14 & 15, 2009 WASHINGTON STATE CONVENTION & TRADE CENTER

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SUPPORTING ASSOCIATIONS

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HOME home and garden features

urban living, kc‫ה‬ns

&

MORE

In this issue, we celebrate Urban Living with stylish condominiums in Belltown (page 50) and Bellevue (page 56) that demonstrate the best local condo design. We are inspired too by a re-envisioned Magnolia blufftop garden (page 62) that is as classically elegant as the house it surrounds. Kitchens are also on our minds: We feature one on Lake Sammamish (page 68) and a sleekly beautiful northeast Seattle room that is our 2009 Kitchen of the Year (page 72). Plus … we couldn’t resist including some favorite ideas from other top contest contenders (page 76). We hope you find these spaces as inspiring as we did!

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LIVING-ROOM FURNISHINGS INCLUDE A MINOTTI SECTIONAL SOFA FROM INFORM INTERIORS, AN ANTIQUE TANSU CHEST AND A CARPET BY WOVEN LEGENDS. “[THAT] IS ONE OF MY FAVORITE LINES THAT [DRISCOLL ROBBINS] CARRIES BECAUSE THEY REALLY DO LOOK LIKE ANTIQUE RUGS,” INTERIOR DESIGNER HOLLY MCKINLEY SAYS. “I’VE PURCHASED SEVERAL FOR CLIENTS.”

a perfect fit WRITTEN BY GISELLE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX HAYDEN

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RIGHT: ANNIE, COLE AND DRISCOLL ROBBINS’ ECLECTIC ART COLLECTION INCLUDES AN ANTIQUE AFRICAN BARBERSHOP SIGN THAT THEY HUNG ABOVE THE CABINETS IN THEIR PEDINI KITCHEN. THE STOOLS ARE ANTIQUES, AND THE HALLWAY WALL (AT LEFT) IS COVERED IN A RICH RED VENETIAN PLASTER.

FROM FLOOR TO CEILING, DRISCOLL ROBBINS’ BELLTOWN CONDO IS A PERFECT FIT FOR HIS FAMILY

A

lot can change in three years. When Driscoll Robbins decided to purchase an urban condominium in the Mosler Lofts building near Seattle Center in 2005, it was the perfect decision. The owner of Driscoll Robbins Fine Carpets was a bachelor (though he had recently started dating someone), and the Belltown building—not yet under construction—was less than a mile and a half away from his Western Avenue retail store. Plus, he had heard the building was going to be the first LEED-certified condo building in Seattle, and that idea appealed to him. “I wasn’t necessarily thinking about buying a condo, but I saw that it was not your usual condo,” he says. “It had a lot more character, and I liked the design of it.” The Schuster Group’s Mosler Lofts project was lauded as one of the most environmentally sustainable urban-residential developments in the region and was recognized as part of the city’s “future vision” in Seattle Homes & Lifestyles’ Seattle Design 100 in January 2006. Driscoll put down a deposit on the unit, knowing he’d continue living in a house in Wallingford for the next year and a half. By buying in early, before the units were built out, he was able to get the 1,500 square feet

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he wanted by purchasing a one-bedroom unit and an adjacent studio. “I got them to leave a few walls out so we were able to redesign the layout,” he adds, and then he enlisted interior designer Holly McKinley to help him figure out the design for the space. Growing up in an artistic family and in the rug business (Driscoll’s father was a rug dealer as well as a painter and art collector) and having owned his own high-end carpet business for nine years (selling rugs that are often works of art in themselves), Driscoll developed his own sense of style. “I’ve had a lot of opportunities to go into the amazing homes of our clients, so I’ve had a lot of opportunities to see what I like and don’t like,” he explains. “We work with so many of Seattle’s top designers—I know a lot of their work—and Holly was someone I’ve always liked to work with, and I’ve always liked her taste.” He approached McKinley to see if she would be interested in collaborating with him on his home, and the partnership clicked. Driscoll already had some furniture pieces, an eclectic art collection and—of course—some beautiful rugs, and McKinley brought to the project innovative design sensibilities and efficient space-planning ideas that

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LEFT: MCKINLEY AND DRISCOLL REMOVED A CLOSET IN THE ENTRYWAY TO MAKE ROOM FOR A DESK; THE ARTWORK ABOVE IT IS BY DRISCOLL’S FATHER, ARKY ROBBINS. BELOW: MCKINLEY DESIGNED THE CANTILEVERED BENCH (LEFT) IN THE LIVING ROOM THAT APPEARS TO HANG FROM ONE OF THE SUPPORT COLUMNS, AND IT WAS FABRICATED BY MEYER WELLS. A FEW OTHER PIECES, INCLUDING THE DINING TABLE (RIGHT), ARE ALSO MCKINLEY DESIGNS BUILT BY MEYER WELLS.

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A SLIDING METAL DOOR IN THE ENTRYWAY CLOSES OFF THE MASTER SUITE OR THE TV–GUEST ROOM. “ORIGINALLY, WE WERE GOING TO TRY TO FIND A RECLAIMED OLD INDUSTRIAL DOOR, BUT THEY WERE TOO BEAT UP AND A LITTLE TOO RUSTIC,” MCKINLEY RECALLS. “WE ENDED UP USING THAT AS INSPIRATION AND CREATING A NEW DOOR.” MCKINLEY DESIGNED THE DOOR, WHICH WAS FABRICATED BY GREG LAMB. THE BUDDHA STAND AT THE END OF THE HALL IS ANOTHER MCKINLEY DESIGN AND MEYER WELLS CREATION; THE RUNNER IS BY MICHAELIAN & KOHLBERG.


LEFT: A WOVEN LEGENDS RUG ALMOST COVERS THE MASTER BEDROOM FLOOR. “ON THOSE DARK FLOORS, THAT PERFECT RED BECOMES A BACKGROUND COLOR,” MCKINLEY SAYS. DRISCOLL’S REASONING IS MORE PERSONAL: “MY DAD ALWAYS SAID, ‘RED RUGS UNDER YOUR FEET MAKE YOU LOOK BETTER AND MAKE YOUR COMPLEXION LOOK BETTER,’ ” HE SAYS. BELOW: BEDROOM AND BATHROOM FURNISHINGS ARE A MIX OF ANTIQUE (THE MIRROR AND BENCH) AND MODERN (CABINETS BY PEDINI).

Driscoll says would never have occurred to him. “Everything that she proposed, I liked,” he marvels, “and everything that I proposed, she liked.” McKinley is equally enthusiastic about the experience: “Not only did Driscoll have great ideas, wonderful taste and a great eye for design, but he was really excited about the whole process and very collaborative,” she says. “He was like the dream client: [someone] with an amazing sense of design and passion for doing it right, all the sensibilities that create a really great working relationship, as well as a result that we were all really pleased with.” McKinley labels the design of the space “Northwest loft contemporary,” but Driscoll describes it as a mix of styles. “I like modern design— but I don’t like it when it gets too minimalist and stark,” he says. “I like to still have a cozy feel, which is why I like to bring in color, especially red, and why I like to bring in antique furniture—bridging that gap between modern and antique.” But while construction delays pushed out Driscoll’s move-in date (as is often the case with new buildings), a few things changed. The relationship Driscoll had just started when he chose his unit in Mosler Lofts developed into something serious, and by the time the building was finished in January 2008, he and Annie were married. Then little Cole was born in November 2008. Now the trio live happily in their urban abode, with its dramatic entryway, its open loftlike kitchen, living room and dining room, its master suite (with room for a crib) and its TV–guest room (with private

bath), where a special memento resides: the rug Annie purchased in 2005 from Driscoll Robbins Fine Carpets—which is how the couple met. “We love it,” Driscoll says of Mosler Lofts. “It’s a super-energy-efficient building—our monthly electricity bill is averaging about $17, including heat and the washer and dryer.” And the owners find they can go a week without driving: “It’s easy living,” Driscoll says. “I can see all the traffic coming in on I-5 every morning and every night, and it takes me five minutes on my bike to get to work and get home.” They also love the large rooftop garden and being just a block and a half from Seattle Center. Driscoll estimates that he and Annie push Cole’s stroller down to the Olympic Sculpture Park about twice a week. It may not always be so—when Cole graduates from the stroller to a bicycle, for example—but for now, the sleek urban condo with efficient built-ins and a custom design that Driscoll once anticipated as being perfect for a solo bachelor has turned out to also be perfect for a family of three. Giselle Smith is editor of Seattle Homes & Lifestyles. Professionals who worked on this project include: Interior Design: Holly McKinley, Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc., 5227 S. Hudson St., (206) 622-5884, hminteriors.com; Carpets: Driscoll Robbins, Driscoll Robbins Fine Carpets, 1002 Western Ave., (206) 292-1115, driscollrobbins.com.

For resource information, see page 79.

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global fusion WRITTEN BY ANGELA CABOTAJE PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID PAPAZIAN

THE LIVING ROOM BALANCES PARED-DOWN MODERN DESIGN AND EUROPEAN ELEGANCE TO STUNNING EFFECT. INTERIOR DESIGNER LENA FOMICHEV SELECTED THIS BOYD CRYSTAL-BEAD LIGHT FIXTURE (AT LEFT) BECAUSE IT REMINDED HER OF RAINDROPS.

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OPPOSITE: POMERANIAN LEO’S FAVORITE SPOT IS ON TOP OF THE SOFA; GALINA’S IS THE DINING ROOM BECAUSE THE WOOD-AND-LEATHER CHAIRS FROM TEAM 7 ARE EXTREMELY COMFORTABLE.

A FAMILY TRAVELS THE WORLD BUT FINDS THAT NO PLACE CAN COMPARE TO HOME

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he Goncharenkos are globe-trotters. Russian natives Galina and Vadim, who moved to the United States nine years ago, frequently travel overseas, and daughter Julia’s modeling career takes her across Europe and Asia. Though this well-traveled family has seen the world, no place is quite like home. For the Goncharenkos, home is a 1,850-square-foot condo in downtown Bellevue—a simple and stylish space with perfect European flair. When Galina and Vadim purchased the previously rented unit in 2005, they had already collected ideas from their international excursions and were looking for a designer who could bring those inspirations to life. “We needed someone who thinks the same way and understands exactly what we mean when we say something,” Vadim says. Enter interior designer Lena Fomichev of LF Interior Design. The Goncharenkos first saw Fomichev’s work in an issue of Seattle Homes & Lifestyles, when her project was named the 2005 Home of the Year. “She was the perfect person for us because she was welcoming to our crazy ideas,” Vadim says. “We are two pieces of one whole thing,” Galina adds, explaining that the three connected on both professional and personal levels. Fomichev began by asking Vadim and Galina to describe their favorite place. Next, she asked the homeowners to tear pages out of magazines and create two piles—one for ideas they loved and the

other for things they hated. From the Goncharenkos’ description of a sunny ocean beach and their visual likes and dislikes, Fomichev created a design around three elements: air, water and fire. Tan floor tiles and a subtle blue paint on the ceiling represent sand and sky. Three types of wood—teak, anigre and walnut—warm the space, while pops of fiery orange add color to the creamy white and ice blue theme. Throughout the home, images of water appear in unexpected ways: A crystal-bead light fixture looks like a flurry of raindrops; glossy and matte glass tiles in the kitchen allude to a shimmering ocean; a voluminous floor lamp seems to billow underwater; coral patterns are etched on the crisscross legs of the coffee table. With help from the team at Homeland Construction, Fomichev removed a wall that blocked the entry from the rest of the home and took out kitchen cabinets that obstructed the flow of light into the kitchen. Unfortunately, she had to adapt her design to some other less-than-ideal structural aspects of the unit. Building regulations forced Fomichev to leave all plumbing in its original location and work with awkwardly angled walls and concrete support pillars spaced 26 feet apart. “I needed to hide [these] somehow but at the same time make the home functional, spacious, beautiful,” Fomichev says. “Every single step was a challenge.” She opted for chic camouflage and designed custom pieces to fit in tight spots.

KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL “I tried to unify every single area to have the same feeling,” says interior designer Lena Fomichev, who made several changes in the kitchen to achieve this goal. To allow more light into the room, she removed a row of hanging cabinets that blocked views out the windows. She also incorporated colors and materials used in the rest of the condo: sand-colored CaesarStone counter tops, teak cabinets and drawers, and blue glass tile for a watery shimmer on the backsplash.

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ABOVE THE BED, ARTWORK BY CASSANDRIA BLACKMORE COMPLEMENTS THE DEEP BROWN WALLS AND LACE CURTAINS IN THE MASTER SUITE. OPPOSITE, LEFT TO RIGHT: FLORAL-INSPIRED SINKS AND SCONCES REFLECT FOMICHEV’S AFFINITY FOR ORGANIC AND NATURAL FORMS IN THE HOME; DAUGHTER JULIA’S BEDROOM IS AN IDEAL SPOT TO UNWIND IN A WHITE LIGNE ROSET ROCKER WITH A VIEW OF THE CITY SKYLINE.

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In the living and dining rooms, Fomichev downplayed the angles of the walls with sheer floor-to-ceiling curtains that stretch from wall to wall. She did the same in the master bedroom with rich brown wallpaper and created a focal point in the middle of the room with a cream-colored bed, headboard and rug to draw the eye away from the walls. Fomichev designed a built-in sideboard for the living room as well as vanities to fit narrow spaces in the master and second bathrooms. Throughout the condo, built-in shelves disguise support columns, hiding concrete behind wood panels. “We are so happy that this was made into reality with Lena’s help,” Vadim says. “All of our friends and guests feel so comfortable here—when we invite someone over for tea, they end up staying three or four hours.”

