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Copyright © 2012 Asian Institute of Technology. All rights reserved. ADDRESS: P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang Pathumthani 12120 Thailand www.ait.asia This Prospectus/Course Catalogue 2012-2013 was compiled and produced by the Media and Communications Unit (MCU), External Relations and Communications Office (ERCO), with the involvement of all AIT employees. AIT wishes to thank the many people who rendered assistance in preparing this report.

Welcome to AIT • OUTSTANDING faculty and academics, supported by the AIT commitment to excellence and quality. • INNOVATIVE interdisciplinary approach to learning across many fields of study. • STRONG FOCUS on research, interactive learning and developing new knowledge. • HANDS-ON experiences and real-world application through exchanges and internships. • PERSONAL attention from faculty experts who teach in small class sizes. • ACCESS to experienced business executives, award-winning scholars, and renowned educators and researchers. • PROXIMITY to internationally recognized Centers of Excellence. • CONNECTION to 19,000+ alumni from 89 countries.

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About the Prospectus/ Course Catalogue 2012-2013 This Prospectus/Course Catalogue 2012-2013 is for people interested in applying for study at AIT. It contains general introductions to our three Schools, the academic programs and the degrees we offer, life at AIT, student and academic support services, fees and financial support information, and tells how to apply for admission. AIT makes every effort to ensure that the programs and courses are offered as described here. However, owing to certain circumstances, AIT reserves the right to withdraw a particular program or course. AIT strongly recommends that you visit the AIT website www.ait.asia for the most up to date information on our academic programs and courses.

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CONTENTS School of Engineering & Technology

24

School of Environment, Resources and Development

100

School of Management

208

Undergraduate Programs

260

www.ait.asia

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A message from the President Home to many of the region’s top experts in a wide variety of knowledge areas, the Asian Institute of Technology is one of Asia’s leading institutions of higher learning. AIT carries out its mission by supporting technological change and sustainable development through a wide array of educational, research, capacity building and outreach programs. More than a university, AIT is a unique international intergovernmental organization that is regionally focused, global in outlook and cosmopolitan in character. Our main campus just north of Bangkok, Thailand, is a tremendous mosaic of cultures, and socioeconomic backgrounds which leads to levels of cross-cultural engagement not found at other university campuses. In addition to the main campus, AIT has established centers in Vietnam and Indonesia. AIT is also a dynamic, diverse, and extremely well-connected network institute dedicated to producing global citizens. Many notable leaders have studied at AIT. Our students benefit from challenging academic programs and cutting edge research, and our internationally-savvy graduates are highly sought after by employers, commanding impressive earning potential throughout their careers. Indeed, opportunities abound for professionals possessing in-depth knowledge of Asia – one the world’s most dynamic and growing regions. The Asian Institute of Technology is a place for talented students who are intellectually curious, serious about their studies, and dedicated to advancing their lives through an exceptional higher learning experience. If you seek the kind of challenges and professional opportunities that we offer, AIT would like to welcome you to its beautiful, clean and green campus!

Prof. Said Irandoust President

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From 1959 until ... Today

Introducing the Asian Institute of Technology The Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) is a leading higher learning institute of engineering and technology, environmental resources and development, and management. AIT operates as a self-contained international community at its main campus located in Pathumthani, some 40 kilometers north of central Bangkok, Thailand. It also delivers some of its programs at its centers in Vietnam and Indonesia. Founded in 1959, AIT fosters an exceptional learning experience in a multicultural environment that reaches beyond boundaries. AIT is an International Intergovernmental Organization of higher learning. It carries out its mission “to develop highly qualified and committed professionals who play a leading role in the region’s sustainable development and its integration into the global economy� by supporting technological change and sustainable development through higher learning, research, capacity building and outreach.

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AIT Facts and Figures Students: 2,300 from 50+ countries Faculty: 120+ from 20+ countries Alumni: 19,000+ from 89 countries Partners: 330

Schools: 3 Research and Outreach Centers: 15 Research & Outreach Projects: 400 Fields of Study: 75+

Courses: 1,000+ Research Staff: 100+ Support Staff: 500+

AIT is “Partnering Asia’s Future” In addition to offering degree courses (bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral), AIT offers short courses / training programs through its AIT Extension, and consultancy services through its AIT Consulting. AIT also houses a number of research and outreach centers, such as the Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology; ASEAN Regional Center of Excellence on the Millennium Development Goals (ARCMDG); Yunus Center at AIT, established in partnership with Professor Muhammad Yunus, recipient of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize; CSR Asia Center at AIT; the Center of Excellence on Sustainable Development in the Context of Climate Change (SDCC); and AIT-UNEP Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific (AIT-UNEP RRC.AP). The institute is also home to the Regional Integrated Multi-hazard Early Warning System for Asia and Africa (RIMES) and Telecoms sans Frontières (TSF).

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International Accolades Ramon Magsaysay Awards In 1989, AIT received the Ramon Magsaysay Award for Peace and International Understanding “... for shaping a new generation of engineers and managers committed to Asia, in an atmosphere of academic excellence and regional camaraderie.”

In 2009, an alumnus of AIT, Yu Xiao Gang was also awarded the Ramon Magsaysay Award. The citation credited AIT and it said “Yu fell in love with nature early on, having been raised in Yunnan, a province of amazing beauty and home to three of the largest rivers in the world: Nu, Yangtze, and Mekong. His interest in the environment was cultivated during a stint in the Yunnan Academy of Social Sciences, and was further deepened when he attended the Asian Institute of Technology, where he earned a Master’s degree in Watershed Management.”

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Why AIT? The Asian Institute of Technology offers the opportunity to study at an advanced international level at an Asian institution with a worldwide academic reputation. Many progressive developments in thinking about the application of science, technology and management to sustainable development have originated at AIT. Few institutions of higher learning are as truly international as AIT. The Institute partners with public and private sector partners throughout the region and with some of the top universities and international organizations in the world. Our main campus offers fast and easy access to Bangkok, a city at the crossroads of East, South-East and South Asia. It is one of the world’s great destinations and a center of commerce, culture and careers. Students will head there for class assignments, field trips, research and internships – and entertainment. The rest of fast-growing Asia is also an easy jump off from Thailand’s cosmopolitan capital. In addition to the main campus, AIT has established centers in Vietnam and Indonesia.

International Opportunities Student exchange and dual degree programs with top international universities and research institutions around the world.

Student Exchange & Dual Degree Programs Some of the possible options for AIT students • TU - Tsinghua University, China • ESCP Europe • HUT - Helsinki University of Technology, Finland • TMSP - Telecom & Management Sud Paris, France • IIMs - Indian Institutes of Management, India • UGM - Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia • University of Tokyo, Japan • Seoul National University (SNU), South Korea • UNESCO-IHE, Netherlands • UPC - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain • Stockholm University, Sweden • National Taiwan University (NTU), Taiwan

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World-class Learning Opportunities AIT’s degree programs are provided by its School of Engineering and Technology (SET); School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD); and School of Management (SOM). Our students benefit from challenging academic programs and exciting faculty-student research projects. AIT is also involved in various Erasmus Mundus academic cooperation mobility programs offered by the European Union.

Degree Options AIT offers Doctoral, Master’s and Undergraduate Degree Programs, apart from conducting training programs.

Postgraduate Degrees MBA PhD EMBA MSc DTechSc Professional Master’s MEng DEng DBA

Undergraduate Degrees Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.) Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.)

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School of Engineering and Technology

http://www.set.ait.asia

The School of Engineering and Technology at AIT develops leaders for a sustainable and technologically driven future. AIT values creative research and solid understanding of the fundamentals in many cutting edge fields of study in engineering and technology. “AIT ranks top in four engineering areas in research in Thailand.� - Thai Research Fund (TRF) study 2010

School of Environment, Resources and Development

http://www.serd.ait.asia

The School of Environment, Resources and Development is one of the top destinations in Asia for the study of sustainable development, and resources and environment. Its key strength is that it responds to regional needs by mobilizing and enhancing capabilities for socially, economically and environmentally sound development.

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School of Management

http://www.som.ait.asia

AIT’s School of Management has been consistently ranked as one of Asia’s top schools for management higher learning and research and its MBA programs. “The School of Management MBA program ranked 1st in Thailand and 8th in Asia.” - Best MBA (http://www.bestmba.org/bestonlinemba_asia.htm)

Undergraduate Program

http://www.ug.ait.asia

AIT now offers four-year Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.) and four-year Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree programs at its main campus in Thailand, and at its partner institutions in Nepal, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Vietnam.

AIT Extension

http://www.extension.ait.asia

AIT Extension provides regular and customized non-degree continuing professional education, short course training and consultancy services. AIT has produced 28,000 trainee graduates from all over the world.

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Fields of Study & Academic Programs School of Engineering and Technology Master’s and Doctoral Degree Programs Civil & Infrastructure Engineering Group

• Construction, Engineering & Infrastructure Management • Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering

• Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management (SET AND SERD) • Urban Water Engineering and Management (SET, SERD)

Professional Master’s Degree Programs

• Structural Engineering

• Geo-System Exploration & Petroleum

• Transportation Engineering

• Geo-Technical Engineering & Management

• Water Engineering & Management

• Hard Disk Drive Engineering Technology (Western Digital-Thailand)

Industrial Systems Engineering Group

• Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering • Mechatronics • Microelectronics and Embedded Systems • Nanotechnology Information & Communications Group

• Computer Science

• Industrial & Supply Chain Management • Project Management in Construction • Telecommunication Technology & Management

Undergraduate Degree Programs • Chemical Engineering • Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

• Information Management

• Computer Science

• Remote Sensing & Geographic Information Systems

• Information Technology • Electronics

• Telecommunications

• Industrial Engineering

Interdisciplinary Programs • Offshore Technology & Management • Information & Communications Technologies

• Information and Communication Technology • Mechatronics • Telecommunications

• Geo-Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering

School of Management Master of Business Administration (MBA) • Entrepreneurship • Technology Management • Sustainable Business • Finance

• International Business-Management of Technology

Doctoral of Philosophy (Ph.D)

• Human Resource

Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)

• Marketing

Inter-School Academic Programs

• Strategy • Public Management

Professional Master’s Degree Programs • Banking and Finance • Corporate Social Responsibility • Intellectual Capital and Knowledge Management • Technology Management • MBA in Energy Business (SOM,SERD)

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Executive MBA (EMBA)

• MBA in Energy Business (SERD, SOM)


Please visit: www.ait.ac.th/AIT/education/academic-programs and www.ait.ac.th/education/fields-of-study

School of Environment, Resources and Development Master’s & Doctoral Degree Programs • Agri-business management • Agricultural systems and engineering • Aquaculture and aquatic resources management • Climate change and sustainable development

Double Degree (1+1 Years) • Urban Water Engineering and Management (SERD, SET)

Professional Master’s Programs • Environmental Engineering and Management

• Energy

• Urban Management

• Energy and environment

• Water Technology Management

• Environmental engineering and management

• Public Policy

• Food engineering and bioprocess technology

• Aqua-Business Management

• Gender and development studies

• Energy Business management

• Natural resources management • Pulp and paper technology • Regional and rural development planning • Urban environmental management

Inter-School Academic Programs • Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management (SERD,SET) • MBA in Energy Business (SERD,SOM)

Unified Bachelor’s & Master’s Programs • Agri-business Management • Energy

Two Stage Master’s Programs (1+1 years) • MBA in Energy Business • Energy and Environment • Certificate Programs • Integrated Coastal Management • Greater Mekong Sub region Development Studies

Undergraduate Programs: • Bio-Systems Engineering • Environmental Engineering • Chemical Engineering

• Environmental Engineering and Management

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Campus Life: A home away from home AIT’s idyllic 330-acre campus contains all the necessary facilities and elements for students from many different cultures to live, study, learn, work, and thrive together.

• • • • • • • • •

Library Language Center State-of-the-art laboratories AIT Conference Center Sports and recreation facilities, including a golf course Computing services Campus housing with internet connection Medical clinic AIT International School (Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 6)

Why consider AIT? Just a few more reasons… Activities: Student-driven events on and off campus – cultural, athletic, and social interactions. Student Organizations: Student Union and student national associations and clubs connect students and give voice to their academic and social concerns. Recreation and Wellness: Ample recreation facilities, and services catering to students’ social, physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual health. Athletics: Stay fit, have fun and make friends playing golf, football, basketball, cricket, and many more. Campus Housing: AIT provides on campus housing to its students. Staff members are on hand, dedicated to creating a safe, dynamic learning and living environment.

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Some students speak out At AIT, I was able to reinvent myself. A year into my MBA, I already feel that I am one step closer to working in the finance industry. In fact, I have already secured a job at one of the largest banks in Thailand. Jeeranan Prompes Thailand MBA Candidate

One of the happiest moments of my life was when I got a scholarship from HEC Pakistan to study at AIT. Back then I could not have imagined that I could earn a double master’s degree from AIT and UPC in Spain, or win a grant from Google to work on an open source project as part of Google’s Summer of Code Program. At AIT, I learned that nothing is impossible. Waheed Iqbal Pakistan Ph.D. Candidate, Computer Science I had lived in the United States for six years when I had a chance to come to Thailand with the East-West Center Leadership program from Hawaii. During a field trip I experienced the tsunami hit region. It ignited in me this need to understand development issues in Asia better. AIT is very well reputed in Nepal and when I found out that they have a gender and development studies program – I had to apply. I have not only learned about the issues and the region, AIT also gave me a different perspective in life and changed my career path. Nisha Onta Nepal Ph.D. Candidate, Gender and Development Studies I learned something very new from excellent instructors. I feel at home at AIT. I will recommend AIT short courses to my friends back home, and I myself plan to return to AIT to pursue my master’s. Ms. Flavia Da Costa Henriques Timor-Leste Finance Officer and Administrator, AIT Extension trainee

AIT really provides you a great environment for learning and many different opportunities to new things. It’s definitely a stage to a brighter future. Chen Yu Ting Taiwan Freshman, B.Eng. Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

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Applying to AIT for Graduate Education

www.ait.asia/apply

Applying to graduate study at AIT is a simple process. Application for admission takes only four (4) steps. Go to http://www.ait.asia/apply

STEP 1: Review Requirements and Procedures

Read the Requirements and Procedures page to find out the admissions requirements including tests, transcripts, letters of recommendation, and application fees.

STEP 2: Download Application Forms STEP 3: Study Guidelines for Applicants STEP 4: Explore Financial Aid

If you are interested in applying for financial aid, please see the financial aid information page.

A non-refundable application processing fee has to be paid - fixed at US$ 20 / Baht 800 for the forms downloaded from the web or fixed at US$ 25 / Baht 1,000 for the forms requested by post.

Costs and Expenses Students in full-time attendance pay a registration fee of Baht 20,000 per semester and a tuition fee of Baht 14,000 per credit. The tuition fees are based on the following minimum credit requirements and number of semesters: Doctoral (84 credits /6 semesters), Master’s (48 credits / 4 semesters), Diploma (24 credits / 2 semesters), and Certificate (9 - 12 credits / 1 semester). All students are encouraged to reside on or near the Institute’s campus to benefit from the international environment for intellectual development and cross-cultural experience. The estimated living expense is Baht 15,000 per month. Postgraduate Study Costs (In fixed* Thai baht)

Doctoral Program Master’s Program Diploma Certificate Six Semesters Four Semesters Two Semesters One Semester (36 months) (22 months) (12 months) (5 months) THB (US$) THB (US$) THB (US$) THB (US$)

Registration fee 120,000 @Baht 20,000/semester Tuition fee @Baht 14,000/credit

Postgraduate

(3,750) 80,000 (2,500) 40,000 (1,250) 20,000 (625)

1,176,000 (36,750) 672,000 (21,000) 336,000 (10,500) 168,000 (5,250)

Subtotal 1,296,000 (40,500) 752,000 (23,500) 376,000 (11,750) 188,000 (5,875) Living/accommodation/ other 414,000 (12,938) 253,000 (7,907) 138,000 (4,313) 57,500 (1,797) @Baht 11,500/month** Total

1,710,000 (53,438) 1,005,000 (31,407) 514,000 (16,063) 245,500 (7,672)

*** For the Undergraduate Program costs, please visit www.ug.ait.asia

Notes: * Tuition and other fees are charged per semester in Thai baht. For convenience, students may also pay in U.S. dollars at a rate that is quoted one month in advance before the start of each semester and valid for the duration of that semester. The indicative US dollar figures are based on the exchange rate of 1 US $ = 32 Thai baht. Updates on applicable tuition fees in both currencies can be viewed at www.ait. asia/fees. ** Minimum estimate inclusive of other fees. With the rising inflation over the year, this is recomended to be Thai baht 15,000/month. Doctoral students should top up this estimate by about Thai baht. 1,000 per month for additional research and book expenses.

Financial Assistance AIT offers scholarships on a competitive basis to highly qualified graduate students with demonstrated financial need. Of the students admitted to AIT, about 20% get full scholarships, 30% get full tuition financial aid, and 40% receive financial aid that partly covers tuition costs. The full scholarships cover tuition fees, a monthly allowance and a standard accommodation on campus. 16

Normal Application Deadlines Intake

For applicants requesting AIT scholarships / fellowships *

Others **

August Semester

1 May

15 June

January Semester

15 October

15 November

* To ensure maximum consideration for financial assistance. ** To ensure sufficient time for visa processing and other formalities. For applicants who require an early offer of admission or those with visa or passport restrictions, applications must be received by AIT at least three months prior to these deadlines.


Please visit: http://www.ait.asia/admissions/rp

Eligibility Requirements An applicant must apply to only one of the academic programs leading to the degree of Master of Science, Master of Business Administration, Master in Agribusiness Management, Executive Master and Professional Master; Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Business Administration, Doctor in Agribusiness Management and Professional Doctorate. No applicant is admitted to more than one academic program at a time. AIT is an international institute with English as the sole language of instruction. AIT requires applicants to demonstrate basic proficiency in writing English before entry. The standard is a score of 4.5 on Academic Writing portion of the IELTS Test for entry to the master’s program, a score of 5.0 for entry to the Certification of Advanced Studies (CAS) program and 5.5 for entry to the doctoral program. The Language Center offers an in-house test of English proficiency which is called the AIT English Entry Test or AIT-EET. It is conducted daily on campus in Thailand and by appointment at the AIT Center in Vietnam. AIT also has agents in Yangon, Vientiane, Phnom Penh, Kabul and Bandung, who can arrange to conduct the test. AIT faculty and staff traveling throughout the region also conduct the test. It is scored on a scale similar to IELTS. For more information on the AIT-EET kindly visit the AIT Language Center website at: http://www.ait.ac.th/ education/LanguageCenter/English/prospective-students Interested test-takers can call at 662-524-6623 or send an email to languages@ait.ac.th AIT recognizes several English tests for admissions as listed in the table below. If you submit a score, then you are expected to score at least: (See Table Below).

English Exam

An official test score is valid only for 2 years. All applicants must submit a test score for admissions unless they are native English speakers or graduates of university degree programs conducted in an English-speaking country, in which case the following documents should be submitted

CERTIFICATE OF UNIVERSITY MEDIUM OF INSTRUCTION. This document certifies that you attained your previous degree from a university where the sole medium of instruction is English. The document should be attested and signed by the University Registrar. Note : Because some schools that use English as a medium of instruction do not meet AIT’s standards for English proficiency, the AIT Admissions Unit may not accept certain certificates and may require the applicant to submit a standardized test score instead.

• AIT

ENGLISH ENTRY TEST SCORE (AIT-EET). AIT-EET is administered by AIT Language Unit. For details, kindly visit the Language Center website at http://www.ait.ac.th/education/LanguageCenter/English/prospective-students Interested test-takers can call at 662-524-6623 or send an email to languages@ ait.ac.th

• EXEMPTION.

Applicants who are citizens of and have been educated in an English-speaking county, are exempted from this requirement. Proof of citizenship should be provided.

Detailed Eligibility Requirements for each Program

Master

CAS

Doctor

IELTS/ AIT-EET (AIT Test)

4.5

5.0

5.5

Doctoral Degree Program

TOEFL Paper-based Computer-based Internet-based

500 173 61

525 196 72

537 200 76

GRE (Analytical Writing Test)

4.2

4.5

5

CET 4 (China)

510

530

540

ARC (Lao PDR)

5.0

5.5

6.0

ICE TEFOW

120

140

160

CU-TEP (Thailand)

62

68

70

To be eligible for admission to the regular Doctoral degree program, an applicant must: Have strong academic records (both undergraduate and graduate) and normally hold a four-year bachelor’s degree, and a Master’s degree, preferably with a combination of course and thesis work, from an institution of good standing, acceptable to AIT. The minimum GPA requirement for admission to the doctoral program is 3.50 or equivalent at the master’s degree level.

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• • • • •

Submit a brief outline of dissertation research proposal including the required research facilities, if necessary. Receive a written confirmation that a faculty member at AIT is available and willing to supervise. For the professional Doctoral degree program, in addition to the above-mentioned eligibility requirements, an applicant must: Have at least 5 years of work experience in areas related to the field of study/program at AIT and Be at a level of senior professional/manager/administrator in organization/companies.

Certificate of Advanced Studies Program The Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) Program offered by AIT has the alternative objectives of qualifying for admission to the doctoral program for applicants with minimum CGPA at the master’s degree level of less than 3.50 or equivalent; or undertaking advanced studies combined with research. Other admission requirements are similar to those for the Doctoral Degree Program. Full-time CAS students completing the minimum course credit requirement and attaining a CGPA of at least 3.50 at the end of the second semester are eligible for transfer to the doctoral degree program. Students who are not eligible for transfer to the doctoral degree program are awarded with the Certificate of Advanced Studies. For applicants to the professional Doctoral degree program, initially admitted to the CAS Program, the same eligibility requirements for admission as mentioned in the Doctoral degree program apply.

Master’s Degree Program To be eligible for admission to the regular master’s program, an applicant must:

Hold a Bachelor degree (normally from a four-year program), or its equivalent, in an appropriate field of study from an institution of good standing acceptable to AIT. • Have undergraduate grades significantly above average; the minimum GPA requirement for admission to the master’s program is 2.75 or equivalent at the Bachelor degree level. • Be in satisfactory physical and mental health, and have a record of good conduct. For the Professional Master’s Degree program, in addition to the above-mentioned eligibility requirements, an applicant must:

Have at least 3 years of work experience in areas related to the field of study/program at AIT, and • Be executives in organizations/companies.

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Post Graduate Diploma Program The eligibility requirements for the Diploma program are the same as those entering the master’s degree program. Candidates with only average undergraduate grades may be admitted to the Diploma Program if they have at least two years of professional experience after completing their Bachelor’s degree.

Post Graduate Certificate Program Certificate students need to satisfy the eligibility requirements similar to those entering the master’s degree program and have the appropriate background to take selected courses. In exceptional cases, candidates who lack formal academic qualifications but who have extensive and appropriate professional experience may be considered for admission; the discretion in such cases rests with the School Deans.

Special Program Candidates coming to AIT for programs or courses of at least one semester are considered as Special students. Candidates under non-degree academic exchange agreements between AIT and their home universities are also enrolled at AIT as Special students.

Fellows of AIT Individuals whose qualifications are considered acceptable and who have requested to be attached to the Institute to do research are considered for an appointment as `Fellows of AIT’. A Fellow of AIT has the privilege to use Institute research facilities, the library and recreational facilities and may audit courses with the permission of the instructor. To apply, candidates must submit to the relevant School an AIT Application (Form 1), a copy of CV and a research study plan. Fellows of AIT are endorsed by the relevant School Deans and are formally invited to the Institute by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

A candidate, who has completed a doctoral degree from an institution recognized by AIT, is offered admission as a Post-Doctoral Fellow. • A candidate whose qualifications are equivalent to an AIT master’s degree student is considered for admission as a Research Fellow.

Bridging Program The Pre-Master’s Bridging Program provides an opportunity for AIT candidates from disadvantaged backgrounds to orient and prepare themselves in English and in key subject areas essential for their graduate study at AIT.


The Bridging Program enables students to:

abilities in key subject areas of computer skills, economics, mathematics and statistics.

(a) Strengthen their academic abilities for an AIT degree program; (b) Develop their potential to plan and carry out academic work on the bases of their own defined interests and meanings; (c) Develop their confidence and skills to undertake self-directed learning; and (d) Become more effective communicators in English.

The Language Center coordinates the conduct of Bridging Programs. Resource persons with expertise in various key subject areas work with students in a tutorial mode. Faculty members also contribute significantly to the students’ work. Degree, Diploma and Certificate program students may enroll in the Bridging program in the semester preceding entry to the master’s or doctoral program.

The intensive Bridging Program normally offers 16 weeks of collaboration and interaction in English around pieces of investigative research by students. The content of each program is shaped by the interests and needs of individual students, and their particular fields of study at AIT. Regular individual and small group tutorial sessions are arranged for students to improve their

Duration of Study Master Degree students normally study for 22 months this includes four semesters, two short breaks and one long break between semesters. Doctoral students normally study for six semesters or three years. The diploma programs are at least two semesters-long and the certificate program is one semester-long

Application Requirements and Procedures Applicants may apply online or download the application forms from the AIT website. 1. To apply for admission, applicants must complete and submit the following documents:

• • • • • • • • • •

Acknowledgment cards A & B Admission Action Form A completed AIT Application for Admission (Form 1) Two letters of recommendation from named referees (Form 2) Application for AIT Financial Aid (Form 3) only if applying for AIT financial aid Official attested Transcript(s) (Form 4) Copy of degree Certificate(s) in English Evidence of Proficiency in English Research Proposal (for doctoral program applicants only) Application Processing Fee - US$20 or Baht 800 (Application Forms downloaded from the web) OR - US$25 or Baht 1,000 (Application Forms received by post from AIT)

2. Application Processing Fee A nonrefundable application processing fee of US$20 (or Baht 800) for forms downloaded from the web or of

www.ait.asia/apply

US$25 (or Baht 1,000) for forms received by post, is required to process an application. The application fee may be paid by bank draft, valid credit card or cash and should be made payable to the “Asian Institute of Technology”. Please fill in the Application Processing Fee Payment Notification Form to prove payment. Payment by credit card should be done by showing the payer’s full name, credit card name and number, and card’s expiry date. Payment by cash should be made through a third party based in Thailand . 3. Applications for admission must be received by the normal closing date. If study seats are still available, late applications may be considered. 4. Applicants are requested to apply to the School of their choice and indicate, in order of preference, two fields of study. Each application will be processed according to the first field of study chosen. AIT, subject to its resources and the applicant’s qualifications, will endeavor to provide a program of study appropriate with the applicant’s needs and qualifications. 5. The Admissions and Scholarships Unit acknowledges all complete application by email. If an email address is not provided, applicants are acknowledged by mail through post.

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Administration of Admission The administration of admission is handled by the Admissions and Scholarships Unit. Warnings received regarding spurious records being submitted by candidates seeking admission have led to the practice by AIT of requesting confirmation from the academic institution(s) where the applicant received his/her degree(s) and/or when copies of transcripts/degree certificates have neither been attested nor mailed directly by the institution to AIT. After the closing date, complete applications, which must include an official attested academic transcript, are sent to the Schools for assessment. Once submitted, application materials are not released and cannot be returned to the applicant. While most students are admitted in August, certain fields of study admit students in January (see the Admissions Calendar). Doctoral students may enter either in January or August.

Schools within two weeks of the closing date of receiving applications.

4. Selection and Decision on Admission

1. Deadlines Applicants are responsible for ensuring that all required documents are submitted by the appropriate deadlines. Incomplete application may cause delays in processing. Deadlines that fall on a weekend or a holiday will default to the next working day. Applications for AIT financial assistance received after the admission deadline will be processed for the next intake.

2. Notification of Application Receipt and Status Applicants are notified of the receipt of their application and status by email. The email address must be provided in #2 of the application form (Form 1). If an email address is not provided, the applicant is notified by mail through post.

3. Interviews

• • •

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Applicants for admission from Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam are normally interviewed by AIT Faculty members. Whenever possible, interviews for applicants from other countries are also arranged by the respective School(s). Candidates who were pre-selected for possible admission are interviewed on a date and venue agreed upon by the School(s) concerned. The interview includes a written test prepared by the School as well as English language test (or using Institutional TOEFL). The applications of candidates from countries where no interviews are scheduled are forwarded to the

Normally, at least 16 weeks before enrollment, all applications, including those of interviewed candidates, are forwarded to the Schools for final selection. The selection results are reported to the Admissions and Scholarships Unit about 14 weeks before entry, via the AIT Admission Action Form. The decisions on and approval of offers of admission are made by the Schools. Applicants who require early offer of admission as a basis for seeking financial sponsorship from external non-AIT sources must indicate this when applying. In exceptional cases, an offer of admission without AIT financial assistance may be made immediately, but many decisions are deferred until interview results are available. Applicants who do not meet the minimum qualifications for admission are rejected. However, those applicants who need further English training and/or additional experiences are advised to reapply as soon as they gain additional merits. For applicants who applied for AIT Financial Assistance, the offers of admission with AIT scholarship are issued based on a competitive ranking of qualified candidates selected by the Schools on the basis of academic qualification, professional background, scholarships availability and conditions set by AIT’s donor-partners. The Vice President for Academic Affairs may also approve offers of admission for applicants with special qualifications upon the recommendation of School Deans.

5. Admissions Committee The Admissions Committee (AC) meets on a regular basis to deliberate on admission requirements & procedures, academic fees & pricing policies, student selection and the availability of scholarships, fellowships and assistantships. The committee is comprised of the Vice President for Academic Affairs (Chair), School Deans, Head of Student Office, Head of Finance, Director of Language Center, ITServ Coordinator, Student Union President and Admissions & Scholarships Unit Coordinator. The schedule of the AC meeting is in the academic calendar of AIT but special meetings are called to discuss vital admissions and application issues.


www.ait.asia/apply

6. Notification and Confirmation of Admission For qualified applicants:

Notification of the offer of admission is done by email, normally not later than two months before the proposed date of enrollment, provided the application was received at the proper time and provided that email address is given by the applicant. If no e-mail address is provided, notification is sent through post. The FINAL CONFIRMATION OF ADMISSION IS SENT BY POST MAIL ONLY. The offer of admission may be unconditional or it may specify conditions which must be satisfied before the offer can be confirmed. In such cases, it is the candidate’s responsibility to provide promptly the evidence required to show that the conditions of the offer have been fulfilled. An offer of admission is valid only if the recipient can begin his/her academic program on the enrollment date stated in the offer. Enrollment after the first day of semester and up to the final day for adding and dropping courses (last working day of the second week of semester) is permitted only in special circumstances. Upon receipt of an offer of admission, candidates from outside Thailand must immediately apply for the necessary clearances and travel authorization. No candidate is permitted to enroll without the confirmation of admission, which consists of a Certificate of Admission and ED Visa Letter (for non-Thai nationals). These documents will only be issued after a candidate has written to accept the offer of admission and has satisfied all conditions attached to the offer. The ED visa letter is required to be presented to the Royal Thai Government (RTG) Embassy or Consulate for approval stamp in passport for travel and study in Thailand. Incoming students from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Mongolia, Pakistan, PR China, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and some African countries have visa restrictions and in place of the ED visa letter, AIT requests the RTG Ministry of Foreign Affairs for approval which takes about 3 weeks; authorization is directly conveyed from the RTG Foreign Ministry to the RTG Embassy or Consulate via diplomatic channel.

7. Medical Certificate A successful applicant must submit a duly completed Certificate of Physical and Mental Fitness from a qualified physician written in English. The medical certificate must include a chest x-ray examination. Any medical handicap as well as all previous serious illnesses or operations must be indicated in the Medical Certificate. It is particularly important that the Institute is informed if such handicap could affect the study at AIT. Those who have made false statements or who have concealed medical information of any kind are liable for payment of related medical expenses.

8. False Statements Anyone who, knowingly or otherwise, makes false statements or presents false evidence of any kind at the time of application, at registration, or at any other time after enrollment are dismissed from the Institute.

9. Arrival on Campus

• •

Candidates who have been issued a Certificate of Admissions receive letters of welcome and details of the orientation seminar and registration schedule. All new candidates are required to arrive at AIT on the Orientation Day. Exceptionally, late arrival may be permitted by the School Dean if a candidate provides a good reason in writing but arrival must be on or before the last day of adding /dropping; that is by the last working day of the second week of the semester.

10. Re-application

• Applicants

• •

seeking re-application must inform the Admissions and Scholarships Unit of their continuing interest, by e-mail or by returning the Confirmation on Reapplication Form. Those who wish to reapply within two years after the first application was received do not need to submit a new set of Application Forms. After two years a new set of Application Forms & supporting documents are required. For each re-application an applicant is required to pay the application processing fee of US$ 20 or Baht 800. Students who have previously been dismissed from the Institute shall normally not be admitted to a degree program at the same level.

21


Applying to AIT for Undergraduate Education

www.ait.asia/apply

Admission Requirements Requirements Applicants to the undergraduate program must have successfully graduated from high school after completing 12 years of education or equivalent, or expect to do so before the start of the first semester. Continuation of study is conditional upon proof of high school graduation prior to the end of the first semester of study. Subjects taken in the final year of high school should include calculus, physics, and chemistry.

Eligibility Admission to the undergraduate program is competitive and limited by the number of seats available and AIT’s commitment to maintain a diversity of nationalities amongst the student population. Eligibility is based on the student’s performance in high school, the student’s performance on standardized exams, and the student’s English language skill. Students should submit the following: 1. High school transcripts. An official transcript including all grades from at least the last two years of high school must be submitted. 2. Standardized examination results. An official copy of the results of a standardized college preparatory examination must be submitted. The following are acceptable: 1. National college entrance examination for the applicant’s home country. The examination must be conducted in English. 2. Results of a centralized national high-school exit examination. The examination must be conducted in English. 3. ACT, IB, GCSE “A” Level, 6th form or 7th form, NCEA. 4. SAT I and II. SAT II scores for three subjects: Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. 5. AIT Entrance Examination. 3. Evidence of English language proficiency. Students should achieve an IELTS score of 5.5, a paper-based TOEFL score of 537, a computer-based TOEFL score of 200, an Internet-based TOEFL score of 76, a CET 4 score of 540, an ICE TEFOW score of 160, or a CU-TEP score of 70. Applicants able to visit AIT can visit the AIT Language Center and take the AIT English Entrance Test (AIT-EET) in lieu of a standardized test. At the discretion of the admissions committee, applicants may be asked to appear for a personal interview in a major city in their home country, and they may be asked to take the AIT Entrance Exam prior to admissions. Transfer from another accredited university is possible. Applicants should submit all transcripts from previous universities along with their application. See http://www.ug.ait.asia or write admissionug@ait.asia for further information or clarification of eligibility requirements for applicants from specific countries.

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Financial Assistance: AIT Undergraduate Fellowships Based on the academic performance of students during the course of study, partial fellowships will be awarded to a select number of students. At the end of the each year of study, the recipients are selected for fellowships for the next year.

Fees and Expenses All students are encouraged to reside on the AIT campus to benefit from the international environment for intellectual development and personal growth. Beyond tuition and registration fees, the total estimated cost of living at AIT is 130,000 Thai baht per year.

Academic Calendar

Expense Type

Cost (Thai baht)

Cost (US dollars)*

Semester

AIT

Tuition Fees

216,000 / year

7,000 / year

Semester I

September–December

Registration Fees

7,200 / semester

240 / semester

Semester II

January–May

Living Expenses

130,000 / year

4,300 / year

Summer

June–August

* Payments are billed in Thai baht; US dollar costs are estimates subject to fluctuation due to exchange rates.

Admission Procedures Applications for admission are accepted on an ongoing basis. AIT seeks applicants who show demonstrated commitment to and enthusiasm for intellectual growth. Application materials are available at http://www.ug.ait.asia and on the enclosed CD.

For more information

Visit http://www.ug.ait.asia or contact Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs School of Engineering and Technology Asian Institute of Technology P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, THAILAND Phone: +66 2 524 5210, 5333 Fax: +66 2 524 5333 email: admissionug@ait.asia

Visa Arrangements for Thailand Visa arrangements are facilitated by the Government Relations Unit (GRU) for all non-Thai students. Applications for educational visas must be submitted to the Thai embassy in the students’ home countries (in most cases, applicants visiting Thailand on a tourist visa must return to their home countries to change visa status). On admission, GRU will send supporting documentation to the Thai embassy in students’ home countries.

Medical Insurance AIT arranges a standard insurance plan that covers the majority of costs for hospitalization, outpatient treatment, dental care, and personal accident. The estimated cost is 2,599 Thai baht or approximately 75 USD per year. On-campus medical services are provided by health professionals and medical staff on a 24-hour basis.

23


School of Engineering & Technology Civil & Infrastructure Engineering Group

Construction, Engineering & Infrastructure Management

31

Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering

35

Structural Engineering

41

26

Transportation Engineering

Water Engineering and Management

44

46

Industrial Systems Engineering Group

Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

52

Mechatronics

55

Microelectronics and Embedded Systems

57

49

Nanotechnology

61

Information & Communications Group

Computer Science

66

Information Management

71

63

Remote Sensing Telecommunications and Geographic Information Systems

73

78

Interdisciplinary Programs

Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation & Management

24

84

Geosystem Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering

89

80

Information & Communications Technologies

Offshore Technology & Management

95

96


Typical Study Plan A master’s degree is completed in less than two years while a doctoral degree is, on the average, completed in three years.

Master’s Student During the first two semesters, master’s students are expected to complete the coursework requirement. They need to enroll for required courses during the first semester. Students who need preparation in English and computer skills may enroll in the bridging program during the May/June inter-semester period, prior to the August (first) semester. In summary, a master’s student follows the following: Duration

4 semesters and 1 Inter-Semester Period (21.4 months)

Entry Semester

August (typically) or May/June (for Bridging Student)

Total Credits Required

48 credits (720 contact hours)

Thesis Option

26 coursework credits + 22 thesis credits

Research Study Option

38 coursework credits + 10 research credits

Doctoral student Doctoral students are required to take a minimum of 84 credits that comprise 24 credits of coursework including a maximum of 6 credits of special study and 60 credits of dissertation. The composition of courses taken by a doctoral student requires the consent of his/her dissertation advisor. In summary, a doctoral candidate follows: Duration

6 semesters and 3 Inter-Semester Periods

Entry Semester

January or August

Total Credits Required

84 credits = 24 coursework credits + 60 research credits

25


CIVIL AND INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING GROUP Since the founding of AIT, its civil engineering fields have promoted modern methodologies, emerging technologies and innovative materials for the design and construction of safe and economical infrastructure in the region

Construction, Engineering and Infrastructure Management (CEIM) The Construction, Engineering and Infrastructure Management (CEIM) field of study prepares students to become effective managers and decision-makers familiar with the modern techniques of construction management, engineering management and infrastructure management. It trains professionals to play a leading role in the international construction industry. It molds students to become active leaders in the infrastructure development and management.

Areas of Specialization Students may choose to either specialize in Construction Engineering and Management (CEM) or Infrastructure Management (IM). Construction Engineering and Management covers advanced project management approaches to finance, plan, design, construct, monitor and control construction projects. This master’s degree program emphasizes in-depth construction project management approaches such as project organization management, construction planning and control, project procurement, contract management, productivity analysis and improvement, quality and safety improvement, IT in project management, sustainable construction, project financing, Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) for infrastructure management, international construction joint ventures and construction business strategy. Infrastructure Management focuses on the processes necessary for the planning and development of new infrastructure, and on maintaining and operating mature infrastructure for sustainability. A wide variety of management topics are covered, such as infrastructure planning, infrastructure economics, infrastructure management systems, optimal maintenance management, reliability of infrastructure systems, asset valuation and utilization, and infrastructure planning under risk and uncertainty. Professional Master’s in Project Management (with specialization in Construction Project) The aim of this MPM program is to provide applied and advanced project management knowledge to professionals working in large-scale construction projects. The program is designed for a one-year study period. Selected students are construction industry professionals with at least 3 years experience.

26


Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in civil engineering, environmental engineering are preferred. Degrees in other fields of engineering, urban and regional planning, architecture, and quantity surveying are also considered.

Doctoral Program: Master degree in Construction Engineering and Management, Infrastructure Management or in any other field of civil engineering. Candidates with significant research or professional experience are highly preferred.

Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering (GTE) Being one of the oldest fields of study of AIT the GTE field of study has always adapted with the new demands of civil and energy infrastructure development markets, while preserving its well-known identity. Beside the classic areas of foundation engineering, earth structures, underground excavations, land subsidence, and landslide mitigations, analytical and numerical methods in geotechnical engineering, geotechnical engineers and researchers are increasingly involved in new and dynamic areas of ground improvement, geosynthetic engineering, land reclamation, lightweight and green geo-materials, forensic engineering, geohazards investigation and mitigation, geoenvironmental engineering and georisk management. To meet the new demands in exploration of new energy and natural resources the GTE field has developed new courses for the upstream sector of oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) such as exploration geophysics, petrophysics, well logging interpretaytion, drilling and well completion technology, petroleum reservoir engineering, production technology, geochemistry, and numerical modeling/analysis. Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering field offers three (3) areas of specialization: • Soil Engineering; • Engineering and Applied Geology; • Geoenvironmental Engineering;. Other than these specializations, the field also provides an interdisciplinary area of study on Geosystem Exploration and Petroleum Geoengineering (GEPG) and the following professional master programs in Vietnam: • Professional master in Geotechnical Engineering & Management (PME-GEM) • Professional master in Geoexploration & Petroleum Geoengineering (PMEGEPG) http://www.set.ait.asia/gte/

27


Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering, Geology, Geotechnical Engineering, Mining, Geophysics, Petroleum Engineering, Mechanical Engineering; other disciplines are considered on a case-to-case basis.

Doctoral Program: Master degree in Engineering Geology, Geotechnical Engineering, Geoenvironmental Engineering, Geophysics, Petroleum Engineering, and Mining.

Structural Engineering (SE) Structural engineering has always been seen as one of the few professions where one can combine real technical skills with artistic flair. Structural engineers are known to be people who enjoy innovation, opportunities, responsibility and excitement, whilst working within a creative profession. Structural engineers plan and design various structures such as buildings, bridges, dams, sport stadiums, towers, and underground structures. As they create the built environment, they have an enormous impact on our everyday lives. In order to design and construct safe and economic structures, they need to keep abreast with the latest methods of structural analysis, modeling concepts for computation, advanced design, material technology, and improved knowledge in structural loadings. The field educates professionals who will be at the forefront of advanced research in Structural Engineering. They are trained to respond creatively to the industrial requirements of infrastructure development.

Areas of Specialization Structural Engineering field of study offers two major areas of specialization, (a) Advance Structural Analysis, Computational Mechanics, and (b) Structural Design, Structural Engineering Materials. Subjected to variety of complex loading scenarios, the safe and economic buildings must be designed by structural engineers who have thorough knowledge in both areas of specialization. Thanks to the advance and affordability of computer technology along with comprehensive knowledge in structural and material behavior, structural engineers in the present can model, analyze, and design complex structures with more accuracy, safer for residents, and less expensive. Referring to the area of structural analysis and computational mechanics, the focus is on the analysis of complex structures, nonlinearities, finite element analysis, engineering mechanics, structural dynamic and vibration, wind and earthquake engineering. In the area of structural design and engineering materials, the major aim is on the understanding of material behaviors, leading to safe and economic design of structural member. The exploration for new structural engineering materials under the awareness of production cost, friendliness to ecosystem, and sustainable development. Researches in this area include low – cost construction materials, concrete technology, reinforced

28


and prestressed concrete structures, steel structures, earthquake and wind – resistance design, building and bridge engineering, and fire protection technology.

Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering; mechanical engineering and architectural engineering will be considered on a case-to-case basis.

Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in Structural Engineering.

Transportation Engineering (TRE) The Transportation Engineering field exposes students to the process of alleviating transportation problems. The coursework and research in the area provide advanced knowledge in transportation planning and economics, traffic engineering, and the design of highways/pavements and other transportation facilities. Transportation Engineering students acquire advanced skills concerning the planning, design, operations, maintenance, rehabilitation, performance, and evaluation of transportation systems, including their economic and public policy aspects. The field imbibes in each student the development of analytic, problem-solving, design, and management skills suitable for public and private sector professional work.

Areas of Specialization Transportation Engineering offers two areas of specialization, (a) Planning and Engineering and (b) Highways and Pavements. Depending upon individual choice and interests, students may freely select courses such that they receive training either in Planning & Engineering or Highways & Pavements. Under Planning & Engineering, students are trained on planning and logistics as well as traffic and safety. Among other topics, they are immersed to issues relating to transportation systems, urban/regional transportation analysis and planning methods, airport planning & design, and traffic engineering. Students gearing for a specialization in Highways & Pavements take courses in design and operation as well as in management systems and maintenance. They are skilled in geometric design and highway safety, design/performance of highways and airport pavement as well as pavement management systems.

Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering; other engineering fields (e.g. urban and regional planning and systems engineering) are also considered.

29


Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in Transportation Engineering and other related engineering fields.

Water Engineering and Management (WEM) The Water Engineering and Management field imparts education and training toward an understanding of the complexity of water use and water resources management problems. It offers a balanced curriculum, which covers both the engineering and management aspects of water resource development. Students are trained to acquire knowledge and hands-on practice in tools and techniques to come up with viable and sustainable solutions within the framework of the integrated water resources management at the river basin scale. Water Engineering and Management covers five major areas: Agricultural Water; Coastal Water; Urban Water; Water Resources; and Extreme Events and Risk Management. The courses are designed in such a way that students can specialize according to their interests. Courses on watershed hydrology, hydrodynamics, water resources systems, and concepts in water modeling provide the solid foundation to the advanced courses. The field emphasizes on tools and techniques in resource planning and management in addition to laboratory and field practices.

Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in Civil or Agricultural Engineering; other relevant engineering fields and applied sciences are considered on case-to-case basis. Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in fields related to Water Engineering and Management.

30


Program

(CEIM)

Field of Study — Construction, Engineering & Infrastructure Management Code

Course

Description

CE70.11

Project Cost and Financial Management

Cost is a very important factor in project management. This course impacts the skills needed to estimate, plan and control project costs on large infrastructure projects. The course is designed in three self-contained modules corresponding to different requirements in the infrastructure cost management process. Upon completion of this course, students are able to develop project feasibility study, to estimate project cost and to manage the financial and cost issues of construction projects.

August

None

CE70.12

Organizational Management in Construction

This course explores the organizational management concepts applied in managing a construction firm and project. The course is divided into three modules: (i) Strategic Planning in Construction Firms, (ii) Organizational Management in construction Projects and (iii) Team and Leadership Development. Upon completion of this course, students will have the knowledge to analyze and solve problems related with organizational management issues in construction firms and projects.

August

None

CE70.13

Research Methodology in the Built Environment

This course will provide state-of-the-art knowledge about advanced research in construction engineering and management. It will also provide needed knowledge and skills for construction students to conduct their master or/and doctoral thesis.

August

None

CE70.14

Quality Management in Construction

This course explores the effective knowledge and practice in managing construction project quality. The course is divided into three modules: (i) Quality Management System, (ii) Total Quality Management in Construction Industry and (iii) Project Quality Material Management. The first module explains the concept and application of quality management system in construction industry. The second module covers material management which contributes 6080% of the total project cost. Success in managing quality of materials is significant for the overall quality of the project. The third module covers the model of implementing Total Quality Management developed by the Construction Industry Institute, USA. Upon completion of three modules, students will be able to manage quality performance in construction projects.

January

None

CE70.21

Integrated Project Planning and Control

Project planning management is considered as a critical project success factor. Organizations introducing new strategic initiatives require effective project planning management. This course explains theories and practices of the planning and scheduling techniques applicable to the construction industry and introduces advanced planning tools.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

31


Program

(CEIM)

Field of Study — Construction, Engineering & Infrastructure Management

32

Code

Course

Description

CE70.22

Legal and Contractual Risk Management

This course provides a general foundation in construction law, risk and contracts that construction practitioners need to protect themselves, their employers and the works. To facilitate smooth running of construction projects, construction professionals need to be aware of their rights, obligations and liabilities when they enter into contractual relations either as individuals or on behalf of their employers. Upon completion of this course, the students will have the knowledge to develop a sound and effective contract as well as manage the contract.

January

None

CE70.23

Project Performance Management

The efficient use of construction resources is essential to effective project management. This course provides knowledge of the modern techniques used for assessing the level of productivity, forecasting optimum levels of productivity and deciding how to reach productivity goals through strategic management actions.

January

None

CE70.33

Occupational Safety and Health Management in Construction Projects

Large construction projects, such as oil and gas construction project and power-plant project, involved expensive equipments and international stakeholders. For this kinds of projects, safety and health in the project site are of paramount important since failure in work safely may cause unexpected high cost of accidents. This course explores advanced management approach and techniques in managing occupational safety and health in large construction projects. The course is divided into three modules: (i) Safety and Health in Construction, (ii) OSH Management System and (iii) Total Project Safety Culture. Upon completion of the course, students will have the knowledge to manage construction site safety and health, and developing total project safety culture.

August

None

CE70.41

Infrastructure System Analysis and Management

This course focuses on the essential elements of infrastructure maintenance planning and management

January

None

CE70.42

Reliability of Infrastructure Systems

To enhance the capability of managers and policy-makers, this course explores concepts and methods of structural reliability and formulates procedures for ensuring adequate safety and performance of infrastructure components and systems.

January

None

CE70.43

Project Financing

Financing project is vital for development of any organizations. This course provides advanced knowledge and experience in the formulation of project financing. The focuses are on structuring of Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) to raise funds to finance capital investment project and to design the interactions of project participants for effective financial operations. Upon completion of this course, students will have the knowledge to develop effective methods for project financing and managing the risks associated.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(CEIM)

Field of Study — Construction, Engineering & Infrastructure Management Code

Course

Description

CE70.44

Communication and Negotiation Skills for Project Managers

Project manager must have the skills to communicate effectively and negotiate with the project team, project client, supplier and subcontractors. This course will train the students to be able to understand how to effectively communicate with others, and how to make an effective presentation to present important messages, such as project proposal and progress, to the customers. In addition, important concepts of negotiation, such as value exchange, zone of possible agreement, Best Alternative to NoAgreement (BATNA), and their applications to construction industry are discussed.

August

None

CE70.9004

Applied Project Management in Housing and Real Estate Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in housing projects. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in housing project development.

August

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

CE70.9005

Applied Project Management in Power-Plant Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in power-plant projects. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in power-plant project development.

InterSem

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

CE70.9006

Applied Project Management in Oil Refinery Construction Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in industrial complex construction projects. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in oil refinery construction project development.

InterSem

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

CE70.9007

Applied Project Management in Industrial Complex Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in industrial complex construction projects. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in industrial complex project development.

InterSem

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

CE70.9008

Applied Project Management in Oil/Gas Pipeline Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in oil/gas pipeline construction projects.

InterSem

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

33


Program

(CEIM)

Field of Study — Construction, Engineering & Infrastructure Management

34

Code

Course

Description

CE70.9009

Applied Project Management in High Rise Building Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in high rise building construction projects. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in high rise building construction project development.

InterSem

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

CE70.9010

Construction Business and Project Simulation

The purpose of this module is to develop students skills in managing construction project management and construction business. Students will use a construction business and project simulation software to apply the management and project management knowledge that has been learned in the previous courses.

InterSem

With Consent from the instructor

CE70.9011

Applied Project Management in Commercial Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in commercial construction projects such as hotel, apartment and office building. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in commercial project development.

January

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

CE70.9012

Applied Project Management in Petrochemical Projects

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in petrochemical construction project. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in petrochemical project development.

January

Organizational management in construction, integrated project planning and scheduling and with consents from the instructors.

CE70.9013

Applied Project Management in Highway

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in highway. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in Highway project development

InterSem

None

CE70.9014

Applied Project Management in Public Infrastructure

The purpose of this module is to provide a real case study on the application of project management in Public Infrastructure project. Case analysis and discussion will be presented in terms of how the concepts of project management are applied in public infrastructure project development

InterSem

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering (GTE) Code

Course

Description

CE71.12

Rock Mechanics

Rock mechanics is a principal subject in geological and geotechnical engineering. It plays a vital role in the exploration and production of oil and other natural resources; mining, construction of civil infrastructures, transportation routes, and water resource facilities, hydropower projects; and in the prevention and mitigation of natural hazards particularly landslides. Knowledge on rock mechanics is essential for infrastructure development projects of all countries where there are existence of mountainous terrains.

August

None

CE71.13

Advanced Soil Mechanics and Testings

The soil-engineering field of study involves three categories. The first one deals with the fundamental and advanced principles of the mechanics of soil behavior both under laboratory and field conditions. The second, deals with applied topics such as foundations and earth structures, excavations and soil improvement.This course deals with the fundamental and advanced principles of soil behavior as a prerequisite for applied courses related to the design of foundations, earth structures, excavations and soil improvement. This course also provides fundamentals and advanced laboratory and field testing of soils.

August

None

CE71.24

Geo environmental Engineering

Geotechnical engineers are increasingly challenged to solve environmental problems related to the reduction of construction waste, waste disposal facilities and cleanup of contaminated sites. This effort has given rise to a new discipline of specialists in the field of geo environmental engineering. To be effective, geo environmental engineers must be armed not only with the traditional knowledge of geotechnical engineering, but also with the knowledge of principles of environmental engineering. This course provides basic principles and phenomena in geo environmental engineering, and some application of landfill design.

August

None

CE71.31

Engineering Geology

To provide a balanced and comprehensive understanding of the methods and approaches that is useful in dealing with the great variety of geologic conditions encountered in engineering works.

August

None

CE71.41

Analytical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering

Geotechnical engineers are increasingly challenged to solve geotechnical problems using analytical solutions, numerical methods, and experimental methods. This course provides sound fundamental knowledge of solid mechanics and geo mechanics, and introduces effective analytical solutions for practical problems.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

35


Program Field of Study — Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering (GTE)

36

Code

Course

Description

CE71.42

Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering

Numerical methods have been widely used for analysis and design in Geotechnical Engineering. This lecture provides the theoretical framework of finite element method through computation, derivation, computer programming of basic problems, and the application of the method to practical geotechnical engineering problems.

January

CE71.41

CE71.51

Foundation Engineering and Design

Foundation Engineering is an important component of education and training of Civil Engineers. All superstructures are to be supported on well-designed foundations for their safety and subsequent performance. The course imparts the principles of foundation analysis and design. It also includes judgement in foundation engineering practice and forensic geotechnical engineering.

January

CE71.11 Advanced Soil Mechanics and Testing

CE71.53

Underground Excavation and Tunneling

Rapid urbanization and the development of infrastructures in the Asian region, coupled with the increase in people’s environmental awareness have given a great impetus to the demand for underground space utilization and tunneling activities in the region, in line with the global trend in sustainable development of infrastructures.

January

CE71.12

CE71.55

Geosynthetic Engineering and Design

The term geosynthetics come from geo which refers to earth and synthetic which means man-made products. The materials used in the manufacture of geosynthetics are almost entirely from polymers, although fiberglass, rubber and natural materials are also used. Currently, geosynthetic materials have emerged as widely used engineered materials in civil engineering community. These products are cost-effective, widely available and actively marketed. It is, therefore, imperative to study its fundamental properties and their measurements in laboratory tests as well as their design and applications in civil engineering infrastructures.

January

CE71.11 (Advanced Soil Mechanics and Testing) or Consent of Instructor.

CE71.56

Ground Improvement Techniques

As more engineering structures are built, it becomes increasingly difficult to find a site with suitable soil properties. The properties at many sites must be improved by the use of some form of soil improvement methods, such as: static or dynamic compaction, reinforcement, drainage or by the use of admixtures. Thus, it is important for the soil engineers to know the different soil improvement methods; the degree to which soil properties may be improved; and the costs and benefits involved. In this way, the soil engineer can gain knowledge in order to design ground improvement projects as well as to advise the client regarding value engineering to save cost and obtain maximum benefits for the specific project.

January

CE71.11 Advanced Soil Mechanics and Testing

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering (GTE) Code

Course

Description

CE71.57

Risk and Reliability Analysis of Geotechnical Infrastructures

Risk analysis and reliability-based design in geotechnical infrastructure plays a vital role in the safe and economical construction of infrastructural facilities. This course synthesizes the background knowledge on probabilistic techniques, risk analysis and reliability as well as emphasizes application to actual design of slopes, embankments, dams, foundations, tunnels and excavations considering uncertainty in design parameters and models. Risk-based decision making and life cycle cost analysis are also included as important components of this course. Field and laboratory test data are interpreted considering the associated risks to help the selection of design parameters, which strongly influence geotechnical design. In this course, the students solve real world problems in geotechnical infrastructure projects.

August

None

CE71.61

Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

Geotechnical engineers are increasingly challenged to solve the geotechnical problems under dynamic and seismic loading conditions. This course provides fundamental knowledge of soil dynamics, and practical application of soil dynamics and geotechnical earthquake engineering.

January

None

CE71.63

Workflow in Oil and Gas Operations

This course aims to give a better understanding of the practical side of the oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations to the students. The course will be a combination of lectures, seminars and field visits to oil and gas companies in the SE Asian countries in order to witness the actual operations. The lectures will consist of different sessions, each of which will take between 2 to 4 weeks, covering petroleum geology and geophysics (G&G), petro physics, drilling, reservoir management and production technology. The teaching of the course is largely carried out by the invited industrial experts from major companies.

January

None

CE71.65

Exploration Geophysics

To provide a comprehensive and advanced knowledge on geophysical exploration techniques, their applications and limitations in solving various geological, hydro geological, geotechnical, and environmental problems, with an emphasis on mineral and hydrocarbon exploration.

January

None

CE71.66

Petroleum Reservoir Engineering

This course provides fundamental knowledge of properties and behaviors of petroleum reservoir and hydrocarbons in the reservoir.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

37


Program Field of Study — Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering (GTE)

38

Code

Course

Description

CE71.68

Well Logging Interpretation

The course provides both basic and advanced knowledge on well logging and formation evaluation, including Quick look Log, Full and Advanced Interpretation and softcomputing analysis. The course also deals with new types of logging such as FMI and NMR as well as the special types of formation such fractured basement. The course is designed in such a way that the staffs from oil and gas company, who need to update the knowledge on well logging and formation evaluation techniques to work in a subsurface team, can attend it as training course in relatively short period.

InterSem

CE71.70 or as allowed by the instructor.

CE71.69

Fundamentals of Geo system Exploration

To provide a fundamental understanding on geological and geophysical techniques to explore a geo system or a part of its that need to be sustainably exploited or developed for economic and industrial growth of society, especially those are potential of mineral, groundwater and petroleum resources. The course is particularly useful for engineers who would like to further specialize in hydrocarbon exploration and production.

August

None

CE71.70

Petrophysics

Petrophysics is one of the key courses for integrated and advanced studies in geophysical and reservoir engineering. The course is designed for geoscientists and reservoir engineers in demand throughout the petroleum industry, especially for those who work in an integrated asset teams. The aim of the course is to provide with the tools and techniques to fully characterize a geosystem in term of physical properties, in particular for a petroleum reservoir.

January

None

CE71.71

Drilling & Well Completion Operation

With the increasing demand and consumption for both oil and natural gas, most of all oil & gas companies accelerate their exploration and production activities in an effort to maintain the production output. Drilling has been one of the forefront core operations. The main objective of this course is to outline the core subjects in drilling and well completion operations to help understand better the well design, risk assessment, cost involved and environmental impact. Some local case studies and experiences with advanced drilling technology will be presented. An important part of the course is on petroleumrelated rock mechanics to provide the students with a needed background regarding drilling stability and conduction of acoustic logging.

August

None

CE71.72

Petroleum Production Engineering

This course provides knowledge of petroleum production system with the main focus on subsurface production (from the reservoir up to the wellhead).

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering (GTE) Code

Course

Description

CE71.9001

Selected Topic: Decision Analysis and Risk Management for O&G Industry

This is a customized course for the PME-GEPG program in HCM City. The international oil and gas industry is one of the most important, highly capital-intensive and risky industries at global, regional, and local levels. Therefore, it is very crucial to carry out prudent economic evaluations of any capital investment’s commitment before resources are committed. This requires a through understanding of the techniques available and their application by all those involved in decision-making. Furthermore, Joint venture is now becoming the primary form of business organization in the oil and gas industry. Professionals need to know the risks involved in such business organizations, how to properly manage the risks.

August

None

CE71.9004

Selected Topic: Petroleum Geochemistry

Petroleum geochemistry evolved rapidly in the period 1970-2000 and is now a mature dis-cipline widely used in many aspects of petroleum exploration. If one thinks of the petroleum system, petroleum geochemistry plays a role in characterizing the source rocks, evaluating thermal history of the source rocks and whether they have matured enough to generate oil or gas, monitoring migration pathways and playing a significant role in reservoir characterization.

January

None

CE71.9005

Selected Topic: Practical Soil Engineering

The soil-engineering field of study involves three categories. The first category deals with the principles and mechanics of soil behavior both under laboratory and field conditions. The second deals with applied topics such as foundations and earth structures, while the third category is more advanced in nature and research oriented. This course on “Mechanics of Soils”, which belongs to the first category, deals with the fundamental principles of soil behavior as a prerequisite for courses related to the design of foundations and earth structures.

August

None

CE71.9007

Selected Topic: Instrumentation and Advanced Soil Testing

The objective of this course is to acquaint students with geotechnical instrumentation and advanced geotechnical testing equipment and test procedures. Current geotechnical investigation practice in Asia has primarily focused on conventional soil testing which may not be adequate and appropriate for designing sophisticated geotechnical structures. State-of-the-art geotechnical testing equipment, in both field and laboratory, are available in the market, but adaptation of these equipment by the practitioners is rather slow, probably due to the lack of awareness, unfamiliarity with the new equipment. These new testing equipment are designed to improve sampling quality and to determine other essential soil properties which are required in designing special geotechnical structures.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

39


Program Field of Study — Geotechnical and Earth Resources Engineering (GTE)

40

Code

Course

Description

CE71.9012

Selected Topic: Geotechnical Investigation and Exploration

In planning, designing, construction, and maintenance/management stages, characteristics of the ground condition is one of the most important geotechnical issues. There are many techniques to investigate/explore the soil stratigraphy and depth profile of soil parameters to meet the required quality and quantity in engineering sense. This course provides the students and practical engineers with the updated and advanced techniques of in-situ geotechnical investigation of soft clay ground. In addition, shallow exploration geophysics as a powerful tool to add the soil investigation will be taught to equip the student with the latest development in geo exploration technology.

January

None

CE71.9013

Selected Topic: Risk Management for Infrastructure Development and Planning

The concepts of the risk and uncertainly are familiar to geotechnical engineers. Since predictions are not perfect there is always the possibility of failure or unsatisfactory performance. The first part of the course introduces the bases of the risk and the risk assessment using R language. The other part of the course, Infrastructure asset management, provides a framework for handling both short and long - range planning by combining engineering principles with sound business practices and economic theory. Therefore, it is inevitable for engineers who are involved in infrastructure asset management to obtain knowledge associated with socio-economic theory.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Structural Engineering (STE) Code

Course

Description

CE72.11

Computer Methods of Structural Analysis

This course offers fundamental principles of modern structural analysis as a common platform for all applications in structural engineering. The course aims to equip structural engineers with methodologies in line with the fast development of computing technology.

August

None

CE72.21

Structural Dynamics

As modern structures are becoming more slender and light, they are also becoming more susceptible to dynamic loadings. Examples of reallife dynamic problems that frequently confront civil engineers include: aerodynamic stability of long-span bridges, earthquake response of multi-story buildings, impact of moving vehicles on highway structures, etc. The traditional engineering solutions to these problems, based on “static force” and “static response”, are no longer valid in most cases. Many of these problems have to be tackled by applying knowledge of structural dynamics. Thus, a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior of structures as well as the underlying principles is essential for structural engineers.

August

None

CE72.21

Structural Dynamics

As modern structures are becoming more slender and light, they are also becoming more susceptible to dynamic loadings. Examples of real-life dynamic problems that frequently confront civil engineers include: aerodynamic stability of long-span bridges, earthquake response of multi-story buildings, impact of moving vehicles on highway structures, etc. The traditional engineering solutions to these problems, based on “static force” and “static response”, are no longer valid in most cases. Many of these problems have to be tackled by applying knowledge of structural dynamics. Thus, a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior of structures as well as the underlying principles is essential for structural engineers.

August

None

CE72.31

Continuum Mechanics

This course advances students from the onedimensional and linear problems conventionally treated in Strength of Materials courses into more general, three-dimensional problems. Indicial notation is introduced and used to describe the motion of a continuous body; various stress measures, and the fundamental concepts of constitutive modeling, linear elastic fracture mechanics, and one-dimensional, nonlinear constitutive models.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

41


Program Field of Study — Structural Engineering (STE)

42

Code

Course

Description

CE72.41

Advanced Concrete Technology

To provide students with advanced and practical knowledge of concrete technology which covers properties of fresh concrete, hardened concrete, and the concept of designs of mix proportion. Durability of concrete structures will be discussed in details. New concrete-making materials and recent advancements in concrete technology, namely high performance concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, self-compacting concrete, and concrete for structural repairing will also be included as well as special topics on premixed dry mortars and special mortars.

August

None

CE72.12

Finite Element Methods in Engineering

This course provides an introduction to the finite element method, from engineering rather than a purely mathematical point of view. However, the mathematical foundations of the method are presented along with their physical interpretations. The basic theory and several applications of the finite element method, as well as the standard procedures taken in developing stand-alone finite element computer codes or applying larger public domain or commercial finite element software packages to analyze particular problems, are presented.

January

CE72.11

CE72.22

Wind and Earthquake Engineering

Wind and earthquake excitations are two major dynamic loadings for many modern civil engineering structures, hence the need for civil engineers to learn more about these loadings and their complex nature. An improved understanding of these loadings will enable design engineers to ensure the safety and serviceability of structures.

January

CE72.21

CE72.32

Tall Buildings

New achievements in material science, computer-aided design, and construction technology have opened the path towards more sophisticated and elegant structural systems for tall buildings. This course aims to equip graduate students with advanced knowledge of multi-disciplinary aspects on modeling, analysis, design and construction of tall buildings.

January

None

CE72.42

Experimental Methods in Structural Engineering

The aim of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge required in performing experiments in structural engineering. The course is intended to be taken by students who expect to carry out research work that are based on experiments.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Structural Engineering (STE) Code

Course

Description

CE72.51

Advanced Steel Structures

The structural potential of steel for long-span structures has become apparent. There is great scope for the development of the structural potential of steel, taking advantage of its high strength and stiffness, automated design and fabrication, speed of erection and improved means of protection against corrosion and fire, to produce elegant, economic and durable structures. This course will focus on the general introduction of steel structures, stability theory and design of steel structures.

January

None

CE72.52

Advanced Concrete Structures

To provide students with advanced knowledge of behaviour and design of reinforced concrete structures, review of specifications, limit states, creep and shrinkage, shear and torsion, serviceability, and design with high-strength and fiber-reinforced concrete.

January

None

CE72.62

Forensic Engineering: Structural Evaluation and Retrofitting of Structures

To provide students with basic principles of failure mechanisms in cementitious materials, timbers, and metals in order to diagnose the causes of defects in any constructed facilities. The various testing methods including non-destructive and destructive tests for concrete and steel will be covered. Structural evaluation and strengthening techniques will also be included. Many case studies will be introduced and discussed.

January

CE72.41

CE72.90

Advanced Topics in Bridge Engineering

This course is aimed at providing students with advanced knowledge of some selected topics in bridge engineering. These topics are considered interesting and useful for those who want to pursue their future careers as professional bridge engineers.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

43


Program Field of Study — Transportation Engineering (TRE)

44

Code

Course

Description

CE73.11

Transportation Systems

This course is aimed at providing background knowledge of transportation engineering with detailed and thorough understanding of the framework of transportation system and its basic characteristics to transportation students.

August

None

CE73.14

Transportation Economics and Project Evaluation

This course aims to provide students with the tools necessary to undertake transport project evaluation. These tolls comprises of microeconomics background, transport demand forecasting, impact analysis and comprehensive judgment.

August

None

CE73.15

Public Transportation Systems

This course aims to present the various modes of public transportation from their historical development to their current operational situations. Emphasis is placed on what to expect in the future from public transportation.

August

None

CE73.17

Airport Planning and Design

This course will provide students with the experience and understanding of the procedures involved in airport planning and designs.

January

None

CE73.22

Planning for Traffic Safety and Injury Prevention

This course is designed to help students understand the patterns of traffic crashes, recognize sites and situations where traffic crashes are over-represented, learn safety treatments for such sites, as well as the causes of different accidents through reconstruction techniques.

January

None

CE73.24

Intelligent Transportation Systems

This course provides an overview of intelligent transportation systems (ITS), which include a wide range of information technology applications to surface transportation. The different categories of ITS to be covered include traffic management systems, traveler information systems, fleet control systems, commercial vehicle regulation systems, transit systems, rural systems, and vehicle control systems.

January

None

CE73.32

Design and Performance of Highway and Airport Pavement

This course aims to help students understand the theory and concept of pavement design for highway airport infrastructure to endure the increasing volumes and loads of traffic. Construction techniques for pavements are essential to the quality and performance of pavements in the long run, and highway engineers need to be equipped with basic knowledge of pavement construction techniques.

January

None

CE73.33

Pavement Management Systems

This course presents the different elements of pavement management systems, which encompasses a wide spectrum of activities including planning, programming of investments, design, construction, maintenance, and periodic evaluation of performance. A number of case studies will be presented in this course.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Transportation Engineering (TRE) Code

Course

Description

CE73.35

Sustainable Transportation

Description: With the progress of motorization, the environmental aspect of transportation facilities has become very important even in developing countries and the focus of transportation is expanding to social and economic areas. On the ground, sustainability is now a top priority topic in the various fields. In this class, sustainability-related transportation issues will be discussed.

August

None

CE73.36

Transportation Planning Methods and Analysis

There are various mathematical analysis methods, which are utilized in transportation studies. Transportation engineers must understand these methods, especially statistics and probability concepts in engineering.

August

None

CE73.37

Transportation Demand Modeling and Forecasting

This aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of transportation in urban development and planning, methods of analysis and forecasting transportation demand, transportation systems management and transportation sustainability.

January

None

CE73.38

Transportation Logistics

This course will provide students with an understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of several contemporary and advanced topics on actual logistics planning based on the fundamental knowledge mathematical programming and transport systems.

January

None

CE73.39

Traffic System Analysis and Control

Traffic Engineering is one of the core subjects in transportation engineering. The course provides basic knowledge derived from various traffic engineering subjects. It will equip students with the knowledge of traffic characteristics, traffic operations, analysis, procedures, and design considerations for traffic engineering problems.

January

None

CE73.40

Advanced Geometric Design and Highway Safety

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the basic principles and techniques of highway design. In addition, the course will teach the theory and criteria of geometric design of rural urban and rural roads, and the safety aspects.

January

None

E73.9005

Selected Topic: Logistics Systems

This course will provide students with an understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of several contemporary and advanced topics on actual logistics planning based on the fundamental knowledge mathematical programming and transport systems.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

45


Program Field of Study — Water Engineering and Management (WEM)

46

Code

Course

Description

CE74.11

Watershed Hydrology

This course provides an understanding of the circulation of water and its constituents through the hydrologic cycle, hydrologic data collection, analysis, forecasting and hydrologic design.

CE74.12

Hydrodynamics

CE74.13

Water Resources Systems

CE74.14

Semester Offered Prerequisite August

None

August

None

This course aims to develop systems thinking as it relates to water resources planning and management and to provide deterministic systems approach for analysis through case studies.

August

None

Concepts in Water Modeling

This course provides basic knowledge and understanding of mathematical modelling including numerical methods in modelling of water resources engineering problems and computer hand-on experience.

August

None

CE74.21

Irrigation and Drainage Engineering

The course is aimed at providing students some fundamental knowledge of soil physics and soilwater-plant relationships, which are essential in irrigation and drainage engineering. Advanced and innovative concepts on irrigation and drainage planning and design are discussed; and theories are supported by fieldworks and laboratory exercises on soil characterization, soil water movement, crop-irrigation water requirements modeling, and design/evaluation of irrigation drainage systems.

August

None

CE74.22

Irrigation and Drainage Systems Management

The course aims to provide students with some innovative tools and modern approaches for irrigation and drainage systems operation and management and performance evaluation.

January

None

CE74.31

Coastal and Estuarine Processes

This course provides fundamental knowledge on waves and their actions on bed sediment as well as tide and tidal current and their actions on pollutants, siltation and salinity intrusion.

August

None

This course provides a review of fluid properties, fluid pressure, and fluid forces; advanced knowledge in fluid flow hydrodynamics based macroscopic and microscopic analyses including hydrodynamic similitudes, flow boundary layers; applications on flow in pipes, open channels, hydraulics structures and hydraulic machinery.


Program Field of Study — Water Engineering and Management (WEM) Code

Course

Description

CE74.32

Coastal Zone Management

This course provide students with the knowledge of coastal processes, planning and management strategies for the development of coastal zone areas, including action plans with examples on different approaches for coastal zone management.

January

None

CE74.41

Water Supply and Sanitation

This course aims to provide fundamental knowledge on the design and management of water supply system and sanitation facilities.

August

None

CE74.42

Urban Drainage Management

This course is aimed at providing fundamental and advanced knowledge of the design and management of urban drainage.

January

None

CE74.51

River Engineering and Modeling

This course is designed to provide knowledge on river flow hydrology, sediment transport, and in the mixing process of water quality; alluvial channel roughness, river engineering works, river morphology; sedimentation in reservoirs; field measurement and case studies.

August

CE05.12

CE74.52

Groundwater Development and Management

This course provides the fundamental know-how on groundwater flow and transport processes, sources of pollution, techniques for groundwater resources assessment, environmental issues of overcharging and overexploitation of groundwater development, management of groundwater resources development and groundwater pollution.

January

None

CE74.53

Land and Water Conservation and Management

This course aims to provide a holistic understanding of soil and water conservation for watershed management. Emphasis is placed on technical, agronomic and biological approaches to soil and water conservation, conservation methods and the design of appropriate measures. The course will also highlight conservation strategies and conservation planning at the watershed level.

January

None

CE74.54

Integrated Water Resources Management

This course provides knowledge and understanding of the multi-dimensional factors leading to effective water resources management; and to stress the interaction of factors within the framework of the institutional and the management system through case studies.

January

None

CE74.55

Modeling of Water Resources Systems

The course provides knowledge on modelling for the solution of complex environmental and water resources problems and an overview of several well-recognized and popular computer models for water resources development, planning, and management to the students. Hands-on practice of some relevant computer programs is emphasized in the course.

January

CE74.11 (Watershed Hydrology)

Semester Offered Prerequisite

47


Program Field of Study — Water Engineering and Management (WEM)

48

Code

Course

Description

CE74.61

Flooding Modeling and Management

The objective of this course is to provide advanced knowledge in flood hydrology, flood modelling; flood forecasting models, artificial neural network; flood control and management, flood risk analysis and mapping; flood plain development, flood damages and feasibility of flood control projects.

January

CE74.12

CE74.71

EIA GIS Applications in Water Resources

The course will provide students with the knowledge and understanding of approaches needed for Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of water resource projects. The principles of Geographic Information System (GIS) and its application procedures for EIA and for decisions in water resources planning and management will also be covered.

January

None

CE74.9001

Research Design and Experimental Methods

The course aims to train students in planning, designing and conducting a field research and how to write research proposals and reports especially for water resource development projects. The course is also envisioned to enhance the students writing, communication and presentation skills. In addition, the course will provide the students hands-on experience on laboratory and in-situ measurements of hydraulic and soil hydrologic properties and processes as well as on sampling soil and water in the field and its analysis in the laboratory.

January

None

CE74.9002

Climate Change and Water Resources

This course aims to provide the knowledge and understandings of climate change and its impact on water availability, use and demand; environmental and socio-economic implications; modeling tools and methods for climate change projections and impact assessment in water sectors; vulnerability assessment and climate change adaptation strategies in managing water at regional, national and local level. Also current status of policies, laws and international climate change debates and negotiations, in particular to water resources management will be discussed.

January

IN84.12

Floods and Droughts

Floods and droughts are one of the most destructive natural phenomena in Asia and around the world. They can cause serious damage to life, properties, public utilities and infrastructures. They hamper social and economic growth of developing countries. Knowledge on hydrology of floods and droughts; understanding on their causes, frequencies and magnitudes are required to achieve effective management and mitigation measures of floods and droughts.

Semester Offered Prerequisite


INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING GROUP For several decades, AIT has served in the development of the region by equipping young engineers with the high-tech knowledge required to work in complex industrial environments. Since its inception, the Industrial Systems Engineering (ISE) thematic group at AIT has contributed to this mission by focusing on industrial competitiveness and innovation for sustainable growth in the region. For more info: http://www.ise.ait.asia

Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (IME) Since its inception in the early 1970’s, the Industrial Engineering program at AIT has committed to prepare qualified engineers with high-tech knowledge for supporting sustainable industrial development of the region. Starting as Systems Engineering in the early days and becoming Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering today, its focus has always been on responding to current needs and future trends for industry to be competitive. The credit requirements of the regular and non-thesis professional master’s programs are 49 credits and 33 credits, respectively. The credit requirement of the doctoral degree is 84 credits of which 66 credits are for research dissertation. IME also offers diploma and certificate programs toward master’s degrees.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Strong quantitative background; undergraduate degree in mechanical, production, industrial, electrical, electronics, or chemical engineering; other engineering fields; other applied sciences.

For Doctoral Program: One should have a good master’s degree in one of the above disciplines. For more info: http://ime.ait.asia/

49


Mechatronics (MEC) At present, most academic institutions and industries in the Asian region are only system integrators. Components are procured from more developed countries (e.g. computer numerically controlled machines, robots, and automated guided vehicles) and are integrated as a system (e.g. flexible manufacturing system). To support the growth of the region’s economy, expertise not only as system integrators but also as builders of components of advanced technologies must be developed. The growing number of electronic devices and the strong interactions between mechanical and electronic parts no longer permit separate investigations of these components. Mechatronics provides new insights through an integrated consideration of mechanics, electronics and information technology. The curriculum is designed to provide multidisciplinary knowledge and to develop the ability to design mechatronics systems.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in electronics, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, computer engineering or science; other engineering disciplines.

For Doctoral Program: One should have a good master’s degree in one of the above disciplines.

Microelectronics and Embedded Systems The Master’s Program in Microelectronics and Embedded Systems, introduced in May 2000, responds to the needs of countries in Southeast Asia, many of which are in transition from labor-intensive to high-tech industries. The curriculum focuses on design and IC packaging aspects for specific applications. Fabrication, including prototyping of chips, is included in the curriculum and is featured in partnership with microelectronics industries and collaborating universities overseas.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in electronics, electrical engineering, physics, computer engineering and other closely related engineering disciplines.

For Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in any of the above disciplines. For more info: http://set.ait.asia/mt/

50


Nanotechnology Postgraduate nanotechnology masters courses are a well-recognized means of gaining experience in state-of-the-art techniques and applications of nanotechnology. AIT’s nanotechnology program is addressed to the needs of engineers and science background students for entering into this burgeoning technology area. Nanotechnology at AIT focuses on nanomaterials engineering at an international level.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: The programme is open to graduates with a bachelor’s in engineering (electrical, chemical, mechanical, industrial, telecommunications, computer engineering, electronics, and instrumentation) as well as Bachelor’s of Science (physics and chemistry).

For Doctoral Program: One should have a good master’s degree in one of the above disciplines. For more info: http://nano.ait.asia

51


Program Field of Study — Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (IME)

52

Code

Course

Description

AT72.01

Deterministic Optimization Models

To introduce the student to deterministic models which can facilitate decision making. Modeling concepts and applications of linear, integer, nonlinear, and dynamic programming as well as network models are addressed. Solution methodologies for each type of optimization models are discussed. The student will also learn how to use modeling and optimization software.

August

None

AT72.02

Production and Operations Management

To provide the student with a broad based foundation of subjects concerning the management of production and operation systems. The various aspects of production planning, scheduling, control and other related management issues are addressed, enabling students to acquire sufficient background required for the subsequent specialized courses.

August

None

AT72.03

Statistical Models and Design of Experiments

Data analysis and deducing the inferences for decision making are commonly encountered problems in experimental work both in the real field as well as simulation on computers. The objective of this course is to impart to the students working knowledge of frequently required statistical methods with a special emphasis on design of experiments.

August

None

AT72.04

Engineering Economy

All engineering and management decisions have economic consequences, such as profitability and risk. This course is aimed at providing the necessary background and techniques for economic evaluation of decision alternatives. Topics such as time value of money, depreciation and taxation, cost estimation and cost control, risk and uncertainty in decision-making, and replacement analysis are included.

August

None

AT72.05

Quality Control and Management

Quality has been being considered as one of the key competitive advantages in many enterprises. It is really a powerful strategic business weapon in a highly competitive market nowadays. This course is developed to help impart to the student knowledge on basic concepts of quality management and quality management system as well as the need of using statistical analysis in quality control and improvement. Advanced quality control techniques for sixsigma improvement process and various sampling techniques for quality inspection are also covered.

August

Consent of Instructor

AT72.06

Industrial Project Management

This course views the whole project cycle, addressing the managerial, the technical, economic and financial considerations. After completing the course, one is expected to possess the knowledge required to effectively and efficiently undertake the task of planning and implementing a project.

August

Consent of Instructor

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (IME) Code

Course

Description

AT72.07

Multicriterion Decision Models

Traditional decision models are mono criterion and are handicapped in real-life applications. This course is designed to extend these important decision models from mono criterion to a more realistic multi criterion framework. General approaches and specific techniques which are practical are presented.

August

Consent of Instructor

AT72.08

Stochastic Decision Models

To introduce the student into basic and more advanced topics of mathematical modeling process of decision problems in complex stochastic industrial environments. This course covers stochastic operations research models, algorithms, and applications. Markov chains and queuing models are discussed. Renewal theory, reliability theory, and stochastic models for manufacturing systems are also taken into consideration. This course also covers the analytical models which are the complements to a discrete event simulation approach. Students will acquire in this course the basis for the study of other probabilistic topics in their curriculum.

January

None

AT72.09

Inventory and Logistics Management

This course is aimed at providing the background and skills necessary for effective inventory management at a single and multiple stocking points. Special emphasis is laid on the inventory control models. Introduction to logistic concepts in planning and operations including purchasing and order processing, distribution network planning, and transportation is discussed.

January

Consent of Instructor

AT72.10

Scheduling and Sequencing

To present a unified systems approach to scheduling and sequencing problems in relation to technological planning. Fundamentals of scheduling methodology and modeling for job shop and flow shop type production systems are presented and their applications discussed in relation to real operating environments.

August

Consent of Instructor

AT72.11

Modeling and Simulation of Discrete Event Systems

To impart knowledge and practical experience in simulation modeling of discrete event systems. The principles of modeling, simulation techniques and simulation experiment planning are presented and then applied in project work.

January

Consent of Instructor

AT72.12

Reliability Theory and Maintenance

To provide the basic concepts of reliability, maintainability and availability. This course covers the analysis of failure time distribution, the determination of system reliability and the allocation of reliability in the design phase.

January

AT72.08 Stochastic Decision Models

Semester Offered Prerequisite

53


Program Field of Study — Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (IME)

54

Code

Course

Description

AT73.02

Advanced Manufacturing Processes

During a manufacturing process, we add, subtract, or form materials in order to give a desired shape/property to the workpiece. The quality of the workpiece is influenced by several factors, including material properties, process parameters, tool geometry, and environmental factors. This course instructs techniques for modeling and analyzing the mechanics of both conventional and unconventional manufacturing processes.

August

None

AT73.03

Engineering Metrology

Knowledge of measurement and instrumentation is of increasing importance in industry. Advances in automated manufacturing and requirement to conform to various standards have resulted in a proliferation of computerized and automated inspection techniques along with the classical metrology methods.

August

None

AT73.06

Product Design and Development

Strategies for responding to a market, product idea, existing products, customer needs, product specifications, functional requirements of the product(s), technical solutions for meeting the functional requirements, decomposition of products into modules for various product-life-cycle reasons, documentation and so on are the important elements of product development. How to consider these elements in a systematic manner, while developing a product, is the focus of this course.

January

None

AT73.14

Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing

This course will provide fundamental knowledge on rapid prototyping, reverse engineering and their applications in manufacturing. Rapid prototyping and reverse engineering are technologies, enhancing product design and development process by allowing prototypes to be developed quickly. The students will learn about basic concept of RP, RP technologies, slicing techniques, reverse engineering and rapid tooling.

August

None

AT73.18

Biomechanics

The human musculoskeletal system must be well understood to design and manufacture human implants and devices directly operated by human force. Biomechanics of Human Movement must also be well understood. This course focuses on the human skeleton, actuation and control. Related kinematics and dynamics of human motion is investigated with the purpose of designing biomechanical devices focused on Implants.

January, August

None

AT72/73/74/ 75.9001

ISE Seminar

ISE program is an interdisciplinary program with various fields of study and areas of specializations. These fields of study and areas of specializations are interconnected to some extent. Hence, it will be good for a student who enrolls in a specific field of study or area of specializations to know also the basic knowledge and research directions in the others. The purpose of this seminar course is, therefore, to give a comprehensive overview on the background knowledge of all fields of study and areas of specializations offered in ISE program

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Mechatronics (MEC) Semester Offered Prerequisite

Code

Course

Description

AT74.01

Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanisms and Robots

To impart students the knowledge for analysis of the kinematics and dynamics of planar and spatial systems which are basis for broad classes of mechanisms and machines including Robots. To familiarize the students with the fundamentals of robot design and programming. The students will learn in detail about various robot subsystems, robot kinematics, trajectory planning, dynamics, control techniques, and robot programming methods.

August

None

AT74.02

Control Theory

The Description behind this course is to provide an understanding of classical control theory, digital control theory, state-space control theory, optimal control theory, and also to make the student familiar with the computer aided analysis tool, MATLAB, for control system analysis.

August

None

AT74.03

Sensing and Actuation

The Description behind this course is to provide an understanding of the principle and design of sensors and actuators which are the building boxes for Mechatronics systems.

August

None

AT74.04

Digital and Analog Circuit Design

To provide students with an understanding of important electronics building blocks, to impart practical skills for the design, construction, and characterization of such circuits, and to lay the foundation for the understanding of more complicated systems.

August

None

AT74.05

AI and Neuro-Fuzzy Theory

To introduce the students to computer control for Mechatronics system, which is one of the three necessary basic skills required for Mechatronics. The students will be provided with some of the machine intelligence technologies, e.g. Neural Networks, Fuzzy, Genetic Algorithm, Simulated Annealing, Particle Swarm Optimization, and Artificial Intelligence.

January

None

AT74.06

Pattern Recognition and Image Processing

The field of image processing has grown considerably with increased applications in diverse areas as manufacturing, biology, space and medical. Continuous improvements in speed of digital computers, algorithmic development and requirement of a high tech environment makes this field a very active area for academic and industrial research.

January

None

AT74.07

Automation Technology

To impart knowledge and practical experience in advanced control and programming of automation systems. The principles of advanced automation technology are presented and then applied in lab sessions.

January

None

AT74.08

Microprocessor Systems

The objective of the course is to give the students an insight into architecture, programming and interfacing of microprocessors. System integration concepts through support chips are studied.

January

None

55


Program Field of Study — Mechatronics (MEC)

56

Code

Course

Description

AT74.09

Robust and Adaptive Control

This course is aimed at giving the students an overview on some advanced topics in the automatic control field providing them with the basic knowledge required for dealing with more complex control problems.

January

AT74.9001

Selected Topic: E-Business for Technology

Overview of the principles of electronic business. Differences and similarities between Ebusiness and traditional business. Evolution and trends in conducting e-business on the Internet/Web. Key organizational, technological, marketing, supply-chain, legal, and tax challenges and potential solutions. International aspects. Case studies.

January

AT74.9003

Selected Topic: Fundamental of Disk Drive Technology

This course introduces the students to technology in hard disc drive industry. It covers both current recording technology and future technology with practical process in Hard Disk Drive (HDD) manufacturing.

August

Consent of the Instructor

AT74.9007

Selected Topic: Servo Control

System Modeling and Identification Linear Systems and Control Classical Nonlinear Control Composite Nonlinear Feedback Control Track Following of a Single-Stage Actuator, Track Seeking of a Single-Stage Actuator, Dual-Stage Actuated Servo Systems, Modeling and Design of a Microdrive System, Design of a Piezoelectric Actuator System, Advanced Topics in Servo Controller, Servo Track Writer, Spindle Motor Control

January

None

AT74.9008

Selected Topic: Thesis Research and Academic Writing

The graduates are expected to have the ability to evaluate problems effectively and propose practical solutions. Practitioners must be able to conceptualize programs to acquire quantitative information, to analyze, interpret data and draw conclusions and to view the practices of research and writing as inseparable dimensions of one process. This course provides students with various research planning approaches and proposal development tools as well as providing necessary writing and presentation skills for their thesis research.

January

Consent of Instructor

AT74.9009

Selected Topic: Applied Nonlinear Control

First part of this course covers analytical tool for studying a nonlinear system; such as, phase plane analysis, Lyapunov function and describing function. Second part of this course covers major nonlinear controller design techniques; such as, feedback linearization, sliding control and adaptive control.

August

AT74.9010

Selected Topic: Sensor Fusion and Measurement System-Automated Mapping Technology

Sensor fusion is integration of information from difference type of sensor. Sensor fusion is applied to create one good sensor from at least two sensors in terms of high performance, high accuracy, inexpensiveness, etc.

Semester Offered Prerequisite AT74.02 Control Theory


Program Field of Study — Microelectronics and Embedded Systems (MES) Code

Course

Description

AT81.01

Microelectronics Fabrication Technology

This course serves as an introduction to basic processes used in fabricating semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The objective is to develop the background knowledge necessary to understand the state-of-the-art semiconductor technology related to device fabrication processes.

August

None

AT81.02

Digital Integrated Circuit Design

To provide fundamental concepts in digital systems design. To provide a basic understanding of some computer-aided techniques used in the design verification, synthesis, optimization, and implementation of digital systems.

August

None

AT81.03

Advanced Semiconductor Device Theory

The purpose of this course is to explore in detail the behavior of CMOS and bipolar transistors with emphasis on those parameters and performance factors that are particularly important for VLSI devices of deep-submicron dimensions.

August

None

AT81.04

Recording Head Technology

This course introduces the students to recording head technology in hard disc drive industry. It covers both current recording technology and future technology with practical process in Hard Disk Drive (HDD) manufacturing.

August

None

AT81.05

Analog Integrated Circuit Design

This course is concerned with theory, analysis and design of analog integrated circuits in both Bipolar and MOS technologies. Basic design concepts, issues and tradeoffs involved in analog IC design will be explored. Intuitive understanding and real-life applications will be emphasized throughout the course.

August

None

AT81.06

VLSI Design

This course focuses on the design and synthesis of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) chips using CMOS technology focusing towards the development of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for complex digital systems using integrated circuit cells as building blocks and employing top-down design methods. ASIC design issues at layout, schematic, logic and RTL levels will be studied. Commercial design software will be used for laboratory exercises. An overview of hardware description languages (HDL) and VLSI computer-aided design (CAD) tools and theoretical concepts in VLSI architectures and algorithms will also be discussed. This is a project-oriented course in which the students will be designing and evaluating digital circuits. Weekly assignments will be in the form of design of the cells for the project.

August

None

AT81.07

Micro-electro Mechanical Systems

Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are integration of mechanical elements and electronics on a common silicon wafer using microfabrication techniques.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

57


Program Field of Study — Microelectronics and Embedded Systems (MES)

58

Code

Course

Description

AT81.08

Advanced VLSI System Design

This project-oriented course will consist of the specification, design, implementation, fabrication and testing of a large VLSI chip. Advanced CMOS design topics are covered including HW/SW co-design, high speed CMOS and low power design techniques. System level design entities such as data paths (e.g, ALUs, Register Files, Functional Units), memory, controllers, and clock and power distribution schemes. The high-level description language and high-level synthesis tools are also covered as well as Design-For-Testability design issues. Students work in groups of 2 persons to design, implement and test a CMOS implementation of a system level design entity such as a microcontroller, microprocessor, DSP.

January

None

AT81.09

Optoelectronic Materials and Devices

Recent advances in photonic devices and fiber optic communication systems have created the need for microelectronics students to have considerable exposure to optoelectronic devices. This course will address the basic principles of common optoelectronic devices including semiconductor lasers, detectors, imaging tubes and optical fibres to lead the students to understand the operation principles and applications of semiconductor lasers, various photonic detectors, imaging devices, fibre optic systems and some modern optoelectronic devices and appreciate the rapidly expanding optoelectronics technology.

January

None

AT81.10

Fundamentals of IC Packaging, Assembly and Test

This course provides an overview and a comparison of electronic systems packaging technologies. It includes design; manufacturing; test; IC package assembly; thermal and reliability issues.

January

None

AT81.11

Mixed Signal IC Design

The course involves exploiting advanced circuit design concepts to develop models, circuit topologies, and design strategies for high performance CMOS technology mixedsignal integrated circuits.

January

None

AT81.12

Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology

The emerging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology is leading to a disruptive technological revolution. Nanotechnology promises potential to influence our future with diverse applications in consumer goods, electronics, computers, information and biotechnology, aerospace defense, energy, environment, and medicine. Practically all sectors of the economy is expected to be profoundly influenced by nanotechnology in the very near future.

January

None

AT81.13

Failure Analysis of Devices

With the rapid advancement of IC technology, Failure Analysis(FA) has become a critical element during all the phases of the integrated circuit(IC) product cycle.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Microelectronics and Embedded Systems (MES) Code

Course

Description

AT81.14

Embedded Systems Integration

This project-oriented course will consist of the specification, design, implementation, integration, and testing of an Embedded System. The topics are covered including Embedded Systems HW, Embedded Systems SW, interfacing, communications, control, design technology, and validation. It should help to motivate students to put more emphasis on education in embedded systems by integrating knowledge from many different areas. Students work in groups of 2 persons to design, implement and test a small Embedded System.

January

None

AT81.15

Embedded Systems Architecture

This course focuses on complexities of embedded system design including multiprocessors, VLIW, and superscalar architectures, and power consumption. Fundamental challenges in embedded computing are described, together with design methodologies and models of computation. It also provides an in-depth and advanced treatment of all the components of embedded systems with discussions of the current developments in the field and numerous examples of real-world applications.

January

None

AT81.16

Real Time Systems

This course focuses on complexities of realtime systems including OS kernels, scheduling, semaphore, message queue, I/O systems, memory management, synchronization, and communication. Fundamental challenges in real-time embedded computing are described, together with design methodologies and models of computation. The objects and services that are a part of most Real-Time Operating System kernels are described and real-time system design is explored in detail.

January

None

AT81.xx

Introductory Solid State Physics

This course serves as an introduction to solid state physics with the emphasis on the electronic structure of solid elements. The aim of the course is to give an understanding of intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors. The course will also deal with the properties of different magnetic materials and give some insight of the industrial use of magnetic materials.

AT 81.xx

Selected topic: Head Manufacturing Basics

The course is designed to provide graduate student studying disc drive technology a deep knowledge and understanding of the core manufacturing technology in both theoretical and applications-oriented environments.

AT81.xx:

Selected Topic: VLSI Design Methodologies

To provide the students with a thorough understanding of VLSI design especially focusing on Systems on Silicon.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

Basic quantum mechanics.

59


Program Field of Study — Microelectronics and Embedded Systems (MES)

60

Code

Course

Description

AT81.xx

Selected Topic:Basic Hard Disk Drive Technology

The course is designed to provide Masters student, as well as engineers, academics and government officials interested in the disc drive industry, a true understanding of this core technology in both theoretical and applications-oriented environments. The course outline is developed by Seagate expertises to give the fundamental understanding of the hard disc drive and advanced engineering technology required for future generations of storage systems. The course covers the current frontiers of magnetic recording, optical data storage, probe based systems, holographic, and factory of the future.

Semester Offered Prerequisite August

None


Program Field of Study — Nanotechnology Code

Course

Description

Semester

Semester Offered

AT79.01

Self-Assembly and Molecular Manufacturing

Self-assembly and molecular manufacturing is what is being consider as the new realms of creating future devices and structures. This course describes some of the schemes that are being followed in molecular manufacturing.

January

None

AT79.02

Impact of Nanotechnology on the society

With the onset of next generation of industrial revolution, students need to be sensibilised on the societal aspects of nanotechnology. This course attempts to discusses the impact that nanotechnology may have on our society.

August

None

AT79.03

Intellectual Property Rights for Technology Development and Management

This course will expose the students to diverse aspects of the process of the technology development and its strategic management to maximize economic value from technology. Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) occupies a centre stage in such a process. A module on IPR will be integrated in this course to enable the students internalize IPR as an inseparable entity in their learning. The module will have lectures and practical training through assignments and projects. Further, students will also be exposed to the aspects of proposal writing in this course.

January

None

AT79.04

Solid State Physics for Nanotechnology

This course serves as an introduction to solid state physics with the emphasis on the electronic structure of solid elements. The aim of the course is to give an understanding of intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors. The course will also deal with the properties of different magnetic materials and give some insight of the industrial use of magnetic materials.

January

None

AT79.05

Fundamentals of Chemistry

The purposes of the course are in preparing engineers and scientists with little chemistry background to enter into the world of chemistry to understand various aspects of chemical nanotechnology and to carry out and apply in research.

AT79.06

Catalysis and Photocatalysis

This course is to introduce the enhancement of catalytic activities due to the higher surface to volume ratio in the nano-domain.

August

None

AT79.07

NanoThermodynamics

This course is necessary to introduce students into the realms of the application of classical thermodynamic rules to nanostructures. It is theoretically a new area of thermodynamics– a thermodynamics that supposedly describes the behavior of nanomaterials better than does traditional thermodynamics.

August

None

AT79.08

Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology

The emerging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology is leading to a disruptive technological revolution. Nanotechnology promises potential to influence our future with diverse applications in consumer goods, electronics, computers, information and biotechnology, aerospace defense, energy, environment, and medicine.

January

None

None

61


Program Field of Study — Nanotechnology

62

Code

Course

Description

Semester

Semester Offered

AT79.09

Colloids, Colloidal Principles for Applications

Types of colloids and their fundamental properties; general appearance and shape; formation of particles; colloidal stability as a sum of attractive and repulsive forces; surface reactions; measurement methods; agglomeration; rheology; association colloids; foams; surface physics; structural analysis. The colloidal principles are discussed on many examples with demonstration, experiments, and exercises.

August

None

AT79.10

Microelectronics Fabrication Technology

This course serves as an introduction to basic processes used in fabricating semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The objective is to develop the background knowledge necessary to understand the state-of-the-art semiconductor technology related to device fabrication processes.

August

None

AT79.11

Micro-electro Mechanical Systems

Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are integration of mechanical elements and electronics on a common silicon wafer using microfabrication techniques. This course serves as an introduction to basic processes used in fabricating MEMS devices and designing MEMS sensors and actuators.

AT79.12

Characterization Tools in nanotechnology

The chemical and physical properties of materials are determined by the chemical composition i.e. the kind of atoms, molecules or ions (qualitative composition) and by the relative amount of them (quantitative composition) present in the material. In this course the qualitative and quantitative analysis of materials is discussed.

January

None

AT79.13

Advanced Seminars in Nanotechnology

Advanced seminars in nanotechnology are designed to expand the student’s capabilities by coupling theoretical expectations with experience in the laboratory.

January

None

AT79.9001

Selected Topic: Fundamentals of Bionanotechnology

This module introduces basic concepts of cell and molecular biology, before looking at how biomeolecules can be used for designing nanostructures and the use of those nanostructures in biological and medical applications.

January

None

AT79.9002

Selected Topic: Nanotechnology for Biomedical Applications

Nanotechnology is finding increasing applications in medical sciences. Macromolecules and nanomaterials promise a host of new solutions that will be used in medical practice in the years to come.

August

None

ED73.14

Enzyme and DNA Technology

In bioprocess technology, microbial cells and their components are utilized in technical processes. In order to understand and control these processes knowledge is required on enzyme and DNA Technology. Section I of this course is focused on the enzymes that enable the cell to produce a large variety of compounds. Section II of this course deals with the molecular properties of the genetic material, DNA and RNA and their interaction with DNA-enzymes.

None

None


INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS GROUP Information and communications enable access, connections, and sharing, in which turn enable knowledge creation and economic opportunity.

Computer Science (CS) This field of study focuses on world-class teaching and research into the foundations and applications of computing systems. The curriculum covers a broad range of topics in computer systems, theory, software engineering, information science, and applications. The faculties are particularly active in artificial intelligence, security, computer graphics, machine learning and data mining, robotics, computer vision and image processing, software engineering, networking, simulation, and information systems. The courses and research topics span the range from theory to practice. Students are encouraged to take courses and conduct research in areas related to computer science such as Information Management, Telecommunications, Information and Communication Technologies, Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems, Mechatronics, Microelectronics and Embedded Systems, Industrial Engineering, and other fields of study at the Institute.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Computer Science, Computer Enginnering, Electronics or Mathematics.

For Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in any of the above disciplines. For more info: http://www.cs.ait.asia

Information Management (IM) The Information Management field of study at AIT aims to fulfill the growing need for information management skills in government and private organization. It was the first program of its kind in Asia. The field focuses on planning the effective use of information and communication technologies within organizations, developing corporate and government policies to maximize the benefits resulting from the wide-spread use of these technologies, improving the strategic management of information resources in business, government, and non-profit organizations, and increasing the productivity and creativity of managers and executives who work with information resources.

Software Engineering Area of Study In addition to the traditional Masters program in computer science, the Computer Science field of study also offers a Masters degree in computer science with specialization in software engineering. The Software Engineering Area of Specialization is specially designed to fill the Asia-Pacific region’s need for highly-trained specialists in software development and the management of software development projects. 63


Preferred Background For Master Program Applicants for admission to the field of Information Management should have a strong quantitative background, preferably in computer science or computer engineering, information system or information science, telecommunications, electronic or electrical engineering, applied mathematics or statistics. Applicants from other fields of information service can also be considered if they have already worked as information professionals. In those cases, additional technology related courses may be required.

For Doctoral Program One should have a good master’s degree in one of the above disciplines. For more info: http://www.cs.ait.asia

Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System (RS-GIS) Geoinformatics comprising Remote Sensing (RS), Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) provides extremely useful tools for environmental and natural resources management. They are widely recognized as supporting tools for the planning, monitoring, and management of the appropriate utilization of resources at the country, regional and global levels. While they represent multidisciplinary backgrounds, students in RS & GIS share a common interest, that is, to use remote sensing, GIS, GPS and other space technologies as tools in pursuing their academic work as well as in developing new technologies that are applicable to the region. RS&GIS welcomes students from three other AIT Schools who are interested in attending some subjects that demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of the applications of geoinformatics or space technologies. The basics of geoinformatics or the so-called institute-wide course, was especially designed for such need from other schools. Because of the complexity of the technologies together with the heavy dependence on advanced computer skills, application specialists need to have a sound knowledge of the theoretical aspects and practical approaches to integrate many resources of information that address different applications. Furthermore, scientists, planners or engineers interested in these technologies should be familiar with past, present and future satellite systems, their appropriate usage, data acquisition and handling and integration with other data sources. The curriculum well covers the theoretical aspects and application of space technology, especially in Remote Sensing and GIS. It provides students ample time to gain application knowhow through laboratory sessions. Students are free to use satellite data received by the NOAA, AVHRR and MODIS Satellite Receiving Stations for their theses or research studies. The demand for RS & GIS graduates is very high as there is lack of professionals in these disciplines, particularly those with a vast knowledge of the practical utilization of these technologies. Employment opportunities are available in a wide range of areas, including agriculture, forestry, coastal development and management, urban planning and development, medical technology, mapping and planning, disaster mitigation and environmental management. Employment opportunities are available in a wide range of areas, including agriculture, forestry, coastal development and management, urban planning and development, medical technology, mapping and planning, disaster mitigation and environmental management. 64


Major areas covered in the coursework are fundamentals of remote sensing and GIS, earthenergy interaction, atmospheric correction, application potential in various disciplines, GIS data sources, map projection, geo-statistics, spatial modeling, automated mapping, digital terrain model, GPS data acquisition, and integration of GIS, remote sensing and GPS.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in information, computer, and space related field, civil and infrastructure related fields (regional planning, mapping, cartography surveying, geodesy) earth science environment and natural resources (oceanography, agriculture, forestry, fishery) or social science disciplines with adequate professional experience in a relevant field.

For Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in a field relevant to the chosen program of study. For more info: http://www.rsgis.ait.asia/

Telecommunications (TC) The Telecommunications program offers areas of specialization in transmission systems; switching systems; telematics; network planning, and in collaboration with the School of Management, telecommunications management. The courses offered emphasize modern telecommunications skills in systems planning and engineering, telecommunications software development, and administrative and financial aspects of telecommunications management. Research covers a wide variety of topics at the cutting edge of research and development. Specific issues addressed in the broad fields of transmission and switching systems are, for example, coherent optical communications, multiple-access strategies for cellular-mobile and cabled networks, as well as questions of congestion control and new services in ISDN and future B-ISDN networks.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate study for candidates seeking admission to the field of Telecommunications are in communications, telecommunications, electrical engineering, electronics, and computer science or computer engineering. With the last two, a strong background in communications or telecommunications is expected.

For Doctoral Program: A good master’s degree in Telecommunications or a closely related field is a pre-requisite. For more info: http://www.tc.ait.asia/

65


Program Field of Study — Computer Science (CS)

66

Code

Course

Description

AT70.02

Data Structures & Algorithms

An algorithm describes how to carry out a problem-solving task implementable by computer programs. The design of an algorithm is tightly coupled with how information to be manipulated by it is organized i.e. data structuring.

August

None

AT70.03

Theory of Computing

Theory of formal languages, automata, programs Chomsky hierarchy and classification of programs with respect to associated memory, decidability and complexity theory especially P and NP problems.

August

None

AT70.05

Computer Networks

Network types - wide area networks, local area networks, home networks; circuit switching, packet switching; datagram, virtual circuits; network architecture; error detection, collision avoidance and detection; reliable transmission; the Internet (TCP/IP, routing and addressing, application protocols); ATM networks; network security and quality of service.

August

None

AT70.07

Programming Languages and Compilers

Concepts that underlie programming languages like binding allocation types and abstraction, illustrating those concepts with examples from various languages. Language design and implementation and the ways in which they interact are explored together. Special emphasis is put on compilation and linking, as well as how data types are implemented in memory.

January

None

AT70.08

Operating Systems

This course is about the concepts, structures, and mechanisms of operating systems, taking into account their evolution and the rapid advances in technology, resulting in a variety of systems. The variety is not just in the capacity and speed of machines, their interconnections and interactions, but with the newer applications with demands on systems requirements. The intent of the course is to develop a conceptual framework from the point of view of the management of system resources and user interface, and relate them to contemporary design issues and to current trends in technology.

January

None

AT70.09

Computer Graphics and Animation

This course introduces computer graphics as a practical discipline. The underlying theory of computer graphics, as well as implementation algorithms, will be presented in the context of a modern industry-standard graphics programming language and interface. Instruction shall be in a laboratory setting with continuous hands-on implementation of concepts and emphasis on creating animated and interactive scenes.

January

Basic knowledge of two and three dimensional co-ordinate geometry and trigonometry and C/C++.

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Computer Science (CS) Code

Course

Description

AT70.10

Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the branch of computer science that is concerned with the automation of intelligent behavior. This course provides a comprehensive exposure to the paradigms and techniques necessary for study and research in artificial intelligence. Emphasis is placed on the historical evolution and the emerging trends in technology.

August

None

AT70.12

Web Application Engineering

AT 70.12 is a project-oriented course in which student teams will be paired with client organizations needing online community collaborative learning and information sharing systems. Using a Web server, programming language, and relational database of their own choice, students will take the system from an initial concept through the stages of requirements specification, design, implementation, and usability testing. Along the way, focused laboratory sessions will give students experience with specific technologies and techniques useful across many applications, and lectures will introduce students to the most recent developments in enterprise application frameworks, middleware, and thick clients. Students successfully completing AT 70.12 will be competent databasebacked Web application developers capable of designing, deploying, and maintaining largescale services such as amazon.com.

January

Experience programming in a high-level programming language, e.g. C or Java.

AT70.13

Computer Security

To modeling policy and security, the role and application of cryptography, the mechanisms used to implement policies, the methodologies and technologies for assurance, vulnerability analysis and intrusion detection and building secure systems.

InterSem

None

AT70.15

Advanced Topics in Internet Technology

This course cover fundamental issues in network protocol design and implementation and principles underlying TCP/IP protocol design; historical development of the Internet; Internet routing protocols (unicast, multicast and unidirectional); algorithmic issues related to the Internet; multimedia communication (Voice over IP, Real-time protocols); measurement and performance; next generation Internet (IPv6, QoS) and applications.

January

Computer Networks

AT70.16

Computational Geometry and Applications

This course provides students with an introduction to both the theory and applications of the discipline of computational geometry, which is concerned with the solving of computational problems arising from geometric questions. Essential theory and algorithms will be covered and content will be motivated by practical problems. Implementations of geometric algorithms in a high-level language will be covered. Course will be seminar-style.

InterSem

Data Structures and Algorithms, or Instructor Consent.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

67


Program Field of Study — Computer Science (CS)

68

Code

Course

Description

AT70.17

XML: Foundations, Techniques and Applications

Extensible Markup Language (XML), a W3C recommendation, has been recognized as a standard for self-describing data, knowledge interchange, and information integration. Therefore, it forms an important technology for nextgeneration information systems, particularly for those on the Internet. Since representation, interchange and integration of information are fundamental to all information systems, there will be various applications of XML. An application area that will need XML is e-business.

January

None

AT70.18

Software Architecture Design

Designing, developing, and evolving complex software systems requires a mastery of analytical and technical skills, as well as a knowledge of appropriate processes, architectures and design patterns. Software architects building complex systems must create the illusion of simplicity through decomposition, abstraction, and encapsulation of functionality. This course teaches the fundamentals of software architecture, drawn from research and best practice on large software projects. Students will learn techniques and tools for modeling, analyzing, evaluating, and controlling the development of complex software systems. Real-world case studies will be used throughout the course. A major component of the course will be the design of a significant open-source software project. Students may make a specific contribution to an existing large open source project or start a new project of their own choice.

January

Experience programming in a high-level programming language, e.g. C or Java, or by permission of the instructor.

AT70.19

Software Development and Quality Improvement

This course teaches the fundamental skills of software engineering, drawn from research and best-practice on large open source and commercial software projects. Students will learn and evaluating complex software systems. The emphasis will be on rapid implementation of complex systems through agile development processes, visual development tools, and software frameworks. The course will also improve students’ practical software engineering skills by having them plan and execute a significant open-source software development project. Students may make a specific contribution to an existing large open source project or start a new project of their own choice.

January

AT 70.18 (Software Architecture Design)

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Computer Science (CS) Code AT70.9002

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

Selected Topic: Advanced Topics in Computer Graphics and Related Areas

The two main goals for this course are to study OpenGL ES (Embedded Systems), the emerging standard for handheld devices, and the OpenGL Shading Language, the emerging new standard for OpenGL itself. OpenGL ES is a “lighter� version of OpenGL with additional features designed especially for small-screen graphics, particularly games programming. The OpenGL Shading Language is designed to take advantage of modern processor speeds to make more of the OpenGL pipeline, previously static, now programmable. In particular, every vertex and fragment is individually programmable. This will be a hands-on seminar style course where the participants will be asked to read and present material and, most importantly, share coding experience. We shall study the underlying principles of OpenGL ES and the Shading Language, as well as acquire practical experience with both. Additional topics related to the two main ones will be discussed as they arise.

InterSem

Machine Vision for Robotics and HCI

Machine vision is concerned with the image processing, geometry, and statistical inference tools necessary for extracting useful information about the world from two-dimensional images. After decades of research, although the most advanced machine vision systems still pale in comparison to the visual systems of the simplest mammals, there have been some success stories. This course is an advanced survey of the state of the art in machine vision, focused primarily on robotics applications and humancomputer interfaces. The course is a mixture of lectures on fundamentals, student presentations of research from the primary academic literature, and group projects involving application of machine vision technology to real-world problems. The course prepares students to do thesis research in the field.

January

Programming experience and mathematical sophistication

AT70.9008

Selected Topic: Security, Multiagent Systems, Trust and Online Trading Mechanisms

The course discusses computer security models, multiagent systems and the role of trust in secure multiagent systems. The design of trusted and secure trading mechanisms is studied as application. Insights on how to develop optimaltrading mechanisms are also addressed.

InterSem

None

AT70.9010

Selected Topic: Network and Service Management

The global networked service system is the most complex technical system ever created and is turning out to be a very important infrastructure for society. This course gives students a basic understanding of principles and architectures for management of network resources and services and to learn concepts that makes it possible to: communicate, reason and creatively think about the operation and management of networks and networked services.

January

AT70.20

Required previous knowledge: Course CS - AT70.05 Computer Networks or similar.

69


Program Field of Study — Computer Science (CS) Code

Course

Description

AT70.9022

Selected Topic: Theory of Modeling and Simulation: Application to Serious Games

Intelligent systems, such as speech recognition systems, document classification systems, and character recognition systems, are concerned with the transformation of input data (e.g. speech, documents, or bitmaps) into desired output data (words, document classes, or characters, respectively). To obtain an efficient system, this transformation function must be carefully constructed and its parameters must be properly adjusted. Machine learning is concerned with the automatic learning of these parameters from training examples. It draws heavily on computer science, algorithms and data structures, probability, statistics, and optimization. This course covers fundamental concepts as well as state of the art algorithms in machine learning. The grading system relies on homework, student presentations of research from the primary academic literature, and a project.

August

Programming Experience, Mathematical Sophistication

AT70.9023

Selected Topic: Machine Learning

Modeling and Simulation (M&S) has become one of the widely used domains for complex systems analysis and/or design. M&S is used in the industry, business management, tools for decision making, education, research etc. Within this diversity, theoretical and technical basis have to be known to be able to conduct M&S projects in a wide variety of situation.

August

Under graduate level in mathematics, object oriented programming methodology and language, basic knowledge in C/C++.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

If simulations are augmented with media and interactivity, then M&S enter the world of Serious Games, a fast increasing field of the software industry. The huge potential of serious games applications make them a very promising domain for economical development. AT70.9024

70

Selected Topics: The Semantic Web

The Semantic is a web of data. It provides a common framework that allows data to be shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries. It is a collaborative effort led by the World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) with participation from a large number of researchers and industrial partners. It is based on the Resource Description Framework (RDF). Since sharing and reuse of data and information are fundamental to all information systems, there will be various applications of the Semantic Web. This course investigates good knowledge of the Semantic Web, its foundations, techniques and applications is, therefore, required.


Program Field of Study — Information Management (IM) Code

Course

Description

AT71.01

Database Design

The availability of excellent database software enables easy creation of databases and database applications. However, creation without design usually leads to various database problems, disasters and complete failures. Therefore, good knowledge of database design in both theoretical and practical aspects is required.

August

None

AT71.07

Information Retrieval and Data Mining

With the growth of massive digital data archives, which are not necessarily organized in any order, the twin and complementary processes of information retrieval and data mining have emerged together as a particular important discipline within the information sciences. The object of information retrieval is to automatically search a data archive in order to respond to a user’s query. The object of data mining, on the other hand, is to automatically process a data archive in order to find patterns that represent knowledge or, equivalently, information interesting to the user (not necessarily in response to a targeted query). Information retrieval and data mining invoke multidisciplinary techniques, including those from artificial intelligence, statistics, machine learning, pattern analysis, and others.

August

None

AT71.03

E-Business Development and Technology

To provide students with an overview of the key concepts, strategies, business models, and technologies behind E-business. The course will address the opportunities and challenges of doing business on the Internet, and the challenges of introducing e-business techniques into existing organizations. Essential global issues related to E-Business will be covered.

August

None

AT71.04

Decision Support Technologies

To provide essential Decision Support Technologies concepts and skills needed to build and implement applications to support decision making. The students will have hands-on experience with decision support software tools. Decision Support Technologies cover Decision Support Systems (DSS), Executive Information Systems (EIS), Group Support Systems (GSS), Expert Systems (ES), Data Warehousing, and Data Mining.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

71


Program Field of Study — Information Management (IM)

72

Code

Course

Description

AT71.05

Information Systems Development and Management

Information Systems constitute the primary application of computers and related techno-logy in enterprises and public organizations. Following a well-defined methodology helps to ensure the effective deployment of information technology in organizations. This includes determining and structuring requirements, project planning and execution, implementation, testing, and maintenance. Since information systems development is essentially a process, students will work in groups on real-life projects that conclude with the presentation of a prototype system.

August

AT02.13 Database Design

AT71.06

Human-Computer Interaction

Human-computer interaction (HCI) has become an area of great interest and concern. This course provides the concepts of HCI and user interfaces, focusing on user interface design and technologies. The students will gain principles and skills for designing interactive systems and Web-based applications.

August

AT02.13 Database Design

AT71.9001

ISelected Topic: Information Visualization

Information Visualization is a relatively new area of research that applies interactive graphical interfaces to reveal relationships and enable exploration of large complex sets of information. The goal of the course is to give you an overview of the field and hands-on experience with using visualization tools to analyze common types of information, such as the multidimensional data in databases and the semi-structured information in document collections and hypertext. This course will cover the following: “overview of the state-of-the-art “ perceptual, cognitive, and interactive factors that influence effective visualizations “ algorithms for extracting and analyzing relationships in data and text collections “ case studies using open-source software.

August

AT71.9002

Selected Topic: Seminar in Electronic Government

The course provides the students concepts and principles of e-governments. Insights of egovernment developments and challenges are discussed. All technical, managerial, and social aspects of e-government are addressed. The course is a mixture of lectures on fundamentals, student presentations of research from the academic journals, and a study report on selected e-government topics.

InterSem

Semester Offered Prerequisite

None


Program

(RS-GIS)

Field of Study — Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Code

Course

Description

AT76.01

Geographic Information Systems

This course introduces principles, concepts and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS): a decision support tool for planners and managers of spatial information. Database development, manipulation and spatial analysis techniques for information generation will be taught. Students will have the scope of using GIS for applications in their related fields such as natural resource management, environment, civil engineering, agriculture, information system, etc will be discussed through mini project and laboratory exercises.

January /August

None

AT76.02

Mapping Technology

The course aims at providing RS/GIS and Computer Mapping Technology (CMT) to students with an insight into both academic knowledge and practical skills at the entry level, and further aims at preparing students for more in-depth training in mapping technology and digital photo grammetry.

August

None

AT76.03

Remote Sensing

This course aims at providing students with principles of Remote Sensing (RS) technology, which is the tool to obtain information on the earth from deci-meter level to km level locally and globally. Basic image processing techniques and skill to analyze Remote Sensing image will be taught as well. Application examples of remote sensing technologies to various fields will be introduced to encourage students to use remote sensing in their research.

August

None

AT76.04

Aerospace Technology

Aerospace technology is being developed so fast that the latest information as well as general basic knowledge should be provided so as to apply them to the practical application of GIS, Remote Sensing, ICT, and Earth Science. Analysis and design methodology of aerospace systems will be given in this course, which is applicable to other modern engineering field.

January

None

AT76.06

Advanced Technologies in GIS

This course will familiarize students with advanced topics of spatial database accuracy assessment, 2D and 3D spatial modeling, analysis of discrete and continuous entities in space. There will be special emphasis on statistical analysis of spatial data. Students will be trained to develop models based on regression analysis and logical analysis. The course emphasizes a new emerging application of GIS in Health. Students will also learn customization and automation in GIS and also learn techniques to put the GIS on to Internet.

January

AT76.01 (Geographic Information Systems)

AT76.07

Advanced Mapping Technology

This course introduces RS/GIS and Computer Mapping Technology (CMT) students to advanced mapping technology about automated map recognition, map design, 3D map display and others.

January

AT76.02 (Mapping Technology) or Consent of Instructor.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

73


Program

(RS-GIS)

Field of Study — Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems

74

Code

Course

Description

AT76.08

Digital Photogrammetry

The course aims at providing RS/GIS and Computer Mapping Technology (CMT) students with an insight into both academic knowledge and practical skills at the entry level, and further aims at preparing students for more in-depth training in digital photogrammetry.

January

None

AT76.09

Digital Image Processing in Remote Sensing

This course will provide students with more techniques in digital image processing for remote sensing data analysis adding to AT76.03 Remote Sensing. This course emphasizes on implementation of algorithms as computer programs. The techniques taught in this course have application in several fields dealing with image data.

January

None

AT76.10

Advanced Remote Sensing

This course aims at providing students with advanced Remote Sensing analytical techniques required in various applications; how to extract high-level information from RS data. The techniques taught covers coupling of model parameters and remote sensing data for several applications including the most recent data assimilation techniques, atmospheric correction, Multi-temporal/Multi-Resolution data analysis, OGC Web Services such as Web Map Service, Web Feature Service, and Field Sensor Network. This lecture covers Synthetic Aperture Radar technique as well.

January

AT76.03 (Remote Sensing)

AT76.13

Remote Sensing Data Analysis

The course aims at providing RS/GIS image analysis tool through pre and post processing on satellite images. There will be special emphasis on images registration, extraction, classification and accuracy assessment. Students will be trained to develop a case study project at last.

January

AT7609 (Digital Image Processing in Remote Sensing) or permission from instructor.

AT76.14

Digital Photogrammetry

The course aims at providing basic photogrammetry concept, procedure, processing task and its result through project work. Error analysis is also considered and explained with various methods. Students will be trained through the software given in the lab.

August

None

AT76.15

Microwave Remote Sensing

This course is designed to provide fundamental knowledge and theories of microwave remote sensing. After reviewing the fundamentals of electromagnetics, both real aperture and synthetic aperture radar systems are to be introduced including physical principles.

August

Fundamental knowledge of electromagnetics at undergraduate level.

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(RS-GIS)

Field of Study — Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Code

Course

Description

AT76.16

Advanced Application Development in GIS

This course will familiarize students with spatial database development, geocoding concept, linking databases from different sources, implementing spatial analysis methods and models in advance GIS software towards developing applications. The course emphasizes a new emerging application of GIS in Health. Students will also learn customization and automation in GIS and techniques to put the GIS on to Internet and mobile devices.

January

AT76.17

Spatial Analysis Methods in GIS

This course will familiarize students with advanced topics of spatial database accuracy assessment, spatial modeling, analysis of discrete and continuous entities in space and Spatial Decision Methods. There will be special emphasis on statistical analysis of spatial data. Students will be trained to develop models based on regression analysis and logical analysis.

January

AT76.01 (Geographic Information Systems)

AT76.18

Advance Mapping Techniques

The course aims at providing RS/GIS and Computer Mapping Technology (CMT) to students with an insight into both academic knowledge and practical skills at the entry level, and further aims at preparing students for more in-depth training in mapping technology and digital photogrammetry.

August

None

AT76.9010

Selected Topic: Advanced Aerospace Technology/Global Positioning and Navigation

This course is organized as an extension of AT76.04 Aerospace Technology in the August Semester. After preparation of the mathematical background, the Earth Observation and Global Positioning Satellite are introduced from the view point of a total space system. Next focusing on the Global Positioning system, its basic principle and operational improvement are to be discussed. This course is intended to enhance understanding of Remote Sensing System/Global Positioning System utilization in various application fields, such as GIS, Mapping and RS.

January

AT76.04 Aerospace Technology is strongly recommended.

AT76.9011

Selected Topic: Microwave Remote Sensing

This course is designed to provide fundamental knowledge and theories of microwave remote sensing. After reviewing the fundamentals of electromagnetics, both real aperture and synthetic aperture radar systems are to be introduced including physical principles.

August

Fundamental knowledge of electromagnetics at undergraduate level.

Semester Offered Prerequisite AT76.01 (Geographic Information Systems)

75


Program

(RS-GIS)

Field of Study — Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems

76

Code

Course

Description

AT76.9012

Selected Topic: Workshop on Critical Discussion

This course is to expose students to critical scientific discussions aiming at fostering critical attitude on ideas, observation and logics in order to produce strong and consistent scientific conclusions. Each student will choose one scientific paper and present it, then they will discuss in detail with critical attitude. Each student is requested to raise at least one question during the discussion. The topic presented will be related to remote sensing or GIS. Instructor will guide presentations and discussions.

August

At least one of these courses: AT76.01 Geographic Information Systems (GIS), AT76.03 Remote Sensing, AT76.10 Advanced Remote Sensing, AT76.09 Digital Image Processing in Remote Sensing

AT76.9013

Selected Topic: Spatial Analysis Methods in GIS

This course will familiarize students with advanced topics of spatial database accuracy assessment, spatial modeling, analysis of discrete and continuous entities in space and Spatial Decision Methods. There will be special emphasis on statistical analysis of spatial data. Students will be trained to develop models based on regression analysis and logical analysis.

January

AT76.01 (Geographic Information Systems)

AT76.9014

Selected Topic: Advance Application Development in GIS

This course will familiarize students with spatial database development, geocoding concept, linking databases from different sources, implementing spatial analysis methods and models in advance GIS software towards developing applications. The course emphasizes a new emerging application of GIS in Health. Students will also learn customization and automation in GIS and techniques to put the GIS on to Internet and mobile devices.

January

AT76.01 (Geographic Information Systems)

AT76.9015

Selected Topic: Workshop on Image Analysis Study

The course aims at providing RS/GIS image analysis tool through pre and post processing on satellite images. There will be special emphasis on images registration, extraction, classification and accuracy assessment. Students will be trained to develop a case study project at last.

August

AT7609 (Digital Image Processing in Remote Sensing) or permission from instructor

AT76.9016

Selected Topic: Digital Photogrammetry

The course aims at providing basic photogrammetry concept, procedure, processing task and its result through project work. Error analysis is also considered and explained with various methods. Students will be trained through the software given in the lab.

January

None

AT76.9017

Selected Topic: Terrestrial Photogrammetry and Topography from Remote Sensors

The course aims at providing fundamental methods, including mathematical knowledge on terrestrial photogrammetry. Measurement concept, procedure, processing and its solution are in practice. Students will be trained through terrestrial photogrammetry equipment and software given in the lab. Student will be using the digital stereo data and extract topographic elements.

InterSem

Consent of Instructors

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(RS-GIS)

Field of Study — Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Code

Course

Description

AT76.9018

Selected Topic: Geoinformation Technology in Climate Change Applications.

Issues related to climate variability, energy, carbon sequestration, impacts on rain fall, agriculture and health will also be discussed as part of the course content. Land use computation of green house gases and field measurements of biomass for data base development will be discussed. Students will have the scope for understanding basic issues related to carbon trading and mainstreaming of climate change into sustainable development.

August

None

AT76.9019

Selected Topic: Data Modeling for Geospatial Information

The course aims at providing the way of Data Modeling for Geospatial Information to students with an insight into both academic knowledge and practical skills at the entry level, and further aims at preparing students for more in-depth training in understanding what model and modeling is, what object orientation and UML is, how to describe UML diagram, and what ISO and OGC standard is.

January

Consent of Instructor

AT76.9020

Selected Topic: Aerospace Technology

Aerospace technology is being developed so fast that the latest information as well as ge-neral basic knowledge should be provided so as to apply them to the practical application of GIS, Remote Sensing, ICT, and Earth Science. Analysis and design methodology of aerospace systems will be given in this course, which is applicable to other modern engineering field.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

77


Program Field of Study — Telecommunications (TC)

78

Code

Course

Description

AT77.01

Telecommunication Networks

To provide the student with an understanding of the evolution of telecommunication networks from traditional Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), through the emergence of data networks, local area networks, integrated services digital network (ISDN), broadband ISDN, development of fast packet switching, to the Internet. An overview on the role of telecommunications in developing countries, telecommunications organizations, telecommunication standardizations and services is also provided.

August

None

AT77.02

Signals, Systems and Stochastic Processes

To lay the theoretical foundation for understanding the behavior of deterministic and random signals in communication systems, and to complement the theory with extensive laboratory work.

August

None

AT77.04

Data Communications

To impart a unified systems view of the broad field of data and computer communications. The fundamental principles of data communications are thoroughly presented and then applied in data communication networking.

August

Consent of Instructor

AT77.05

Teletraffic Engineering

To provide an overview of basic teletraffic theory for network dimensioning and performance characterization of circuit switched public telecommunications networks, broadband networks as well as the Internet.

August

None

AT77.06

Multimedia Communications and Systems

Due to advances in digitization and coding, a number of information bearing services such as speech, data, text, audio, video graphics etc., can be processed, stored and retrieved in a unified manner. These information bearing services together loosely form multimedia. This course is intended to provide the fundamentals of multimedia and its use, storage and retrieval.

January

Consent of Instructor

AT77.07

Cellular Mobile System

To ensure that the student attains a good understanding of both analog and digital cellular mobile systems deployed worldwide.

January

None

AT77.09

Error Control Coding

To provide the students with a comprehensive understanding of error control techniques used in digital communications.

January

Consent of the Instructor

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Telecommunications (TC) Code

Course

Description

AT77.11

Digital Modulation Techniques

To provide the students with theoretical and practical knowledge of digital modulation methods for base-band and pass-band. The main emphasis is on digital transmission via carrier modulation as used for data modems and in wireless systems.

August

Consent of the Instructor

AT77.13

Digital Communications

To provide students with thorough understanding of the fundamentals in digital communications and information theory.

January

Consent of the Instructor

AT77.15

Satellite Communications

To provide a comprehensive understanding of satellite communications principles and related technologies involved. Starting from orbital mechanics related to spacecraft deployment, the course evolves through satellite link design, signal processing and access techniques, type of networks and finally drawing conclusion with performance and reliability of the system.

August

Consent of the Instructor

AT77.17

Network QoS

Communication networks of all types are developing at such a rapid pace and with the widespread deployment of networks that can support very high data transmission rates and a wide range of services, the task of providing the guaranteed Quality of Service (QoS) is becoming increasingly complex. The task is worthwhile because it provides the insight required to improve operating efficiency.

January

Consent of the Instructor

AT77.18

Optical Network

To provide students with practical knowledge and research background in optical networks. The emphasis will be on problems at the network layer that are unique to optical networks.

January

Consent of the Instructor

AT77.19

Optimization for Communications and Networks

To provide students with the fundamentals of various optimization techniques and demonstrate how they can be applied to problems related to communications and networks.

August

Consent of the Instructor

Semester Offered Prerequisite

79


INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management (DPMM) The aim of this academic program is to instill the necessary interdisciplinary capacities to manage and minimize the effects of disasters in people on the front lines of disaster response and preparedness. Upon completion of the program, graduates will have gained a profound scientific understanding of natural and human-made disasters. They will be able to assess risks properly, construct disaster management plans using appropriate tools and techniques, and apply suitable measures to mitigate risk. They will possess the skills necessary for handling complex emergency situations and to communicate with various stakeholders and policy makers on issues associated with disaster preparedness, mitigation and management. Given these skills and expertise, program graduates will be ready to play a leading role in protecting lives from the forceful rising tide of disasters. For more info: http://dpmm.ait.asia/ Professional Master’s Degree Program is a one-year academic program requiring 33 credits, spanning two semesters and a summer period of twelve weeks. August and January semesters provide lecture courses with the summer period reserved for an internship at disaster-related institutions and working out a project report of mutual interest to the student and the internship provider. This program is aimed at those who are currently working at disaster-related institutions and who would like to expand their knowledge base as well as to acquire new skills and the ability to meet the present and future performance challenges. Candidates for this program should have completed a bachelor’s degree and have gained at least 3 years of work experience in disaster-related areas. Interested students may shift to the regular master’s degree program if they meet its requirements. Master’s Degree Program is a 22-month academic program requiring 28 credits of coursework and 22 credits of master’s thesis study. The program is aimed at those who are looking for a career in disaster preparedness, mitigation and management, and at the faculty and staff of universities and research institutions. Students are expected to do a thesis directly related to aspects of natural or human-made disasters in their home countries. After successfully completing this program, these students may pursue further studies in the Doctoral Degree Program on “Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management”. Doctoral Degree Program is designed for faculty and staff of universities and for senior staff of government and international agencies. The program requires 18 credits of coursework and 66 credits of dissertation research study. Students are expected to have gained a recognized Master’s degree in the subject areas relevant to, or related with disaster preparedness, mitigation and management. Doctoral dissertations are expected to produce new, regionally relevant findings, solutions, or technologies for disaster preparedness, mitigation and management problems. The faculty from AIT and collaborating institutions will jointly supervise doctoral students. Post-graduate Certificate Program is a one-semester program that spans 15 weeks with a course load of 12 credits (4 courses of three credits each). This program will be offered both in January and August semesters. The credits earned in this program can be transferred to the AIT professional master’s or regular master’s degree program in “Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management”, as well as to programs in other appropriate fields of study. 80


Geosystem Exploration and Petroleum GeoEngineering (GEPG) Exploration and production of Earth resources and oil and gas in particular is a progressive and highly technical business that offers a wide-range job opportunities to practicing engineers. Exploration technologies for onshore and offshore geosystems are integrated in the curriculum. Students with orientation toward oil and gas industry will be trained specifically on Petroleum Geoengineering and will deal mostly with issues in the upstream sector (E &P), including fundamental of geoexploration, exploration geophysics, petrophysics, drilling and well completion, petroleum reservoir engineering and production technology. GEPG also exposes students to emerging issues in geotechnical and earth resources engineering related to rock and soil mechanics, oil tank foundation, gas pipeline construction as well as other petroleum infrastructure works. More than just offering an international environment for higher education and a pool of teaching faculty who are experts from the academe and the industry, the field would allow students to take in courses in geographic information system (GIS) and computational technology as well as project and finance management, areas where modern geoengineers need to be better equipped with.

Preferred Background For Professional Master’s and Master’s Program: A four-year bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent in Geological, Geophysical, Petroleum, Mining, Mechanical and Civil Engineering.

Doctoral Program: Master degree in in Geological, Geophysical, Petroleum, Mining, Mechanical and Civil Engineering. For more info: http://www.set.ait.asia/gepg/

Information and Communications Technologies Information and Communications Technologies field is a newly established area of study in response to the needs for the offering of a curriculum selectively drawn from the curricula of Telecommunications (TC), Computer Science, and Information Management (CSIM). With strong emphasis on communications aspects - rather than on the aggregation of hardware, software, networks, equipment and related industries - ICT recognizes the important role of information services and applications in the creation of a complete ICT infrastructure.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program Undergraduate degree in Computer Science or Computer Engineering, communications, telecommunications, electrical engineering, electronics, applied mathematics/ statistics and information systems.

81


For Doctoral Program Master’s degree in a field relevant to the chosen program of study.

Curriculum For the 1st and 2nd semesters, ICT students will take courses from CSIM and TC. A set of 2-4 new courses will be introduced to characterize the ICT features in the 2nd year. For more info: http://www.ict.ait.asia/

Offshore Technology and Management (OTM) The program of this first kind of regional post-graduate study in Offshore Technology and Management is designed to combine the application-oriented course works, field studies and internships, by which graduates are expected to be equipped with high skills and knowledge-and-practice-readiness to mitigate the shortages of skilled manpower in the upstream sector of oil and gas industry (E&P). As an industrial applicationoriented program, OTM with its unique characteristics offers flexible study structure which allows students to build their own area of specialization besides those recommended areas. With the available teaching expertise; library and laboratory facilities; multitude offered courses from schools; skilled and professional faculty members and staffs; strong collaborations with overseas partner universities in Europe, Asia, Australia and North America; and strongly supported by oil and gas industries, OTM post-graduate program has become one of the most suitable post-graduate study for engineers and young managers to pursue higher professional careers in oil and gas industry and government bodies as well.

Program Structure for OTM Awarded Degrees 1. Professional Master of Engineering (PME) Students have completed the study, if he or she has earned 33 accumulated credits with minimum Grade Percentage Average (GPA) not less than 2.75. The period of study will last, respectively, for 12 months and not later than 2 years for full-time and part-time or flexible students.

2. Master of Engineering or Master of Science (M.Eng or M.Sc) Students, who enroll in the regular postgraduate program studying in Offshore Technology and Management, will complete his or her full-time study in 22 months. The degree will be awarded, if he or she has earned 48 credits with minimum accumulated GPA of 2.75 for the first 2 semesters.

Qualification of Applicants Bachelor degree in Engineering or Science in related fields (Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Petroleum Engineering, Geology, Geophysics). At least 3 years of work experience in related areas of oil and gas industry. Proficiency in English. 82


Enrollment

Deadline for Application

August

15 June

January

15 November

Recommended Study Plan 1. Professional Master of Engineering (PME)

Semester

Recommended courses

Credits per courses

Total credits

August

4

3

12

January

4

3

12

Internship

9

9

Inter-semester

2

2*

May

Total accumulated credits for PME students

33/495 Contact Hours

2. Master of Engineering or Master of Science (M.Eng or Msc)

August January

Thesis

12

12*

Thesis

10

10*

Total accumulated credits for ME students

48/ 540 Contact Hours

* Only for M.Eng students

83


(DPMM)

Program

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management

84

Code

Course

Description

IN84.01

Managing Disasters

Disasters are extraordinary events that require special knowledge and skills to tackle the damage, casualties and disruption they cause. The field of disaster management is relatively new and rapidly evolving and as the world population grows and urbanization spreads, more and more individuals and infrastructures are getting exposed to potentially damaging disaster events and the threat of large-scale losses. Disaster management began to grow beyond the ‘response and relief’ environment and its focus is shifting to risk analysis, communications, risk prevention/mitigation, and social and economic recovery. This requires a new skill base for disaster managers and this course is aimed at providing students necessary knowledge and skills in disaster management by covering all the components of the disaster cycle (mitigation/prevention, preparedness, response and recovery) and beyond. This course covers the principle and practices in disaster management which can be adapted to jurisdiction of various sizes, at various levels and various situations.

August

None

IN84.11

Mitigation of Earthquake Disasters

The earthquake has wide range effects and can be devastating to people. To effectively minimize the earthquake disasters, its mitigation concept is inevitably involved in many braches of sciences. The course provides the essential knowledge on the natures and evaluations of each earthquakes impact including ground shaking, earthquake-induced landslide, liquefaction and tsunami. Consequently, the course introduces the measures, emergency response and recovery plans, strategies for protection and loss estimation and risk and vulnerability analysis against these disasters.

January

None

IN84.12

Floods and Droughts

Floods and droughts are one of the most destructive natural phenomena in Asia and around the world. They can cause serious damage to life, properties, public utilities and infrastructures. They hamper social and economic growth of developing countries. Knowledge on hydrology of floods and droughts; understanding on their causes, frequencies and magnitudes are required to achieve effective management and mitigation measures of floods and droughts.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


(DPMM)

Program

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management Code

Course

Description

IN84.13

Georisk Engineering

Geotechnical Engineers are increasingly challenged to solve problems arising from the impact of human activities on the geological environment but also from natural geo hazards. The economic impact resulting from geological hazards, in particular in developing countries, is significant. The purpose of this course is to educate students so that they are able to understand the principles and reasons of geological risks. They will be educated to identify and quantify the geo risk and, the engineering precautions to avoid or prevent the hazards and mitigate impacts resulting from such risks.

None

IN84.14

Tsunami Science and Preparedness

The course will provide students with the fundamental knowledge of tsunami science, understanding of its consequence as catastrophic destruction to human and to reduce the damage by appropriate mitigation and preparedness.

None

IN84.15

Energy Technologies for Disaster Warning and Management

Reliable energy supply is a prerequisite to effectively manage both pre and post disaster situations. Effective warning systems in predisaster situation can greatly reduce the devastating losses and suffering to human, livestock and others. A reliable energy supply is therefore absolutely essential for the warning and communication systems for evacuation. In a post-disaster situation, source of energy and appropriate technologies to deliver them will be important to save lives and to start rehabilitation. This course is particularly designed for managers and practitioners to give an overview of suitable energy technology options for disaster warning systems and how to meet the energy needs in a post disaster situation. This course also provides basic knowledge on how to quickly set up temporary energy supply systems. Demonstration of such systems will also be covered in laboratory and case studies.

None

IN84.16

Climate Prediction and Early Warning Systems

Weather and climate, which is nothing but the state of the atmosphere at any given time, plays an important role in our present and future environment. Early warning System consists of climate prediction and translation of this severe weather/climate information into potential hazards understood by the users. The course is designed in five simple modules covering basic understanding of earth’s atmospheric system, techniques of weather and climate forecasting and the generation of Early Warning System with application in various hydro-meteorological hazards.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

January

None

85


(DPMM)

Program

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management

86

Code

Course

Description

IN84.21

Remote Sensing and GIS for Disaster Mitigation

This course introduces the basic principles of Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) and the major applications for disaster monitoring and management.

August

None

IN84.22

Geospatial Technologies for Disaster Risk Management

Remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) is a very effective tool for spatial information acquisition and management. While remote sensing has become operational information extraction system with affordable data cost, GIS provides flexibility in integrating various information and studying spatial dependency in disaster related phenomena comprehensively and affectively. These two technologies are popular in developed countries and getting popularity in the region too. This course will equip students with tools that will assist them in assessing the existing situation of a disaster and vulnerability and identifying factors that need to be considered in planning, decision making in disaster risk reduction.

January

None

IN84.31

Human Conflicts and Humanitarian Emergency Management

The main objective of the course is to focus on nature and causes of human conflicts. It aims at searching possible solutions to the problems arising out of the conflicts: both short and long-term with particular emphasis on the roles of the development workers and policy makers.

August

None

IN84.32

Health and Ecological Risk Management in Disaster Situations

The course deals with the risks natural and manmade disasters which pose danger to the society and ecosystems. Wide varieties of chemicals are discharged into the environment intentionally or accidentally and cause widespread pollution. They may gradually bio-accumulate in the environment or cause immediate and acute toxicity of humans. Natural or man-made, typhoons, Bhopal chemical disaster or the Avian flu pandemic, the disasters necessitate prevention of the spread of diseases and illnesses as the first priority of the governing authorities. The provision of water supply, basic sanitation services and waste management are essential elements of any disaster management/ mitigation programs and special skills/technologies are needed to handle and mitigate the ensuing problems.

None

IN84.33

Coastal Resiliency and Natural Disaster Preparedness

This course is designed to present students with a background on the concepts and issues associated with Coastal Community Resilience. It will provide them with an understanding of the tools necessary to assess CCR within a community and then introduce techniques for designing and implementing an effective resiliency enhancement program. The curriculum will also analyze natural and anthropogenic factors influencing Coastal Community Resilience. The focus is on the human dimension of coastal hazards rather than disaster science.

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


(DPMM)

Program

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management Code

Course

Description

IN84.34

EIA Framework for Disaster Management

UN experts reviewing bitter lessons learned from the last tsunami disaster have noted that one of the major errors of our tackling the event was that the tool of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) was not incorporated into the existing Disaster Management Plan. This course deals with the EIA framework providing a platform for all other disaster-related tools. The platform facilitates their application in a holistic way combining specific and strategic issues through, e.g., the Rapid and the Strategic Environmental Assessments (REA, SEA).

IN84.35

Planning and Implementation of Disaster Emergency Management

The course focuses on critical issues and associated post disaster phenomena for analysis and planning in meeting emergencies and needs of the affected areas and communities. This will provide scope for working out preparedness measures for the future to deal and cope up with the disaster impacts efficiently and effectively. The discussions will confine to most common disasters with higher frequency of occurrence such as flood, drought and cyclones, etc. The course participants will be trained for undertaking practical works relating to planning and implementation of emergency management using a practicum on identified natural disaster(s).

January

None

IN84.36

Community-Based Disaster Risk Management

The CBDRM course provides an opportunity for participants to understand the concepts behind disaster risk reduction, studying past trends in disaster risk and occurrence; looking at current activities implemented by organizations, NGOs and practitioners and; appreciating the importance of community participation in the disaster risk reduction and management process. The course covers aspects as diverse as stakeholder analysis, vulnerability and resource assessment, participatory approaches in CBDRR, risk reduction implementation, advocacy and challenges faced. In addition to the regular class lectures and discussions, a 2-day field visit is included for practical learning.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

87


(DPMM)

Program

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management

88

Code

Course

Description

ED79.07

Selected Topic: Disaster Management in Urban Environmental Planning

Developing countries are experiencing a rise of economic, social and environmental losses due to frequent disasters occurring in urban areas. The frequency and intensity of such disasters are increasing with rapid urbanization, industrialization and population growth. Most urban disasters are natural phenomenon intensified by man-made interventions in the environment. This raises the necessity of incorporating the concepts of disaster preparedness, management and mitigation in urban development and environmental planning. This course is designed to provide a broad understanding on the approaches to disaster management in urban areas and, particularly community-based disaster management methods.

IN84.9002

Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance

API: DMHA or the Asia Pacific Initiative on Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance is a hybrid online disaster training course via video conferencing and content on an ecourse management system. This course is offered through a multiple site video teleconference system that connects all participating educational institutions with students on their respective campuses. The video teleconference connections are established through Internet protocol and network bridging. More than ten institutions around the globe continue to collaborate and share resources in the planning, organizing and delivering of the course. It has a website that has several sections starting with an introductory seminar covering a broad range of topics related to Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (DMHA). Presentations originate from participating member institutions, and include contributions from academics, practitioners, government policy makers and international organizations. Additional materials and resources are found in the website, and whenever possible, include live links to source information. API: DMHA has been offered at AIT since the inception of DPMM Program in August 2008. Any member of the AIT Community can be a part of the course without extra tuition fee. Students get a special certificate after the completion of the course.

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

August

None


Program

(GEPG)

Area of Study — Geosystem Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering Code

Course

Description

CE71.63

Workflow in Oil and Gas Operations

This course aims to give a better understanding of the practical side of the oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations to the students. The course will be a combination of lectures, seminars and field visits to oil and gas companies in the SE Asian countries in order to witness the actual operations. The lectures will consist of different sessions, each of which will take between 2 to 4 weeks, covering petroleum geology and geophysics (G&G), petrophysics, drilling, reservoir management and production technology. The teaching of the course is largely carried out by the invited industrial experts from major companies. The course studies the following: practical works of petroleum geology and geophysics, seismic stratigraphy, petrophysics and well logging, petroleum reservoir management, petroleum drilling operation, petroleum production technology, project works.

January

None

CE71.65

Exploration Geophysics

To provide a comprehensive and advanced knowledge on geophysical exploration techniques, their applications and limitations in solving various geological, hydrogeological, geotechnical, and environmental problems, with an emphasis on mineral and hydrocarbon exploration. The course studies the following: overview on geophysical exploration, applications and limitations; seismic: basic theory, seismic data processing and interpretation; refraction and reflection seismic; 3D seismic; electric: natural and artificial electric methods; electric imaging technique; geoelectric forward and inverse analysis; magnetic and gravity: fundamental relationship, field procedures, data reduction, processing and interpretation; well logging: basic well logging types and interpretation; other geophysical exploration methods; exploration project planning and management; advanced geophysical topics.

January

None

CE71.66

Petroleum Reservoir Engineering

This course provides fundamental knowledge of properties and behaviors of petroleum reservoir and hydrocarbons in the reservoir through the following topics: Rock and fluid properties, volumetric calculation, reservoir types and drive mechanisms, material balance, decline curve analysis, fluid flow in porous media, well testing, immisicible displacement.

August

None

CE71.68

Well Logging Interpretation

The course provides both basic and advanced knowledge on well logging and formation evaluation, including Quicklook Log, Full and Advanced Interpretation and softcomputing analyses, new types of logging such as FMI and NMR and the special types of formation, e.g., fractured basement reservoir.

Inter-Semester Period

CE71.70 or as allowed by the instructor.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

89


Program

(GEPG)

Area of Study — Geosystem Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

The course is designed in such a way that the staffs from oil and gas company, who need to update the knowledge on well logging and formation evaluation techniques to work in a subsurface team, can attend it as traing course in relatively short period. The course studies the following: review on basics of well logging: logging types, terminology, logging contracts, preparation of a logging program; coring, well mud logging; quicklook log interpetation: basic quality control, identifying the reservoir, identifying the fluid and contact, calculating porosity and hydrocarnon saturation, permeability determination; full intepretation: net sand definition, porosity calculation, Archie saturation, permability; advanced interpretation techniques: saturtion/height analysis, shaly sand analysis, carbonate, fractured granite, multi-mineral/ statistical models, FMI, NMR, thermal decay neutron interpretation, ANN and Fuzzy logic; production geology and reservoir engineering issues. CE71.69

CE71.70

90

Fundamentals of Geosystem Exploration

Petrophysics

The course provides a fundamental understanding on geological and geophysical techniques to explore a geosystem or a part of its that need to be sustainably exploited or developed for economic and industrial growth of society, especially those are potential of mineral, groundwater and petroleum resources. The course is particularly useful for engineers who would like to further specialize in hydrocarbon exploration and production. The course studies the following: geosystem concept in global and local scale; fundamentals of rocks and minerals; geological processes; geosystems as targets of geological and geophysical exploration; mineral, groundwater and petroleum resources; elements of structural geology, petroleum geology and petroleum hydrogeology; geological and geophysical exploration techniques; mineral exploration; and aspects of hydrocarbon exploration and production (E&P).

August

Petrophysics is one of the key courses for integrated and advanced studies in geophysical and reservoir engineering. The course is designed for geoscientists and reservoir engineers in demand throughout the petroleum industry, especially for those who work in an integrated asset teams. The aim of the course is to provide with the tools and techniques to fully characterize a geosystem in term of physical properties, in particular for a petroleum reservoir.

January

None

\

None


Program

(GEPG)

Area of Study — Geosystem Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

The course studies the following: introduction to geology and petrophysics; overview of the physical properties of rocks and different methods to determine and analyze them; density, porosity, permeability, wettability, internal surface (fractal geometry), electrical (resistivity, conductivity, dielectric constant, induced polarization, magnetic, acoustic or elastic properties (velocities, modules, stress-strain relationship), thermal properties etc.; correlation between petrophysical parameters; well logging techniques; near-wellbore environment; invasion profiles and characteristics; darcy’s law; flow to vertical and horizontal wells; formation waters characteristics and resistivity; presentation of petrophysical data; practical work with well log, core and well pressure data; advanced/customized topics in petrophysics. CE71.71

Drilling & Well Completion

With the increasing demand and consumption for both oil and natural gas, most of all oil & gas companies accelerate their exploration and production activities in an effort to maintain the production output. Drilling has been one of the forefront core operations. The main objective of this course is to outline the core subjects in drilling and well completion operations to help understand better the well design, risk assessment, cost involved and environmental impact. Some local case studies and experiences with advanced drilling technology will be presented. An important part of the course is on petroleumrelated rock mechanics to provide the students with a needed background regarding drilling stability and conduction of acoustic logging.

August

None

January

None

The course studies the following: petroleum-related rock mechanics, elasticity, failure mechanics, stresses around boreholes, micromechanical models, mechanical properties, stability during drilling, fracturing, reservoir compaction, basic drilling equipment, casing design and cementation, drilling fluids, well completion, risk assessment and management, management of oil spill during operation, directional drilling and local case studies. CE71.72

Petroleum Production Engineering

This course provides knowledge of petroleum production system with the main focus on subsurface production (from the reservoir up to the wellhead). The course studies the following: analysis of production system performance, flows in pipes, nodal analysis, artificial lift methods, and production enhancement.

91


(GEPG)

Program

Area of Study — Geosystem Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering

92

Code

Course

Description

CE71.12

Rock Mechanics

Rock mechanics is a principal subject in geological and geotechnical engineering. It plays a vital role in the exploration and production of oil and other natural resources; mining, construction of civil infrastructures, transportation routes, and water resource facilities, hydropower projects; and in the prevention and mitigation of natural hazards particularly landslides. Knowledge on rock mechanics is essential for infrastructure development projects of all countries where there are existence of mountainous terrains. The course studies the following: properties of intact rock, rock mass and discontinuities, index properties and classifications, strength and deformability properties, moisture-sensitive and time-dependent properties of weak rocks and related problems, deformability of rock mass and related problems, groundwater in rock mass, foundations on rocks, shear strength along discontinuities, rock slope engineering, permeability and rock mechanics for petroleum engineering application.

January

None

CE71.13

Advanced Soils Mechanics and Testings

The soil-engineering field of study involves three categories. The first one deals with the fundamental and advanced principles of the mechanics of soil behavior both under laboratory and field conditions. The second, deals with applied topics such as foundations and earth structures, excavations and soil improvement, etc . This course deals with the fundamental and advanced principles of soil behavior as a prerequisite for applied courses related to the design of foundations, earth structures, excavations and soil improvement, etc. This course also provides fundamentals and advanced laboratory and field testing of soils. The course studies the following: soil formations and their relevance to engineering properties, mechanical analysis, index properties and soil classifications, effective stress principle for saturated and partially saturated soils, permeability, seepage analysis, stresshistory and compressibility of soils, stress distribution in soils, stress-strain behavior and strength characteristics, stress path method and stress-strain theories, laboratory and field testing.

August

None

CE70.23

Project Performance Management

The efficient use of construction resources is essential to effective project management. This course provides knowledge of the modern techniques used for assessing the level of productivity, forecasting optimum levels of productivity and deciding how to reach productivity goals through strategic management

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


(GEPG)

Program

Area of Study — Geosystem Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

actions. The course studies the following: strategic management, performance management and measurement, key performance indicators, budget allocation systems, productivity in construction, factors affecting construction productivity, productivity measurement, productivity improvement during design and construction. CE81.81

The Economics of Oil and Gas

Oil and natural gas combined together contribute more than 50% of the world energy demand. Both oil and natural gas would play a significant role in the global primary energy supply in coming decades. Oil and natural gas are particularly important in Asia and the Pacific region both in terms of production and consumption. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to the concepts of economics of oil and natural gas development, production and trading, particularly in the upstream oil and gas industries. The course studies the following: oil and gas market fundamentals and pricing mechanism, oil and gas production and development economics, oil and gas exploration economics and decision analysis.

August

None

AT76.01

Geographic Information Systems

This course introduces principles, concepts and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS): a decision support tool for planners and managers of spatial information. Database development, manipulation and spatial analysis techniques for information generation will be taught. Students will have the scope of using GIS for applications in their related fields such as natural resource management, environment, civil engineering, agriculture, information system, etc will be discussed through miniproject and laboratory exercises. The course studies the following: mapping concept, data structure, data management techniques, data acquisition, global positioning system interface, data manipulation and analysis, map output generation.

August

None

CE71.9001

Decision Analysis and Risk Management for O&G Industry

This is a customized course for the PME-GEPG program in HCM City. The international oil and gas industry is one of the most important, highly capital-intensive and risky industries at global, regional, and local levels. Therefore, it is very crucial to carry out prudent economic evaluations of any capital investment’s commitment before resources are committed. This requires a through understanding of the techniques available and their application by all those involved in decision-making. Furthermore, Joint venture is now becoming the primary form of business organization in the oil and gas industry. Professionals need to know the risks involved in such business organizations, how to properly manage the risks.

August

None

93


Program

(GEPG)

Area of Study — Geosystem Exploration & Petroleum Geoengineering

94

Code

Course

Description

CE71.9004

Petroleum Geochemistry

Petroleum geochemistry evolved rapidly in the period 1970-2000 and is now a mature discipline widely used in many aspects of petroleum exploration. If one thinks of the petroleum system, petroleum geochemistry plays a role in characterizing the source rocks, evaluating thermal history of the source rocks and whether they have matured enough to generate oil or gas, monitoring migration pathways and playing a significant role in reservoir characterization.

January

None

CE81.9018

Advanced Drilling Project Management and Offshore Safety Course

The main objective of this course is to guide OTM students to have a better understanding in the Oil & Gas Offshore Core Operations. The course will outline the up-to-date technology utilized in Today’s Drilling Operations, such as the use of MWD and LWD, The Application of Underbalanced Drilling. In addition, it is extremely important for the students to have a thorough understanding on the Safety Aspects, particularly related to offshore working environment. The course will also introduce the concept of Project Management so that the students will have a better understanding on working as a team as well as principle on how to manage the works/projects, which is imperative for their future work. The course studies the following: basic directional drilling techniques, the use of MWD/LWD, new drilling Technology, well cost and planning, the concept of project management and the fundamental of offshore safety with local and international case studies.

January

CE81.9015 Drilling and Well Completion Operations

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Information & Communications Technologies (ICT) Code

Description

Rationale

AT80.01

Information and Communication Technology Applications: Users and Producers

The course aims to give a broad exposure to issues related to user-centered design and implementation of services and products related to various information and communication technologies. The focus is in the application areas of education, healthcare, governance and rural development.

August

None

AT80.02

Information and Communication Technology Applications: Project Design

Most ICT applications are developed in projects for which a number of innovative ideas have to be created and critical decisions need to take place. This course provides a practical approach to the project design process for ICT applications. The focus is on the use of creative idea generation and problem solving methods, and assessment of appropriate ICT design methods. These issues will be demonstrated through a relevant ICT-application design project implemented by the students, and resulting in a project design document.

January

Information and Communication Technology Applications: Users and Producers

Semester Offered Prerequisite

95


Program Field of Study — Offshore Technology and Management (OTM)

96

Code

Course

Description

CE72.11

Computer Methods of Structural Analysis

This course offers fundamental principles of modern structural analysis as a common platform for all applications in structural engineering. The course aims to equip structural engineers with methodologies in line with the fast development of computing technology. This course investigates structural modeling concept; static and kinematic requirements for a structural system; deformation of one-dimensional structural members under bending, axial and shear actions, and due to temperature changes; discrete modeling of structural systems; matrix force and matrix displacement methods; direct stiffness method; introduction to numerical methods and solution techniques appropriate to discrete structural systems; condensation and substructuring techniques for largescale structural systems.

August

None

CE72.21

Structural Dynamics

As modern structures are becoming more slender and light, they are also becoming more susceptible to dynamic loadings. Examples of real-life dynamic problems that frequently confront civil engineers include: aerodynamic stability of longspan bridges, earthquake response of multi-story buildings, impact of moving vehicles on highway structures, etc. The traditional engineering solutions to these problems, based on “static force” and “static response”, are no longer valid in most cases. Many of these problems have to be tackled by applying knowledge of structural dynamics. Thus, a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior of structures as well as the underlying principles is essential for structural engineers. This course investigates dynamics of simple structures (single-degree-of-freedom systems); multi-degree-of-freedom structures; continuous structures; earthquake response; random vibrations; control of dynamic response.

August

None

CE81.71

Introduction to Offshore Structural Engineering

The objectives are to introduce subjects of offshore structural engineering and to consider the factors, which influence the design of offshore structures. A broad approach is introduced initially to provide a background to field development, geology and drilling technology. Later, more specific subject matter is introduced to explain the ocean environment and its influence upon structural response. The remaining part of the course deals with structural issues such as static and dynamic behaviour, materials, fatigue, and corrosion. The course investigates introduction and overview of field development; The geological background; The ocean environment; Fluid, current, wind, and earthquake loading; The response of various types of offshore structure; Structural mechanics; Static and dynamic analysis; Sea-bed geotechnics; Fatigue and corrosion; Materials of construction; Codes of Practice and design recommendations.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Offshore Technology and Management (OTM) Code

Course

Description

CE81.74

Design of Fixed Offshore Structures

The main objective is to provide an analysis and design procedure for a complex structure, which is easy to use. Also, the procedure will provide an insight into the behaviour of offshore jackets so that the preliminary design of a jacket for a drilling platform, production station, etc, can be carried out conveniently. The course investigates introduction; Design criteria for environmental conditions; Platform shapes and weights; Wave forces; Member design; Joint design; Foundation piles; Load-out, transportation, installation; Conductors, risers and Jtubes; Corrosion and cathodic protection; The safety case; De-commissioning and abandonment.

August

None

CE81.9012

Structural Safety and Reliability of Fixed Offshore

The uncertainties on design parameters, environmental loadings, material strength, soil properties, etc. provoke by climate changes that used for structural assessment have become the recent issues for verification of ‘fitness for purpose’ of fixed offshore platforms around the world. The course investigates probability theory and statistics, structural safety, reliability system, safety index, Limit State function, reliability methods, Goodness-of-fit tests, MonteCarlo simulation, etc.

August

None

CE81.72

Dynamics of Offshore Structures

Offshore structures always undergo dynamic environment during their service life time. This course provides theoretical aspect of dynamics of offshore structures, focused more for steel jacket platforms. The course investigates frequency of platform, random environmental forces, pile-soil model, modal analysis

January

CE81.71, CE81.74, CE72.11 and CE72.21

CE81.73

Fabrication and Marine Operation Engineering

This course is focused on theoretical and practical aspects of fabrication and marine installation of steel jacket platforms that required by fabrication engineers and offshore field engineers. The course investigates yard, lifting, load-out, sea-transportation and offshore installation

January

CE81.71 and CE81.74

CE81.9006

Advanced Steel Materials & Design for Offshore Steel Platforms

The above course will be available in August semester. The material to be presented will be slightly different as to be updated every semester to include the latest information. This course is focused on theoretical elastic design and practical aspects of steel jacket template platforms. The course investigates metallurgy, manufacture, fabrication, tubular, shapes and line pipes, welding, mechanical properties, steel section design, steel connections, plate girder.

January

CE81.74

Semester Offered Prerequisite

97


Program Field of Study — Offshore Technology and Management (OTM)

98

Code

Course

Description

CE81.9011

Subsea Technology

This course will emphasize on design of subsea pipeline and associated structures according to international design codes such as DNV, ABS, API and NORSOK. In addition, students will be introduced to advanced subsea components design including stinger design, flexible riser design. The course investigates subsea pipeline, subsea structures, pipelay analysis, risers, and umbilical.

January

None

CE81.81

The Economics of Oil and Gas Projects

Oil and natural gas combined together contribute more than 50% of the world energy demand. Both oil and natural gas would play a significant role in the global primary energy supply in coming decades. Oil and natural gas are particularly important in Asia and the Pacific region both in terms of production and consumption. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to the concepts of economics of oil and natural gas development, production and trading, particularly in the upstream oil and gas industries. The course investigates oil and gas market fundamentals and pricing mechanism; oil and gas production and development economics.

August

None

CE81.9008

Economic Risk and Decision Analysis for the Oil and Gas Industry

The international oil and gas industry is one of the most important, highly capital-intensive and risky industries at global, regional, and local levels. Therefore, it is very crucial to carry out prudent economic evaluations of any capital investment’s commitment before resources are committed. This requires a through understanding of the techniques available and their application by all those involved in decision-making. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to the science of decision making and risk theory. Focus on the application of decision analysis, utility theory and real option valuations to the analysis of strategic decision problems characterized by risk, uncertainty and management flexibility. The course investigates oil and gas project evaluations under risk and uncertainty; decision analysis; real options valuation.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Offshore Technology and Management (OTM) Code

Course

Description

CE81.9020

Project and Contract Management for Oil and Gas Exploration & Production and Construction

This course provides comprehensive framework for different types of Oil and Gas Exploration & Production and Construction projects and contracts. It is aimed to use academic know ledges, international practices and case studies as main tools to improve students and professionals’ capability building in project and contract management for Oil and Gas Exploration & Production and Construction projects. This course covers project management and contract management aspects including contract interpretation, quality and HSE management, interface management, cost control and planning, document control, information technology, commercial and finance, liability, and risks management for Oil and Gas Exploration & Production and Construction projects.

January

CE81.9021

Special Topics in Offshore HSE and Project Management

The objectives of this course is to introduce the Health Safety and Environmental (HSE) Aspects, particularly related to offshore working environment, so that the students are aware with the involved hazardous and risk. The course also introduces the Concept in Project Management and Risk Management in order for the students to have a better understanding on working as a team as well as principle on how to manage the works/projects, which is imperative for their future work. The course investigates fundamental of heath safety and environmental concepts essential for offshore operations, the concept of project management, project cost analysis, control and planning, with local and international case studies.

January

None

CE81.9016

Asset Integrity Management for Oil and Gas Industry

This course provides a comprehensive framework of major aspects of asset management, system reliability, and risk management in offshore oil and gas exploration and production assets. The course introduces the process to develop and implement management strategies for both singular and a portfolio of oil and gas facilities. Developing asset management strategies requires defining “asset” and determining its condition and monetary value through quantitative integrity and condition assessment, from which decisions can be made on how to best allocate human and financial resources to preserve or increase an asset’s (or portfolio of assets’) value. Course content also includes the formulation of procedures for ensuring adequate safety and performance at the component and system levels, and introduction to international practice and case studies of asset management in oil and gas E&P facilities.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

99


School of Environment, Resources & Development

Agricultural Systems & Engineering

102

Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management

109

Gender and Development Studies

Natural Resource Management

144

148

Energy

118

Food Engineering and Bioprocess Technology

Regional and Rural Development Planning

Urban Environmental Management

130

Pulp and Paper Technology

154

Environmental Engineering and Management

157

Agri-Business Management

Climate Change and Sustainable Development

Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation & Management

168

170

178

Energy and Environment

Energy Business Management

184

192

Greater Mekong Sub-region Development Studies

Water Technology and Management

206 100

160 167

Interdisciplinary Programs

100

140

200


Agricultural Systems and Engineering (ASE) Agricultural Systems The Agricultural Systems specialization provides a holistic understanding of small holder agriculture, the type mostly found in Asia. It provides comprehensive understanding of physical and biological production factors from the perspective of the producers, including how economic and social forces affect farm enterprises. The key focus are on agricultural systems development; land and crop productivity management; soil and water management; crop eco-physiology; crop modeling; agricultural environments; promotion of technology transfer and farming systems. This specialization prepares the graduates for sustainable agricultural development and management.

Agricultural Engineering Agricultural Engineering specialization places emphasis on the application of engineering principles to agriculture to increase the efficiency fo food production through effective use of inputs and management of natural resources. It provides a broad knowledge of farm machines; machinery & equipment design; selection and management; controlled environment agriculture; precision agriculture; terramechanics; soil & water engineering and instrumentation and measurement techniques. It prepares professionals to develop, adopts and disseminate knowledge and technologies that focus on the engineering and management of biological and agricultural resources.

Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in agricultural sciences, agricultural technology, agricultural or mechanical engineering or related fields.

Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in a relevant field and detailed dissertation research outline must be submitted with the application.

101


Program Field of Study — Agricultural Systems & Engineering (ASE)

102

Code

Course

Description

ED70.01

Farm Production Engineering

Agricultural machinery can contribute to reduction of human drudgery, increase in productivity and reduction in peak labor demands. This course provides broad knowledge of the various farm production activities carried out by different agricultural machines and equipment.

August

None

ED70.03

Agricultural System Analysis

Agricultural systems with biological components interacting with social and economic elements are extremely complex in nature. This course is designed to introduce concepts and techniques of systems analysis in an agricultural context and to illustrate the value of holistic approach through a number of quite different case studies. The manager or the administrator of such a system constantly looks forward to those techniques or methods, which him in planning, scheduling and controlling the activities in the system. The course should help students in identifying rational ways to improve the efficiency of agricultural systems.

January

None

ED70.05

Design and Testing of Agricultural Equipment

This course is essential for practicing design engineers, providing combined theoretical and practical techniques as well as using computer graphic design that can improve the design efficiency and improvement in performance of agricultural equipment through standard testing and evaluation. Students will have their opportunities to use engineering principle, innovation and computer aided design to develop selected machine and tool that appropriated to agricultural production in most of Asia.

August

None

ED70.06

Agricultural Systems

The course is gives an overview for the Agricultural & Aquatic Systems and Engineering Program. It emphasizes holistic systems approach as a pre-requisite for consideration of the contribution of agriculture to sustainable development. It reviews the wide range of farming systems in Asia with an assessment of the constraints to, and the potential for, their expansion. It looks at key issues of sustainability and the impact of resource limitations on farmer decision making and productivity.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Agricultural Systems & Engineering (ASE) Code

Course

Description

ED70.07

Agricultural Environments

Increased food production depends on judicious use of the available agro-ecological resources. Therefore, maintenance of vegetation, management of pests, conservation and efficient management of soil, water and nutrients, and plant-residue management are essential components of appropriate land utilization. The selection of suitable crops and cropping systems and their management require knowledge of the climatic, physical and biotic determinants of plant growth, both in terms of their magnitude and quality. This course provides information on short-term and long-term changes of the environment, how they could be modified by land-management practices, and their consequences for land productivity.

August

None

ED70.08

Crop Productivity Management

Crop productivity depends on eco-physiological conditions and crop management practices, and their interactions. Crops respond differently to soil and climatic conditions. The selection of suitable crops and crop-management practices for given geographical locations is critical for the sustainability of crop productivity. Crop productivity management demands a systems approach. Hence, understanding soil and aerial environments and their variability, performance of crops under such changing conditions while maintaining soil parameters that govern soil productivity are important in the overall management of crop productivity. This course provides students with an understanding of soil productivity, the dynamics of soil processes and their relevance for biomass production of crops.

August

None

ED70.09

Livestock Production Systems

The course offers a broad knowledge on livestock production systems which is a component of small hold farming systems. The course develops an appreciation of livestock production systems and appreciation of livestock production systems in tropical countries, their classification, purposes, key components and processes and opportunities for improvement.

August

None

ED70.11

Farm Management Economics

To provide a framework for better understanding the operation and management of farming system by the subsistence and semi-subsistence farm household in the Asian region by (i) incorporation of the use of tools of farm management analysis in solving local problems, (ii) demonstration of the relationship of farm management research to policy formulation and its impact on farmers income; and, (iii) development of the students awareness of farm problems in different countries.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

103


Program Field of Study — Agricultural Systems & Engineering (ASE)

104

Code

Course

Description

ED70.12

Precision Agriculture

Precision agriculture is a new concept in production. The course aims to educate students to deal with the comprehensive approach to crop production planning and implementation. It deals with three key elements: information and advanced agricultural technologies, and management.

January

None

ED70.13

Agricultural Soil Mechanics

Knowledge of soil-water interactions is necessary to understand the crop water response to inputs. Similarly, to design the mechanisms or systems and tools used in for off-road conditions and in soils knowledge of tillage and traction theories is essential. This course is designed to upgrade students with related theories and practices.

January

None

ED70.14

Instrumentation and Measurement Techniques

There is no substitute for careful experimentation as well as analyses techniques interpreting experimental data in many areas of basic research and applied product development. It is mandatory to use reliable instruments and to follow standard procedures to obtain accurate results in experimental research. This course is designed to give students a sufficient background of analytical and experimental considerations of various instruments and how to use them for the measurement of various parameters some of which they might come across in their thesis research and further professional activities.

January

None

ED70.15

Aquacutural Engineering

Modern aquaculture is a multi-disciplinary activity. It requires a basic knowledge of not only relevant sciences but also of engineering principles associated with design, operation, and management of aquacultural systems. This course is intended for students with or without engineering background. Necessary engineering principles and biological/chemical aspects of aquaculture are introduced at the beginning of the course followed by engineering design of aquacultural structures and equipment. The laboratory sessions involve the actual design activities giving students a hands-on experience of the material learned in the course.

InterSem

None

ED70.16

Controlled Environment Agriculture

Intensive agricultural production in controlled environment is becoming popular to overcome limitations of agricultural land and vagaries of nature, especially for the production of high value crops. The objective of the course is to provide understanding of the factors involved in greenhouse and nursery production of high value crops and plants.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Agricultural Systems & Engineering (ASE) Code

Course

Description

ED70.17

Crop Eco-physiology and Modeling

Crop responses to physical, biotic and management parameters determine the magnitude and quality of yield. Physiological parameters determine the net assimilation in a crop system. Knowledge of physical, biotic and management parameters and their interactions will help ensure optimal productivity of cropping systems. Computer simulation models of the soil/crop/atmosphere system help understand the processes determining crop responses to changes in system components, predict crop performance under different location-specific conditions, and guide management decisions.

January

ED70.18

Integrated Pest Management

Integrated pest management (IPM) has become the conceptual basis for small- and large-scale plant protection programs, throughout Asia. This course emphasizes the ecological basis of pest management, the techniques and experiences involved and place them in context with socio-economic aspects. Therefore, this course will be offered to provide guidance on how to approach pest management in its entirety and how to practically handle a case using a learning cycle approach, experimentation based on science.

January

ED70.19

Land Husbandry

Appropriate land management and the conservation of land resources are of high priority in sustainability-focused agricultural development. Land husbandry expands on traditional concepts of soil conservation. Soil-quality, productivity and conservation issues are addressed as integrated systems of land-resource management. Based on generic principles, characteristics of local agro-ecosystems and local technology, concepts for location-specific conservation systems are developed. For sustainable agricultural land use, it is essential that these concepts also encompass the socioeconomic and cultural dimensions of land management.

January

None

ED70.21

Agricultural Sector and Policy Analysis

To develop an understanding of the role of agriculture sector on economic growth and its policy impact on food security, income distribution and environmental improvement which are essential for sustainable development.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite Undergraduate courses providing a basic understanding of soil, crop, and atmospheric systems, biology, ecology, and basic mathematic and computer skills.

105


Program Field of Study — Agricultural Systems & Engineering (ASE)

106

Code

Course

Description

ED70.22

Advanced Agricultural Experimentation

Agricultural environments are very diverse and heterogeneous. The design and analysis of agricultural experiments must be capable to capture and address these conditions in a scientifically appropriate way. The prior knowledge in selecting the right design, planning and conduct of agricultural experiments and data handling and analysis are essential for successful agricultural research. This course provides students of agricultural systems and related disciplines with advanced theories, approaches and methodologies for designing, conduct, data analysis and interpretations of agricultural experiments.

January

Instructor’s consent

ED70.23

Human Factors Engineering

Human muscle energy is prerequisite for cultivation task. In developing countries it is unlikely that muscle power will be displaced significantly by mechanical power sources within the foreseeable future. It is important to know how human factors affect the work performance. The application of ergonomics in the design of farm equipment and work practices will reduce wastage of valuable human energy. Ergonomic studies are necessary to make a rational use of human capabilities and an optimum adaptation of the work situation to these capabilities.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management (AARM) The Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management (AARM) is a field of study established in 1981 within AIT’s School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD). It is committed to improving regional institutional capacity in aquaculture, aquatic resources management, and integrated coastal management, through innovative approaches that integrate education, research and outreach. AARM has graduated more than 500 masters and PhD students from 35 countries and these alumni are now occupying important and influential positions in their countries and in international organizations. Currently, AARM has 8 faculty members from the US, UK, Sri Lanka, Philippines, India, Nepal, Germany and France. It has collaboration and linkages with many universities and organizations all over the world.

Areas of Specialization 1. Aquaculture Technology (AT) 2. Aquatic Resources Management (ARM) 3. Integrated Coastal Management (ICM, an interdisciplinary program) Certificate and Degree Programs Postgraduate Certificate program (9-12 credits, 1 semester) Postgraduate Diploma program (26 credits, 2 semesters) International Master in Aquaculture Business Management (33 credits, 2 semester and 1 intersem), at AIT Vietnam n collaboration with the School of Management (SOM) Regular masters program (48 credits, 4 semesters) Doctoral program (84 credits, 6 semesters)

• • • • •

The first two semesters in the regular masters and doctoral programs are devoted for coursework. Thesis and dissertation research are conducted after the first year.

107


Preferred Background The minimum requirement for admission to the Master’s degree is a four-year Bachelor’s degree in Aquaculture, Fisheries, Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, Biology, Environmental Science, Social Sciences or related fields. Candidates for the Doctoral program should hold a Master’s degree or its equivalent from an institution of good standing.

Internship AARM has access to national government agencies, international non-government organizations and private aquaculture farms in Thailand and other countries. Internship is arranged for AARM students as well as students from universities abroad who would like to gain real work experience in these organizations.

Research AARM’s cross-cutting research themes include:

• • • • • •

Small-scale aquaculture Seed production and genetics Aquaculture nutrition and feed technology/ management Participatory approaches to aquatic resources management for sustainable livelihoods Integrated coastal management Regional education development

AARM encourages students to select research topics relevant to their own careers and conduct research in their own countries. They are taught to identify real world problems related to aquatic resources and to use participatory problem solving approaches to develop practical solutions that can be implemented at local level. Students undertaking their thesis research on campus use our extensive field facilities, well-equipped laboratories and hatcheries.

Outreach The Wetland Alliance, composed of AIT, WWF, WorldFish Center and Coastal Resources Institute (CORIN), works with 30 partner organizations in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam for poverty alleviation, wetlands management, and sustainable local development. Continuing the efforts of AARM’s Outreach Program, the Alliance offers faculty and students opportunities and encourages them to engage in research and educational activities that are of critical relevance for local Alliance partners. Since early 1990s, AARM has been actively working on capacity development of institutions mainly through training of their officials and upgrading their education system especially in Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Bangladesh. More recently, AARM has introduced innovative approaches to post-graduate education in aquaculture and aquatic resources management in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Nepal and Vietnam.

108


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management Code

Course

Description

ED71.01

Analytical Techniques in Aquaculture

This course is essential to aquaculture researchers to learn laboratory methods for analyzing physical and chemical properties of soil and water, metrological and biological parameters. The course also covers field-sampling methodologies for collecting quantitative data from the different aquaculture systems and familiarizes students with ways to interpreting them.

January

Basic biology and chemistry

ED71.04

Aquatic Seed Production

One of the primary impediments in aquaculture development and fisheries management through stock enhancement is the lack of quality, quantity and year-round availability of seed. Over the last two decades, a great deal of new knowledge has been generated in reproduction of fishes. This new knowledge has been in the areas of physiology and molecular endocrinology. A clear understanding of reproductive biology (morphology and physiology) is critical to controlling reproduction. Broodstock and hatchery management skills are also essential to produce high quality seed on demand. Controlled reproduction of aquatic species has implications to both, aquaculture and fisheries management. Early part of this course attempts to explore and review the most current knowledge in fish reproduction biology through lecture and discussion. The latter part of the course endeavors to provide skills necessary for hatchery managers through practicum and discussion.

August

None

ED71.06

Principles of Integrated Coastal Zone Management

As the interface between land and the oceans, coastal zones play an increasingly important role in sustainable development. Human economic endeavors intensify the complex relationships between the earths marine and terrestrial environments and people. The importance and special nature of coastal areas require carefully designed management systems that ensure their responsible and sustainable development. This course emphasizes a combination of thorough planning and research, the need for reliable information and statistics, strong implementation mechanisms, clear and reliable channels of communication, and cooperation among planning institutions as the basis for good coastal governance and development.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite

109


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management

110

Code

Course

Description

ED71.09

Coastal and Inland Fisheries Management

Fisheries resources have been threatened by an increasing number of fishers along with adoption of modern fishing technologies. This has resulted in depletion of fish stocks, habitat degradation, conflicts between small scale and industrial fishers and between local and non-local fishers. As most fisheries problems are complex and contain human as well as biological dimensions, an integrated management approach is of utmost importance for the sustainability of world fisheries resources. This course provides the students with an interdisciplinary and integrated perspective on fisheries resources management.

January

None

ED71.24

Tools for Integrated Coastal Management

Coastal managers should be familiar with different planning and management approaches and tools. This course introduces effective planning and management tools and trains student to use those tools for coastal management using integrated problem-solving approaches. The course also guide students how to develop management framework for sustainable development in the coastal areas.

January

ED71.06 Principles of Integrated Coastal Management

ED71.25

Aquaculture and Aquatic Resource Systems

The course is intended as an overview for Aquaculture & Aquatic Systems Management Field of Study. It emphasizes a holistic systems approach as a pre-requisite for consideration of the contribution of aquaculture and aquatic resource systems to sustainable development. It reviews the wide range of aquatic resource systems in Asia with an assessment of the constraints to, and the potential for their expansion. It looks at key issues of sustainability and the impact of resource limitations on farmer decision making and productivity.

August

None

ED71.26

Coastal and Inland Aquaculture

This course presents an overview of the wide range of coastal and inland aquaculture farming systems in Asia with an assessment of the constraints to, and the potential for their expansion. A grasp of the variety of these systems, and a holistic understanding of their technical characteristics and environmental effects is very important for any aquaculture specialist, whether they be teacher, researcher, development specialist or practitioner. The course emphasizes why, as well as how to culture marine and freshwater organisms and avoid adverse environmental effects. Field trips to coastal and inland aquaculture farms will provide the students the opportunity to learn about the actual operation and management of different aquaculture systems, in terms of technical, environmental, social and economic aspects.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management Code

Course

Description

ED71.27

Aquaculture Engineering and Water Quality Management

Understanding basic knowledge of engineering principles and water quality parameters is a fundamental requirement for design, operation and management of modern aquaculture systems. This course contains materials relevant for students who are interested in pursuing aqua cultural engineering and water quality management with aquaculture technology as their study stream.

January

None

ED71.28

Aquaculture Planning and Management

Aquaculture has brought significant benefits to national economies and employment opportunities to many people throughout the world. However, planning of aquaculture development is not widely practiced. National aquaculture development plans, if any, are usually prepared by a government agency with little inputs from other stakeholders. Proper planning and management is necessary because aquaculture is vulnerable to pollution caused by other resource users and if poorly designed or managed, aquaculture may also cause pollution or the spread of disease, and conflicts with other resource users. Students need to think through the process of planning for sustainable aquaculture development, and be equipped with appropriate tools for planning and management.

January

None

ED71.29

Genetics and Biotechnology in Aquaculture

Application of genetics in fish is still in its infancy and many cultured stocks are little different from or inferior to their wild caught relatives. Domestication and brood stock management impact on the genetic status of stocks and ignorance of genetic principles leads to negative impacts such as inbreeding and unintentional selection. Advances are now being make in the application of genetics including genetic improvement programs. There is also now a realization of the need to understand the value and structure of natural genetic diversity to effectively manage fishery stocks. This course provides a grounding in the basic principles of genetics as applied to the effective and sustainable management of cultured and wild fish stocks.

January

None

ED71.30

Aquatic Ecosystem Assessment and Management

Understanding aquatic ecosystems is a fundamental requirement for management of aquatic resources. Given the increasing demands on aquatic resources, impact assessment is necessary for sustainable use of aquatic and other natural resources. This course provides basic knowledge of ecological process of aquatic ecosystems and the tools necessary to assess the impacts on ecosystem health. A case study for each type of ecosystem will be undertaken.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

111


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management

112

Code

Course

Description

ED71.31

Tools for Aquatic Resource and Environmental Assessment

The increasing demand and stresses on aquatic resources and ecosystems that are caused by development, population growth and global climate change increase the need for evidencebased decision making and formulation of development policies. Resource and environmental assessment are important tools for the promotion of sustainable development and ensuring the responsible use of aquatic and other natural resources. Sustainable development can only be achieved through bringing together technical, economic, social, environmental, and local expertise and knowledge, and applying them comprehensively to the development process. Increasing complexities of development and growing public inquiry about the consequences of resource use and environmental change, pose new and demanding challenges on generating, analyzing and sharing scientific information about aquatic resources and ecosystems with a wider audience. This course provides some of the basic tools necessary to both assess aquatic resources and environment as well as translating scientific information into action for sustainable development.

January

None

ED71.32

Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation

The purpose of the course is to provide the students with an understanding of the importance of biological diversity, the causes of biodiversity loss and threats. More importantly, this course offers a set of tools to conserve species, population and biological communities, and approaches to sustainable development of aquatic resources.

August

None

ED71.33

Geoinformatics for Resources Planning and Management

Geoinformatics including Remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely use in evaluation of earth resources, use as a cost effective and timely information acquisition method and as a tool in planning and management of these resources for sustainable development. Geoinformatics offers the best approach to collect information, integrate, comprehensive analyze and recognize potential scenarios in studying complex situation arises due to high competition for limited resources due to increasing demand by global population. Remote sensing has become operational information extraction system providing timely and affordable data. GPS is a widely used tool to help with all variety of problems related to location. GIS provides a platform to integrate spatial and non-spatial data pertaining to land and flexibility in studying spatially dependent phenomena efficiently. This course offers students to acquire the fundamental knowledge in Geoinformatics and provide necessary practical knowledge to use them in resource planning & management through laboratory/field/discussion classes.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management Code

Course

Description

ED71.34

Statistical Applications in Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management

Research issues in aquatic resources management are diverse and the research investigations range from conducting aquaculture experiments to studying complex socio- environmental interactions. The research designs, which take either (or both) scientific method and systems approach, should be capable to capture and elucidate these complex interactions. Thus, a thorough knowledge on both experimental and survey designs and methods of acquiring, analyzing and interpreting both qualitative and quantitative data to find solutions to research problems is necessary. The students should have both knowledge and practical competence in the use of relevant analytical tools for their specific fields. This course, thus, covers selected analytical techniques and demonstrates their applications in aquaculture and aquatic resources management. The course stresses on the relationships between research objectives and research design and the use of appropriate analytical tools and computational methods.

January

None

ED71.35

Seminar on Recent Developments in AARM

Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management (AARM) is a broad Field of Study. Due to the rapid technological development it is very difficult to keep up with information on current advances and burning issues in the field in the region as well as around the world. Within the Field of Study, we are often unaware of what efforts have been made or are under-way in contribution to the development of the field. Therefore, this seminar or case study course has been designed to facilitate information sharing and regular dialogue among students, staff, faculty as well as visiting experts. The course provides a good opportunity especially to the students of becoming familiar with a wide range of recent research and developments in the fields of aquaculture and fisheries in the region and the world.

August

None

ED71.36

Aquaculture Nutrition and Feed Technology

Feed cost comprises over 50% of total operation cost of the most fish and shellfish farming enterprises. Reducing the cost of feed provides more opportunity for diminishing production cost than any other expenses. Since a reduction in feed cost depend primarily on the efficient feeding practices, a thorough understanding of the nutrient requirements of fish/shrimp, nutrient sources and feed management practices is necessary for developing profitable on-farm production plans. This course, therefore, provides a thorough knowledge of the applied and fundamental aspects of fish/shrimp nutrition and fish feed technology.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

113


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management

114

Code

Course

Description

ED71.37

Wetlands Ecosystem Management

The purpose of the course is to provide the student with an introduction to tropical wetlands and their sustainable management. Tropical wetlands, i.e. floodplains, marshes, swamps (mangroves), represent some of the most valuable environmental assets available to developing countries. The course is aimed at those who are interested in a general approach to, and guiding principles for, the sustainable management of these particular ecosystems.

August

None

ED71.38

Aquatic Animal Health Management

As aquaculture husbandry intensifies to increase productivity, the problems of disease of cultured organisms arise. The knowledge in preventive and remedial measures is essential to maintain healthy stocks. This course complements other courses in aquaculture curriculum.

August

None

ED71.39

Seminar on Recent Developments in Integrated Coastal Management

Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) is an interdisciplinary and dynamic field of study. Students in this field have to be updated with current developments. A series of seminars will be presented by ICM doctoral and masters students as well as our faculty and invited experts in current issues related to coastal management. This seminar course is designed to expose post-graduate students to a wide range of regional and global research/ development issues in coastal management.

January

None

ED71.40

Workshop on Integrated Coastal Management

The coastal management challenge of today is not to apply technical fixes to technical problems but rather to create and sustain a dynamic process of governance. For the successful coastal manager, an understanding of the policy cycle and learning the skills (technical, social, management, organization, communication) are necessary. The course provides students with practical skills to design, implement and learn from integrated coastal management (ICM) programs and experiences from around the world - with a focus on the Asian Region.

January

Principles of ICM

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management Code

Course

Description

ED71.41

Internship in AARM and ICM

Rapid technological advancement and increased job competition in Aquaculture, Aquatic Resources Management and Integrated Management demand more practical and job-oriented education with hands-on experience. This internship course is designed to provide students an opportunity to be exposed to the real work environment of government agencies, non-government organizations, international organizations, universities, research institutions, private companies engaged in aquaculture, aquatic resources management, and integrated coastal management. The internship also aims at providing opportunities for students to learn the latest developments in the sector and develop associated specific skills, and to identify the real world problems which can be addressed in further research in the selected area.

InterSem

ED71.42

Marine and Coastal Ecosystems

The purpose of the course is to provide the students with an introduction to major aspects of the environmental biology in a range of common tropical, coastal and marine ecosystems. The course serves as an important introduction to the ecological aspects of integrated coastal management (ICM).

August

None

ED71.43

Thesis Research Workshop

The graduates holding Masters degree are expected to have the ability to evaluate problems effectively and propose practical solutions. Practitioners must be able to conceptualize programs to acquire quantitative information, to analyze, interpret data and draw conclusions and to view the practices of research and writing as inseparable dimensions of one process. As formal courses of experimental and survey designs usually address theoretical concepts of statistics and data analyses, students are not well equipped for research project design, planning, management and result presentations. This course fills the gap by providing students with various research planning approaches and proposal development tools as well as providing necessary writing and presentation skills for their thesis research.

January

None

ED71.9010

Selected Topic: Aquaculture Business Management: Issues and Tools

Aquatic product trade is one of the most globalized sectors among agricultural activities. In many places, competition is high not only on International markets but also on local markets where farmers often have to compete with cheap imported seafood. Moreover, regulatory requirements are becoming stricter and always more complex. Introducing business management tools in aquaculture production has become a mandatory requirement for ensuring the sustainability of the activity, not only to compete on the market but also to add value to products.

August

Basic understanding of aquaculture and its practices

Semester Offered Prerequisite At least one semester course work completed.

115


Program

(AARM)

Field of Study — Aquaculture and Aquatic Resources Management

116

Code

Course

Description

ED71.9012

Selected Topic: Coastal Project Management and Evaluation

Time-bound small projects contribute assist in developing different management options matching with coastal bio-physical conditions; conservation strategies; resilient building; empowerment of coastal communities; socioeconomic status of stakeholders; institutional capacity to respond to natural and man-made pressures; and sustainable business development within Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) framework. Thus, coastal managers should be familiar with different project planning and management approaches. This course introduces various tools that assist in developing efficient coastal management projects and guide students to prepare a project proposal. The project is to be implemented in the home country of the students.

August

ED71.06 Principles of Integrated Coastal Management; ED 71.24 Tools for Integrated Coastal Management

ED71.9013

Selected Topic: Thesis Proposal Writing

Graduate students are expected to write thesis or dissertation proposals before they can start conducting their research. It is therefore important to provide them with knowledge and skills in selecting a suitable thesis topic, formulating research questions, searching and reading scientific papers and other references, writing the introduction, literature review, materials and methods, references, and preparing the research timetable and budget. For each topic, a lecture will be given and examples will be provided for better understanding, and students are then expected to write each section of the proposal for presentation to the class and for comments and corrections by the instructor. As thesis topics have to be based on proper literature review, students will also be required to collect, read, summarize and present key reference papers.

Intersem

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Energy Since 1979, the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) has been engaged in training energy specialists in response to the regional needs for developing capability, and for efficient development and management of the energy sector. The objective of energy studies at AIT is to train professionals to serve in national and international institutions, research, planning and development departments of energy ministries, energy utilities, energy companies, industries, energy conservation agencies and consulting firms, and educational and research institutions. The focus of energy studies at AIT is on the following areas: energy and the environment; renewable energy and energy efficiency; energy systems (supply and demand) management; energy economics and planning; electric power systems management; and restructuring of energy industries. The Energy Field of Study at AIT is interdisciplinary in nature, encompassing technology, planning and management aspects to address the current and emerging needs of the energy sector. Students can specialize in three areas: Electric Power System Management (EPSM); Energy Economics and Planning (EEP); and Energy Technology (ET).

Areas of Specialization 1. Electric Power System Management 2. Energy Economics and Planning 3. Energy Technology

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: The preferred fields of undergraduate study for candidates seeking admission to the Master’s and Diploma programs are: Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Civil Engineering, Physics, Economics and Management and Public Administration (with relevant Energy background).

For Doctoral Program: Applicants to the Doctoral program should have a Master’s degree in energy-related field with a good academic performance.

117


Program Field of Study — Energy

118

Code

Course

Description

ED72.01

Energy Resources and Technologies

Considering that energy is a critical need of the society, it is important that energy graduates should have an understanding of: i) the reserve position of fossil energy resources in quantitative terms as well as in terms of its lifetime, ii) the importance of renewable energy and its availability, iii) the working principles of different renewable energy technologies, and (iv) applications of energy technologies in the economic sectors.

August

None

ED72.02

Energy Audit and Thermal Energy Conservation

Efficient use of energy is one of the most attractive means to address the growing demand for fossil fuel utilization and the associated environmental problems. This course presents energy auditing methodology and techniques for thermal energy management in different energy systems.

August

Consent of Instructor

ED72.03

Rational Use of Energy in Industry

As an important input to the industrial growth, energy provides considerable scope for its management through both technical and nontechnical means. This course presents an approach that introduces economic energy utilization in industrial enterprises for producing the required goods and services efficiently while taking into consideration financial, environmental, social and other constraints. At the same time, conflicts that may arise due to the differences in macro and micro perspectives related to energy use are dealt with to find acceptable solutions.

August

None

ED72.04

Organization and Finance of a Power Utility

Efficient organization and well-managed finance are essential for a successful electric utility. This course is intended to give an overview of the organization and management of power utilities. It is designed to introduce n e w concepts and technologies in utilities operation, particularly on management decision making.

August

None

ED72.05

Demand-Side Management

An emerging trend in reducing cost and optimizing resource use in an electric utility is to promote efficiency of electricity use and to encourage customers to shift away from the system load peak while filling the system load valley. Concurrently there is a global development of the electric utility service towards deregulation. This course is intended to introduce concepts and practices in management of customer demand, and evaluation methodology of program success. It examines the methodologies for assessing the impact of energy efficiency and load management technologies on the utility’s load shape. It would also examine the development of deregulation in the electric utility service and the emergence of integrated energy services in the industry.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy Code

Course

Description

ED72.06

Design and Management of Energy Systems

There is a trend of energy facilities being outsourced by industry and building owners so that they can focus on their main areas of businesses. Professionals required to handle these energy facilities should have adequate skills to provide reliable energy services at competitive costs. A good understanding of the fundamental thermodynamic and engineering concepts, and techno-economic optimization techniques are essential for efficient designing and operation of such facilities. This course is intended to bridge thermal technology with systems engineering, and is application oriented. A review of the fundamental concepts of energy and energy analysis of thermal processes is first demonstrated and then the students are exposed to the mathematical tools for characterization of the performance of energy equipments and optimization tools. Energy recovery by pinch technology will be discussed. Management of energy systems is also an important aspect to provide trouble free service to the industry.

August

None

ED72.07

Power System Design and Operation

Power system networks are experiencing rapid growth in their size requiring increased interconnections between different utilities, especially in the developing countries. For coordinated operation of these systems, computer based dispatch centers are being set up which perform various energy management system (EMS) functions. The operation of interconnected systems also require formulating proper design criteria for setting up of new generating plants, EHV transmission networks and grid. Further, recent design practices must be adopted in selection of various associated equipments. This course is intended to expose the students to some of the design and operation practices being adopted in the modern power system networks.

August

None

ED72.08

Power Distribution Systems

Distribution System is an important portion of power systems due to its high investment and its direct effect on customer. This course is intended to give an overview of the characteristics of distribution systems, power quality requirements, and protection measures. The planning and design considerations are also introduced.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

119


Program Field of Study — Energy

120

Code

Course

Description

ED72.09

DC and Flexible AC Transmission

Developing countries are often facing problems in coping up with ever increasing load demands, because of lack of investments in building new generation and transmission facilities. This is where the flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) controllers come in to effect. FACTS controllers are products of FACTS technology; a group of power electronics controllers expected to revolutionize the power transmission and distribution system in many ways. FACTS controllers can increase the loadability or distance to voltage collapse of power system, so that additional loads can be added in the system without addition of new transmission and generating facilities.

August

None

ED72.10

Computer Aided Power System Analysis

To pursue in-depth study leading to a career in electric utility or related organizations, it is essential to understand the tools for analysis and the phenomena in electric power systems. This course is intended to introduce students to advanced analytical tools for analysis of power systems under normal and disturbed conditions. The course aims at computer modeling power systems, mathematical techniques development and use of application software for system studies.

August

None

ED72.11

Rural Electrification and Distributed Generation

August

None

ED72.12

Energy Statistics and Energy Demand Forecasting

Rural electrification, which is requires huge investment, is an important concern in Asian electric power utilities. Distributed generation is one new option being promoted to solve rural electrification problems along with the some other problems of urban distribution systems. The issues such as system capacity investments, grid expansions, etc. also benefit through distributed generation. This course is intended to provide the knowledge on the importance and benefit of rural electrification, availability of resources, distributed generation technologies, technical and financial feasibility of applying distributed generation to rural and urban areas. Comprehensive knowledge of the overall energy system, which covers both commercial and traditional energy sources, from primary production to transformation and end-uses is indispensable for energy planners/economists. Similarly, energy demand analysis and forecasting constitute basic elements of energy planning and policy formulation. The course aims at providing training on energy accounting frameworks, equipping students with statistical data analysis skills and providing an in-depth understanding of the energy demand analysis and forecasting methodologies.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy Code

Course

Description

ED72.13

Development and Evaluation of Energy Projects

Understanding the project cycle is important because of lumpy nature of most energy projects and their wide socio-economic and environmental impacts. Its importance has increased in the era of deregulated and privatized energy industries, and in view of global concern about sustainable development of energy projects. The main objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts and methodologies for project identification, project preparation, project evaluation and project financing.

January

None

ED72.14

Restructuring of Energy Industries

The traditional approach to industry structure and regulation that contributed to phenomenal growth of network industries has been effectively contested in some countries and has gained significant momentum worldwide. Competition, private participation and flexible regulation are the salient features of the new regime. The course would cover rationale behind restructuring, alternative mechanisms for restructuring, functioning of restructured entities in new environment, and policy issues related to restructuring of energy industries.

January

None

ED72.15

Energy Price Theory and Applications

Energy pricing is one of the most important policy instruments in energy resource planning and demand management. This course is designed to expose the students to the foundations of price theory and their applications to energy pricing and policy analysis.

August

None

ED72.16

Efficient Lighting and Daylighting

To introduce new concepts and technologies in lighting which offer substantial energy efficiency improvement over existing technology and practice. To examine concept and methods of daylighting, its applications and its impacts on aesthetics and energy use.

January

None

ED72.17

Energy Management in Buildings

To enable essential but practical understanding of the energy processes in buildings. The course covers the external and internal energy processes in the control of the built environment. It also examines emerging technologies for energy management.

August

None

ED72.18

Advanced Technology for Energy Management in Buildings

To examine the advanced technologies currently being developed for low-energy buildings. The course covers methodological analyses of the energy processes embodied in technologies for energy management in buildings, applicable mainly in hot climate.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

121


Program Field of Study — Energy Code

Course

Description

ED72.19

Biomass Conversion

Biomass is one of the most important sources of energy in the developing countries, and provides 14% of the world’s energy. This course deals with the technologies of converting biomass into upgraded fuels as well as direct combustion.

January

Consent of Instructor

ED72.20

Workshop on Energy Issues and Communication

Students need to be trained in preparing reports and in developing presentation skills. This course aims to make students aware of diverse issues in the field of energy that cannot be covered in conventional classroom lectures, and to improve their skill in preparing reports and making professional presentations.

January

None

ED72.21

Power System Dynamic and Stability

Present day interconnected power system networks are characterized by their highly non linear dynamical behavior. Stability analysis is carried out at almost all stages of the power system design, operation and control to assess the dynamic response of the system to various types of disturbances and interaction of controllers. This course is aimed at providing a basic understanding to different types of stability phenomena being observed in the power system networks including the analysis methods and the design of control measures required for the improvement of system stability

January

Consent of Instructor

ED72.22

Power Sector Management Under Deregulation

The organization of the electric sector in the world has been changing dramatically to allow for competition among generators and to create market condition in the sector, seen as necessary conditions for increasing the efficiency of electric energy production and distribution, offering a lower price, higher quality and secure product. This course is aimed at providing a basic understanding to different types of power system restructuring process of the world with special emphasis to the Asian countries.

January

None

ED72.23

Optimization and AI Applications in Power System

Present day power systems have grown large with inter-connections to neighboring systems. The operation modern power systems is a complex task. For secure and optimum operation, various functions are carried out through modern Energy Management Systems (EMS).

January

None

Decisions are required for various operating strategies such as Preventive Control, Emergency Control and Restorative Control. This course is intended to expose students to concepts and methodologies in optimization and AI techniques for power system operation. It aims to impart some hands-on-experience in the power system optimization through use of computer tools.

122

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy Code

Course

Description

ED72.24

Electricity Economics and Planning

This course is designed to develop an in-depth understanding of key economic and other concepts related to electric utility planning and to expose the students to modern approaches of electricity planning, electricity pricing and environmental implications of alternative power development plans.

August

None

ED72.25

Energy Economic Modeling and Policy Analysis

Formulation of economically efficient strategies and development plans for energy system requires a sound understanding of energy supply and demand options as well as the interrelationships between the energy sector and the economy. Models of energy and economic systems facilitate such an understanding. The course is designed to expose the students to major energy-economic modeling approaches and their applications to energy technology assessments and energy and environmental policy analysis.

January

None

ED72.26

Environmental Policy and Management of Energy Systems

To develop an understanding of policy instruments and approaches for environmental management of energy systems.

January

None

ED72.27

Oil and Natural Gas Economics

Oil and Natural gas combined together contribute about 50% of the world energy demand. Both oil and natural gas would play a significant role in the global primary energy supply in coming decades. Oil and natural gas are particularly important in Asia and the Pacific region both in terms of production and consumption. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to the concepts of economics of oil and natural gas development, production, transport, distribution, and trading.

January

None

ED72.28

Solar Energy

The market for solar systems is mature and expanding, both in thermal (for heating, cooling and power generation) and in photovoltaic applications (for lighting, water pumping and rural electrification). Concerns regarding the environmental effects of large scale fossil energy use is expected to the further development of solar energy systems in the future. This course is aimed at providing the students with an understanding of the basic processes in the established solar energy technology. Specifically, this course will deal with the solar radiation estimation techniques, the principles of operation, performance analysis and application of solar thermal conversion devices and direct solar electricity converters. Current and future applications of solar thermal and photovoltaics will also be discussed.

January

Module 1: None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

Module 2: Module 1 Module 3: Module 1

123


Program Field of Study — Energy

124

Code

Course

Description

ED72.29

Solar Design Methods and Applications

As the market for solar thermal and photovoltaic systems expands in Asia, engineers and scientists need to be able to apply modern techniques for designing efficient and cost effective solar energy based systems. The aim of this course is to present the methods available for the design of solar thermal systems and photovoltaics. The sizing aspects applied to water heating, air heating, drying, cooling and photovoltaics will be discussed for specific end use applications in both urban and rural communities, as well as for buildings and industry.

January

ED72.21 Solar Energy

ED72.30

Energy, Environment and Climate Change: Issues and Strategies

This course aims at exposing the students to the problem of climate change (currently a matter of significant global concern) as well as to technological and policy options to mitigate greenhouse gases (GHG). It is also aimed at equipping the students with approaches to carry out assessments of GHG emission mitigation projects and their economic analysis. Furthermore, the course covers the key features of international conventions on climate change including the clean development mechanism (CDM).

August

None

ED72.31

Electrical Energy Management

The objectives of the course are to provide a review of energy relations in electromagnetic field and electric network, to present the characteristics of electrical energy use in major equipment, to provide a foundation for an integrated view of efficiency in electricity use.

January

None

ED72.37

Integrated Approach to Energy Auditing

Managers of industrial and commercial facilities always seek ways to reduce costs and improve reliability of production or service provision. While materials utilization, manpower cost, production, quality, energy costs, and waste minimization are all subject to regular scrutiny, energy efficiency is typically not considered. This course presents a novel method of integrated approach to energy auditing that seeks to optimize the overall system employed to ensure production or provision of services using the least amount of energy that can be cost-effectively achieved.

August

None. Students should possess a science or engineering degree.

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy Code

Course

Description

ED72.9006

Selected Topic: Productive Use of Energy

Energy is a prerequisite for sustainable development and poverty alleviation. Productive use of energy is an important aspect in the design and implementation of energy projects, especially in rural areas. Focuses on productive use of energy more importantly for renewable energy projects is geared recently in the recognition of the fact that the provision or access to energy is not the end-goal rather is an attempt to make the energy input work directly and economically for rural economic development. The course is designed to give students an understanding on issues of how to maximize social and economic benefits, and improve economic sustainability of rural energy projects through Productive Use of Renewable Energy.

January

Consent of Instructor

ED72.9007

Selected Topic: Clean Coal and Waste to Energy Technologies

Energy conversion account for a large share of carbon emissions. A reliable, affordable energy resource, fuel (coal, biomass, petcock etc) and waste will power economic growth, and help us achieve environmental goals at the same time. Therefore, engineers and scientists need to be able to apply modern techniques for designing efficient and cost effective solids fuel based systems. The aim of this course is to present the methods for the design of advance solids fuel conversion systems especially fluidized bed combustion system.

August

Consent of Instructor

ED72.9009

Selected Topic: Wind Energy

Rising fuel prices driven by growing demand, decline in the fossil fuel reserves, and incontrovertible evidences of global warming are all causing serious concerns on energy and environment security around the globe. Unfortunately for a world that is so used to cheap fossil fuels, the reality is too difficult to accept to initiate serious effort at finding alternatives. However the time is running out and experts have been urging for quick and paradigm shift in the way we generate and utilize energy. Under this scenario, Wind Energy holds great promise and needs to be harnessed in a far greater scale than it is now. Academic institutions have a very great role to play in this. This course is aimed at providing a basic as well as in depth understanding of Wind Energy. Overview and types of wind energy conversion systems, principles of their operation is included. Wind data analysis and Site matching of wind turbines are very important from the viewpoint of extraction of maximum energy from the wind is given more time. Demonstration & hands on training: Software package on Optimum Site Matching of Wind Turbines.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite

125


Program Field of Study — Energy

126

Code

Course

Description

ED72.9010

Selected Topic: Hydrocabon Engineering

Oil and natural gas combined together contribute about 50% of the world energy demand. Both oil and natural gas would play a significant role in the global primary energy supply in coming decades. Oil and natural gas are particularly important in Asia and the pacific region both in terms of production and consumption. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to the concepts of exploration, drilling, production and refining

January

ED72.9011

Selected Topic: Distributed Generation

Penetration of Distributed Generations (DGs) in power systems is increasing through out the world as economical and environment benefits of DGs are well-understood. Renewable resource based generations, in particular, are more attractive as they do not emit GHG emissions that contribute to global warming and climate change. However, allowing larger number of DGs in power systems could pose a numerous technical challenges. Moreover, if DG installation is planned properly, it could enhance technical performances of distribution system. The course is intended to given an in-depth coverage of various issues that to be resolved before allowing DGs in large numbers into power systems.

InterSem

ED72.9012

Selected Topic: Electric Power Quality

An electric power system is subject to several types of disturbances (imperfections) that may impair the performance and continuity of electrical energy supply of the system. This course aims at introducing power system irregularities often encountered in an electrical energy system. Emphasis will be placed on some important phenomena such as power factor enhancement, harmonics, voltage sags and three-phase voltage unbalance.

August

Students with electrical engineering (EE) background are preferred, adventurous students without EE background are also welcome.

ED72.9014

Selected Topic: Solar Energy (Module A and B)

Sun earth relationships, solar radiation and its measurement, solar radiation climatology; thermal processes in solar and flat-plate collectors; concentrating collectors; applications of solar thermal energy; photoelectric effect in semiconductor p-n junctions, solar photovoltaic components and systems, applications of photovoltaic solar energy; storage systems for solar energy (thermal and photovoltaic); recent advances in solar energy applications.

January

Module A: None Module B: Module A

ED72.9015

Solar Energy (Module A and C)

Sun earth relationships, solar radiation and its measurement, solar radiation climatology; thermal processes in solar and flat-plate collectors; concentrating collectors; applications of solar thermal energy; photoelectric effect in semiconductor p-n junctions, solar photovoltaic components and systems, applications of photovoltaic solar energy; storage systems for solar energy (thermal and photovoltaic); recent advances in solar energy applications.

January

Module A: None Module C: Module A

Semester Offered Prerequisite None


Program Field of Study — Energy Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered

Prerequisite

ED72.9016

Selected Topic: Solar Energy (Module A)

Sun earth relationships, solar radiation and its measurement, solar radiation climatology; thermal processes in solar and flat-plate collectors; concentrating collectors; applications of solar thermal energy; photoelectric effect in semiconductor p-n junctions, solar photovoltaic components and systems, applications of photovoltaic solar energy; storage systems for solar energy (thermal and photovoltaic); recent advances in solar energy applications.

January

None

ED72.9017

Selected Topic: RETScreen for Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy

It is widely accepted that renewable energy has an important role to play in the sustainable development by providing access to energy/electricity and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. RETScreen Clean Energy Project Analysis Software is a unique decision support tool which can be used to evaluate the energy production and savings, costs, emission reductions, financial viability and risk for various types of RenewableEnergy Technologies (RETs). The software also includes product, project, hydrology and climate databases. Use of this software can help a wide range of users to effectively implement renewable energy projects. This course provides the background, methodology, and applications of electricity generation using renewable energy resources and technologies using ETScreen.

InterSem

Consent of Instructor

ED72.9018

Selected Topic: Clean Coal Technologies and Carbon Capture and Sequestration

This course is designed to expose the students to the problem of climate change due to the use of coal for energy services as well as to technological options for the mitigation of CO2 emissions from the coal sector. This course also equips the students with approaches to carry out assessments of Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) and Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). The major options to promote CCT and CCS will also be covered in the course.

InterSem

None

ED72.9019

Selected Topic: Integration of Renewable Energy Resources into Power System

The increasing number of renewable energy sources (RES) and distributed generators (DG) requires new strategies for the operation and management of the electricity grid in order to maintain or even to improve the power supply reliability and quality in future. One major objective of this course is to develop an appropriate methodology to assess renewable energy sources from a utility perspective and is compatible with the technical and economic assessment techniques employed by utility engineers and planners.

August

127


Program Field of Study — Energy

128

Code

Course

Description

ED72.9020

Selected Topic: Rational Use of Energy in Buildings

The building sector accounts for 30-40% of world’s primary energy consumption and is responsible for about 33% of total global CO2 emission. Buildings also provide the highest economic GHG mitigation potential. This course is intended to introduce essential and practical understanding of energy processes and rational use of energy in buildings. The course covers the external and internal energy processes involved in the control of the built environment. It also examines emerging technologies, policies and measures, to lower the building sector’s dependence on fossil energies and enhance

August

ED72.9021

Selected Topic: Energy Risk Management

August

ED72.9022

Selected topic: Smart Grid for Sustainable development

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the production of an energy commodity, the route it takes to reach the ultimate end-user, the risks of dealing in physical energy commodities, and the financial commodity markets. Smart grid to enhance reliability, security, robustness and efficiency of transmission and distribution systems. Integration of renewable energy sources and distributed generation. Advanced metering infrastructure, home-area networks, real-time energy pricing, plug-in hybrid vehicles, demand response, load curve shaping, and energy storage systems. Enabling active participation of consumer, cyber and physical security.

ED72.9023

Energy Management System

ED72.9024

Energy Management System

Semester Offered

Prerequisite None

InterSem

A simple overview about contents of this course is given below by bold and blue texts. Smart philosophy + Smart components+ Smart management = Smart system and, hence, Smart system + power system or grid = Smart Grid.

Energy management system; commitment to implement energy management system; identification of energy and cost saving opportunities; planning and implementation of the energy management action; monitoring and review of energy management activities

InterSem

None

Energy management system; commitment to implement energy management system; identification of energy and cost saving opportunities; planning and implementation of the energy management action; monitoring and review of energy management activities

InterSem

None


Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM) Environmental Engineering and Management at AIT began in 1964 with the need for sanitary engineering to address the problems of providing adequate water supplies and sanitation facilities. This pioneering environmental engineering program has grown into a range of fields needed to tackle the environmental issues facing Asia today. Environmental Engineering and Management Field of Study is part of the School of Environment, Resources and Development. The overall program looks for solutions to environmental problems, water supply and sanitation, wastewater treatment and disposal systems, air pollution, solid and hazardous wastes, waste minimization, and life cycle assessment, environmental impact assessment and management and environmental toxicology.

Areas of Specialization

• Environmental Technology and Management • Environmental Toxicology, Technology and Management • Water and Wastewater Engineering Two-Phase Master’s Program with AITCV The Environmental Engineering and Management in collaboration with AIT Center in Vietnam (AITCV) offers a Two-Stage Master Program in Environmental Technology and Management for Vietnamese and interested candidates in the region. This program is designed professionals working in the field of environmental engineering and management, planning, design, operation and management of water supply, wastewater treatment and disposal systems. The first batch of the program was officially launched at the AITCV-Hanoi in July 2004 and is offered annually since then. The program offers 1 semester in Vietnam, which is taught by regular AIT faculty, and qualified students join to continue the study at AIT in Thailand starting from the second semester. The students are from industries, organization and universities in Vietnam. Scholarship providers are Ministry of Education and Training (MOET), Vietnam, Electricity of Vietnam (EVN), Petro Vietnam and Industrial Zones like Sonadezi, Vietnam.

Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degrees in biochemical or chemical engineering, civil engineering, environmental engineering or related applied sciences, or health science and biomedical science are preferred. Undergraduate degrees in civil and environmental engineering, architecture, economics, geography, law, natural science, public administration, sociology or urban and regional planning or related applied sciences are also considered.

Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in a relevant field and detailed dissertation research outline must be submitted with the application.

129


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM)

130

Code

Course

Description

ED78.01

Environmental Chemistry & Laboratory

The purposes of the course are in preparing engineers and scientists to help those engaged in basic research, to carry out apply research, and to conduct pilot plant and plant scale studies.

August

None

ED78.05

Waste Reduction and Recycling

With the enormous quantity of wastes being generated by human activities, the practice of waste treatment alone will not be effective in solving pollution problems. This course covers Description and strategy of waste reduction and recycling, technologies and management criteria, uses of the reclaimed products and health impacts.

January

None

ED78.07

Solid Waste Management

This course is to provide knowledge of engineering principals and issues concerning solid waste management.

August

None

ED78.08

Environmental Quality Management

There is a need to enhance understanding and to introduce techniques and policy for management of highly interrelate and interdisciplinary environmental protection factors.

January

None

ED78.10

Environmental Health and Sanitation

The problems of water supply, drinking water, sanitation and health in rural areas of developing countries are still series. This course aims to create concern about the severity and fatality of water borne diseases. In this course, the role of hygienic education to prevent the transmission of water borne as well as fecal contaminant diseases is highly emphasized. Integrated approach to health and sanitation problem in developing countries has been made throughout the course including the suggestions and solutions for a proper behavioral and strategic plan on this respect.

January

None

ED78.11

Integrated Life Science

There is a need to impart an understanding of the fundamentals of biology, life science and biochemistry for students who did not study these subjects at undergraduate level.

August

None

ED78.12

Principles of Toxicology

It is important to establish a clear understanding of the inter-related concepts involved in the study of toxicology. For this, a basic knowledge in chemistry and biology is required. Because of this students are asked to take the course “Integrated Life Science” as a pre-requisite which is offered as a modular type and completed in 4 weeks before starting this course.

January

Integrated Life Science or equivalent course

ED78.13

Health, Development and Environment

It is important to establish an awareness of the interrelationships of health, environment and development with specific reference to impacts on health and environment by current, practices in industry, in transportation, and in agriculture and human settlement (urbanization and megacities).

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM) Code

Course

Description

ED78.14

Membrane Technology in Water and Wastewater Treatment

The objective of this course is present principles and applications of membrane processes in environmental and biotechnology applications. The emphasis of this course will be more on the engineering aspects of the membrane technology.

August

None

ED78.15

Design of Water Supply and Wastewater System

This course is to provide fundamental knowledge on the design of water supply and wastewater systems for urban area.

InterSem

Consent of Instructor

ED78.16

Applied Microbiology and Laboratory

Because most wastewaters can be treated biologically, it is necessary to understand the requirements of each biological process and to ensure that the proper environment is produced and effectively controlled.

January

None

ED78.17

Advanced Processes for Wastewater Treatment Reuse and Recycling

To familiarize the environmental engineers with principles, design and operation of various advanced processes for treatment, reuse and recycle of wastewater.

January

ED78.35: Wastewater Treatment

ED78.18

Toxic Organics and Trace Metals in Ecosystem

Illegal dumping of hazardous waste on land or mismanagement of landfill has been led to a serious problem of ground contamination with toxic substances. However both the soil and sediments may become polluted from other sources as well such as pesticides, soil conditioners and organic fertilizers including organic waste by-products. Therefore a deep understanding on the pathways and effects of those toxic organics and heavy metals containing in the wastes, following soil application is needed for a better planning of land use and management. This will include mobility, bioavailability, toxicity and absorption characteristics. Likewise factors controlling these properties will be identified. Impacts of toxic substances on soil health need to be emphasized. Mechanisms of metal uptake by higher plants must be understood for ground cover establishment of contaminated lands. Chemical and biological treatments to detoxify the hazardous materials will be included. This course is designed to examine the relationships of soil-plant accumulation of toxic substances. Land degradation due to chemical constraints and assessment of contaminants and their potential mobility in soil will be covered.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

131


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM)

132

Code

Course

Description

ED78.19

Environmental Impact Assessment

The objective of this course is to introduce EIA concept and elaborate EIA procedure and methodology, development and implementation, emerging issues and gaps. It consolidates the understanding of EIA as a useful tool in decision-making process and in management of development projects. This course combines lectures with actual training in EIA using selected case studies with focus on priority sectors of development in the region. Knowledge of cumulative environmental impact assessment philosophy will also be introduced.

August

None

ED78.20

Industrial Waste Abatement and Management

The objective of this course is to present for both environmental engineers and managers an overall view on industrial waste abatement and management strategies and techniques.

January

None

ED78.21

Water Quality Management

Industrialization and population increase have led to increased water consumption. On the other had, unchecked industrial and municipal discharges have severely deteriorated the water quality. The course emphasizes how water resource should be managed to maintain the quality.

January

None

ED78.22

Air Pollution Modeling and Applications

This course provides fundamental aspects of mathematical modeling for air pollution and practical applications of models for planning and managing air quality in various meteorological and topographical conditions.

InterSem

ED78.37: Air Pollution Engineering and Management

ED78.23

Hazardous Waste Technology and Management

Due to rapid industrialization hazardous waste disposal is becoming a serious threat to human health and the environment. This course aims to provide fundamental knowledge on hazardous substances and wastes, waste minimization and technologies for hazardous waste treatment, including remediation of hazardous waste contaminated sites. Hazardous waste management and regulatory aspects commonly used for hazardous waste control are covered.

August

None

ED78.24

Design of Air Pollution Control Systems

This course aims at the combination of theoretical knowledge with practical applications of air pollution control techniques. It provides basic principles enabling selection of optimum control device/control system for a particular application. Practical designing cases are introduced to equip students with important basic technical requirements of actual air pollution control systems.

August

ED78.37: Air Pollution Engineering and Management, or equivalent

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM) Code

Course

Description

ED78.25

Principles of Cleaner Production

Cleaner production (CP) which is a continuous application of an integrated preventive environmental strategy to processes, products and services improves eco efficiency and reduce risks to humans & environment. Application of CP helps to use resources efficiently, increase energy efficiency, reduce costs and wastes, and thus improve industry productivity. The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of CP practice and technologies in the important sectors of the economy, methodologies and tools to apply CP to use energy efficiently, reduce pollution and minimize wastes. Detailed examples and case studies to explain the concept will be presented.

January

None

ED78.27

Environmental Toxicology

A background knowledge is required of the major groups of toxic substances encountered by man and animals through food and the environment, and also the toxic substances to which people are exposed in the workplace.

January

ED78.11: Integrated Life Science or equivalent course

ED78.28

Health/Environment Risk and Impact Assessment

This course has been designed to focus and link between health risk assessment with the environmental impactassessment. This is because by incorporating the effect or toxicity assessment into the EIA program, human as well as the environment will be better protected in sustainable manner.

January

None

ED78.29

Environmental Microbiology

This course will be essential for students who wish to take advanced courses in the field. It will provide basic knowledge on highly complex systems. In practice this course has been offered by sharing laboratory sessions and lectures with “Applied Microbiology and Laboratory”. After that students in the ETT&M field need to strengthening in the area as listed in the course content I, II, III and IV.

January

None

ED78.30

Molecular Biology of Environmental Stress

The course will cover advanced aspects of gene regulation, biomedical and physiological responses. This information is essential for those carrying out research in the field.

January

Basic courses in Microbiology or Biotechnology

ED78.31

Bioengineering and Environmental Health

The course brings together experienced in problem solving approaches research scientists-people who use every tool available to tackle the most important health and environmental problems, and to develop novel technologies. It will combine the strengths of traditional disciplines, such as engineering or chemistry, with the realization that solving complex real world problems requires an interdisciplinary approach made possible by a broader educational approach and collaborative efforts between scientists of many disciplines.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

133


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM)

134

Code

Course

Description

ED78.32

Seminar in Environmental Biotechnology

There is a need for advanced students to learn and present state-of-the-art research in the area of biotechnology.

January

Basic course in Life Science or Microbiology

ED78.33

Seminar in Toxicology

There is a need to link principles and their applications in all aspects of environmental toxicology and environmental management.

August

ED78.12: Principles of Toxicology

ED78.34

Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Environmental engineers and managers should be aware of mostly biological nature of majority of environmental processes. It is impossible to control pollution without proper understanding of microbial phenomena in nature and man-made environments (wastewater treatment reactors, etc). Since most wastes can be treated biologically, it is necessary to know the microbiological requirements of each process and ensure that the proper conditions for microorganisms are maintained and effectively controlled. Toxicological aspects of environment are often determined by microbial processes, and thereby environmental toxicity can be successfully monitored and controlled only through proper understanding of microbial world.

January

None

ED78.35

Wastewater Treatment

Water and wastewater treatment by biological process is one of the most important fields of environmental engineering. In this course, students will be given basic knowledge about biological water and treatment methods.

August

Consent of Instructor

ED78.36

Drinking Water Treatment

To provide environmental engineers, principles, design criteria and conceptual design of various physico-chemical unit processes encountered in conventional and advanced water treatment.

August

None

ED78.37

Air Pollution Engineering and Management

Rapid urbanisation and industrialisation create increasing numbers of sources of harmful air pollutants leading to new dimensions in air quality management. This course equips engineers and scientists with fundamental theoretical and practical knowledge to understand the complexity of the air pollution problem, multiple effects of air pollution, and principal tools for effective air quality management.

August

None

ED78.38

Sampling Design for Environmental Monitoring

This course is mandatory before research work is started; it is expected that the students will have basic knowledge of fundamental statistics.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM) Code

Course

Description

ED78.9001

Selected Topic: Environmental Immunitoxicology and Reproductive Toxicology

Exposure to environmental and occupational chemicals would result in adverse health outcomes such as hypersensitivity, reproductive effect and immune suppression. Nowadays advanced research on immune toxicology especially on mechanisms of action has provided us more understanding on the effects of those widely found chemicals such as PCBs, TCDD, phthalate etc. Because of this we designed the course to teach our ETT&M students to later to conduct research or manage risk assessment concerning with those chemicals.

ED78.9002

Selected Topic: Principles of Environmental Health

ED78.9003

Selected Topic: Chemicals in Aquatic Environment and their Chemistry

The knowledge on aquatic chemistry is essential for environmental engineers to analyze water quality and to understand the mechanisms of water treatment processes.This course provides fundamental knowledge on acids and bases, precipitation and dissolution, redox reaction, and organic chemistry in aquatic environment.

August

None

ED78.9004

Selected Topic: Environmental Economics for Toxicology

Asian countries are increasingly faced with problems of managing their local and regional environments besides the issue of global climate change. This course seeks to prepare the students for acquiring a command over the subjects of environmental economics so that they will be able to use its concepts and toolkits for analysing environmental problems and to seek their solutions.

January

None

ED78.9005

Selected Topic: Biotechnology for Toxics Assessment and Control

InterSem

None

ED78.9006

Selected Topic: Detection of Environmental Pollution

ED78.9007

Selected Topic: Ethical Issues in Environmental Management

Semester Offered Prerequisite January

None

January

The knowledge on analytical chemistry with microanalysis technique is essential for environmental engineers to understand water quality and as well as the mechanisms of water treatment processes. This course provides fundamental knowledge on acids and bases, precipitation and dissolution, redox reaction, and organic chemistry in aquatic toxicology.

January

August

135


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM)

136

Code

Course

Description

ED78.9008

Selected Topic: Advances in Environmental Health Science

August

ED78.9009

Selected Topic: Toxicology of Pesticides and Industrial Chemicals: Occupational Health and Safety

January

ED78.9010

Selected Topic: Environmental Economics

January

ED78.9011

Selected Topic: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Wastewater Treatment Systems

Construction, operation and maintenance of wastewater treatment facilities involves costs. In order to make wastewater treatment processes financially viable, detailed knowledge of cost elements involved is necessary.

August

ED78.9012

Selected Topic: State of the Art of Hazardous Chemicals Management

The inadequate management of hazardous and industrial wastes, hazardous chemicals, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and obsolete pesticides constitutes a threat for health and environment, locally, regionally and globally (UN Millennium Ecosystem Assessment). The recently ratified Stockholm Convention on POPs aim to protect human health and the environment by requiring Parties to take measures to reduce or eliminate releases of hazardous chemicals from intentional production and use, from stockpiles and wastes and from unintentional release. This course aims to provide an updated and thorough overview of the state of the art of hazardous chemicals management in light of the obligations of several international hazardous chemicals conventions and exemplify the theoretical content with practical real life experiences. The course will contribute in strengthening the capacity on sound hazardous chemicals management in general and for the implementation of the Stockholm Convention on POPs in particular.

January

ED78.9013

Selected Topic: Advance Chemical Analysis

Persistent organic pollutants are on the legislative table in all countries today. To be able to understand the relevance and behavior of these chemicals in treatment systems and in the nature it is favorable to know the analytical procedure. Several organizations are performing investigations or monitoring of these compounds and the principal investigator must then understand the analytical scheme in order to optimize the investigation targets for economical savings and maximizing reasons.

InterSem

Semester Offered Prerequisite

None


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM) Code

Course

Description

ED78.9014

Selected Topic: Receptor Modeling for Air Pollution Source Apportionment

This course aims to provide fundamental principles and practical applications of receptor modeling for air pollution source apportionment. The course content emphasizes the data analysis methods, the underlying theory of source apportionment, and how to distinguish the impacts from local and distant sources. Ambient air sampling and sample analytical methods to provide data suitable for receptor modeling will be covered. Practical applications of the receptor models will be done through the exercises and assignments.

August

ED78.9015

Selected Topic: Cost Benefit Analysis of Environmental Clean-up

Environmental pollution has led to severely polluted waterways as well as land sites. Environmental cleanup of polluted waterways and land sites involves costs. These costs include environmental, social as well as economic costs. Construction, operation and maintenance of clean-up facilities warrants detail technical knowledge as well as knowledge of these costs.

January

ED78.9016

Selected Topic: Applied Microbiological Laboratory

January

ED78.9017

Selected Topic: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

January

ED78.9018

Selected Topic: GHG Mitigation and Energy Recovery from Waste

In recent years, anthropogenic activities have led to substantial increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions into atmosphere which has led to climate change. Waste management sector is an important contributor of greenhouse gas emissions. Appropriate and effective waste management practices are capable of providing mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Adoption of innovative policy measures along with efficient technologies can lead to substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from waste sector.

January

None

ED78.9019

Selected Topic: Climate and Environment Co-Benefit

Human-induced changes to the Earth climate become a topic of the intense interest. This course equips engineers and scientists with fundamental knowledge on the Earth climate system and how it changes, potential effects of the climate change, as well as the measures to deal with the changes with co-benefit considerations.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

None

137


Program Field of Study — Environmental Engineering and Management (EEM)

138

Code

Course

Description

ED78.9020

Selected Topic: Corporate Environmental Management

This course is designed to help companies meet the dual challenges of achieving the complex goal of environmental excellence together with business success, in other words an effective management of eco-efficiency. The course provides an overview of the changing business environment related to environmental protection. It presents concepts, methods and skills needed to integrate the concept of sustainable development and eco-efficiency into the decision making process of domestic or international companies follow the ISO 14000 series of international environmental standards.

InterSem

ED78.9021

Selected Topic: Environmental Services in Emergency Situations

“DISASTER” in other terms it is also known as Natural calamities or hazards. Disaster can happen any time anywhere. There is no discrimination in terms of magnitude and impact, loss could be much higher in developed countries and may be less in developing countries or vice-versa. What matters and important in such cases is the reliability and assurance of the Environmental Services in such Emergency Situations.

January

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Food Engineering and Bioprocess Technology (FEBT) Food Process Engineering (FPE) focuses on the application of engineering principles to the design of postharvest and food processing equipment; changes which may occur within products during handling, processing, and storage; measuring and controlling the quality of raw food materials; the handling and utilization of wastes generated during on-farm processing; and bioprocess technology for the conversion of raw agricultural products to useful food products. Bioprocess Technology (BPT) focuses on new developments in biotechnology and its applications in agro/food, organic farming, biopolymers, cosmetics and pharmaceutics. In this technology, the biocatalytic properties of novel enzymes are used for the conversion of raw materials or wastes into valuable materials. Biomaterials with specific growth promoting properties are developed for application in organic farming. To strengthen applicability of microorganisms for specific purposes, courses are given in genetic engineering of microorganisms. DNA with interesting properties is transferred to produce strains for industrial applications. Methods for the detection of genetically modified (GMO) plant material in agriculture commodities and food products are also being developed.

Preferred Background Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in agricultural or food engineering, chemical engineering, agroindustrial technology, food science, food technology, biochemistry, bio-polymer science, environmental engineering, microbiology, molecular biology, or related applied sciences.

Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in a relevant field and detailed dissertation research outline must be submitted with the application.

139


Program Field of Study — Food Engineering and Bioprocess Technology (FEBT)

140

Code

Course

Description

ED73.01

Food Process Engineering

The growing demand on nutritious and high quality processed foods places greater emphasis on the engineering aspects of the processes and equipment utilized in handling, processing, and distribution of food. Food process engineering will continue to play a vital role in strengthening of food processing capability and meeting future technological needs.

August

None

ED73.02

Postharvest Engineering

To minimize the postharvest losses and ensure the safety and quality of processed food, use of improved pre- and postharvest engineering practices are of prime importance. This course intends to prepare students to advance the scientific knowledge and application of engineering principles and problem-solving techniques to activities and technologies associated with and integral to the production, processing, handling, storage and distribution of biological resources to include cereal and horticulture crops.

August

None

ED73.03

Bioprocess Technology

The success of biotechnology depends on its impact on the market place and the health and environmental gains expected. These pragmatic goals can be achieved only by an interdisciplinary applied approach leading to large scale processes. This course will provide the basic engineering for the quantitative analysis of biotechnology to both biologists and chemical engineers.

August

None

ED73.04

Bioreactor Design and Control

This course will overview those aspects for different configurations of bioreactors which are required for novel bioprocess application. Instrumentation and fermentation process control will also be reviewed along with bioreactor support system.

August

None

ED73.05

Industrial Microbiology

Microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts, and fungi) have a broad spectrum of industrial synthetic capacities and play a major role in production and decay in agriculture. This course is focused on the industrial and agricultural application of microorganisms. The course presents the theoretical background required to identify a microorganism, to understand its biochemical functions, to apply it in controlled fermentation and to assay for microorganisms in food and in soil quality control.

August

Instructor’s consent

ED73.06

Food Engineering Operations

Food engineering operations link the basic scientific knowledge of foods with the manufacturing of foods. The course emphasizes on the principles and design of the systems for food processing and preservation by various unit operations.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Food Engineering and Bioprocess Technology (FEBT) Code

Course

Description

ED73.07

Bioanalysis for Industry and Eco Farming

Analysis of biocomponents is the key to improve crop quality and to enhance industrial production of food and biomaterials. This course presents the theoretical basis of analytical methods in modern biochemistry including the use of immunochemical techniques. These methods concern quantitative analysis of essential metabolites, economical important side products, criteria for quality and appropriate storage, detection of microbial decay products, and diagnosis of plant disease. The interpretation of the analytical data is discussed in terms of present regulation regarding bioproducts and ecofarming.

January

None

ED73.08

Numerical Computations in Food Process Engineering

Unit operations in food process engineering often involve complex calculations. Many graphical procedures developed in the past to aid solution of complex problems have become redundant with the advent of microcomputerbased instructions utilizing numerical methods. This approach not only gives wider flexibility in solving a given problem, also helps a great deal in considering various alternatives in a systematic and efficient manner with a surprising ease of computation.

January

None

ED73.09

Engineering Properties of Food Materials

In handling, processing, storage, and distribution of foods at various stages, engineering properties play a key role in design of the equipment, processes, and monitoring of the quality. A knowledge of engineering properties may lead to greater efficiency in production and utilization of food materials, less waste, and foods of higher quality and lower cost to the consumer.

January

None

ED73.10

Food Process Engineering Laboratory

The growing demand of high quality processed and longer self-life food products places greater emphasis on using improved technologies/techniques for handling, sorting, packaging, transporting and temporary storage of raw food commodities. The aim of this course is to provide hands on knowledge of food processes to produce quality professionals in this field.

August

None

ED73.11

Bioseparation Processes

The separation and purification of biomolecules is frequently the most expensive operation of an overall bioprocess. Separation costs often determine the final costs of most biotechnological products and hence its understanding is of great importance in determining the feasibility of a process. This course provides the basic knowledge on analysis and design of process-scale recovery, isolation and purification of desired bio-products.

January

None

ED73.12

Advanced Bioprocess Technology Applications

Recent developments of new and efficient biotechnological methods have led to a wide range of applications in food and agriculture, health care and environment management. Some of these advances are expected to affect all facets of life in the years ahead as it will change the type of food we produce and eat, the medicines used for treatment and enhanced welfare, the sustainable sources of energy and the care of the environment around us. The new developments which are likely to make all this possible and some of the present achievements will be covered. The opportunities for generating new products and services processes through biotechnology research will be discussed in this course.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

141


Program Field of Study — Food Engineering and Bioprocess Technology (FEBT)

142

Code

Course

Description

ED73.13

Bioprocess Practica

Bioprocess technology combines fundamental knowledge in agro-industrial and environmental technology, Microbiology, genetic engineering and biochemistry, with practical experience and practical data on technical application of microorganism enzymes and cellular components. In the bioprocess practica training is focused on the setup of lab scale and pilot scale experiment that provide useful and reliable data on industrial and environmental useful microorganisms, bioconversions, fermentations and product down stream processing.

January

None

ED73.14

Enzyme and DNA Technology

In bioprocess technology, microbial cells and their components are utilized in technical processes. In order to understand and control these processes knowledge is required on enzyme and DNA Technology. Section I of this course is focused on the enzymes that enable the cell to produce a large variety of compounds. Section II of this course deals with the molecular properties of the genetic material, DNA and RNA and their interaction with DNA-enzymes.

January

ED73.05 Industrial Microbiology

ED73.9001

Selected Topic: Dairy and Meat Biotechnology

Biotechnology is becoming increasingly important to food. In some industries, it is part of a process that has deep roots in human society, whereas many other applications of biotechnology are new to food production and processing system. It is now possible to generate animal with useful novel properties for dairy, meat or fiber production, for environment control of waste production, and for production of useful products for biomedical purposes or other human consumption. Animal and agricultural scientists, food scientists, food technologists, nutritionists, dietitians and the related professionals must have a rich understanding of new and advanced biotechnology, because biotechnology has the potential to be used as a tool within each of these disciplines. A knowledge of dairy and meat biotechnology along with the advancement in farm animal technology may lead to greater efficiency in production and utilization of dairy and meat materials, less waste and foods of higher quality and lower cost to the consumer.

January

ED73.9002

Selected Topic: Processing Effects on Functional Components of Foods

Understanding the molecular interactions of components and their effects in complex food systems is basic and very essential to all research and development in the field of food science and technology, nutrition and food biotechnology. This course aims to develop and advance understanding of the chemical and biochemical components of food, their relationship to nutritional quality and their impact on human health. Biochemistry of food macromolecules, food micronutrients and food additives, storage and biotechnology processes in the value of food, plant, and animal products with emphasis on the postharvest and processing effects will be taught and explored.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Gender and Development Studies (GDS) Gender and Development Studies (GDS) is a center for graduate studies, research and outreach in the School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD) at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) in Thailand that aims to work as a regional center of excellence in the field of gender and development studies, and to integrate gender as a key intellectual perspective and ethical concern in AIT as well. Within the overall gender specific framework, GDS highlights both the need for specialized academic degree awarding studies in gender and development, and the integration of gender analysis and a gender relations perspectives in AIT’s other fields of study. GDS has spent substantial efforts over the years to streamline their teaching and research on a core of very essential gender issues. This core rests on the pillars of gender theories and methodologies, gender equity and equality issues, human rights, political and economic empowerment in the context of rapid globalization and climate change. GDS offers graduate level courses and provides substantial input to student’s Masters and PhD dissertation research. During the period of 1999 – 2012, over 240 Masters and PhD students graduated with a degree of Gender and Development Studies. These graduated are from diverse countries from Asia, Europe, America and Africa. Short courses and workshops are also offered on gender planning and gender analysis in various development fields. In short, a significant degree of gender mainstreaming by GDS had been achieved through its teaching, research publications and outreach programs.

Vision The Vision of GDS is to be center of excellence in Gender and Development Studies in the Asian region that:

• • • • •

trains specialists in gender and development; increases gender awareness among technology, management and development professionals; generates knowledge through interdisciplinary research and publications in technology, development, and gender relations in Asian societies; assists other institutions in Asia to strengthen gender studies through training, research and outreach; and functions as an academic arm of community-based efforts for the advancement of women and sustainable development.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree or equivalent in sociology, anthropology, economics, public administration, geography, agriculture, philosophy, history, architecture, public health, education, psychology and other related disciplines; experience in development work or people’s movement, total commitment to gender equality.

For Doctoral Program: Applicants to the Doctoral program should have a Master’s degree in a field relevant to the chosen program of study and detailed dissertation research outline must be submitted with application.

143


Program Field of Study — Gender and Development Studies (GDS)

144

Code

Course

Description

ED75.01

Gender and Development : Principles and Concepts

In the recent decades of economic development and continued environmental degradation, gender and development studies have become important. This course provides an overview of gender and development as an academic field and how gender relations and advancement of women have become a major concern in development programs.

August

None

ED75.03

Gender, Enterprise and Organizations

Women in many parts of Asia are managers of the household economy, as well as the major force behind what are being called micro-enterprise and the informal sector. The role of women in the management of large-scale industrial enterprises, whether in the government or corporate sectors, is also growing. The course is designed to analyze gender aspects in microand large enterprises/organizations, as well as women’s roles and positions in in value chain and cross-border trade under globalization.

January

None

ED75.04

Gender Rural Livelihoods and Sustainable Development

This course is designed to acquaint students with the wider processes of economic, political and cultural change in agrarian and natural resource use contexts; to apply concepts for a gender analysis of the impact of rural restructuring and environmental degradation on livelihoods; to provide useful analytical frameworks integrating gender, rural development and natural resource use and management for development policy and planning.

August

Instructor’s consent

ED75.06

Gender, Culture and Human Development

Anthropological and historical accounts note that there is inequality between men and women in terms of their social position in societies. In the wake of globalization and economic development, this inequality is based on the premise that notions about gender and gender relations are embedded in culture and ideology, and are often used to either maintain a particular order or to accompany social transition. The objective of the course is to stimulate critical perspectives on cross-cultural comparison on notions of gender and gender relations and their relevance to cultural practices that reinforce women’s subordination.

January

Instructor’s consent

ED75.07

Gender Analysis and Gender Responsive Development Planning

The course equips students with knowledge and skills on gender analysis in development project/program/ policy. This is a practical course that is targeted to students who are interested in working as gender specialists. The course introduces and critically assesses existing frameworks and approaches for gender analysis in the field level and gender planning and mainstreaming.

January

Instructor’s consent

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Gender and Development Studies (GDS) Code

Course

Description

ED75.08

New Technologies, Industrialization and Gender

Women’s entry into paid employment and participation in new industries has been phenomenal in Asia, arguably the most economically globalised region today. At the same time, the past decade has also seen a decline in female labour force participation. New forms of employment have emerged as industrial regimes restructure, adopting more complex and flexible production organizations and patterns of work. The objective of the course is to analyze women’s position as well as the role of new technologies in various industrialization contexts, in order to provide the analytical background for the formulation of policies to promote the equal and safe participation of women in the industrialization process.

InterSem

Instructor’s consent

ED75.10

Gender, Urbanization and Urban Management

Increasing urbanization and processes of globalization have gender-specific effects as well as are influenced by gender factors. This course provides an understanding and analyses of the processes and contradictory outcomes of urbanization for women and men in Asian cities. It will also help students to locate spaces and opportunities for transformation in situations of gender inequality in the context of growing urbanization and within urban management policies and programs.

August

Instructor’s consent

ED75.11

Gender Politics, Civil Society and Human Rights

Gender would not exist without power. Gender inequalities, identities and resistance are constituted and reshaped by power struggles for and against political institutions, and the norms they create. This course offers an examination of gender through power, contested in State institutions and the public sphere and sought through various legal instruments. It attempts to contextualize our knowledge of gender in its political past, underlining the important role the Nation-State, as an institution owning the means of coercion, has had in engendering spaces and identities while committing, condoning, or suppressing gender-based violence. In contrast, the course will examine the role of the women’s movement. Although politics remains highly influenced by the national interests of the State and political elites traditionally made up of men, such civil society mobilization is reinventing gender discourse, realigning power struggles, and consequently the locus of political action.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

145


Program Field of Study — Gender and Development Studies (GDS)

146

Code

Course

Description

ED75.9005

Selected Topic: Gender Migration and Human Trafficking in Asia

The course will take a gender approach to studying various forms of migration, exploitative migration and trafficking in persons in Asia, including forced labor migration, sex slavery and other form of involuntary servitude. While sub-national forms of migration movements and trafficking will be addressed, we will focus on cross-border migration, exploitative migration and trafficking as such movement in persons has increased rapidly while States remain uncoordinated in their response. Migration is both an outcome and a cause of vulnerabilities. Those who are forced into such trades are often victims of traffickers and State authorities who consider them illegal aliens. Women tend to be particularly vulnerable to involuntary servitude and trafficking and the gender division of labor resulting from migration results usually in more abuse and less protection by labor and immigration laws.

January

None

ED75.9006

Selected Topic: Gender and Health

In Asia as in other parts of the world there is growing awareness that men and women differ in health status and health utilization and have different health needs. Still, health systems continue to fail to take these differences into consideration in designing services, allocating resources and setting strategic priorities. Too little is also done to address those power relations in society that generate and keep in stand health inequities. The purpose of this course is to foster understanding of men’s and women’s health-illness processes and the social and biological determinants of gender inequities in health. A related objective is to stimulate thinking on gender-inclusive health care systems and policies. Particular attention will be devoted to the specific socio-political contexts in which health systems are embedded, with a special focus on Southeast Asia.

January

None

ED75.9007

Selected Topic: Gender and Development Economics

This course exposes students to feminist critique on economic development theories and approaches, questioning top-down, growthoriented development which is over dependent on Western/modern technology. Students will learn how the gender-blind aspects of existing development processes and technological invention and promotion has generated disequilibrium in society; hence, adversely effect women and the less advantaged, including children. This course will help students to develop a Gender Lens that enable them to understand the complexity of social and economic change which is essential to work for sustainable development.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Natural Resources Management (NRM) Through teaching, research and outreach activities, the Natural Resources Management field of study at AIT seeks to develop professionals who can contribute to the conservation and sustainable management of terrestrial and coastal resources, through a curriculum and research program that exposes students to a wide range of contemporary topics. Because of the complex nature of NRM issues, the focus of teaching at the NRM field of study is to equip students and trainees with a wide range of skills and techniques for natural resources and environmental management. The student body is dynamic and highly diverse; we have awarded MSc and PhD degrees to students from most South and Southeast Asian countries, as well as from beyond these regions. We provide education and research opportunities leading to MSc and PhD degrees in NRM. Over the course of the degree program, both MSc and PhD students will learn about a wide range of NRM issues and conservation and management strategies, including ecology, biodiversity conservation, integrated land management, forestry, natural resources economics, and remote sensing (RS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In addition, the students will undertake independent research projects leading to a thesis. Both course work and a thesis are required for the MSc and PhD degrees.

Areas of Concern Tropical ecosystems, forestation and agroforestry, land evaluation and resource management, natural resource economics, land degradation and modeling, spatial information systems, protected area planning and management. Students learn about a wide range of NRM issues and conservation and management strategies, including ecology, biodiversity conservation, integrated land management, forestry, natural resources economics, and remote sensing and GIS.

Preferred Background Due to the interdisciplinary character of NRM, students with a wide variety of backgrounds including agriculture, biosciences, environmental sciences, geography, geology, forestry, soil sciences, but also social sciences such as anthropology, are encouraged to seek admission to the MSc, PhD, diploma and certificate programs offered by the NRM field of study. Graduates from the NRM field of study work in a variety of fields and sectors, including government service (such as in forestry and / or environmental departments), non-government organizations, and in academia. Many of master’s students also choose to pursue a PhD degree either at AIT or at other institutes or universities.

147


Program Field of Study — Natural Resource Management (NRM)

148

Code

Course

Description

ED76.01

Ecological Principles for Natural Resources Management

Managing and conserving natural resources requires a fundamental understanding of natural dynamics. This course will introduce students to the essential concepts of ecology and familiarise them with ecosystem patterns and processes at various spatial and temporal scales. A special focus lies on tropical and subtropical ecosystems of Asia, in particular forests and woodlands. The importance of ecology for sustainable natural resource management will be illustrated using selected case studies.

August

None

ED76.02

Natural Resources Management Issues in Asia

As an international institute, AIT receives students from many countries, each of which has its own natural resources management issues. It is very important for future natural resource managers to be exposed to the NRM-related issues across Asia, so that they can put their own country’s issues in a regional perspective. This course has been designed to promote a regional awareness of NRM related issues for incoming students through lecture and one field trip in Thailand. By the end of the course, it is expected that the students will be able to discuss the broad issues of NRM at the regional level.

August

None

ED76.03

Forestry

Asia has a long history of both traditional and industrial forestry. The forestry sector is an important backbone of several economies, and it contributes to the livelihoods of millions of rural inhabitants. Forests represent not only a source of wood for building materials and biofuels, they are also important for biodiversity conservation, watershed protection and climate regulation. In this course forest related students of NRM are exposed to the principles of forestry in the context of Asia, and get in-depth experience with the tools and theory of the evolving field.

January

None, but the course ED76.01 (August Semester) is recommended as basis

ED76.04

Biodiversity and Conservation

Biodiversity conservation in the Asia/Pacific Region involves dealing with diverse biophysical, socioeconomic, cultural, political and legal issues to resolve conservation problems and natural resource use conflicts. The objective of the course is to provide participants with a sound knowledge of conservation biology, an overview of current approaches to biodiversity conservation, e.g. eco regional or communitybased approaches, and with a solid introduction to planning and management strategies for biodiversity conservation inside and outside of protected areas.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Natural Resource Management (NRM) Code

Course

Description

ED76.05

Integrated Land Use Management Systems

Integrated land use systems, which combine elements of farming, forestry, pastoralism and aquaculture are an important component of land use in tropical and subtropical Asia. These are traditional as well as modern types of integrated land use. The focus of the course will be on agroforestry systems (swidden cultivation, forest gardens, taungya) and on integrated agriculture-aquaculture systems. Integrated land use systems are capable of contributing significantly to sustainable land use, economic diversification, watershed protection and biodiversity conservation. The course will provide students with a knowledge of the various types of integrated land use systems, as well as with an understanding of their ecology and economics. The aim of the course is to enable students to assess and enhance the sustainability of integrated land use systems.

August

None

ED76.09

Integrated Natural Resources Planning and Policy

Planning for natural resources management is mainly concerned with reconciling use of natural resources with conservation of natural resources and of the environment as a whole. The aim of the course is to provide master’s level students with an understanding of environmental, socioeconomic and policy perspectives on resource relationships, with an insight into the paradigms of conservation and sustainable development, and with a policy background to an understanding of resource use and planning issues. Another important aim is to familiarize students with modern planning tools for natural resources management and conservation, such as strategies for sustainable development & environmental impact studies.

January

None

ED76.11

Natural Resource Economics

(1) To understand the relationship between natural resources and economics, as well as the role and importance of environmental issues in economic development. (2) To use and critically assess methods applicable for the measurement of environmental problems, cost benefit analysis, cost effectiveness analysis.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

149


Program Field of Study — Natural Resource Management (NRM)

150

Code

Course

Description

ED76.13

Natural Resources Degradation and Conservation

Degradation of natural resources has undermined the supporting capacity of the ecosystem. This has direct link with the current issues of food security, poverty alleviation and environmental conservation including the global environmental processes, e.g. climate change. Hence, understanding of the natural resources degradation is vital for formulating integrative and suitable conservation strategies to respond to the challenges of sustainable food production and reversing environmental problem. This course provides students with the concept, types, causes and impacts of various types of natural resources degradation. Students will learn about the tools, methodologies and indicators to assess and monitor degradation extent and severity and also basic concept of good practices for conserving the important natural resources.

August

None

ED76.14

Society and Natural Resource Management

Natural resource managers are faced with a wide range of issues and responsibilities they must effectively address. Most of such issues have a social component. It is therefore important for the natural resource planners and managers to have an understanding of social dimensions of the complex natural resource issues so that they can take consideration of these factors in planning and implementation of projects related to natural resources management.

August

None

ED76.15

Research Design for Natural Resources Management

Students in Natural Resources Management will be undertaking field research in order to complete their M.Sc. or Ph.D. degrees. As such, an understanding of how to design and execute a research plan and present research findings based on scientific analysis is of utmost importance. This course will fill the need by providing lectures and hands-on experience in research formulation that parallels students crafting of their own research questions for the research proposal and employing appropriate statistical techniques during data analysis.

January

None

ED76.16

Land Resources Management

Addressing food security has remained a challenging issue. Ever increasing food demand, persisting land degradation problem and increasing competition for land for other purposes than food production has compounded to the complexity of the issue. Besides, there is increasing concern over the important role of land use with the other important global change issues, like climate change, land degradation and biodiversity loss. Hence, it is important to understand the critical yet complex roles of land for managing land resources judiciously, which requires a holistic and integrated approach. Hence, it is important to understand the critical complex roles of nland. The course will provide the students with the concept and issues of these interrelated links, techniques, and tools for conducting systematic land evaluation to help make appropriate decisions.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Natural Resource Management (NRM) Code

Course

Description

ED76.17

Geospatial Techniques in Natural Resources Management

Natural resources monitoring, planning and management requires location specific geographic data. Scientific geospatial tools and techniques, such as but not limited to, Remote Sensing (RS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and Global Positioning Systems (GPS), are widely used to observe, quantify and analyze the issues related to natural resources resulting from various human-environment processes at multiple geographic scales. The course provides the students the concepts of geographic data/information, concepts and principle of remotes sensing, GIS, and GPS. The course puts special emphasis to equip the students with knowledge and skill in applying these tools and techniques in the context of natural resources management, such as land, forest, biodiversity.

August

ED76.9002

International Forestry Resources and Institutions

This is a two-month, intensive training course on Common Pool Resource theory and the multidisciplinary, crosscutting research and analytical methods of IFRI to examine the institutional arrangements and local management of forests. The IFRI research program intends to address issues such as: determining how to change processes leading to deforestation in many countries of the world; assessing what types of institutions are associated with sustainable forest practices; and helping policymakers and forest users to design more effective forest policies. IFRI provides a way for people to collect, store, and analyze data over time about forests and the communities that use forests. It can be used to conduct baseline studies; measure change over time in forest conditions and in local governance structures; and share information with pertinent and interested colleagues. (http://www.umich.edu/~ifri/) This training course will be a combination of lectures, field work, and group-based learning.

InterSem

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

151


Program Field of Study — Natural Resource Management (NRM)

152

Code

Course

Description

ED76.9003

Dynamic Modeling of Environmental Systems:

The world consists of many environmental systems, with biological, technological, economic and social dimensions. Besides their diversity, most of these systems are complex, which means that the vast number of interacting components, factors, flows and stocks they include make it very difficult to understand and predict their behavior under ever-changing conditions. Further, such evolving conditions (e.g. climate change, natural resources evolution, social and economic changes and decisions) demand prospective and multidisciplinary investigations to support environmental policies. With recent advances in computer and software, powerful and user-friendly technological options are now available for simulation-based investigations, making use of dynamic modeling tools. The course provides the students concepts and principles of dynamic modeling (DM). Examples illustrate the multidisciplinary nature of dynamic modeling of environmental systems, help the students to gradually acquire the necessary knowledge and skills in dynamic system thinking and modeling. Lab-based practicals, guided- and self-research on own project form the last part of the course, meant to provide the students with operating know-how on current most widely-used DM platforms in natural resources management.

January

None

ED76.9004

Soil and Water Conservation for Agro-environmental Management

Environment in an area/region is deeply related with the ways of manipulation and exploitation of soil and water, the two most significant natural resources especially in the agriculture-dominated Asian countries. An understanding of the issues involved in agriculture and environment from different standpoints (scientific, socio-economic, area-specific etc. is very important for the students who are interested in environmental and natural sciences.

January

None

ED76.9005

Land Use and Climate Change

Climate change impacts are inevitable although may vary in its magnitude from place to place. Land use being one of the major causes of climate change and the fact that enormous land use change occurring in Asia driven by several reasons, particularly for the need of meeting the food demands. Given the crucial role of land, the issue is becoming more complex in the face of food insecurity, poverty alleviation and emerging issue of climate change impact. This course intends to introduce the students intrinsic linkage between land use and climate change to amply equip them with the knowledge of the land use change and climate change science, role of land use on mitigation and adaptation of climate change impacts.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Pulp and Paper Technology (PPT) Pulp and Paper Technology focuses on sustainable solutions to the rapidly growing pulp and paper industries in the region, by meeting the demand of high quality engineers and managers. It provides students with comprehensive understanding of the pulp and paper industry, its unit processes, environmental aspects and the sustainability of the processes and products.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, metallurgy, environmental engineering, physics or chemistry.

For Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in a relevant field and detailed dissertation research outline must be submitted with the application.

153


Program Field of Study — Pulp and Paper Technology (PPT)

154

Code

Course

Description

ED74.01

Pulp Manufacture

The purpose of the course is to give students a broad knowledge in all pulping processes, and unit operations, from raw material handling to the end products including the environmental impact of pulping processes.

August

None

ED74.02

Fiber and Paper Fundamentals

To provide students with an understanding of basic mechanisms in the preparation of pulp fibers for papermaking; characteristics of the paper web forming and strength development; the essential paper properties and their dependence on fiber properties; overview of paper mill operations.

August

None

ED74.09

Unit Operations in a Chemical Pulp Mil

The purpose of this course is to give the students a comprehensive understanding of unit operations and technology of chemical kraft pulp mills.

January

ED74.01 Pulp Manufacture

ED74.10

Pulping and Papermaking Laboratory

The objective is to familiarize the students how to utilize the laboratory experiments in solving problems in pulp and paper mills.

January

ED74.01 Pulp Manufacture ED74.02 Fiber and Paper Fundamentals

ED74.11

Environmental Control in Pulp and Paper Industry

The purpose of the course is to give the students a comprehensive understanding of environmental aspects and emission control technology in the pulp and paper industry.

January

None

ED74.16

Recycled Fiber Technology

Recycling has established itself as a reliable raw material for paper and board industry. The process and the quality of product for recycled fibers are different from origin. The course aims to cover some details on processing techniques and product developments.

January

None

ED74.17

Pigment Coating and Printing

Printing requires a smooth surface of uniform composition, achieved only by pigment coated paper. The course gives a comprehensive review of coating along with printing. The fundamentals of coating and printing ink transfer are explained, and the essentials of each technique briefly introduced.

January

ED74.02 Fiber and Paper Fundamentals

ED74.9001

Selected Topic: Fiber Structure and Chemistry

The purpose of this course is to give the students comprehensive knowledge of the structure and chemistry of fiber raw materials. It is very important for the students to understand the organic and physical chemistry of the pulp and papermaking processes.

August

Basic knowledge in chemistry

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Pulp and Paper Technology (PPT) Code

Course

Description

ED74.9002

Selected Topic: Process Technology of Papermaking

The objective is to give a systematic description of the unit operations of the papermaking, from stock preparation to the reel. The analysis is aiming at giving the students tools for understanding of the process and its dynamics, and the options for improving the quality and efficiency of the process and the product.

ED74.9003

Selected Topic: Advanced Course in Papermaking

The course looks at specific paper properties deeper than the course Fiber and Paper Fundamentals. This advanced course aims at studying in depth selected paper characteristics representing basic physical qualities of paper, process and quality problems.

Semester Offered Prerequisite August

ED74.02 Fiber and Paper Fundamentals

January

ED74.02 Fiber and Paper Fundamentals and ED74.9002 Process Technology of Papermaking.

155


Regional and Rural Development Planning (RRDP) Regional and Rural Development Planning focuses on rural poverty, improvement of the quality of life, and social and economic development of rural areas. Practice-oriented rural-regional planning is carried out regularly at district and sub-district levels following a participatory and integrated approach. Attention is paid to management of development institutions, and infrastructure and physical resources. Sectoral and spatial planning is equally emphasized along with the management of rural development programs and local development projects to strengthen rural communities for sustainable development. Selected areas of concern are: poverty analysis, concepts and processes of rural and regional development; community development planning; agricultural development and planning; planning and management of rural development projects; regional planning techniques; rural-urban relations; NGO management policy and development administration; sustainable development theories and practices; and decentralization and governance.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in geography, economics, sociology, anthropology, practical science, public administration, agricultural science, architecture, civil engineering, rural and regional planning, and other related disciplines. Professional experience in rural development related areas would be an added advantage.

For Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in a relevant field and detailed dissertation research outline must be submitted with the application.

156


Program Field of Study — Regional and Rural Development Planning (RRDP) Code

Course

Description

ED77.01

Rural and Regional Development

The main objective of the course is to focus on development concepts, poverty analysis, regional disparity, different approaches and theories of rural-regional development.

August

None

ED77.02

Social Research Methods in Development Planning

To give an orientation of scientific research methods and techniques that are widely used in development planning. Planners need to know, understand and be able to apply methods, techniques and terminology of scientific research in social science research so that they can assess the value, quality and limitations of research inputs. The course focuses on the application of basic social research methods and techniques, analysis of the data collected and interpretation of the findings, presentations of findings and conclusions.

August

None

ED77.05

Rural Urban Relations

The purpose of this course is to provide the conceptual and theoretical foundations of ruralurban relations in the context of regional development with case studies from Asian countries. This course integrates between the rural and urban planners to identify appropriate policy measures in bringing balanced development.

January

None

ED77.06

Regional Planning Techniques

The objective of this course is to strengthen the analytical base for spatial planning. This provides applications of techniques and serves as a methodological training of the regional and rural development planners.

August

None

ED77.08

Agricultural Development and Planning

An understanding of the issues involved in planning for agricultural development at various scales of analysis, the farm, the region and the nation.

August

Instructor’s consent

ED77.11

Project Planning and Management

Projects are the building blocks of development. To achieve sustainable economic and social development, policies and plans have to be converted into action through projects. Given the scarcity of resources, projects have to be properly planned and implemented. This course aims at enabling students to develop project planning and management skills following the learning by doing approach.

January

Instructor’s consent

ED77.14

Community Development Planning

This course emphasizes on community organization and their dynamics, community participation and empowerment for development activities, local governance with a selected list of methods and techniques for community development planning.

January

None

ED77.15

NGO Management, Policy and Development Administration

The main objective of the course is to focus on managing NGOs/Civil Society and making them more effective in working for the poor and the disadvantaged.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

157


Program Field of Study — Regional and Rural Development Planning (RRDP)

158

Code

Course

Description

ED77.16

Research Design and Methods

The course is designed to assist students in their preparation of a thesis research proposal. The course will address four major components essential for the proposal consisting of research conceptualization, literature review and analysis and understanding basic design principles and methodological input and methods for the thesis research.

January

ED77.17

Rural Regional Planning Workshop

The course will provide conceptual framework, techniques and methodology in rural and regional planning to analyze problems and then formulate a development plan of the study area, involving the active participation of people at the grassroots level. The course participants will be encouraged to use their practical expertise and applications of theoretical knowledge in development planning acquired earlier in conducting the field study in the selected area.

January

ED77.18

Sustainable Development Theories and Practices

Making students aware of the basic principles of sustainable development, and enabling them to analyze sustainable development policies through the analysis of policies adopted by their countries.

August

None

ED77.9007

Decenralization and Governance

Providing concepts, principles and policy framework on decentralization and governance to enable students to apply and analyze them through policy implementation and practices in public reform and various regional and rural development programs adopted by their countries and other development organizations.

January

None

ED77.9008

Rural Development Management Workshop

The course will provide conceptual framework, workshop methodology, techniques to be applied in rural context for developing, analyzing and managing rural development projects at the local level. The students are encouraged to use their experiences and apply theoretical knowledge gained through other courses in conducting field study in Thailand

InterSem

ED77.9009

Rural Project Planning and Management

Projects are the building blocks of development. To achieve sustainable economic and social development, policies and plans have to be converted into actions leading to outcomes through appropriate projects. Given the scarcity of resources, projects have to be properly planned and effectively implemented. This course aims at enabling students to develop result/objective oriented project planning and management skills following the learning by doing method.

InterSem

Semester Offered Prerequisite None


Urban Environmental Management (UEM) The UEM field of study responds to the need to study Urban Planning and Urban Management problems from environmental perspectives to promote sustainable urban development. Faced with deteriorating environmental conditions which threaten urban productivity, the quality of life of urban residents and the social cohesion of cities, the field develops and teaches the capabilities and skills to confront and reverse these negative trends. UEM draws on and integrates theories and perspectives from the established disciplines of urban planning, urban and regional development, and public policy and management into a distinctive framework of problems, issues, and questions concerning the urban environment in a developing society context. This field of study deals with environmental problems such as poor water supply and sanitation, inadequate solid waste and waste water management, land-use conflicts and deteriorating environmental quality in the home, neighborhood and city.

Preferred Background For Master’s Program: Undergraduate degree in architecture, civil and environmental engineering, economics, geography, law, natural science, public administration, sociology or urban and regional planning.

For Doctoral Program: Master’s degree in a relevant field and detailed dissertation research outline must be submitted with the application

159


Program Field of Study — Urban Environmental Management (UEM)

160

Code

Course

Description

ED79.01

Urban Environmental Management Systems

Students in the Urban Environmental Management field of study come with different educational backgrounds and limited work experience on planning and management tasks. Therefore, an introductory course on urban environmental planning and management system is necessary to bring these students to a common platform. This course helps students to understand the existing management systems, methods and techniques that are used to address urban environmental problems. The course deals with both conventional environmental management systems as well as state of the art environmental management systems. The course is presented in a manner to create an overall framework within which the other specialized courses of the Urban Environmental Management are presented.

August

None

ED79.02

Urban Environmental Management (UEM) Research Methods and Techniques

This course is particularly focused on data gathering and analysis in both basic and applied research relevant to the field of environmental management. It provides a generic set of tools and also utilizes social theory and methods and techniques in social science research in systematizing and analyzing empirical data. It is intended to provide the students with the necessary conceptual understanding and skills training in data gathering and analysis that will serve their needs in academic research in the UEM field of study as well as future investigative tasks as urban environmental managers. Its objective is to provide the following: a) conceptual understanding of scientific research and policy-related research; b) basic competence in investigative skills required of urban environmental managers; and c) familiarization with a set of generic analytical and data- gathering tools, both in quantitative and qualitative approaches in academic and applied research.

August

Instructor’s consent

ED79.03

Urban Planning and the Built-Environment

Students in the field of Urban Environmental Management come from diverse educational backgrounds, and sometimes with limited professional experience. Their exposure to planning and management paradigms is even more limited. Since Urban Environmental Management is a new discipline emerging from the more established disciplines such as Urban Planning, Urban Architecture, and Urban Ecology, some command on these knowledge areas has been recognized as essential to perform UEM oriented tasks. This course is designed to cater that purpose.

August

Instructor’s consent

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Urban Environmental Management (UEM) Code

Course

Description

ED79.04

Environmental Science and Technology for Decision Makers

The interdisciplinary and complex nature of urban environmental problems requires basic understanding of science and technological aspects affecting decision making of many professionals including planners and managers. Such knowledge will permit decision makers to consider and evaluate environmental impacts associated with any developments or projects in hand. This course will provide the students with basic technical knowledge on environmental problems, characteristics and sources of pollutants, and possible technical solutions particularly those relating to urban environment.

August

Instructor’s consent

ED79.05

Urbanization and Environmental Policy

Management of the urbanization process and urban environment are two top priorities in the policy agenda for sustaining cities’ role in human development. In rendering these management tasks, urban professionals need to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the urbanization process and a deeper appreciation of urban environmental components. With this in view, the course seeks to impart policy expertise for (a) better management of the urbanization process, (b) pursuing the goal of a decentralized urban system, (c) improving the working and living conditions of the urban poor and (d) developing sustainable urbanization and urban development strategies.

August

Instructor’s consent

ED79.06

Environmental Auditing

In urban environmental management, environmental auditing represents an important component of the environmental management process, as it is a key management tool for evaluating environmental performance. This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the theory and practice of environmental auditing.

January

Instructor’s consent

ED79.07

Disaster Management in Urban Environmental Planning

Developing countries are experiencing a rise of economic, social and environmental losses due to frequent disasters occurring in urban areas. Most urban disasters are natural phenomenon intensified by man-made interventions in the environment. This raises the necessity of incorporating the concepts of disaster preparedness, management and mitigation in urban development and environmental planning. This course is designed to provide a broad understanding on the approaches to disaster management in urban areas and, particularly community-based disaster management methods.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

161


Program Field of Study — Urban Environmental Management (UEM)

162

Code

Course

Description

ED79.08

Environmental Legislation

Beginning the 1970’s, the leading challenge in the courts has been environmental considerations, and the leading concern of developing countries’ federal and state legislatures in the present decade has been to turn out laws responsive to the social drive for protection of the environment. It is through the legal process that the primary attack on the pollution problems of the ever-growing urban centers are being made and solved. This course is designed to impart an expertise in (a) understanding basic legal concepts in general and environmental law in particular for analyzing the legal context of urban environmental management, and (b) gaining a systematic knowledge of environmental legislation and its enforcement at both national and international level.

August

None

ED79.09

Urban Environmental Design

Urban eco-system is distinguished from other eco-systems by the dominant presence of built components in the urban environment. These built components such as buildings in general and housing in particular and also infrastructure facilities, civic facilities, recreational spaces, town centers etc. should be properly designed and built in order create conducive environmental qualities for various human activities in the city. This course intends to make students understand scope of eco-sensitive design and planning of various urban spaces and design strategies for environmental quality management in such spaces.

August

None

ED79.10

Urban Environmental Planning and Management Workshop

Urban Environmental Management curriculum requires an opportunity for the students to practice theoretical concepts and management techniques in an interdisciplinary teamwork situation, which in many ways resembles the challenges they have to face in their future careers. The UEPM Workshop provides this opportunity for students to experiment with methods and techniques that they learn in other courses. Students are expected to synthesize the knowledge they have acquired on concepts of environmental management, methods of data collection, and techniques of urban environmental analysis, in studying a ‘real-world situation’ and then propose urban environmental planning and management strategies for the chosen study area. The whole workshop is simulated as if conducting a realistic project, and terminates short of implementing the proposals.

January

Instructor’s consent

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Urban Environmental Management (UEM) Code

Course

Description

ED79.11

UEM Research Design

This short course on UEM research design is intended to familiarize the students about the core elements of a UEM focused research and the choices that need to be made with regard to each. It also teaches the students about the connection between the core elements of a research proposal. Knowledge of the ‘logic of a research design’ and its core elements should enable students to ‘think about’ their own thesis project in a systematic way.

January

ED 79.02 UEM Research Methods and Techniques

ED79.12

Management of Urban Housing, Infrastructure and Service

The built-environments of cities are largely manifested by housing and settlements of people, and infrastructure and service networks that support their living. The absence of adequate infrastructure and services make the living condition of people below acceptable environmental standards. Under served settlements are usually characterized by poor in-door and out-door living conditions, sanitary conditions and health conditions. Therefore, urban environmental managers require special knowledge and skills in making urban settlements habitable places to live in. This course is designed to offer such knowledge and skills.

August

None

ED79.13

Strategic Environmental Assessment for Urban Development

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is the most widely practiced environmental management tool in the world. Required by legislation or policy in most countries and in international funding organizations, EIA is used to make development projects both more environmentally acceptable and more sustainable. The strategic environmental assessment (SEA) techniques encompass broader scope covering urban development as a sector of activities. It enables, environmental considerations into decision making at the policy, plan, program as well as project level. The course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills for such decision-making.

January

Instructor’s consent

ED79.14

Governance and Urban Management

The challenge of urban governance today is understanding and realizing a public management that goes beyond simple administration and overcoming the traditional separation between politics and administration. This course addresses the relevant issues in this field, focusing on the intersection between urban politics and public management, emphasizing among others the interactive relationship between citizens, elected bodies, the administration, and organized groups or individual policy advocates (as representatives of organizations and business) at the city level. These public agencies and actors and their interactions are examined in the context of the social agenda of cities’ sustainable future.

January

Instructor’s consent

Semester Offered Prerequisite

163


Program Field of Study — Urban Environmental Management (UEM)

164

Code

Course

Description

ED79.15

Urban Economics and Finance

In view of the importance of urban economics and finance for urban planning, management and environmental management, this course is designed to provide a graduate level understanding of the operation of urban economics, local government finance and financing of urban infrastructure and sound services. Privatization of various forms of public-private partnerships, the potential of foreign direct investment (FDI) and cost recovery through user charges are assuming increasing significance in the urban service provisions. A good set of new literature has grown in recent years based on substantial innovations and good practices in financing urban services. Thus, both theory & practice in this subject area is well developed for its offering at graduate level education. The conceptual and policy aspects of the course seek to enable the students to contribute to better management of the urban economy and environment.

January

Instructor’s consent

ED79.16

Environmental Conflict Resolution and Mediation

Rapid growth and urbanization of developing countries have conditioned the rise of incidence of conflicts in both natural and built environments. Environmental managers have to deal wisely and effectively with these often complex conflicts in order to minimize the various negative consequences and cost of unresolved disputes and/or of resolving it through public adjudication or use of force. This course imparts foundational theoretical knowledge on social and environmental conflicts that provide social scientific perspectives and tools to for identifying and analyzing environmental conflict situations. It also provides the key principles and strategies in bargaining, negotiation and mediation in disputes. Furthermore, through simulation and case reviews, it imparts relevant skills in negotiation and mediation practices.

January

Instructor’s consent

ED79.17

Multivariate Analysis for Planning

The aim of this course is to develop basic research sense and capability by teaching the methods for socio-economic data analysis and modeling, and by letting students apply them on their thesis research fields. The methods and techniques which will be provided, covers applied descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis and quantitative modeling. The course also intends to develop their computer skill for statistical application.

January

Enough knowledge of basic statistics

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Urban Environmental Management (UEM) Code

Course

ED79.18

Systems Analysis and Methods for Urban Environmental Management

Description The aim of this course is to develop knowledge and skill related to systems approach and some systems analysis and statistical methods for planning, design, implementation and evaluation stages of the management process. The methods and techniques which will be provided, covers several systems analysis techniques in the management process, applied descriptive statistics, conceptual and analysis modeling. The course also intends to develop their computer skill for application.

Semester Offered Prerequisite January

Instructor’s consent

January

Instructor’s consent

This course investigates introduction to systems approach, analysis, and techniques for management process in preliminary, planning/evaluation, and implementation steps, conceptual and analysis modeling with applications focusing in environmental management and urban development; application of system analysis in decision making techniques, multi-objective analysis, asset flow analysis, material flow analysis, input-output analysis, life cycle assessment, and integrated assessment. ED79.19

Assessment and Implementation of Development Projects

The need of managing intervention more efficiently and effectively and to maximize project results is always an issue of managing development projects. Most of the project managers, consultants and other professionals including NGOs face difficulties in accessing not only in the appraisal process but also in the implementation of development projects especially with the limited resources. Based on lessons learnt and experience gained from past and on-going projects, maintaining control during project implementation to stay on the line from the beginning to the end of project to ensure achieving reasonable results is not an easy task. Therefore this course aims to explore key strategic and major tools as well as practical issues concerning assessment and implementation of development projects. The course also intends to develop analytical skills for applications in urban development and environmental management projects through different interventions including community-based development, training programs, networking, and applied research. This course investigates concepts of development projects, project framework and environment, results-based management, project management stages and tools, analysis of projects from different aspects including gender equality, project implementation, project monitoring and evaluation, project communications, and cases of urban environmental management projects

165


Program Field of Study — Urban Environmental Management (UEM)

166

Code

Course

Description

ED79.20

Urban Planning and Environmental Design

Urban eco-systems differ from natural ecosystems due to the dominant presence of built components and their spatial and functional relationships. Built components such as buildings, infrastructure facilities, civic amenities, residential neighborhoods and town centers should be properly planned, designed and built in order to facilitate various urban functions. This course deals with the challenges faced by contemporary cities to make them environmentally conducive for various human activities. The course intends to make the students understand the scope of eco-sensitive urban planning and design from macro level to micro level.

August

None

ED79.9003

Selected Topic: Gender Analysis for Urban Environmental Management

With increasing urbanization, how to manage urban environment is becoming more and more important in the Asian region. In order to achieve sustainability in maintaining livable urban environment, we need a combination of technical, economic, social and political approaches to the problem. Studies on the intersection of gender and UEM are still new. CIDA-AIT partnership project on Southeast Asia Urban Environmental Management Application (SEA-UEMA) project have provided a platform to deepen our understanding on this issue especially in the context of Southeast Asia. The content of the course is guided by the rich experience and insights gained from SEA-UEMA project.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Interdisciplinary Programs

Agri-Business Management (ABM) As the nature of rural economy of many developing countries of Asia-Pacific region shifts from subsistence farming to commercial food enterprises, a new breed of agribusiness professionals is needed to manage this transformation. AIT’s Agri-Business Management (ABM) program caters to the unique needs of agribusiness professionals, which comprise of knowledge and skills in elements of agriculture sector policy issues, technology, marketing and finance. Agribusiness professionals are needed in several sectors, including in multinational companies involved in corporate farming, food processing, packaging and marketing, agricultural finance institutions, agricultural cooperatives, animal feed industry, biotechnology industry, fertilizer and pesticide industry, irrigation and mechanical equipment manufacturing, medicinal plants/herbs, and government-initiated rural/agricultural development schemes. ABM builds on long standing strengths and experience in research, and internal and external postgraduate teaching in the fields of agricultural production, preservation, processing, agro- and food-industry management and marketing, and in agricultural development. The program focuses on the potential for and contribution of the agribusiness industry in developing economies. It is aimed at enhancing small business entrepreneurship among primary producers of agri-food products, and traders and other market intermediaries in the value chain. The course is appropriate for entrepreneurs themselves and also for people working in the public sector and non-governmental organizations. Entrepreneurs and others will be enabled to take advantage of opportunities within the agri-food and related sectors, and increase the contribution of these sectors within public and national objectives.

167


Program Field of Study — Agri-Business Management (ABM)

168

Code

Course

Description

ED80.01

Analytical Techniques and Decision Tools for Agribusiness

Sound understanding and working knowledge of new decision making techniques and tools are becoming important to all business applications, including agribusiness management systems. Most undergraduate curricula in Asia provide little preparation for these. The course will combine up-to-date tools available from different disciplines such as economics, operations management, statistics, and mathematics, and demonstrate their applications in agricultural enterprises.

January

None

ED80.02

Agro-Industrial System Development

Development of agro-industries is being emphasized in the economies of many countries in the Asian region. A “system approach� to study complex interactions of major components is necessary to formulate and implement agro-industrial projects effectively. A course highlighting the interaction and equilibrium between marketing, raw material supply and processing would provide necessary information for this need.

January

None

ED80.03

Agribusiness Management: Principles and Practices

Agriculture in Asia has traditionally been viewed as a subsistence or cultural activity. This perspective is undergoing a rapid change due to globalization of food market. Agribusiness management, being a multi-disciplinary area of study, covers aspects of policy, finance, technology and entrepreneurship. The course will provide a broad overview of agribusiness development in the Asia-Pacific region over the last three decades and cover above aspects in terms of their influence on agribusiness development.

August

None

ED80.04

Safety and Standardization of Food Products

It is recognized that there is an increasing need for greater quality assurance, transparency and traceability in the food supply chain and food safety. It is a global issue of increasing concern for governments, food producers, food processors and handlers, as well as consumers. The course ephasizes food quality control as the mechanism for the prevention of food-borne illness and food spoilage.

August

None

ED80.05

Agri-Food Supply Chain Management

Efficient and effective material handling has been considered a vital requisite for any commodity-business including agribusiness. Bulk and perishable nature of material to be handled makes it rather complex. Understanding and mastering the concepts and techniques of supply-side in food-chain is therefore considered necessary. This course provides broad knowledge of various management issues related to the agricultural supply chain and the need for a holistic approach to the whole chain. It also highlights numerous modern strategic issues, which are sophisticated in nature and application.

January

None

ED80.06

Trade Policies in Agribusiness

To develop understanding on principles of agribusiness along with business strategy and agribusiness strategic management; review economic principles, marketing plan and regulations; and international agricultural trade and quality standards; which will help in devising suitable agribusiness strategy in the context of dynamic global business environment.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD) Through teaching, research and outreach activities, CCSD program at AIT seeks to develop professionals who can contribute to protect the world, especially Asia, from the impact of climate change whilst promoting sustainable management of terrestrial and coastal resources, through a curriculum and research program that exposes students to a wide range of contemporary topics. Due to the interdisciplinary character of CCSD, students with a wide variety of backgrounds including agriculture, biosciences, environmental sciences, energy, forestry, including social sciences such as e.g. anthropology, economics and sociology are encouraged to seek admission to the Master’s Degree program offered by the CCSD course. Graduates from the CCSD course enjoy successful careers in government (e.g. forestry and/or environmental departments etc.), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and in academia. Many MSc students also choose to pursue a PhD degree at AIT or other institutes and universities.

Preferred Background This program offers certificate, diploma, master’s and doctoral degree programs in “Climate Change and Sustainable Development”. CCSD aims to provide middle and senior level managers and policy makers with an advanced knowledge and skills in climate change and sustainable development. It is designed to upgrade their skills while familiarizing them with know-how through unique continuing professional education, specifically tailored to meet the needs of the region for rapid and sustainable growth and development. This program will prepare trained professionals in Climate Change and Sustainable Development.

Scholarship and Fellowship Sources Several governments, international agencies and foundations fully or partially sponsor the cost of studies, everyday expenses and travel for students of CCSD. These include United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and Asian Development Bank (ADB). AIT fellowships for Master’s and Doctoral programs covering part of the tuition fees are offered to qualified applicants on the basis of their previous academic performance and professional background.

169


Program Field of Study — Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD)

170

Code

Course

Description

IN84.16

Climate Science and Climate Modeling

Climate change, a burning topic concerned by people of all walks of life, is nothing but the deviation from the mean state of the atmosphere over a period of time in a region. Applications of future climate change such as mitigation, adaptation etc. demands the knowledge of future climate. Future state of the atmosphere can be derived from the present state of the atmosphere and prediction models. This course provides a preliminary understanding of the earth’s climate system, its spatial and temporal changes, climate modeling fundamentals and also down scaling concepts. The course is designed in four simple modules covering basic understanding of earth atmospheric system, physics and dynamics of atmospheric motion, weather and climate forecasting methods with their uncertainties and model output downscaling methods. Upon completion of this course, student will be acquiring fundamental knowledge on climate, weather and their changes in space and time. The student will also be aware of climate models and their prediction uncertainties. A basic knowledge on downscaling of coarse global model outputs (GCM’s) to a fine regional scale will also be acquired by the students at the end of the course. This course investigates atmospheric composition, vertical and horizontal structure of the earth’s atmosphere, variations in wind, temperature, humidity along the vertical and horizontal directions, forces influencing atmospheric motion, closure of atmospheric variables, primitive equation climate prediction models, Initial and boundary conditions, physical processes, Global and regional climate models, downscaling mechanisms of global climate information.

Bachelor’s degree

ED82.01

Emission Mitigation in the International Context

Addressing climate change requires the collaboration of all nations. The United Nations framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are the two major international platforms which brings scientists, policy makers, researchers, NGOs to discuss, negotiate and provide inputs for future working on issues related to mitigation and adaptation. Students attending the program on Climate change and sustainable development should know the modalities, functioning and issues discussed in these international forums. This course aims to address this need. This course also aims to make students aware of the various issues in the international context, and to improve their skill in preparing reports and making professional presentations. This course investigates UNFCCC, IPCC, Conference of Parties, CDM Executive Board, Kyoto Protocol, Bali road map and Copenhagen statements, National communications from member countries, communication and presentation skills.

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD) Code

Course

Description

ED72.01

Energy Resources and Technologies

Considering that energy is a critical need of the society, it is important that energy graduates should have an understanding of: i) the reserve position of fossil energy resources in quantitative terms as well as in terms of its lifetime, ii) the importance of renewable energy and its availability, iii) the working principles of different renewable energy technologies, and (iv) applications of energy technologies in the economic sectors. This course investigates reserves, production and consumption of oil, coal and gas, technologies for conversion; fundamental principles, applications and status of solar energy, biomass energy, wind energy, hydropower, geothermal energy, wave energy, tidal energy, and ocean thermal energy; outlook of fossil and renewable energy.

August

None

ED72.30

Energy, Environment and Climate Change: Issues and Strategies

This course aims at exposing the students to the problem of climate change (currently a matter of significant global concern) as well as to technological and policy options to mitigate greenhouse gases (GHG). It is also aimed at equipping the students with approaches to carry out assessments of GHG emission mitigation projects and their economic analysis. Furthermore, the course covers the key features of international conventions on climate change including the clean development mechanism (CDM). This course investigates greenhouse gases and climate change; technology options for GHG emission mitigation; policy options for GHG emission mitigation; international climate change conventions, protocols and perspectives.

August

None

ED72.20

Solar Energy

The market for solar systems is mature and expanding, both in thermal (for heating, cooling and power generation) and in photovoltaic applications (for lighting, water pumping and rural electrification). Climate change concerns due to the large scale fossil energy use is expected to help promote solar energy systems in the future. This course is aimed at providing the students with an understanding of the basic processes in the established solar energy technology. Specifically, this course will deal with the solar radiation estimation techniques, the principles of operation, performance analysis and application of solar thermal conversion devices and direct solar electricity converters. Current and future applications of solar thermal and photovoltaics will also be discussed. This course investigates sun earth relationships, solar radiation and its measurement, solar radiation climatology; thermal processes in solar and flat-plate collectors; concentrating collectors; applications of solar thermal energy; photoelectric effect in semiconductor p-n junctions, solar photovoltaic components and systems, applications of photovoltaic solar energy; storage systems for solar energy (thermal and photovoltaic); recent advances in solar energy applications.

January

Semester Offered Prerequisite

Module 1: None Module 2: Module 1 Module 3: Module 1

171


Program Field of Study — Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD)

172

Code

Course

Description

ED72.9009

Wind Energy

Rising fuel prices driven by growing demand, decline in the fossil fuel reserves, and incontrovertible evidences of global warming are all causing serious concerns on energy and environment security around the globe. Unfortunately for a world that is so used to cheap fossil fuels, the reality is too difficult to accept to initiate serious effort at finding alternatives. However the time is running out and experts have been urging for quick and paradigm shift in the way we generate and utilize energy. Under this scenario, Wind Energy holds great promise and needs to be harnessed in a far greater scale than it is now. Academic institutions have a very great role to play in this. This course is aimed at providing a basic as well as in depth understanding of Wind Energy. Overview and types of wind energy conversion systems, principles of their operation is included. Wind data analysis and Site matching of wind turbines are very important from the viewpoint of extraction of maximum energy from the wind is given more time. Demonstration & hands on training: Software package on Optimum Site Matching of Wind Turbines. The course investigates Basics of wind energy, Types of wind energy conversion system, wind turbine construction and operation, Wind Data Analysis & Site Matching, Stand alone and Grid connected WECS.

August

ED72.9017

RETScreen for Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy

It is widely accepted that renewable energy has an important role to play in the sustainable development by providing access to energy/electricity and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. RETScreen Clean Energy Project Analysis Software is a unique decision support tool which can be used to evaluate the energy production and savings, costs, emission reductions, financial viability and risk for various types of RenewableEnergy Technologies (RETs). The software also includes product, project, hydrology and climate databases. Use of this software can help a wide range of users to effectively implement renewable energy projects. This course provides the background, methodology, and applications of electricity generation using renewable energy resources and technologies using RETScreen. This course investigates principles of electricity generation from solar, biomass, wind and micro-hydro; Application of RETScreen; Analysis of environmental and financial implications of electricity generation from renewable energy; and case studies.

InterSem

Semester Offered Prerequisite

Consent of Instructor


Program Field of Study — Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD) Code

Course

Description

ED72.9018

Clean Coal Technologies and Carbon Capture and Sequestration

This course is designed to expose the students to the problem of climate change due to the use of coal for energy services as well as to technological options for the mitigation of CO2 emissions from the coal sector. This course also equips the students with approaches to carry out assessments of Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) and Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). The major options to promote CCT and CCS will also be covered in the course. This course investigates combustion of coal and carbon dioxide emissions; CCT and CCS for CO2 emission mitigation; measures to promote CCT and CCS; Case studies on clean coal technology use and carbon capture and sequestration from Asian countries; and global market for CCTs.

InterSem

None

ED82.9001

GHG Mitigation and Energy Recovery from Waste

In recent years, anthropogenic activities have led to substantial increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions into atmosphere which has led to climate change. Waste management sector is an important contributor of greenhouse gas emissions. Appropriate and effective waste management practices are capable of providing mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Adoption of innovative policy measures along with efficient technologies can lead to substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from waste sector. This course investigates natural carbon cycle, anthropogenic activities and its influence in natural carbon cycle, greenhouse gas emissions from waste sector, energy recovery from waste, technologies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from waste, policy measures for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from waste sector.

January

None

ED82.9002

Bioenergy for GHG Mitigation

Biomass is one of the most important sources of energy in the developing countries, and provides 14% of the world’s energy. This course deals with the technologies of converting biomass into upgraded fuels as well as direct combustion. This course investigates introduction to biomass conversion; thermochemical conversion of biomass: pyrolysis, gasification and combustion; biological conversion of biomass: biogas and biodiesel; densification of biomass; biofuels; environmental impacts.

January

Consent of Instructor

Semester Offered Prerequisite

173


Program Field of Study — Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD)

174

Code

Course

Description

ED82.9003

Clean Development Mechanism: Principles and Practices

A legally binding set of obligations called “Kyoto Protocol (KP)” was established by the conference of the parties of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to address the global climate change by reducing the Greenhouse Gases (GHGs). The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), one of the three cooperative mechanisms established under the Kyoto Protocol, is an important potential instrument to promote foreign investment in Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction options while simultaneously addressing the issue of sustainable development. As of March 2010, 4968 CDM projects have been registered. Out of this 3897 projects (i.e. 78.4%) are from the Asia & Pacific region. The course investigates climate change and clean development mechanism – an overview; CDM prospects in different sectors; CDM project cycle, modalities and related entities; CDM baseline methodologies; Development of CDM projects and CDM project design document (PDD); Monitoring methodologies for different CDM projects; