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First published in 2013, revised in 2017 by

Network Creative Services Pty Ltd PO Box 4193 Briar Hill Victoria 3088 Australia email: info@ncs.net.au http://www.ncs.net.au/book.html Copyright Š 2013, 2017 Network Creative Services Pty Ltd. This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealings for the purposes of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission. Enquiries are to be made to Network Creative Services Pty Ltd. Copying for Educational Purposes Where copies of part or whole of the book are made under Part VB of the Copyright Act, the law requires that prescribed procedures be followed. For information, contact the Copyright Agency Limited. National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-publication data: Webb, Bradley. b. 1966 Guide to Self Publishing. 2nd Edition Bibliography. Includes index. ISBN 0000000000000 (eBook) 1. Printing. 2. Publishing. 3. Author - Self Publishing. I. Title. 000.000000000 Written by Bradley Webb. Edited by Chester Eagle. Typeset in Adobe Caslon Pro 9/18pt. Artwork and typography by Network Creative Services Pty Ltd. Cover photograph by Matthew Deller, Pic-This Photographics. iv


To all those budding authors with a story to tell and now a better way to tell it.

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Sensational Cattle Stealing Case: The Harry Redford Story By Albert H. Sutton Edited by Louise Moloney First published in 2002, reprinted 2009 ISBN 0958016232 (softcover), 0958016240 (hardcover) A4 (297mm x 210mm) Extent 176 Pages

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P R E FA C E

Since the establishment of our publishing division in 2001, Network Creative Services have been inundated with inquiries from authors seeking further information on how to publish their titles professionally. To meet this demand and assist self-publishers in making production and distribution decisions, we have put together this book. It aims to answer your questions, clarify the steps taken when producing publications, and point you in the right direction for any problems or queries you might have along the way. Network Creative Services constantly deliver quality products at competitive prices. For too long, authors who chose to self-publish had to put up with poor workmanship from suppliers all too eager to sacrifice quality for profit. Our team of expert editors, designers and printers ensure your publication meets a standard of excellence worthy of the written words within. Our staff is expert in the field of design and print; ensuring our book production service consistently produces material of a superior standard. Authors publishing through Network Creative Services are guaranteed a product to rival any mainstream publication. Through out the book you will see printed samples from some of the titles we have successfully completed for our clients. They range from short run digital to high end full-colour traditional printing. All our jobs were tailor made to suit the clients needs and budget. However, one constant throughout is our commitment to quality. BRADLEY K. WEBB

MPub&Ed

Network Creative Services Pty Ltd

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FOREWORD

This Guide offers writers - or clubs, committees, families or businesses - a way to create a book. This is by no means new, but it seems so because the production of books has for so long been considered the work of publishing companies operating for prof it. If they can sell it, they’ll publish. If it won’t sell enough copies in a

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short enough time, they’ll reject. And it’s gone further than that. A book is an idea, or collection of ideas, and the public thinks that writers produce these ideas. Only if publishers ask them. Modern publishers see themselves as the people with ideas, and writers, artists etc as underlings paid to create or execute the ideas dreamed up in the publisher’s off ice. Agents exist to f ind the talents required by publishers, and to act as barriers to anyone blundering into the system without being asked. Where does that leave the writer, hoping for a chance? Answer: outside. In the dark. Without hope, unless … … unless the writers, or artists, have the skills and conf idence to do the job for themselves. Many won’t, quite a few will and this Guide offers a way to those who may want to but lack a little conf idence. It can be done. Indeed, it should be done, otherwise many f ine ideas will never be turned into books, and the life of the mind will become a supermarket shelf, with stocks replaced as soon as they’re cleared. Thought itself can be turned into a prof it-making product; there are people working on this all the time. The alternative is for those who love books and feel a need to produce them to take control of the process. It’s a process as ancient as writing itself, and it’s as new as the electronic revolution. Only a good mind can create a good book, but to take that idea from the mind to the table, the desk, or your favourite chair, is a lot easier than it used to be. If you’re not sure, not convinced, read on. Better still, follow the Guide, and do it. CHESTER EAGLE www.trojanpress.com.au

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CONTENTS

I N T R O D U C T I O N 01 M O T I V E S 05 P R O D U C T I O N 07 W R I T I N G 08 E D I T I N G 10 D E S I G N 11 T Y P E S E T T I N G 12 P R I N T I N G 13 D I G I TA L v T R A D I T I O N A L

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N U M B E R I N G 18 I M P R I N T 18 C O P Y R I G H T 19 RIGHTS 20 ISBN 22 RESPONSIBILITIES 23 C i P 24 LEGAL DEPOSIT

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BARCODE 26 D W THORPE

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PRESS RELEASE

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REVIEWS 30 ADVERTISING 31

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PROMOTION 33 SELLING 34 INTERNET 35 ONLINE STORES

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SEARCH ENGINES

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RSS 39 BLOGGING 39 NETWORKING 40 D I S T R I B U T I O N 41 DIY 42 TERMS 42 FREIGHT 43 SOS 43 RETURNS 45 DISCOUNTS 45 GST 46 FA U LT S 4 6 D I ST R I B U TO R 47 GLOSSARY 48 C O N TA C T S 5 2 RE VIEWS: SAMPLE

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NOTES 58

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Runs In The Blood By Marcie Jones Edited by Chester Eagle First published in 2008 ISBN 9780958016292 (softcover) A5 (210mm x 148mm) Extent 400 Pages

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INTRODUCTION

Traditionally, the book world took a dim view of ‘print on demand’ for authors looking to establish solid writing credentials. The term vanity press saw many authors take a beating in the credibility stakes. This stigma was extended to reviewers who were reluctant to judge what they sometimes deemed poor quality product because it had not been properly edited; or that there had not been enough lead-time to properly assess the publication prior to launch. However, the true distinction between vanity publishing and self-publishing is simple: who owns the books when they come off the printing press? If the answer is the printer, who then pays royalties to the author on the basis of books sold, then the book has been vanity published. If the author owns the books outright, and can thus dispose of them as he or she likes, then that author has self-published. The problem stems from authors using their family name or business as the official publisher of their book. A vanity publisher typically fails to provide any useful editing service, and many vanity publishers charge excessive fees, which are never likely to be recouped from sales of the books involved. Vanity publishers typically do little or no effective marketing. It should be noted that in the nineteenth and early twentieth century it was common for legitimate authors to pay the costs of publishing their books. Such writers could expect more control of their work, greater profits, or both. Self-publishing was not judged negatively as it has been more recently. Among the authors taking this route to w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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Ned: The Exhibition By Ian Jones Photography by Matthew Deller Edited by Ben Collins First published in 2002 ISBN 0958016224 (softcover) A5 (148mm x 210mm) Extent 136 Pages

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publication was Lewis Carroll, who paid the expenses of publishing Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and most of his subsequent work. Such authors as Mark Twain, Zane Grey, Upton Sinclair, Carl Sandburg, Edgar Rice Burroughs, George Bernard Shaw, Edgar Allen Poe, Rudyard Kipling, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, and Anais Nin also resorted to self-publication for some or all of their works. Many authors have successfully made a career by starting off with publishing their first book. People like Mark Hansen, who self-published his first book and went on to make a multi-million dollar business out of it, shows what is possible through self-publishing. Closer to home, renowned Australian author Matthew Reilly had his first book Contest self-published. His subsequent books were picked up by an international publishing house and, as they say, the rest is history. Self-publishing is sometimes difficult to differentiate from vanity publishing. The latter term is a pejorative one, usually referring to situations in which a publisher contracts with authors regardless of the quality and marketability of their work. They appeal to the creators’ vanity and desire to become a ‘published author’, and make the majority of their money from fees charged to the creators for publishing services, rather than from sales of the published material to retailers or consumers. Vanity presses often try to disguise themselves, calling themselves ‘ joint venture’ or ‘subsidy’ presses (neither term is accurate; in a vanity press arrangement, the author undertakes all of the risk (unlike a joint venture), and pays 100% of the cost of publication (unlike in a true subsidy arrangement). Sectors of the self-publishing movement are aware of the pitfalls of working with ‘vanity presses.’ For example, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America web site maintains one of the most comprehensive scam-alert sections in the w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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publishing industry, and works hard to keep writers and potential writers aware of the risk of being scammed by dubious vanity presses. In his guide for would-be self-publishers, How to Publish Yourself, author Peter Finch unequivocally states that such presses are ‘to be avoided at all costs.’ So-called vanity presses may not necessarily engage in deception or fraud, however, and some creators knowingly and willingly enter into such deals, placing more importance on getting their work published than from profiting from it. Because there is no independent entity making a judgment about their quality, and because many of them are published at a loss, self-published works are often perceived as equivalent to vanity-press works, or equally deserving of skepticism from distributors, retailers, or readers.

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MOTIVES

Publishing houses must be confident of sales of several thousand copies to take on a book. An otherwise worthy book may not have this potential for any number of reasons: • the work is not of interest to a commercial publisher; • author wishes to retain complete editorial control over content; • author is unknown and does not have substantial resume; • popular topic but of interest only in a small geographic area; • addresses an obscure topic in which few people are interested; • content is controversial enough that publishers do not wish to be associated with it; • author wishes to obtain a larger percentage return from retail sales. Occasionally an author may choose to self-publish for reasons of control, because they want access to their customer list, or because they love the business of publishing. When working with a publishing house, an author gives up a degree of editorial control, and sometimes has little input into the design of the book, it’s distribution, and it’s marketing. In addition to the issue of control some authors with limited markets may also self-publish in order to obtain a better financial return. An author in a specialist area may be confident of a certain number of sales but also realise that the maximum number of sales is limited, and wish to maximise their earnings. In this situation the author may risk a significant amount of their own capital to self-publish their own work. This avoids a publisher taking a significant cut of the w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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proceeds and if also self-distributed avoids distribution fees as well. The payoff is a much larger percentage of the sale price being returned as profit. For instance, in a limited market such as Australia an author who is confident of sales can gain a better financial return by self-publishing their work. Authors who are considering self-publishing in order to claim more of the financial reward, however, would be well advised to investigate the industry thoroughly before launching. Producing and marketing a book may be well within their grasp, but many of the back-office functions may require unforeseen investments of time and/or money. In addition, industry-standard terms of trade will eat into their margins to an often-unexpected extent. Authors whose books are related to their other ventures may do rather well as self-publishers. This is because their books can be used to feed customers into their other work. The synergies can benefit both the market for the books and for their other endeavors.

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PRODUCTION

Set out a schedule that is realistic and allows a margin for unforeseen circumstances. Planning is the key to making the publication of your book an enjoyable process! This book is intended to help familiarise you with each step of the production before embarking on the process itself. We believe it is better to take a little longer to produce a good-quality product than make costly mistakes as a result of rushing the project. In general terms, the main stages in the production process are writing, editing, design and printing. However, there are various steps within each of these stages. As a full service supplier we are more than happy to assist with your publishing event at any stage of your production planning.

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Ellen: a woman of spirit By Noelene Allen Edited by Chester Eagle First published in 2012 ISBN 9780958016216 (hardcover), 9780987278005 (eBook) A5 (210mm x 148mm) Extent 248 pages

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WRITING

To make the layout easier your manuscript should be produced using a word processing program such as Microsoft Word (.doc) or Apple Pages (.pages). You should also supply an A4 size hard copy print of your document on one side of the paper only, with double line spacing and a 3cm margin (important if you require our editing service). Include a page number on every page as this allows the pages to be kept in order (these will not be your book’s actual page numbers). Providing hard copy only (without a digital word file) will incur additional expense, as retyping your manuscript or scanning each page using OCR software can be a time consuming process. However, if you wish to reproduce a family memoir or a previously published piece we can arrange cost effective solutions to suit your budget.