The Goncharenkos enjoy their home so much that sometimes they too find it hard to leave. After moving in, Galina told Fomichev, “I don’t want to go anywhere. This place is heaven for me.” Coming from jet-setters who have seen the world, that’s certainly high praise. Newl¥wed Angela Cabotaje is Assistant Editor of Seattle Homes & Lifestyles. Professionals who worked on this project include: Interior Design: Lena Fomichev, LF Interior Design, (425) 466-9515; Construction: Rick Lanning, Homeland Construction, 8254 N.E. State Hwy. 104, Kingston, (360) 297-4575.

For resource information, see page 79.

THE ELEMENTS OF DESIGN 1. Custom floating shelves are dual-purpose: They display books

and hide a concrete support pillar. 2. A custom wraparound mirror in the powder room takes the

focus away from the oddly angled walls.

3

3. Fomichev used three types of wood—teak, anigre and walnut—

throughout the home for an interesting mix of colors. Hidden storage cabinets in the master bath play up the differences.

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crown jewel

THE REDESIGN OF A MAGNOLIA BLUFF LANDSCAPE KEEPS THE BEST OF THE OLD AND ADDS NEW LIFE WRITTEN BY MARTY WINGATE PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDREW DRAKE

A BROAD LAWN AND TERRACES ON THE WEST SIDE OF THIS MAGNOLIA HOME STEP DOWN TO THE POOL, HOT TUB AND FORMAL GARDENS PLANTED WITH SEASONAL BLOOMS. ALL LEVELS SHARE THE EXPANSIVE VIEW OF PUGET SOUND AND THE WEST POINT LIGHTHOUSE AT DISCOVERY PARK.

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F

AT THE FRONT GATE AND RUNNING THROUGH THE GARDEN, A CARPET OF GREEN (PACHYSANDRA TERMINALIS) CREATES A LUSH GROUND COVER FROM WHICH CLIPPED BOXWOODS AND OLD RHODODENDRONS EMERGE. OPPOSITE: WHITE AND GREEN CREATE A CRISP EFFECT WITH WHITE HYDRANGEAS IN THE REPRODUCTION FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT CONCRETE POTS AND ‘ST. MARY’ SOUTHERN MAGNOLIAS (MAGNOLIA GRANDIFLORA) PAIRED ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FRONT DOOR.

inding the jewel hidden in the jungle was an assignment that landscape architect Randy Allworth took to heart. He carved out a serene landscape from a dense forest of rhododendrons and other 80year-old trees and shrubs that closed in on this Magnolia bluff home. “It was an overgrown hodgepodge—you couldn’t see the façade of the house,” Allworth says. “We wanted to give the landscape more transparency.” The approximately 92,000-square-foot property is set back from the bluff; it includes a level approach from the street and a broad lawn behind the house to the west. Terraces above the lawn and a lower level with a pool and hot tub overlook Puget Sound. The house and original garden dated from 1930, and both needed revision: The owners wanted to add on to their house, and though the garden contained many lovely, mature specimen plants, it needed an update. While the addition (by Seattle architecture firm Suyama Peterson Deguchi) was under way, Allworth redesigned the garden, with construction by the Nussbaum Group, led by Dale Nussbaum and Brian Rogness. Allworth took advantage of the upheaval, clearing out the understory and moving mature plants away from the house. He edited out some plants and moved others to an on-site nursery until it was time to replant. The homeowner researched garden styles and looked through stacks of magazines to discover what she wanted their garden to

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become. “We learned your eye doesn’t want to go to so many things,” she says. “I need to see repetition. It’s a palette that’s easy to look at.” In addition to bringing in new, large rhododendrons, Allworth saw potential in many of the existing plants. Keeping older plants makes the finished garden look well-established—like the house—rather than new. Allworth moved dogwoods, a Japanese snowbell tree (Styrax japonicus) and rhododendrons—some as tall as 15 feet—about the property like pieces on a chessboard. The result is a quietly refined garden with less congestion, where visitors can better appreciate the plants’ forms. The view from the front gate presents a composed picture along the drive, with the ground a carpet of evergreen Pachysandra and an allée of multistemmed crape myrtles (Lagerstroemia ‘Natchez’) leading to a lawn where the Japanese snowbell stands. “It’s all about the house. You want to welcome people into your house, not hide from them,” the owner says of the change from overwhelming growth to simplified elegance. “You couldn’t see the house before—it felt like Gone With the Wind when Scarlett couldn’t find Tara in the fog.” Art accents the garden, beginning near the allée, where a large copper pig stands amid the ground cover. The owners bought Seattle artist Reilly Jensen’s Penny the Inside Out Pig from the 2001 Pigs on Parade, a fund-raiser for the Pike Place Market Foundation.

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ABOVE: ONE’S EYE IS LED THROUGH AN ALLÉE OF MULTISTEMMED CRAPE MYRTLES (LAGERSTROEMIA ‘NATCHEZ’) TO REST ON THE FRAMED VIEW OF A JAPANESE SNOWBELL (STYRAX JAPONICUS), RESCUED FROM ITS ORIGINAL POSITION TOO CLOSE TO THE HOUSE. BELOW AND OPPOSITE: HUMMOCKY GROUND AND STYLIZED CONIFERS INDICATE A SHIFT IN ATMOSPHERE FROM THE FORMAL GARDEN TO THE JAPANESE GARDEN, WHERE ALLWORTH REBUILT A WOODEN BRIDGE.

The interior of the garden, enclosed by the perimeter wall of green created by conifers, rhododendrons and other tall evergreens, feels spacious. “The backdrop gives the space depth,” Allworth says. Limbing up the rhododendrons—removing lower branches— created space between the ground cover and the canopy of tall shrubs. “One thing we tried to do was to change the cliché of the Northwest garden: rhody, rhody, rhody,” Allworth says. “We wanted to reveal them in a way by editing out other things and [let visitors] see them all the way to the ground.” The drive loops around a planted island to the porte-cochere—the covered area at the front door—where Allworth took advantage of space nearest the house for the most architectural plantings. At the corner of the house, a large copper beech (Fagus sylvatica ‘Riversii’) from the original garden serves as a majestic backdrop. At the end of the allée, lawn takes over from the black Britannia granite stone path. The expanse of grass keeps a low profile so that nothing gets in the way of the Sound view. As a focal point at the end of the lawn, perfect for contemplating a sunset, sits a white Chinese marble bench with bronze base by Washington artist Julie Speidel. “It’s a hard-edged thing on soft grass,” Allworth explains. Formal garden style allows the designer to juxtapose strong lines with contrasting textures and forms for visual appeal no matter what is in bloom. In the front garden and along the allée, soft mounds of Japanese boxwood (Buxus microphylla var. japonica and its cultivar ‘Winter Gem’) emerge from the carpet of pachysandra. Boxwood is used again as a low hedge behind the house, where it delineates the railing around the lawn, and also at the top of the terrace and on the pool level. “I like to keep my color palette simple,” Allworth says. The older rhododendrons put on a spring show of white and pink, but for the majority of the year the garden is serene in its greenery, yet interesting in texture and form. In spring, dwarf rhododendrons bloom with a background of white dogwoods, and in late summer, the crape myrtles flower white. Fall warms up the show, with brilliant color from the crape myrtles, dogwoods and viburnums. Repetition in all forms reinforces the formal landscape design. The planters at the front door are repeated along the sunroom terrace. Allworth’s intentional geometry makes the secret Japanese garden even more of a surprise. It is found down rustic stone steps off the pool terrace, perfectly hidden from view. The garden offers a quiet respite or the opportunity for a brief stroll up to the gate and out onto the lawn. The transformation—or, perhaps, reenvisioning—of this garden is as remarkable to the owners as it is to casual admirers. The entrance had been all grass (“It looked good about two days a year,” the owner says), with crowded, overgrown plants hiding the house. Simplifying the garden by removing some plants and clearing the space between ground and canopy resulted in a calm visual appeal. “We wanted to quiet everything down, to appreciate what was here,” Allworth says. Professionals who worked on this project include: Landscape Design: Randy Allworth, Allworth Design, (206) 623-7396, allworthdesign.com; Construction: Dale Nussbaum, Nussbaum Group, (206) 545-0111, nussbaum-group.com; and Architecture: Suyama Peterson Deguchi, s-pd.com.

For resource information, see page 79.


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STREAMLINED, MINIMALIST, ELEMENTAL, INDUSTRIAL—ALL ARE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S POPULAR CONTEMPORARY DESIGN GENRE. THIS KITCHEN, DESIGNED BY POLINA ZAIKA AND JULIA SANDETSKAYA OF MUSADESIGN, SHOWCASES THAT STYLE WITH A COMBINATION OF MATERIALS: TEAK, STAINLESS STEEL, LIMESTONE, MARBLE AND GLASS. THE MASTERFUL COMBINATION OF ELEMENTS SETS THE STAGE FOR SOPHISTICATED DINING AND LIVING THAT ARE UNIQUE, NOT STANDARD.

well-scripted WRITTEN BY LINDSEY ROBERTS PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX HAYDEN


INSPIRED BY THEIR CLIENTS’ DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY SKILLS, A PAIR OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS CREATE A MULTILAYERED KITCHEN

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ibby and Paul Matthaeus’ kitchen is like a finished film production: it appears as one cohesive, seamless picture, yet is made of many individual, inspired parts. The room’s most interesting starting point for interior designers Polina Zaika and Julia Sandetskaya of MusaDesign, however, was Paul’s company. Digital Kitchen, the company Paul founded in 1995 and ran as chief creative director for 14 years, is a pioneer in the film and video production industry. The largest company of its kind in the United States, it emphasizes digital graphics and visual effects and is best known for the opening creative direction for TV’s Six Feet Under, House, True Blood and Nip/Tuck. This past year, Digital Kitchen won its 10th Emmy Award. When Paul started his company, Zaika was a student at Seattle’s School of Visual Concepts, and she admired the work he was doing. So when the Matthaeuses were referred to MusaDesign for a full-house remodel in 2007, Zaika was honored. “It was definitely interesting to work with a guy of his caliber,” she says. Design inspiration for Paul and Libby’s kitchen also came from its Lake Sammamish location, the site’s steep access from the street and the couple’s affection for streamlined design with industrial touches. All of these influences appear in the finished room, yet none dominates. Before buying this house in 2007, Paul and Libby had a house in Kirkland’s Bridle Trails neighborhood and a lake house near Monroe.

Their remodeling goal was to combine what they loved about each of those houses in one property. Mainly, they wanted to merge their everyday lives with a retreatlike lake environment, especially since they anticipated their daughter and son soon moving out (both are now in college). Their Bridle Trails house was 4,400 square feet, and their current one is just 2,900 square feet, but the clean, contemporary lines and uncluttered design make the Sammamish house feel equally spacious. Now, when the kids come to stay, it also feels like the whole family is away at a weekend house. “The location of the house really spoke to our environment, which is mountains, water and sky. That’s really what you get from every room of the house,” Paul says. To mimic the mirrorlike properties of the adjacent lake, Zaika and Sandetskaya decided to bring reflective surfaces into the kitchen. They installed white laminate glass in the island and cabinets that look like the color of milk or the moon—not typical clear window glass. “You can’t even see from [first glance] if it’s glass or another material that has shine,” Zaika says. “It doesn’t have the cold feel that glass usually does. At the same time, it has that reflective ability.” In addition to imitations of lake and sky, another graphic element involves strong horizontal lines, which give the kitchen an illusive feel of being larger and taller. The lines are repeated in rectangular glass-paneled upper cabinets and teak wood lower cabinets, as well as the shape of the

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{ Clever twists in plot make this kitchen a standout. The teak tiles on the stainlesssteel-edged bar are unexpected because they are not ceramic or glass.

Cupboards built by Darby Huffman of Kitchen & Bath Studio open up instead of out, so the homeowners don't have to hold the doors when removing dinnerware.

island, marble backsplash and horizontal grain of the teak. “Your eye notices the lines and not the height of the ceiling,” Zaika says. Horizontal lines also circle the eye around to the water—which the kitchen faces. The home had a significant physical limitation that the designers had to consider: To reach the house from the street, one has to either walk down an almost vertical metal staircase or ride in a motor-operated tram. Everything the design team brought in had to be transported down the stairs or via the tram’s 3-foot-by-4-foot car, and the process became an unexpected motivation to be sustainable. “You have to think about it: Does it really need to be taken out?” Zaika says, referring to what was in the existing kitchen. The refrigerator, oven, microwave and dishwasher stayed; the overwhelming amount of 1980s-inspired taupe—on the walls, carpet, tile and laminate—was evacuated. The industrial element is expressed in stainless-steel appliances (from the previous kitchen) and backsplash, but also in three pendant lights above the island. “We really wanted to have pendants that would be part of this industrial, artistic feel of the kitchen,” Zaika says. Designed by Sofie Refer, the “Bulb Pendant Light” has a transparent shade, bulb and wire. “They’re industrial and yet elegant at the same time,” Sandetskaya says. “They don’t draw a lot of attention to themselves; they’re very stripped back and minimalist,” Paul adds. “They play well against the white walls and the stainless steel. They don’t distract your eye away from the solid Burmese teak cabinets or the Calcutta marble.” The designers also added a “digital” theme, represented in small

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One action that made the kitchen a masterpiece, however, was the installation of three pendants, designed by Sofie Refer, over the stainless-steel island sink.

square teak tiles, which Zaika and Sandetskaya laid out in a grid on the surface of the bar attached to the kitchen island. Each 2-inch-square tile has its own unique grain pattern and orientation, but all of the tiles together make up an eye-catching counter-top surface. The kitchen itself is so understated and elegant that Paul says it doesn’t feel like a kitchen. “It’s almost like a staging area for those other two spaces,” he says, referring to the adjoining dining room and living room. He likes the recessed glass panel in the island, which lights up at night and creates a sense of warmth, visually drawing the rooms together. The real accomplishment for MusaDesign was to take a standard, contemporary design and make it interesting in a subtle way, through material choices rather than loud design decisions. Libby says they would never have thought of installing wood tiles or limestone flooring without designer guidance. “We really credit them with bringing in new, creative products,” she says. With all of the pieces working together, Libby and Paul have a sublime space in which to cook and entertain. As in Paul's company, the visual effects are well-directed. Professionals who worked on this project include: Interior Design: Julia Sandetskaya and Polina Zaika, MusaDesign, 2617 Fifth Ave., (206) 448-3301, musadesign.net; Construction: Darby Huffman, Kitchen & Bath Studio, 2009 Fourth St., Ste. B, Port Townsend, (360) 301-5881, kitchen-bathstudio.com.

For resource information, see page 79.

SeattleHomesMag.com


cente® of antion FOR A BUSY FAMILY OF FIVE, THIS AWARD-WINNING KITCHEN IS COMMAND CENTRAL WRITTEN BY STACY KENDALL PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX HAYDEN

LEFT: The cast-glass backsplash fashioned by local artist

Peter David was implemented to be a reflective element “almost like another window,” Marinello says. She suggested they choose a polished finish, rather than the brushed one used for the drawer pulls, on all of the faucets to add another dimension of shimmer, which is balanced by the subtle gray cabinets and honed marble.

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hen Socrates wrote “know thyself,” he probably wasn’t talking about designing a kitchen, but when a family in northeast Seattle decided to build their dream home, they endeavored to create a kitchen that functioned perfectly for their lifestyle—by knowing exactly what they wanted. Planning took more than a year, and interior designer Susan Marinello and architect Craig Stillwell credit the homeowner for being fully engaged in the design process. “Before the kitchen was built, Karen knew where everything was going and the purpose of every drawer,” Stillwell says. Karen always knew that she would use Marinello for the design of her family home—the two women have known each other since they were both 14. “There’s no way I was going to work with anyone else, nor would she let me,” the homeowner jokes. The process was a true collaboration, and the result is a blend of Karen’s taste and Marinello’s creative suggestions. “Susan was able to visualize the house as a whole and how everything flowed,” Karen says. Functionality and organization keep school lunches, soccer parties and family gatherings from being arduous undertakings. Karen made sure the real reason people are drawn to the kitchen is because of its inviting atmosphere. “We wanted our home to be peaceful, but also a retreat where everyone would feel welcome,” she says. Therefore, a sense of tranquility and balance was no design afterthought—Stillwell wove it directly and purposely into the layout. Symmetry and spatial alignment achieve what he calls “a subconscious level of order.” The harmonious effect of the architectural elements is continued in the design details, which display a dynamic tension between modern and traditional. Although both Karen and Marinello set out to design a traditional home, the last thing they wanted was fussy or florid. “It is truly what I call ‘modern classic,’ ” Marinello says. “We were striving for timeless yet fresh.” Architect, interior designer and homeowner were three parts of a fourcornered partnership that was completed by contractor Andy Constan. The foursome worked together to build a home that is light and open while still being classic and composed. In the kitchen, rather than subscribing to the conventional “work triangle” rule, the designer and homeowner created zones: Food prep, cooking and cleanup are relegated to specific areas of the kitchen where they make the most sense. “I’m OK with walking two or three steps,” Karen says. “The most important thing was that the kitchen flowed.” “This is the textbook example of a successful project,” Marinello says. “The design team worked beautifully together, and Karen was fully committed to the entire process.” She and her family now have a kitchen that unites the most lived-in spaces of the home, where Mom can conduct the family’s comings and goings. “It’s never just one or two of us in here,” Karen says. “The kitchen is really command central.” Another key indication that it was a successful project is that the homeowner loves the result. “It’s a great sense of accomplishment,” Karen says. “When we took this on, I felt a huge responsibility to my family to give it my best—and we got exactly what we wanted.” Socrates would approve.

W

ABOVE: “People say to me that they wish they had this room,” Karen

says of her butler’s pantry. In addition to offering storage space for baking supplies, dried ingredients and serving accoutrements, it is essentially a miniature kitchen, where dishes can be washed and food prepared. The family uses it most when entertaining, when they can assemble meals here and put guests’ dishes in the extra fridge, while the kitchen island stays free of everything but hors d’oeuvres.

Professionals who worked on this project include: Interior Design: Susan Marinello, Susan Marinello Interiors, 119 S. Main St., Ste. 300, (206) 344-5551, susanmarinello .com; Architecture: Craig Stillwell, Stillwell Hanson Architects, 7601 Greenwood Ave. N., Ste. 101, (206) 297-1504, stillwellhansonarchitects.com; Construction: Andy Constan, CDB General Contractors, 614 N.E. 41st St., (206) 706-3154, cdbuilt.com

For resource information, see page 79.

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SeattleHomesMag.com


“IT IS TRULY ‘MODERN CLASSIC.’ WE WERE STRIVING FOR TIMELESS, YET FRESH.” —SUSAN MARINELLO

ABOVE: Behind the cabinets’ serene façade lies the organization that makes this kitchen work for a busy family. Ventilated drawers (NEAR LEFT) keep dry goods at their best, and a compost and recycling center is conveniently located under the prep sink. No space was wasted: Toekicks hide pullout step stools (FAR LEFT) to access the upper cabinets, and central vacuum system openings carry away swept-up dirt.

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 in  ta!s 1 2

3

When architect Thomas Isarankura of Baan Design remodeled a Madison Valley kitchen, he knew the homeowners desired maximum cabinet space and maximum light. To accomplish both goalsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and to meet their request for a traditional kitchen with a contemporary edgeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;he designed a blackened-steel shelving unit to hang beneath the wenge cabinets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to keep that wall open to the window and not close off the adjacent stair or the window from the kitchen,â&#x20AC;? Isarankura explains. The sleek shelf displays and stores tableware, yet allows sunlight to reach the kitchen. Cabinet materialsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;blackened steel, dark wood and square stainless-steel knobsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;juxtaposed with the farmhouse sink and marble counter tops add the modern touch the homeowners wanted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The cabinets] allowed us to lace in of some of the older qualities of the house with a more modern kitchen,â&#x20AC;? Isarankura says. Baan Design, 1541 Magnolia Boulevard W., (206) 297-0589, baandesign.net

2. hidden gem The owners of this Queen Anne house love to entertain and envisioned a home that could serve as an elegant backdrop for their busy lifestyle. Enter architect Jay Deguchi of Suyama Peterson Deguchi, who stayed true to the homeownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; vision and designed a functional yet unobtrusive kitchen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to avoid it looking like a standard kitchen,â&#x20AC;? Deguchi explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And the one thing that makes a kitchen look like a kitchen is usually the [range] hood.â&#x20AC;? To avoid this, Deguchi and project architect Sarah MacDonald

designed a stainless-steel hood with a hinged, cerused oak face that, when closed, appears to be part of the wall of cabinets. The fan is set at an angle directly above the range and has removable stainless-steel filters that are dishwasher-safeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a godsend for two avid chefsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as well as a handy strip of low-voltage lighting to brighten the space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is extremely functional, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hidden,â&#x20AC;? Deguchi says of the final product. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The homeowners love it.â&#x20AC;? Suyama Peterson Deguchi, 2324 Second Ave., (206) 256-0809, s-pd.com

3. inside out Architect Kevin Price of JAS Design-Build aimed to maintain a connection between the interior of the home and the exterior landscape when designing this Lopez Island kitchen. To bring the outdoors in, he used Cembonit, a cement fiberboard with a waterand dirt-repellent surface, on the walls inside the kitchen as well as for exterior siding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The prevailing theme is a reinterpretation of a modern farmhouse,â&#x20AC;? Price says. Matte-gray siding, secured with exposed square-head screws, provides an industrial contrast to the rustic wood beams and marble counter tops. The panels add definition to the large, open layout of the kitchen, and their horizontal placement visually reduces the scale of the lofted ceilings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cembonit enabled us to highlight certain areas of the space,â&#x20AC;? Price explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And it is durable, natural and cleanableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;perfect for a kitchen.â&#x20AC;? JAS Design-Build, 3540 Wallingford Ave. N., (206) 547-6242, jasdesignbuild.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D;AISLYN GREENE

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SeattleHomesMag.com

1: ŠMIKE KUBIK; 2: COURTESY SUYAMA PETERSON DEGUCHI; 3: FRANK JENKINS, VISTA ESTATE IMAGING

1. let there be light


HOME | real estate

UNIQUE RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS, SUCH AS THE SANCTUARY ON CAPITOL HILL, ARE ATTRACTING BUYER INTEREST. THE SANCTUARY WILL OFFER 12 HOMES WITHIN A REMODELED CHURCH.

COURTESY WINDEMERE REAL ESTATE

SELLING IN THE CITY:

o

HIGHLIGHTS ON WHICH URBAN PROJECTS ARE SELLING OR CREATING INTEREST IN A COMPETITIVE MARKET—AND WHY WRITTEN BY LINDSEY ROBERTS

ne condo boom plus one economic recession equals many difficult decisions. Seattle developers once had no trouble selling projects, but now some have put building units up for auction and others are selling condos at steep discounts. Without construction financing, many developers are waiting until the economy gets stronger before they even break ground on another project, says Dean Jones, a real estate market strategist and president of Seattle-based real estate consulting firm Realogics, Inc. Urban projects around town are selling, however, despite the housing market troubles. Some developers are slashing prices to make sales, while others get an edge by creating projects that are somehow unique in the marketplace. When the economic climate turns competitive, “beige” projects don’t stand out and therefore have a harder time selling, Jones says. To attract buyers, The Parc in Belltown offers unique buyer-rewards programs. Intracorp, the developer, “sold 20 units in the last six months while its peers were just starting to realize that the market was becoming far more competitive,” says Sam Cunningham, managing broker and partner with Jones in Realogics Brokerage, a division of Realogics. This summer, The Parc offered to match the $8,000 Federal Housing Tax Credit dollar for dollar, giving buyers a potential $16,000 discount. If buyers didn’t qualify for the credit, The Parc offered $8,000 to be used as they chose—toward pre-paids or closing costs. At press time, The Parc had three units remaining to be sold, according to Ryan Raffetto, sales manager for The Parc.

Why not just cut the bottom line? Because, Raffetto notes, simply making deals doesn’t motivate people. “Ninety percent aren’t investment purchases. Most people want to find a home, to live in it,” he says. “This is just a way for us to start a conversation with our buyers.” One condo project not cutting prices or making deals is Fifteen Twenty-One Second Avenue. It currently stands above the crowd—and not just because it’s the tallest all-residential building in downtown Seattle. According to Jones, Fifteen Twenty-One is selling one condo a week on average (although the project lost 37 total sales to contract forfeiture between November 2008 and spring 2009), and this condo project alone represented half of the top 25 home sales in King County in the spring for all product types. At press time, it had closed 85 units, representing 60 percent closed—a percentage that compares well to the 40 percent average closure rate in downtown Seattle condos for 2009 thus far. Developers Opus Northwest, LLC, and The Justen Company designed the building to be unlike others that offer a traditional mix of studios, one-bedrooms, two-bedrooms and penthouses. Instead, Fifteen Twenty-One offers 143 penthouse-style homes, ranging from 1,625 square feet to 2,895 square feet. “So, ultimately, this project dared to do something that its competitors didn’t, and as a result, it earned the sales they didn’t,” says Realogics Brokerage’s Cunningham, who has interacted with all of the Fifteen Twenty-One buyers and has been a downtown Seattle condo dweller himself for four years. With so many projects vying for buyers’ attention, unique attributes

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HOME | real estate

such as all-penthouse all-the-time daring or high-end design features can make a project stand out above the rest. Location, however, is still key, especially in this competitive market. The Sanctuary, for example, is a historic building that has been transformed into urban town homes “while answering to a condominium lifestyle,” says Windermere’s Moira Holley, the real estate agent for the project. Built in 1906, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, on Capitol Hill reopened its doors May 30, 2009, as a private residence development. The model unit is the only completed unit, but one buyer has already chosen a “shell” in order to ensure a completely custom-finished product. “The feedback that we are receiving is that buyers are looking for something innovative and unique within the Seattle market,” Holley says. “Further, the repurposing of the church is definitely a big draw as well.” Holley believes that this project’s uniqueness, pricing and low association dues are creating interest. While up-and-running urban projects with the right amount of cachet are selling, urban projects in the works, such as this one, also have potential buyers buzzing. Holley has seen people come back week after week to watch the project grow. Another way to give a development that “wow” factor is to build it on highly coveted ground. The Enclave, a project by Trinity Real Estate Inc., is scheduled to break ground late this year or early next year as part of the five-acre master-planned community called Wards Cove on Lake Union. Each high-end waterfront town houselike residence will be a “condo in scope,” says Nick Glant, the listing agent and owner of Northwest Group Real Estate. Each of the first nine units in phase one are planned to be 2,500 square feet to 3,000 square feet, with a rooftop terrace, private garage, option for an elevator and—unlike traditional town houses—unattached to its neighbors. The biggest draw, however, is the opportunity to own a brand-new customizable luxury property on the crowded Lake Union waterfront. Seven reservations for The Enclave had been made at press time. “The days when someone was buying something in the sky that doesn’t have a unique attribute I think [are] over,” Glant says. “People need to feel like they’re buying something that’s a piece of history … you know that there’s not a project or piece of land like it down the road.” What potential buyers should know is that the current real estate market is about finding the best long-term investments to live in and enjoy. When it comes to a condo that will have lasting value, potential buyers should look at a building’s individual attributes and market performance to determine its current value, Jones says. Cunningham suggests deciding which building is right for you and then negotiating a fair price for a home within that community based on in-building market comparables. If you enjoy the home, chances are someone else will down the line when you need to sell. With the Northwest Multiple Listing Service reporting that more King County houses sold in June 2009 than June 2008, many in the housing industry as a whole have reason to be hopeful. Although condominium sales didn’t parallel these statistics—88 condos sold in downtown Seattle in 2008 versus 57 thus far in 2009, according to Coldwell Banker Bain’s John Deely—the upward housing trend could give life to the whole market. “I think eventually all the projects will be occupied and will make downtown a better place,” says William Justen, Fifteen Twenty-One’s development partner. “I think they’ll all be successful because Seattle has a good reputation, and it’s becoming an international city with a thriving downtown. It’s just a matter of how quickly it happens.”


HOME | resources 50 A PERFECT FIT Interior Designer: Holly McKinley, Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc., 5227 S. Hudson St., (206) 6225884, hminteriors.com. Page 50 | Rug, reproduction 16th-century Mamluk carpet, woven in Turkey by Woven Legends, Driscoll Robbins Fine Carpets, 1002 Western Ave., (206) 292-1115, driscollrobbins.com; sofa, sectional, Minotti, Inform Interiors, 2032 Eighth Ave., (206) 622-1608, www.informseattle.com; chair, Inform Interiors; blue pillows, Southeast Asian textile, custom design, Holly McKinley Interior Design Inc.; coffee table, custom design, Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc., fabrication, Meyer Wells, 1600 W. Armory Way, Bldg. 269, (206) 282-0076, meyerwells.com; artwork above sofa, Robert Motherwell, Greg Kucera Gallery, 212 Third Ave. S., (206) 6240770, gregkucera.com; bench, built-in, custom design by Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc., fabrication, Meyer Wells. Page 52 | Cabinets, Pedini Seattle*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-229, (206) 767-4625, pediniseattle.com; stools, antique, Material Culture, 4700 Wissahickon Ave., Philadelphia, Penn., (215) 849-8030, material culture.com; artwork above cabinets, antique African barbershop sign; Venetian plaster wall, Cyrus Watson, (206) 251-5240. Page 53 | Artwork on wall to right of desk, Arky Robbins; dining table, benches, custom design, Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc., fabrication, Meyer Wells; lamp above table, Inform Interiors. Page 54 | Metal door, custom design, Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc., fabrication and engineering, Greg Lamb, (206) 240-4338; runner, woven in Nepal by Michaelian & Kohlberg, Driscoll Robbins Fine Carpets. Page 55 | Bed, Inform Interiors; bedding, Matteo Home, Red Ticking, 2802 E. Madison St., (206) 3229890, redticking.com; chairs, Modele’s Home Furnishings, 964 Denny Way, (206) 287-9942, modeles furniture.com; rug, vegetable-dyed rug, Woven Legends, Driscoll Robbins Fine Carpets; mirror, antique, Material Culture; bench under mirror, Glenn Richards, 964 Denny Way, (206) 287-1877, glennrichards.com; cabinets, faucet, Pedini Seattle*.

56 GLOBAL FUSION Interior Designer: Lena Fomichev, LF Interior Design, (425) 466-9515; Contractor: Rick Lanning, Homeland Construction, 8254 N.E. State Hwy. 104, Kingston, (360) 297-4575. Page 56–57 | Bead light fixture, Kentfield Lighting by Boyd, Susan Mills Showroom*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-200, (206) 682-6388, susanmills.com; cabinets, shelves, custom design, LF Interior Design, fabrication, Homeland Construction; fireplace, stool, EcoSmart Fire, Inform Interiors, 2032 Eighth Ave., (206) 622-1608, www.informseattle.com; sofa, coffee table, Roche Bobois, 1015 Western Ave.,

(206) 332-9744, rochebobois.com; carpet, chair, pillow fabric, Trammell-Gagné LLC*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-105, (206) 762-1511, tgshow room.com; lamp, Morning Glory by Aqua Creations, Terris Draheim, Inc.*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P288, (206) 763-4100, terrisdraheim.com. Page 58 | Range hood, Miele, 1112 Andover Park W., Tukwila, (206) 574-0770, miele.com; tile, Ann Sacks Tile & Stone Inc., 115 Stewart St., (206) 4418917, annsacks.com; faucet, Eve High Arc Faucet by KWC America, Fixture Universe*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-390, (206) 767-4003, www.fixture universe.com; counter top, CaesarStone, CaesarStone Northwest, 7036 S. 190th St., Kent, (425) 2518668, caesarstoneus.com; cabinets, Time Kitchen by Snaidero Kitchens & Design, Studio Snaidero Seattle, 5600 Sixth Ave., (206) 762-0413, studio snaideroseattle.com. Page 59 | Table, chairs, Team 7 USA Collection, Ralph Hays Contemporary Designs*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-239, (206) 763-8668; chandelier, Vasilio by Eurofase Lighting, Lighting Universe*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. P-391, (206) 762-7335, www.lightinguniverse.com; floor tile, Pental, 713 S. Fidalgo St., (206) 768-3200, pentalonline.com. Page 60 | Bed, carpet, Aurora Uno by Poltrona Frau, Limn, limn.com; bench, B&B Italia, Diva Furniture, 1300 Western Ave., (206) 287-9992, www.divafurniture.com; curtain fabric, TrammellGagné LLC*; side tables, shelves, wraparound mirror, custom design, LF Interior Design, fabrication, Homeland Construction; wall lamps, Eurofase Lighting, Lighting Universe*; bedding, pillows, custom design, LF Interior Design, fabric, TrammellGagné LLC*; artwork above bed, Cassandria Blackmore, blackmorestudios.com; wallpaper, Phillip Jeffries Ltd., Jennifer West*, Seattle Design Center, Ste. A-100, (206) 405-4500, jenniferwest showroom.com; powder room tile, Statements Distinctive Tile & Stone, 6140 Sixth Ave. S., (206) 7628181, statementstile.com; powder room lighting, Lighting Universe*. Page 61 | Sinks, faucets, Fixture Universe*; flower wall lights, Eurofase Lighting, Lighting Universe*; wall tile, Statements Distinctive Tile & Stone; mirror, cabinets, custom design, LF Interior Design, fabrication, Homeland Construction; carpet, rocking chair, ottoman, sconces, Ligne Roset, 55 University St., (206) 341-9990, ligne-roset-usa.com; bed, Hydra by Poltrona Frau, Limn; curtain, Limn; bedding, pillows, custom design, LF Interior Design; nightstand, B&B Italia, Diva Furniture.

68 WELL-SCRIPTED Interior Designers: Julia Sandetskaya and Polina Zaika, MusaDesign, 2617 Fifth Ave., (206) 448-3301, musadesign.net; Builder: Darby Huffman, Kitchen & Bath Studio, 2009 Fourth St., Ste. B, Port Townsend, (360) 301-5881, kitchen-bathstudio .com; Granite Installation: FloorCraft Inc., 7842

156th Place N.E., Redmond, (425) 885-4161. Page 68 | Lights, Bulb Pendant Light by Sofie Refer; cabinets, teak hardwood with Blenheim 495 glass inserts, custom design, Darby Huffman; backsplash, Calcutta gold marble, FloorCraft Inc.; downdraft, Viking Downdraft 30-inch VIPR Professional Services, Arnold’s Appliance, 1625 132nd Ave. N.E., Bellevue, (425) 454-7929, arnoldsappliance.com; cooktop, Viking Gas Cooktop 30-inch VGSU, Arnold’s Appliance; island chairs, LEM Piston Stools, Design Within Reach, 126 Central Way, Kirkland, (425) 828-0280, dwr.com; floor, 18-inchby-18-inch Olde Dutch, DuChâteau Floors, (619) 793-5899, duchateaufloors.com. Page 71 | Counter top, gold Calcutta marble, FloorCraft Inc.; sink, 513-687 BlancoPrecision Undermount Sink with Blanco 221-015 Sink Grid, The Fixture Gallery, 4302 Stone Way N., (206) 6324488, thefixturegallery.com; wood tile, Mosaic D’Asolo, the WTP Collection, WTP Corp., (866) 9891111, wtp-corp.com.

72 KITCHEN OF THE YEAR Interior Designer: Susan Marinello, Susan Marinello Interiors, 119 S. Main St., Ste. 300, (206) 344-5551, susanmarinello.com; Architect: Craig Stillwell, Jim Vissher, Stillwell Hanson Architects, 7601 Greenwood Ave. N., Ste. 101, (206) 297-1504, stillwellhanson architects.com; Contractor: Andy Constan, CDB General Contractors, 613 N.W. 41st St., (206) 7063154, cdbuilt.com. Page 72–73 | Ovens, steamer, Miele, miele.com; microwave, GE Profile Spacemaker, GE Appliances, geappliances.com; refrigerator, Sub-Zero Preservation, Bradlee Distributors Inc., 1400 Elliott Ave. W., (206) 284-8400, bradlee.net; backsplash, cast glass by Peter David, Peter David Studio, Inc., (206) 547-2868, peterdavidstudio.com; range, Wolf Cooking, Bradlee Distributors Inc.; island sink, Porto Fino, Kohler, kohler.com; faucet, Dornbracht, dornbracht.com; counter top, Calcutta marble, Meta Marble and Granite, 410 S. Front St., (206) 762-5547; hardware, Hamilton brushed nickel, Builders’ Hardware & Supply, 1038 116th Ave. N.E., Ste. 310, Bellevue, (425) 679-5115, builders-hardware .com; stools, Two Zero Six, Inc., (206) 384-0834. Page 74 | Sink, Quatro Alcove Series, Whitehaus, whitehauscollection.com; faucet, Dornbracht; dishwasher, coffeemaker, Miele; pantry refrigerator, Frigidaire, Albert Lee Appliance, albertleeappli ance.com. Page 75 | Backsplash, cast glass by Peter David, Peter David Studio, Inc.; sink, Quatro Alcove Series, Whitehaus; drawer fittings, custom design, Craig Stillwell, fabrication, Wood Products Northwest, 407 S. Water St., Ellensburg, (509) 925-6002; doors, glass art by Mark Olson, Unique Art Glass, 1483 130th Ave. N.E., Bellevue, (425) 467-5599, unique artglass.com, design, Susan Marinello Interiors, fabrication, Craig Stillwell.

80 ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT

SeattleHomesMag.com Vol. XIV, No 7 © 2009 by Network Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. Seattle Homes & Lifestyles™ (ISSN 1525-7711) is published 6 times a year (FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT, DEC) by Network Communications, Inc., 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 770-962-7220. Periodical postage paid at Lawrenceville, GA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Seattle Homes & Lifestyles™ P.O. Box 9002, Maple Shade, NJ 08052. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both zip codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription. Subscriptions, $22.47 for one year; $32.47 for two years. Canada and Mexico add $24.00 per year. Single copy price $3.95. Subscription questions, (800) 368-5938. CPM#40065056. Canada Post PM40063731. Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5

SeattleHomesMag.com

Interior Designer: Kathy Banak, Authentic Home, 4151 California Ave. S.W., (206) 937-3070, authentichome.com; Architect: Jay Lazerwitz, Art & Architecture, 6126 12th Ave. N.E., (206) 524-8680, artandarch.net; General Contractor: Orly Waller, Orly Waller Construction Services, 4814 Beach Drive S.W., (206) 963-2510.

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HOME | room for improvement

Bowed iridescent tiles give the wall a textured, three-dimensional feel.

 A larger island allows for more seating and room to socialize.

 Additional windows in the nook give the kitchen much-needed natural light.

AFTER

BEFORE

refreshing the palette WRITTEN BY KIMBERLY LEINSTOCK PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX HAYDEN

The Challenge: Pam and Steve Schwartz love entertaining, but the dark, cramped kitchen in their 1933 Georgian colonial home in West Seattle was unwelcoming. The kitchen hadn’t been updated in 17 years and had only a few small windows. Tired-looking cabinets, black appliances and outdated lighting contributed to the drab feel. “The color palette was dark and not very happy,” says interior designer and color consultant Kathy Banak of Authentic Home.

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SEPT.OCT 2009

The Solution: Inspired by the home’s beach location, Banak chose a palette of soft blue, off-white and warm beige to make the kitchen more inviting. Honed Lemon Ice granite counter tops complement the iridescent glass mosaic backsplash. “The color palette is remarkable. It’s like taking a breath of fresh air,” Pam says. “Paint changes everything—it makes a huge difference.” Banak raised the ceiling and installed custom oak beams to give the kitchen a sense of space SeattleHomesMag.com

and a casual elegance. To give the Schwartzes a place for family gatherings and entertaining, she added a much-needed nook with comfortable seating for six—enough space for half of the girls’ baseball team. “It’s so inviting. Everyone congregates in the kitchen, “ Pam says. But when the family is not entertaining, she says, “It’s my quiet place. I just want to be there.” For resource information, see page 79.


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Our new online videos, brought to you by leading design correspondents (our editors!), showcase emerging trends in kitchens, baths and furniture. Plus, ideas and real solutions to help you achieve these looks in your own home.

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Northwest Art Alliance presents

November 13–15, 2009 • 10AM to 6PM at Seattle Center Exhibition Hall and Northwest Rooms Join over 200 artists representing all mediums For details go to nwartalliance.com

Seattle Children’s Hospital Benefit Friday, November 13 • 5PM to 8PM Sponsored by the Preston Kuppe Guild

Teapot by Gail Pendergrass


Seattle Homes & Lifestyles  

September/October 2009

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