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MAY2018 ISSN 1684-8187

www.typhoonclub.com


Typhoon Club Videos! Enjoy watching videos that support selected features in this issue of Typhoon Club. Visit the Typhoon Club Facebook page and click on the links:

www.facebook.com/typhoonclub

World History The Four-Minute Mile

Popular Culture Pigcasso – The Painting Pig

How Do You Feel? The Apprhension Engine

Sport Plogging

www.facebook.com/typhoonclub 2 TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018


What’s In Typhoon Club This Month?

4 World History 6 How Do You Feel 8 Down To Earth 10 Popular Culture 13 I Want To Be... 16 Sport 18 Science 20 Wok’s Cooking 22 What Do You Think? 24 Know Your Typhoon Club 26 Word Search 27 Sudoku

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Editorial Welcome to the May 2018 issue of Typhoon Club! We are delighted to be able to introduce to our readers a very talented artist. Her paintings are selling for lots of money and she has just enjoyed her very first exhibition of her work. Turn immediately to the Popular Culture section to learn exactly who – or what – this artist is. For all the foodies amongst our readers, we take a look at some Japanese food which you either love or hate. We are talking about uni, which comes from the sea urchin. If you have ever wondered why sea urchins are called sea urchins, you will find the answer in Wok’s Cooking? You will also discover exactly what uni is. You may never want to eat it ever again. In our World History section, we write about the excitement of when a human being first ran the distance of one mile in under four minutes. For many years people thought it was impossible for a human to run so fast – until it actually happened. We also explain the origins of the circus clown. It is said that there is always sadness behind the smile and laughter of the clown. The man who created the clown we know today was far from happy. Find out why in I Want To Be… Happy reading.

Publisher Mark Cowley / Cho Moon Sook Cyclone Publishing Ltd. Editor Catherine Lee Chinese Editor Winnie Tsui Designer Johnny Chan Games Editor George Printer Takkai Company Limited Photos AFP Contact Details: Room 1, Block A, 6/F Wing Hing Lee Industrial Building 32 Hung To Road Kwun Tong, Kowloon Tel: 2806 1018 Fax: 2573 8716 Email: typhoonclub@gmail.com Website: www.typhoonclub.com

Typhoon Club is published by Cyclone Publishing Ltd. This publication may not be sold. No part of this publication may be otherwise reproduced, adapted, performed in public or transmitted in any form by any process without the prior authorisation of the publisher. © Cyclone Publishing Ltd., 2018. 「大風吹」乃Cyclone Publishing Ltd.印製。版權所有。此刊物內任何部 份將不得在未經本公司授權的情況下複製、使用、向公眾展示或傳播。 © Cyclone Publishing Ltd. 2018年。

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WORLD HISTORY

Roger Bannister just after he has broken the four-minute mile

The Four-Minute Mile 4 TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018


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very serious runner wants to be the fastest. It was certainly the case when it came to running the distance of one mile, or 1,609.344 metres. For over 100 years, people had said it was impossible. In 1855, the record was four minutes, 28 seconds. By the 1930s, that time had been reduced to within a few seconds over four minutes. People began to ask whether it would be possible to break the four-minute barrier. On the 6th May, 1954, that barrier was broken. The man who did it was Englishman, Roger Bannister. He’d only started to run seriously when he was 17 years old. He was a medical student at Oxford University and would only run when there was time out from his studies. When he did run, he took it very seriously and used his medical knowledge to help improve his performance. The race on 6th May 1954 was at a track in Oxford. There were rumours that this may be the day the four-minute mile would be broken, but the event was nearly cancelled because of the weather. The wind was blowing in the morning at 40 kilometres per hour! However, the wind dropped just before the race was due to start. During the race, Bannister was helped by two other runners who helped set the pace. The young medical student later described his