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EDITING

We recommend that you source a reliable editor to review your manuscript because it is too easy not to notice those little mistakes when you are heavily involved in the writing end of things. As part of our total publishing commitment our professional editing team can deliver a level of assistance relevant to your needs. The extent of our editing service depends on you. We can check basic copyediting including grammar, spelling, typographical errors and inconsistencies in style. At the other end of the scale, structural editing allows us to make more detailed suggestions as to how you can improve your text and ensure that you are making your message clear for your readers. Editing costs will vary depending on the size of your manuscript and the level of editing required. Either way, you retain full control over any changes to be made. All our edited work will be submitted back to you for final approval. If you make the changes yourself, or additional changes, you can ask our editor to proofread the corrections against your original marked-up copy.

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DESIGN

Our professional artists are more than capable designing your book – including the cover, spine and the correct positioning of relevant material on the back (i.e. ISBN and barcode). A great cover can sell a book! In the few seconds it takes a potential customer to glance at the cover and read the blurb they have made up their mind to buy your book, or move on. To create an effective design, we will need to know whether your cover will be printed in one (monotone), two or four colour process (CMYK); what size book you want (i.e. A5 measures 148mm x 210mm); what the book is about; what wording and other elements there will be on the cover; and what sort of look you want for the book. Show examples of what you like and don’t like about other books, but try to allow our designers some creative freedom. When deciding whether to print your book in one, two or four colour (also referred to as full colour CMYK), remember that black is regarded as a colour. If using one or two colours you might use a PMS (Pantone Matching System) colour; our designers will suggest colours, show you examples of PMS colours and explain that colours can look different according to the type of paper they are printed on and the way they are applied (i.e. duotones). You will be kept informed of the design process via email as we supply PDF proofs for you to critique prior to final artwork. We will then submit a colour proof for your final signed approval (either printed, emailed as a PDF, or both).

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TYPESETTING

In the self-publishing world there are too many great books which are let down by poorly conceived design and typesetting. What your book looks like is very important. While some authors are keen to design their cover and text themselves, we believe ‘you can judge a book by its cover’. A professionally designed book is more likely to appeal to readers than one that is poorly designed or produced. It also stands a better chance of being supported by retailers – the easier your book is for booksellers to order and sell, the better. Paying a professional like Network Creative Services to manage the production of your book might sound expensive but with our strategic industry contacts we can source superior rates from suppliers than you will as an individual, saving you both time and money. Even though we handle the production, you are still the publisher of your book. We believe in the importance of keeping you informed at each stage of the production process. Our design guarantee ensures your publication’s quality will stand up against any major published work. So to ensure the best outcome for your text we need to know whether you require colour, illustrations, photographs, tables, charts, or an index. You should also decide whether you plan to supply these additional items electronically or will you require us to scan photographs or illustrations and optimise to fit the layout.

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PRINTING

The most important decisions you must make with regard to printing are what sort of paper and binding will be used for your book, and how many copies will be printed. The quality of the paper will depend on what sort of book it is – possibly a coated stock for a full-colour photographic book, but inexpensive quality uncoated stock for a novel. Network Creative Services will make suggestions as to the most suitable paper and binding for your book. We can provide you with both printed book samples and paper swatches to allow you to choose correctly. To provide a full print quote we will need to know the size of your book; the number of copies (quantity); the preferred stock (paper); the use of colour (i.e. mono, two, CMYK); the finishing (i.e. lamination); the binding (i.e. perfect bound); and delivery point. During press time Network Creative Services will maintain constant email contact, keeping you updated on expected turnaround (delivery) and details of any press checks (if requested).

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Australian Son: The Story Of Ned Kelly By Max Brown Edited by Chester Eagle First published in 2005 (softcover), reprinted 2013 (hardcover, eBook) ISBN 0958016267 (softcover), 9780987278012 (hardcover), 9780987278029 (eBook) A5 (210mm x 148mm) Extent 312 Pages

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D I G I TA L v T R A D I T I O N A L

Generally the decision to print either digitally or offset comes down to quantity. While the more copies you print, the cheaper per unit it will be, it is not economical or efficient to print more copies of your book than you will be able to distribute. For cost effectiveness, if you were seeking a print run of under 750 copies you would be wise to look at a digital solution. Network Creative Services strategic printing partners are old-line book printers who have made the move into digital printing, so they are used to running books with correct grain paper and binding books that don’t fall apart. Our partners run real perfect binders, not the bargain basement versions run by most digital shops (many straight digital book printers lack the experience to know any better, or the money to do anything about it). The digital book printers used by Network Creative Services were producing great books long before anyone ever heard the word Print on Demand (POD). Cover: Modern digital colour presses are excellent. It is difficult to spot the

difference between a process colour cover printed on a digital press and one printed on an offset press. When you add film lamination (i.e. cellosheen) and spot varnish options to the cover the end result is near impossible to distinguish. As all quality covers are laminated to prevent scuffing and to prolong shelf life, this should be a non-issue. No publisher would (or should) sell a book without a laminated cover. One constantly improving issue with digital is where solids or graduated screens are involved. Previously it was relatively easy to see banding and other inconsistencies w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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in these areas but newer technologies have helped alleviate this problem. Digital books aren’t necessarily the answer to ever problem, so if you do choose a digital cover option be aware of their limitations. On books with an order in excess of 250 copies we sometimes recommend a traditional offset printing process for the cover and a digital printing option for the text. Text: In the case of text type it’s hard to tell the difference between the diverse

types of equipment. For straight type, it looks fine. Originally, digital text was a much darker black than offset because it was toner and not ink. It was almost an unnatural look after so many years of seeing not-quite-black ink on paper. The main difference comes in the reproduction of halftones (i.e. pictures). While many readers are getting used to the ‘toner’ look, most considered it an inferior product compared to offset printing. However, new digital production processes offer ‘Offset-Press Technology’ which is much closer to the traditional offset process as it utilises CMYK+ rollers and ink. Through this relatively new process the printer has done away with the limitations of toner and embraced the wonders of ink which does not sit on top of the paper, as it does in the copying process. It is instead ‘pressed’ or absorbed into the paper much like what traditional offset presses do. The end result of this process is a black image quality near exact to traditional offset. When halftones and screen tints are reproduced the quality is sometimes superior to that of traditional offset. We have some great examples from previously published works, which we are more than happy to show you.

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BOOK STRUCTURE

Generally, a book can contain the following elements, although not always all of them, and usually in this standard order: • half-title page • title page • imprint page • dedication • acknowledgments • foreword • contents • list of illustrations • preface • introduction • chapters (body text) • epilogue • glossary • appendixes • list of abbreviations • notes • bibliography • index

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NUMBERING

Page numbers are odd on right-hand pages, and even on left-hand pages. Pages up to and including the introduction are paginated with lower-case Roman (i, ii, iii, iv, etc.) numerals; the following pages with Arabic (1, 2, 3, 4, etc.) numerals. For example, in the case of a book containing all of the above elements, the first page of the body text would be page 1. However, not all pages will be printed with a page number, or folio.

IMPRINT

In the case of books produced by Network Creative Services the information contained on the imprint page (see page ii) includes the publisher’s contact details, the author’s contact details, a copyright notice (including educational clause), a National Library of Australia CiP entry (containing your book’s ISBN), and details of the editor (if any), designer (including type style) and printer (including stock type).

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COPYRIGHT

There is no procedure necessary to protect copyright in your book – it is an automatic right. Generally, as soon as an original work is written down, saved to disk, or recorded in some way, it is protected. And although it does not cost you anything to ‘own’ copyright of your book, copyright can be bought and sold (for example, a magazine may pay to reproduce part of your book, or a film company may pay for the right to produce a film version of your book). Copyright is an internationally recognised system of protecting the rights of creators of written, performed or artistic works such as books, plays, paintings, computer programs or sound recordings. There are a number of aspects of copyright that you as a self-publisher should be aware of. Copyright does not protect ideas or titles (although a title may be registered as a trademark), but it does protect the written or published form of your book. Although the duration of copyright protection can vary, in the case of books it generally lasts for the lifetime of the author of the book, plus fifty years. Under international convention, Australian copyright works are protected in most other countries, and copyright works from most other countries are protected in Australia. Although there is no legal requirement to do so, Network Creative Services will include the international copyright symbol ©, the copyright owner’s name (you, the author), and the year of publication on the printed book. This merely serves the function of indicating who the owner of the copyright on that work is. Remember that as a publisher you are legally obliged to obtain permission to use others’ copyright protected material in your book. The Copyright Council of Australia is an independent non-profit organisation that freely provides a large number of information sheets on this topic from its web site at copyright.org.au. w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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Spitfires Over Malta By Paul Brennan and Ray Hesselyn First published in 2005 A5 (210mm x 148mm) Softcover Extent 116 Pages

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RIGHTS

Moral rights relate to an author’s reputation in connection to their work. These rights now exist automatically in Australia. The three moral rights for authors are: 1. The right of an author to be identified as the author of a work (‘the right of attribution’); 2. The right of an author not to have their work altered in a prejudicial way (‘the right of integrity’); and 3. The right not to have authorship falsely attributed (‘the right against false attribution’). Basically, this means that your work cannot be altered without your consultation and written consent, it cannot be intentionally destroyed or defaced, and you must be credited for your work. The Copyright Council of Australia can provide you with more detailed information on this topic from its web site at copyright.org.au.

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ISBN

An International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a unique, 13-digit number that ensures that your book can be identif ied throughout the world. The various elements of the ISBN comprise the country, language or other ‘group identif ier’ of your book; your ‘publisher pref ix’; the ‘title identif ier’; and a ‘check digit’. The ISBN enables libraries, booksellers and others to identify books in orders, stock control and library systems; it simplif ies processing of book orders; and can be part of the EAN number used on barcodes for books. You will require a separate ISBN for each different title that you publish, and each new edition of a title.

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RESPONSIBILITIES

The goal of all authors is to ensure that their book reaches as many people as possible. There are a number of standard procedures and systems that guarantee that all publications can be located and used by a wide audience, and which protect your rights as a self-publisher. There are also certain legal requirements that you must meet as an author. Information brochures or application forms can be obtained by contacting nla.gov.au/services/ISSN.html.

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CiP

The National Library of Australia manages Cataloguing-in-Publication (CiP) data, which is used by libraries in Australia and around the world to catalogue books. A CiP entry includes the name of the authors, the book ’s title and subjects, and the book ’s ISBN (you must have an ISBN in order to obtain CiP). While CiP data is not a legal requirement, CiP entries are listed on Kinetica, the National Library of Australia’s database of material held in Australian libraries, ensuring that books can be used by a wide audience. As CiP information should be included on the printed version of your book, the National Library of Australia will prepare a CiP entry for your book before it is published, from a form supplied by us and completed by you (to minimise any errors). The CiP information will be printed in your book according to the guidelines provided by the National Library of Australia.

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LEGAL DEPOSIT

Legal deposit is a mandatory requirement to ensure that copies of publications are deposited in libraries in the country in which they are published. In Australia, the Copyright Act 1968 and a number of State Acts require publishers to provide one copy of any work they publish to the National Library of Australia and to the relevant libraries in the state in which it is published. Legal deposit ensures that your book can be identified and used by as many people as possible, now and in the future. You should provide copies of your book for legal deposit as soon as possible after publication. Legal deposit libraries will contact publishers when they find that they have not received a publication required for legal deposit. The time frame within which your book must be lodged with the appropriate libraries varies from state to state, but, generally, it must be deposited within one to two months of publication. There is no charge for legal deposit. An information brochure listing requirements and contact details for each state can be obtained by contacting nla.gov.au/services/ldeposit.html.

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The Nine Pillars Of Cobb & Co. By Dick Gledhill Photography by Evan Morgan Edited by Bruce Foot First published in 2002 ISBN 0 958016208 (hardcover) A4 (297mm x 210mm) Extent 152 pages

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BARCODE

The barcode represents a product’s number in a form that can be read by an electronic barcode scanner. Using computerised inventory and cataloguing systems, publishers, booksellers and libraries utilise barcodes to order, sell and manage books. As part of our complete service we can include a barcode on your book. This will make it easier for a bookseller or library to sell or lend your book. For ease of use the barcode should be included on the back cover of your book. Barcodes should be generated using an ISBN as they are complementary systems. If you choose not to have an ISBN but still require a barcode you will need to contact EAN Australia, who administer this service.

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THORPE-BOWKER

All books published in Australia are eligible for free inclusion in Thorpe-Bowker’s Australian Books in Print, which is used by libraries and bookshops to identify and order titles for their customers. It is currently produced in three different formats: an annual bound edition, a monthly edition on microfiche; and on-line. Australian Books in Print includes lists of Australian titles and authors, as well as contact details for Australian distributors. As Australian Books in Print is an excellent form of free advertising for your book, it is important that you provide up-to-date details for inclusion in each edition. To ensure that libraries and bookshops are able to locate and order your books easily, it is essential that you provide as much information as possible, and as early as possible prior to the publication of your book. Should any details change during the production process, your entry in Australian Books in Print will be updated free of charge, as soon as you notify Thorpe-Bowker in writing, quoting the relevant ISBN. Thorpe-Bowker’s free entry forms allow you to add new titles, and they will assist you in completing them if necessary. Guide to New Australian Books is a unique listing and description of newly published Australian books. Each entry includes an annotation (a description of the work ’s contents), full bibliographic details, author, editor, illustrator and subject index. To be eligible for entry into Guide to New Australian Books, you need to send a copy of your work to Thorpe-Bowker Information Services as soon as possible after publication. When submitting, please include a notification of its recommended retail price and the month and year of its publication. For more information contact thorpe.com.au. 28

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PRESS RELEASE

If you believe that your book is unique in its subject matter or takes a new approach to a subject, or if there is an interesting story behind your decision to self-publish your book, then newspapers, magazines, web sites, radio and television programs may wish to interview you about it. Send a press release about your book to a range of publications and programs, and be sure to address them to the appropriate person. Pay as much attention to writing your press release as you did to writing your book. Remember that you need to grab the attention of the editor or producer who makes decisions. Offer them something timely, new or quirky, but make sure you approach the relevant industry contacts for the type of book you are publishing: if your book is light-hearted, don’t approach a serious, current affairs magazine or program. (If you are not confident about speaking on radio or appearing on television, don’t approach them. Also, don’t expect to be paid for any of these appearances; this is ‘free advertising’ for your book.) One of the best resources for deciding where to promote your book is Margaret Gee’s Media Guide (published by Information Australia), which lists contact details for media outlets all over Australia.

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REVIEWS

You will need to set aside a number of copies of your book for promotional purposes. Sending out review copies can prove to be an expensive exercise if you don’t achieve your aim, so before you send out finished copies, plan your strategy. You may decide to send written material only, stating that a review copy is available on request (see review sample in appendix). Be sure to establish the reviewing policy of the publication in question. There may be particular guidelines that you should follow to increase the chances of your book being reviewed; a magazine may commission books for review, rather than accept unsolicited material. As well as general publications, target any specialist publications (both print and web based) that might be interested in your book. Many clubs and associations have their own member newsletters and are always keen to review a new product that relates to their special interest. You might also choose to send a reading copy to any bookshops that you think may be interested in your book. Many bookshops like to support self-publishers, particularly local authors. If you have a good relationship with your local bookseller, talk to them about the possibility of promoting your book with them. They may even support a reading and signing session in their store if your book will be of interest to their local market. When sending review copies, include an information sheet providing details about the book’s subject, some information about the author, the price and format (hardback or paperback), the book’s ISBN and your contact details. If required Network Creative Services can produce a professional review on behalf of your publication.

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ADVERTISING

If you are going to pay to advertise your book, make sure that you are spending your money effectively. You can pay to advertise your book to both booksellers and consumers, but if you have limited funds, you should concentrate on letting booksellers know about your book through advertising. Don’t advertise your book until you have finished copies to supply to booksellers. Customers want to be able to buy something immediately, and booksellers need to be able to have your book on their shelves in anticipation of customer demand. Trade publications such as Australian Bookseller & Publisher and the Weekly Book Newsletter are ideal places to advertise your book to booksellers. If you do decide to pay to advertise your book directly to customers, you should consider advertising in special-interest publications and bookshop newsletters as well as online newspapers and magazines, as they may be less expensive options. You may also be able to purchase mailing lists from special-interest groups, so that you can email advertising material and order forms to those concerned.

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The Nine Pillars Of Cobb & Co. Associated promotional material: • Launch Invitation DL 2 sided (mono) • Bookmarks 2 sided (CMYK and mono) • Point Of Sale A2 Posters (CMYK) • Splash Page (www.ncs.net.au/cobb& co)

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PROMOTION

When promoting your publication, keep in mind that it needs to stand out from the thousands of other books that are published each year. Every week booksellers and book reviewers receive a multitude of catalogues, information sheets and review copies of masterpieces, and all will need more than your personal guarantee to be convinced that your book has something to offer them. Emphasise your book ’s unique qualities clearly and interestingly, and provide all the necessary information about your book (keeping in mind that sometimes less is more). There are many avenues for publicising your book, and you should plan your publicity strategy even before the book has been printed. Network Creative Services can produce a range of support material including websites, bookmarks, postcards, launch invitations (see page opposite), reviews (see sample, page 56), press releases, etc. to aid in the promotion of your work.

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SELLING

When publishing a book, you must consider whether or not you want to sell it, or whether you’d rather just supply it to certain people. If you decide to make it available for purchase to retail you must invest time and energy into promoting and selling your book. You may wish to engage a professional to handle the distribution, but be aware of the options available to you as you may also wish to do additional promotion yourself. Look into contacting additional groups and associations who may have a particular interest in your book and be sure to include an order form.

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INTERNET

Whether you’re creating a traditional print book or an e-book, creating a web site to promote yourself and your material is a fabulous marketing tool. Often your internet service provider will provide the tools to build and launch your web site but the domain name (URL) will be complicated and extremely long winded (i.e. www.optusnet.com. au/user/your-name-here/your-book-name-here.html). A more professional option is to choose your own domain name (i.e. www.booktitle.com). Network Creative Services can both register your domain and host your web site while also offering you a highly competitive price. You might want to use your own name or the title of your book or whatever you think will drive surfers to your site. Our expertise not only lies in the development of your site but in attracting visitors to it. There’s no use spending valuable time and money in a web site no one will visit! We offer self-publishers and small independent presses easy-to-manage, professional web sites at an affordable cost. Publishers of all sizes need a presence on the web. They should aim to: • sell books directly without retailer discounts; • have access to their site content 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; • be able to add pages to their web site; • have their own web site address (URL); • provide a source of information for the media. You’ll need to provide us with the text for your web page plus any graphics you want to use. If some of the latter are copyrighted, do make sure you get permission to use them w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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and give a proper acknowledgment on the site. For a work of fiction, provide the first chapter to spark reader interest. If your book falls into the non-fiction category, provide your reader with some opening lines in a selection of chapters. Check out other web sites for ideas when designing your own. A web site is always a work in progress, which is part of the excitement. You can sell your books from your web site. You need to set up an account with a provider like PayPal (see PayPal.com.au) that will allow you to accept payments in a variety of formats and currencies, provide useful tools when calculating shipping costs and track your shipping online, all in a secure environment. Network Creative Services allows publishers to get a ‘publisher centric’ web site launched in a matter of days for less than the cost of book design. We can provide you with: • unlimited pages within each site section (including: About Author, Reviews); • purchase page linked to PayPal.com.au or online retailers i.e eBay.com.au; • acceptance of credit cards, transfers, PayPal, e-checks; • professionally designed site just for publishers; • personalized URL (we can register a domain name on your behalf); • competitively priced web site hosting; * fully controlled content from secure administration area; • ability to change content anytime from a web browser. We have priced our service to allow all publishers to cost effectively launch their on-line presence. Contact us for an up-to-date pricing structure. Our aim is to keep fees low to allow the small publisher to maximize their investment by selling books directly to capture the most profit dollars from each book sale.

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ONLINE STORES

Surfing the net will uncover many online bookstores, apart from the more famous ones like bookdepository.com or it’s Australian independent equivalent booktopia.com. au. Try a google.com.au search for a comprehensive list and remember to check their policies with respect to self-published e-book authors. Many prefer to deal with traditional publishers or handle reprints from established authors, abebooks.com is a good example of this. You can also sell your digital product on Amazon (Kindle Direct), Smashwords, and Kobo; and your printed copies on Amazon (Create Space), and eBay, the global experience in online shopping. For details, check out the web site at ebay.com.au.

BLOGS

To maximize the use of RSS, you can create a Blog, which is basically an on-line diary updated perhaps more frequently than the traditional web site. Blogs often contain links, may include input from other people (like an on-line forum) and are a great way to share information about your latest book or product. Check out blogger.com for more information on how to create a blog. For the more adventurous, who are keen to add images and video to their blog and link it all to a user friendly shopping cart, then the free service of squidoo.com may be right for you. w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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Blood In The Dust: Inside The Minds Of Ned Kelly & Joe Byrne By A. N. Baron First published in 2004, revised and republished in 2008 ISBN 0958016259 (softcover) A5 (210mm x 148mm) Extent 226 Pages

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RSS

You can enhance the traffic to your web site by including an RSS feed. This stands for Really Simple Syndication and is a way of sharing news. All you need is an RSS text file that contains information about your site plus your updated news, book-marked by start and end tags. The tags contain a headline title, URL and description. For more information on RSS go to: webreference.com/authoring/languages/xml/rss/intro.

SEARCH ENGINE

A search engine is a program designed to find information on the World Wide Web when you provide a key word or phrase. The search engine will pull up all relevant files from news-groups, databases and directories. Search engines store information about web pages that they gather through web crawlers. A search engine will rank the web sites, putting first the ones it deems most appropriate. Check out searchenginewatch.com to find out more information on how search engines work and which are the most popular. Advertising your book through search engines is a great way to reach the marketplace. Try the following sites: google.com/ads and overture.com (click on ‘Advertising Centre’). Advertising on overture will get you on a number of sites including yahoo.com.au and ninemsn.com.au.

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SOCIAL NETWORKING

While you can’t control word-of-mouth publicity for your book, you can tell as many people as you can about it, and be proud of your achievement. Word-ofmouth publicity can also come about as the result of booksellers recommending it to their customers, or readers recommending it to others. It’s one of the best forms of publicity you can hope to get. The online community is a great place to spread the word with sites like pinterest.com, facebook.com, linkedin.com, instagram.com, and twitter.com attracting millions of users each day.

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DISTRIBUTION

All the promotion in the world will come to naught if you cannot follow through and provide copies of your book quickly and efficiently. You can choose to distribute your book yourself, or employ a distributor or agent to supply your book to booksellers for you. Due to concerns about discounts and returns many bookstores don’t buy directly from authors. So you can see how important it is to get a distributor to handle your book. Choose a distributor with national coverage, including on-line bookstores like amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com. Check their web site for details. Remember that smaller distributors can fold, so go for the big ones like btol.com and ipgbook.com both of which specialize in worldwide coverage, with the latter distributing for independent publishers. All of this service comes with a price however, generally based on a percentage of the list price of each title sold. The percentage can be quite high, as much as 70%, and this will cut into your profits in a major way. Of course, you could distribute the book yourself. Factor in storage costs (free if you keep the titles in your garage), shipping fees, cost of returns, etc. You may also have to offer discounts to encourage sales.

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DIY

The biggest disadvantage of managing distribution yourself is that it takes time and is an ongoing job. You need to be easily contactable (by phone, mobile, email, instant messaging, and sms), and able to provide quick turnaround of orders. You will also need to be vigilant in your accounting and offer standard terms of trade to booksellers.

TERMS

The terms under which you supply your book to booksellers are referred to as Terms of Trade. If you complete your form for free listing of your publisher details in Australian Books in Print, you will be asked for details such as what discount you offer, whether you charge for freight, whether you have a ‘small order surcharge’, and what your ‘returns’ policy is. These are your ‘Terms of Trade’, and if you choose to supply your book yourself, you need to understand these terms and think carefully about them. Your terms of trade are very important decisions, and should be based on sensible business principles that, while being attractive to booksellers, still allow a margin of profit for yourself. Bear in mind a publishing house on average pays an author only 10% from the sale of each book (minus any advance they have already received).

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SOS

Small Order Surcharge is a charge for supplying a small quantity of books, usually based on the number of copies ordered or the net value of an order. For example, a publisher may impose a SOS of ‘$5.00 on single copies’, or ‘$5.00 on invoices under $50.00 net.’

FREIGHT

FIS stands for Free Into Store, which means you bear all the costs of getting copies of your book (regardless of quantity) to the bookshop. FIS + Service Charge means that you apply a set charge for supplying any quantity of your books. Freight Charged means that you charge the bookshop for the actual cost of sending the books to them. Without the distribution facilities of a large publisher you will probably want to charge freight at cost.

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Ned Kelly: A Pictorial History By Bradley Webb Edited by Chester Eagle First published in 2012 ISBN 9780958016278 iPad (1024px x 768px) iBook 118 Pages

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RETURNS

‘All orders firm sale’ (FS) means that booksellers must pay for all copies ordered and cannot return them. ‘Sale or return’ (SOR) means that a bookseller can return unsold copies, usually within a time frame specified by the publisher. You might also wish to offer your books ‘on consignment’, which means the bookseller takes a certain number of copies of your book, pays you as they are sold, and can return unsold copies within a certain time frame. If you choose to sell your books at firm sale, booksellers will expect a higher discount for ‘taking the risk’ on your book.

DISCOUNTS

You need to offer a discount to booksellers to sell your book for you. When planning to self-publish your book, you need to include this discount in your costing; if the GST-inclusive retail price of your book is $29.95, you will not, of course, receive that amount for each copy! Discounts may range from 10% up to 60%, but ‘standard’ discount is 33-40%. You may wish to offer a range of discounts based on the quantity of books ordered.

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GST

You should ensure that the GST inclusive recommended retail price is quoted on all your promotional and other material.

F A U LT S

If your book is faulty in any way – for example misbound or damaged in transit to a bookshop – booksellers will expect to be able to return copies to you and receive either a credit or a replacement copy. As the publisher usually bears the cost of returning faulty copies, you may wish to specify that the bookseller can ‘return title page’ rather than ‘return whole book’.

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DISTRIBUTOR

The biggest advantage of using a distributor or commissioned agent to sell your book is that they have the expertise and resources to do the job effectively. The biggest drawback is that you will need to supply your book to a distributor at a heavy discount, as they are bearing the costs of supplying your book to bookshops, including their commission and discounts to booksellers. Also consider that if you are distributing your book yourself, you can focus all of your resources on it, whereas a distributor or agent is handling many titles at once. You need to be confident that a distributor will do justice to your book. Be sure to ask all the questions you need to feel confident that the distributor will promote your book as effectively as possible. Ask about their publicity policy, the strength of their sales representative force, what they require in terms of discount, and their accounting procedures (that is, when you receive payment for sales of your book), and compare them with others. You will also want to establish whether you are also able to promote and sell your book yourself, as some distributors may prefer an ‘exclusive’ arrangement. Some distributors are known for specialising in particular types of books, and are able to market your book effectively to outlets that will have a particular interest in your book. Both the Australian Publishers Association (APA) and the Australian Booksellers Association (ABA) sell lists of Australian book distributors, which will help you establish which distributors might be interested in selling your book.

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Far Beyond The Falls By A. D. Crichton Edited by Karen Bernardo First published in 2008 ISBN 9780980593907 (softcover) A5 (210mm x 148mm) Extent 214 pages

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GLOSSARY

ABA: Australian Booksellers Association. Agent: May be somebody commissioned by a publisher or distributor to sell books to retail outlets, or somebody who represents the interests of an author. APA: Australian Publishers Association. Barcode: A code printed on a product that can be read by an electronic barcode scanner. Used by publishers, booksellers and libraries to identify, order, sell and manage books using computerized inventory systems. Binding: The type of cover of a book – generally expressed as either hardback or paperback, but sometimes as cased (hardback) or softback (paperback). CAL: Copyright Agency Limited. CiP: Cataloguing-in-Publication. Copyediting: Checking a manuscript for grammar, spelling and typographical errors, and inconsistencies in style. Discount: A percentage of the RRP of a book subtracted by the publisher when supplying the book to a retailer. w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k 48

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I Was At The Kelly Gang Round-Up By Judith Douthie Edited by Noeleen Lloyd First published in 2007 ISBN 9780958016285 (softcover) A5 (210mm x 148mm) Extent 224 Pages

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Distributor: Somebody who supplies other publishers’ books to retailers. Extent: The number of pages in a book. FIS: Free Into Store. The publisher bears the freight costs of supplying books to retail outlets. FS: Firm Sale. A term of trade under which a retail outlet cannot return unsold books to the publisher or distributor. Folio: Page number. Full-colour: Printing using the four-colour process, which uses the ‘process colours’ cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK) to make any colour needed. Hard copy: A printed version of a manuscript or other text, as opposed to an electronic copy of the text. Imprint page: Usually the reverse page of a book’s title page. Carries information such as CiP data, including a book’s ISBN, copyright line, publication date, and information about the publisher and printer. ISBN: International Standard Book Number. Legal Deposit: Statutory provision to ensure that copies of all publications in Australia are lodged with the National Library of Australia and State Libraries. Manuscript: The copy of a book. w w w. n c s . n e t . a u / b o o k

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NLA: National Library of Australia. Returns: Unsold books returned to the publisher or distributor. RRP: Recommended Retail Price. The GST inclusive price at which the publisher recommends that retail outlets sell the book. SOR: Sale Or Return. Term of trade under which a retail outlet may return unsold books to a publisher or distributor, usually within a specified time frame. Supplier: Somebody who supplies books to retail outlets. May be a publisher or a distributor. Terms of Trade: The terms, including discount and returns policy, under which a publisher or distributor supplies books to retail outlets.

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C O N TA C T S

Book Publisher Network Creative Services Pty Ltd Po Box 9143, Briar Hill, VIC 3088 Mob 0418 589 301 www.ncs.net.au info@ncs.net.au Australia Council – Literature Fund 372 Elizabeth Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010 PO Box 788, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012 Tel 1800 226 912 Fax (02) 9215 9111 www.ozco.gov.au literature@ozco.gov.au Australian Booksellers Association Suite 65, 3rd Floor, 255 Drummond Street, Carlton VIC 3053 (PO Box 1088) Tel (03) 9349 5766 Fax (03) 9349 5799 www.aba.org.au abaaba@aba.org.au

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Fourth Dimensional Kisses By GLBT International Community Edited by Al-Antony Moody First published in 2002 A6 (148mm x 105mm) Softcover Extent 200 Pages

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Australian Copyright Council Suite 3, 245 Chalmers Street, Redfern NSW 2016 Tel (02) 9318 1788 Fax (02) 9698 3536 www.copyright.org.au info@copyright.org.au Australian Literary Translators Association Department of Slavic Studies Monash University, Clayton VIC 3168 Tel (03) 9905 2252 lila.zarnowsy@arts.monash.edu.au Australian Publishers Association Suit 60, 89 Jones Street, Ultimo NSW 2007 Tel (02) 9281 9788 Fax (02) 9281 1073 www.publishers.asn.au apa@publishers.asn.au Australian Society of Authors PO Box 1566, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012 Tel (02) 9318 0877 Fax (02) 9318 0530 www.asauthors.org asa@asauthors.org

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Copyright Agency Limited Level 19, 157 Liverpool Street, Sydney NSW 2000 Tel (02) 9394 7600 Fax (02) 9394 7601 www.copyright.com.au info@copyright.com.au Educational Lending Right GPO Box 3241, Canberra ACT 2601 Tel 1800 672 842 Fax (02) 6271 1651 www.dcita.gov.au/elr.html elr.mail@dcita.gov.au International Standard Book Number Agency Thorpe Information Services 18 Salmon Street, Port Melbourne VIC 3207 (Locked Bag 20) Tel (03) 9245 7385 Fax (03) 9245 7393 www.thorpe.com.au isbn@thorpe.com.au

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National Library of Australia - Legal Deposit Unit National Library of Australia Canberra ACT 2600 Tel (02) 6262 1312 Fax (02) 6273 4492 www.nla.gov.au/services/ldeposit.h.tml legaldep@nla.gov.au Public Lending Right Scheme GPO Box 3241 Canberra ACT 2601 Tel 1800 672 842 Fax (02) 6271 1651 www.dcita.gov.au/plr.html plr.mail@dcita.gov.au

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Before Max Brown died in September 2003, he had spent the good part of the last ten years rewriting his 1948 classic Australian Son. Eager to reintroduce it into the twenty first century, Max had sourced new material and updated many of this fine theory’s and findings.

Australian Son, the first modern account of the Kelly outbreak, was originally published in 1948. The book has long been recognised as the classic account of a turbulent, formative period in the history of Australia. The book has featured prominently in later examinations of the story by authors and historians such as Ian Jones, Keith McMenomy, and John McQuilton.

Australian Son: the story of Ned Kelly Max Brown (1916 – 2003) ISBN 0 9580162 6 7 $24.95 rrp Edited and compiled by Chester Eagle Printed and bound in Australia


Australian Son: the story of Ned Kelly was first published in 1948 by Georgian House, Melbourne, and a revised edition was issued in 1956 and 1961. It was republished by Angus and Robertson, Melbourne, in 1980, as part of their Australian Classics series. This further fully revised edition by Network Creative Services Pty Ltd, Melbourne, 2005.

Sale/promotion enquiries: Brad Webb – publisher. Telephone: 03 9444 7406. Email: australian.son@ncs.net.au

Media enquiries: Chester Eagle – editor. Telephone: 03 9497 1018. Email: cae@netspace.net.au

During his later life, Max struck up a close association with the Australian history web site Ironoutlaw.com. Started in 1995 the site recently celebrated it’s 10 years anniversary. The multi-award winning site is the sole distributor of Max’s work. Averaging 218,635 visitors (over 9 million hits) a year, this sales concept is a new initiative in Australian publishing/promotion and one that Max was keen to see come to fruition.

After months of work the end result was then scanned using OCR software. As Max had originally used an ancient word processor (whose disks went missing during the removal of his belongings) the scanned pages were converted into a Microsoft Word document which was carefully reread by Chester — who compared the scanned page to the original, ensuring a perfect transfer. The result was released in 2005 to commemorate the 125 years of the death of Ned Kelly.

His manuscript, however, was still in a million pieces when he suffered a debilitating stroke. Upon his death, Max’s close friend Chester Eagle took it upon himself to undertake the mammoth task of comparing the five surviving manuscripts page by page to determine which sections were the most recent.


GUIDE TO SELF PUBLISHING

Ode To My Ruby Red Slippers By GLBT International Community Edited by Al-Antony Moody and Lee Mak First published in 2003 A5 (210mm x 148mm) Softcover Extent 112 Pages

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Guide to Self Publishing (Australia)  

Since the establishment of our publishing division in 2001, Network Creative Services have been inundated with inquiries from authors seekin...

Guide to Self Publishing (Australia)  

Since the establishment of our publishing division in 2001, Network Creative Services have been inundated with inquiries from authors seekin...

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