experience. “The world seemed to stand still, or did not exist. I felt at that moment that it was my chance to do one thing supremely well.” Bannister ran one mile in 3.59.4 seconds. His success was short-lived. Just over one month later on 21 June, an Australian athlete, John Landy, ran one mile in 3.57.9 seconds. Unlike Bannister, Landy did not use any other runner to help set the pace. You can imagine the excitement when in August of the same year, the two runners were able to race together in Vancouver, Canada. With the world watching, Landy was in the lead for most of the race. At the final turn, Landy looked over his shoulder to see where Bannister was. It was a huge mistake. As Landy turned his head to the left, Bannister raced past Landy’s right shoulder and won. The event became known as the ‘Miracle Mile’ and is considered to be one of the most famous events in sporting history. Roger Bannister went on to become a very successful medical consultant. He continued to run until 1975, when he broke his ankle in a car accident. He always said the Miracle Mile was the highlight of his career. Today, over 500 Americans have run one mile in less than four minutes. The world record holder is currently Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco. He ran one mile in 3.43.13 seconds on 7th July 1999.

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HOW DO YOU FEEL

Music For Nightmares

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Tony created a unique instrument that he calls The Apprehension Engine. If you look at pictures of it, you will see that it looks a little like a mechanic or engineer’s workshop table. Every section of the instrument is there to create a sound or noise that is guaranteed to scare you. When it’s put into the hands of an expert like Mark Korven, you begin to hear sounds that will turn any horror movie into the scariest experience you’ve ever had. Mark has said that his goal when writing music for The Apprehension Engine is to help produce sounds that are disturbing. He demonstrated his skills recently by giving a hugely successful performance one dark evening in a cemetery in Brooklyn, New York – on Friday 13th, of course! In the eerie shadows of candles, members of the audience literally jumped out of their skin. So, is The Apprehension Engine a musical instrument, a machine, or an engine? If you believe that the objective of music is to stir the listener’s emotions, you can probably call it a musical instrument – it’s just that the emotions this instrument stirs do not necessarily make you feel happy or relaxed. Try listening to The Apprehension Engine here: www.apprehensionengine.com Does it scare you to death?

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Special thanks to Tony Duggan-Smith

sually, when you listen to music you will expect it to be enjoyable. Otherwise, what’s the point of listening? Music is everywhere these days. You may wear headphones on the bus to school; music is frequently played in shopping malls and shops. And when we go to the movies we expect music to accompany the images we watch. It can help stir our emotions and make the experience much more pleasurable. Unless, of course, we are watching a horror movie. Then, we expect something different, something that is not pleasant, or something that may even scare us to death! Mark Korven is a composer, and he writes music for movies and TV. He provided the music for a successful horror movie called The Witch. Its director, Robert Eggers, asked Mark not to use any electronic music for this movie. He wanted to create a more real sound. Following this experience, Mark began to think about how a more natural sound could be made for future horror movies. He contacted his good friend, Tony Duggan-Smith, a wellknown musician and maker of musical instruments. What Tony came up with is quite extraordinary.


DOWN TO EARTH

Species 360

Achilles and Karis © ZSL London Zoo

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oos are often criticised by people who ask, “Why are such beautiful animals kept in captivity when they should be in their natural habitat? They’re wild animals and should not be in cages!” It’s a fair question and one we should always ask. But take a closer look at the work done by many zoos around the world, and you will find they are home to many species that are extinct in the wild. They are doing an amazing job. Think about this example: there are less than 300 Sumatran tigers today. They are considered a critically endangered species. Jae Jae is a male Sumatran tiger who was born in San Francisco Zoo. He was flown to ZSL London Zoo recently where he met Melati, a female of the same species; 108 days later, Melati gave birth to two cubs called Achilles and Karis. They all live happily together in London. Through careful planning, it is possible for one zoo in one country to work with another zoo in another to help bring endangered species together. Until very recently, this was an incredibly difficult task. The information about different species used to be stored in thousands of books and files in hundreds of zoos around the world. The information was there, but it was very hard to find. Since 1974, this information has slowly been transferred onto an international computer database called ZIMS (Zoological Information Management System). Today, over 1,000 zoos and aquariums in 93 A red-ruffed lemur

© Tony Bates, ZSL London Zoo

countries are registered with it. ZIMS contains information on 22,000 species and 10 million animals. There are also 75 million medical records available. With this information, organisations are able to actively look for partners for animals under their own management. This can lead to preventing some species from becoming extinct. Every week we read about different species becoming endangered. Habitat loss and climate change have a huge impact. Zoos like ZSL London Zoo together with ZIMS can make a difference. Here’s another example: Eka is a female red-ruffed lemur who lives in a zoo in Poland. She looks incredibly cute, but like the Sumatran tiger, red-ruffed lemurs are nearly extinct. Eka was introduced to twin brothers Nero and Faro, in Germany; 102 days after the meeting, Eka gave birth to George, Fred and Ron, named after the Harry Potter characters. Eka, Nero and Faro seem very happy together – but no-one knows who George, Fred and Ron’s father is. Thankfully, Eka does not seem too bothered about this. TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018 9


POPULAR CULTURE

Pigcasso – The Painting Pig

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he 13th May 2016 was a very important day for Pigcasso and her sister, Rosie. They were two baby piglets, just onemonth old, born on a South African pig farm. Life for any pig born on such a farm is usually short and that brief time is spent in a tiny cage. But Pigcasso and Rosie were lucky. They were saved by an environmentalist called Joanne Lefson who carried the two tiny sisters away from the farm in a single shoe box. Their lives changed forever.

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Joanne lives on an animal sanctuary for rescued animals, which became Rosie and Pigcasso’s new home. When they arrived, some builders were there working. One of them had left his paint and paint brushes. Pigcasso was fascinated with them. Usually, she would eat anything that could fit into her mouth. The paintbrushes, however, were different. She liked playing with them. Joanne decided to see if this tiny little pig could paint. She could.


however, enjoy the occasional mud bath – just like any other happy pig. Instead of adding a signature to each painting, Pigcasso dips her nose into some beetroot juice mixed with black ink and makes a mark. Joanne often takes Pigcasso to the beach or to Table Mountain, where she is able to enjoy the scenery and find new ideas. She had not been painting for very long before an American lawyer who was visiting Joanne’s farm saw one of Pigcasso’s works. He bought it for HK$4,700. Since that first sale, Pigcasso has been able to sell about 50 more to people in England, South Korea and Malaysia. At the beginning of 2018, she had her first public exhibition. It was called, ‘Oink’. Critics described her painting style as ‘abstract expressionist.’ Pigcasso has come a long way and her paintings today sell for much more than the first. Money raised from her art goes towards the upkeep of Joanne’s animal sanctuary. So she has to continue to work very hard, but she doesn’t mind. And whilst she is working, her sister Rosie plays and eats with the other rescued animals without a single care in the world.

Photos: www.farmsanctuarysa.org / Joanne Lefson

Today, Pigcasso is no longer a tiny little piglet. She weighs 171 kilos and is about 1.8 metres long! Since discovering the paintbrushes, she has become an established artist. She picks up a paintbrush with her mouth. Then, by rotating her head, she is able to express her artistic feelings on canvas. Like all great artists, Pigcasso loves to work. You could describe her as a workaholic. Her routine is easy. She wakes up, paints, eats, eats some more, then sleeps. She does, TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018 11


Typhoon Club Summer Magazine Writing Courses 2018 Calling all P1 to P5 students! Please come and join Typhoon Club this summer! Course 1 Course 2 Course 3 Course 4 Course 5 Course 6

Monday 16 – Friday 20 July, 9.30 – 3.00 Monday 23 – Friday 27 July, 9.30 – 3.00 Monday 30 July – Friday 03 August, 9.30 – 3.00 Monday 06 – Friday 10 August, 9.30 – 3.00 Monday 13 – Friday 17 August, 9.30 – 3.00 Monday 20 – Friday 24 August, 9.30 – 3.00

Students can visit many different locations with Typhoon Club including Ocean Park and Hong Kong Disneyland. Our native English teachers will also teach participants how to write their own magazine. For further information, please visit: www.typhoonclub.com Tel: 2806 1030


I WANT TO BE...

Here We Go Again! TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018 13


I WANT TO BE...

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s it fair to say that you either love or hate clowns? When you see them perform at a circus, or entertain young children in a shopping mall, do you look at them and shake your head? Or do they make you laugh out loud? Clowns can be recognised immediately. Their faces are painted white, they usually have a red nose and mouth, and wear very large shoes. Their clothes are also baggy and big. This image can be traced back to just one man called Joseph Grimaldi. He created the clown that we know today. Clowns are often given the name Joey, as Joey is short for Joseph. Grimaldi was born in London in 1778. His Italian father was originally a dentist, but became an entertainer in later life. Grimaldi’s father forced his son to start performing on stage at a very young age. It is said that he first performed when he was just three years old! There was a popular style of theatre in England at this time. Harlequin was its main character, who performed with another character known as ‘Clown.’ As Joseph Grimaldi got older, he began to perform the role of Clown. He became so good that audiences would only want to watch him and not Harlequin. Grimaldi began to paint his face white and wear baggy clothing. He’d encourage the audience to sing popular songs with him. He was also famous for his acrobatics. He would suggest to the audience that he would perform an acrobatic trick that was very dangerous. The audience would go crazy. Then, he would say he could not do it. You can imagine how the audience responded. He would finally agree and shout his famous catch phrase, “Here we go again!” The audience loved it. 14 TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018

Grimaldi began to make huge amounts of money. But his life was filled with sadness. His wife died after giving birth to a son. The clown began to work even harder, sometimes performing at two different theatres in one night. It all became too much for him and he retired

in 1823, aged 45. He was exhausted and remained in great pain for the rest of his life. He married a second time to a lady who enjoyed spending his money. It was not long before he was left with nothing. There is a story that Grimaldi was feeling very depressed shortly before his retirement. He went to see a doctor. Not knowing who his patient was, the doctor suggested that the man in front of him watch Joseph Grimaldi perform at the theatre. Surely the great Grimaldi would make this depressed man laugh? Today, clowns from around the world meet in London every year on the first Sunday of February. In full costume, they celebrate Grimaldi’s life. It’s quite a sight – if you like clowns.


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SPORT

Welcome To The World Of Plogging

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o here is a new word for you. It’s plogging. Never heard of it? Neither had we until a few weeks ago. The word was created by Erik Ahlström, an environmentalist from Sweden. It’s made up of two words: ‘plucking’ which means to take hold of something and quickly remove it, and ‘jogging’ – running at a gentle pace. Plogging is where people who go out jogging stop to pick up any litter they see. They then dispose of it in an environmentally friendly way. In recent years, litter has become a real problem in Hong Kong’s country parks. The Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation

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Department (AFCD) made a bold move recently. It decided to remove all the litter bins from the country parks to encourage walkers to take their litter home with them. It was called the ‘Take Your Litter Home!’ campaign. There are reports that this campaign has been a success, but litter in the countryside and city streets remains a big problem. Could plogging become the solution? How do you become a plogger? Joggers carry a small bag and a pair of gloves. When they see any rubbish, they stop running and pick it up, turning their jog into


Special thanks to Erik Founder of Plogga

a plog. Apart from helping to clean up the area, it also improves their exercise routine because they have to bend over regularly – something you do not normally do when you are out jogging. Stopping and starting a jog also has health benefits and improves fitness. Ploggers are encouraged to take photos of the litter they have picked up and post them on social network pages. It raises awareness and may make people think more about dropping their rubbish. Photos are often linked to comments like this one from The Little Writer: “Today, we had our first plogging. In

a 45-minute long run around the city we managed to collect 17.5 kilos of litter lying around the ground.� Plogging is catching on around the world. Apart from Sweden, there are now ploggers in Thailand, Australia, Argentina, the U.S.A. and many other countries. How do you feel about starting your own plogging team and helping to clean up our country parks and streets?

For further information, please visit: www.facebook.com/plogga TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018 17


SCIENCE

Super Monster Wolf

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armers in Japan have been experiencing a problem. Wild boars have taken to stealing rice and chestnut crops. Electric fences have not been very successful in keeping the boars out. What could the farmers do? They found a solution through an amazing invention. Meet the Super Monster Wolf. Even though the Japanese wolf was hunted to extinction nearly 300 years ago, it 18 TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018

seems that today’s wild animals still have an instinct to run when they hear the sound of a wolf. The Super Monster Wolf is, in fact, a robot that looks like a wolf. It’s 65 cm long and 50 cm tall. It is covered with animal fur, has huge white teeth and flashing red eyes. Sensors in the solar-battery-powered beast detect when an animal is approaching. The Super Monster Wolf instantly let’s off a wolf howl that would terrify the biggest animal.


Photo: Valentin Panzirisch

The developers were concerned that if only one sound was emitted over a period of time, animals could get used to it and ignore it. So, the robotic wolf has a selection of 48 different noises which include dog barks, human screams and gun shots. Each robot has an effective range of about one kilometre. They have become so popular, they are now going into mass production. At the moment, the robots are

unable to move. However, they have pistons in their legs which allow them to move from side to side – just to make their presence even more scary. If you think you need a Super Monster Wolf, they will soon be available to buy for HK$39,000. If that is too much to scare any wild boar away, the robots are also effective at scaring other animals including civet cats, bears and deer. It sounds like a ‘must have!’ TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018 19


WOK’S COOKING

Rich, Creamy Uni!

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apanese restaurants can be found all over our city. When we are able to visit one, we all have our favourites – especially when it comes to sushi! Whether it be tuna, salmon or octopus, we are always ready to dive in – especially if someone else is paying. But what do you think about uni? It’s not everyone’s favourite. Let’s find out some more. What is it? Uni is the Japanese word for sea urchin. The word ‘urchin’ is an old word for hedgehog. Sea urchins are easy to recognise. They have long, thin spines on their shells which are very sharp. You should never tread on one! Sea urchins can grow up to 10 centimetres round and can live for 200 years! We don’t eat the shells. We are more interested in what’s inside them! Where can you find them? Sea urchins live in every ocean in the world. They prefer to be in warm water. They can be found on rocky bottoms or close to coral reefs. There are over 200 different species of sea urchin. The inside of only 18 of them are edible. So what’s inside a sea urchin? Uni of course! Many people think that the uni are the sea urchin’s eggs. They are not.

Uni are the sea urchin’s reproductive organs! The best uni is said to come from Hokkaido in Japan. Uni from California has a very clean flavour. Describe uni to me A piece of uni is usually 1 - 3 centimetres long. The colour ranges from light yellow to rich orange. When it has been cleaned, it looks a bit like a small tongue. It has a texture like ice-cream and melts in your mouth. The flavour is very rich. Uni does not taste like fish, but some people say that eating uni reminds them of the ocean. If they are so rich, are they good for you? Unlike most rich food, uni is good for you! Uni has zero carbs, and contains vitamins A, C and E. It is also full of protein. Uni has fewer calories than many other food items on the menu like sardine, mackerel and eel. Are uni only used by the Japanese? Until recently, you only really found uni in Japanese restaurants. However, today it’s used in other dishes. It is served with pasta, and great in omelettes. Some people even like to eat an oyster with a piece of uni on top. Now that’s luxury for you! TYPHOON CLUB MAY/2018 21


WHAT DO YOU THINK?

The Sound Of Music

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Exams always seem to be just around the corner. It’s time to find a quiet space and to start revising. Everyone has their own methods for revision. You only hope your method is the best one. But here’s a question for you to think about: do you prefer listening to music when you revise, or is it better to study in silence? Research about this very question was recently conducted at Cardiff Metropolitan University in Wales. Thirty students were invited to study for a comprehension. For their revision, they were divided into the following four groups: GROUP 1 Revised in total silence; GROUP 2 Revised listening to music with lyrics they liked; GROUP 3 Revised listening to music with lyrics they did not like; GROUP 4 Revised listening to music with no lyrics.

So which group do you think performed the best in the comprehension? You may be surprised and perhaps disappointed if you prefer to listen to music when you are revising. • Students from group one performed more than 60 per cent better than groups two and three; • Students in group four did better than students in groups two and three; • There was no difference in performance between groups two and three; The evidence from this research certainly makes it look as if you are better to revise with no music at all. The research did find though that if you listen to music you like before (and only before) you begin to revise, your performance may be better. When it’s time to concentrate, especially on new and difficult work, it is best to study in silence. What do you think about this? Is the survey wrong? Were too few people tested to get an accurate result? Is the survey right and it is time to switch off the headphones? Whatever you may think, we suggest you do not share this information with your teachers or parents.

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KNOW YOUR TYPHOON CLUB This month’s issue of Typhoon Club contains lots of information. How much of it have you remembered? Write the answers to the questions into the correct boxes in the grid.

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Across 1. What kind of juice does Pigcasso dip her nose into to create a signature? 3. Urchin is an old word for which animal? 5. Uni’s texture is described as being like what? 6. What is the name of the new sport developed in Sweden which helps the environment? 8. What word means to take hold of something and quickly remove it? 9. What does the Super Monster Wolf have in its legs to make it move from side to side? 13. In which country was Pigcasso born? 15. What powers the batteries that operate the Super Monster Wolf? 16. What was Grimaldi’s popular catch phrase?

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Down 2. Who was the first person to run one mile under four minutes? 4. What is Mark Korvan’s profession? 7. What was the name of Pigcasso’s first art exhibition? 10. What shellfish do some people like placing uni on? 11. In which country does Eka, the red-ruffed lemur live? 12. Name the Sumatran tiger born in San Francisco Zoo. 14. In which Canadian city did the Miracle Mile take place?

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WORD SEARCH ACROBAT APPLAUSE AUDIENCE BIGTOP CLOWN COSTUME ENTERTAINMENT GYMNASTICS

Typhoon Club celebrates the very first clown, Joseph Grimaldi, in the I Want To Be… section. Clowns today are usually found at the circus. Hidden in this Word Search are 16 words relating to the circus. Can you find them? Words can go from left to right, right to left, up, down and diagonally.

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JUGGLER MAGICIAN RINGMASTER STRONGMAN TIGHTROPE TRAPEZE TROUPE UNICYCLE

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Word Sudoku The Typhoon Club Sudoku word this month is:

WRISTBAND DEFINITION: An absorbent band of material worn around the wrist to keep sweat from running onto the hand.

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Each grid should be completed so that each row, column and 3 x 3 box contains every letter to make the word: WRIDTBAND. Good luck!

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VOCABULARY In the left hand column you will find the highlighted words taken from the different features in Typhoon Club. Look up these words in the dictionary and write their meanings in the right hand column. WORD

accurate acrobatics animal sanctuary

CHINESE

準確的 雜技 動物收容所

campaign

活動

chestnut crops

栗子

concentrate

專注

critically endangered

極度瀕危的

depressed

憂鬱

disturbing

令人不安的

edible

可食用的

eerie

恐怖的

effective range

有效範圍

emotions

情感

encouraged

鼓勵

environmentally friendly

環境友善

exercise routine

運動常規

instinct natural habitat pistons

本能 自然棲息地 活塞

recently conducted

最近進行

reproductive organs

生殖器官

stir our emotions supremely

喚起我們的情感 極度地

texture

質地

upkeep

保養

unique

獨特的

ENGLISH DEFINITION

Typhoon Club  

Typhoon Club is a monthly magazine designed to encourage young people to enjoy their reading. Launched in Hong Kong in 2002 it has been used...

Typhoon Club  

Typhoon Club is a monthly magazine designed to encourage young people to enjoy their reading. Launched in Hong Kong in 2002 it has been used...

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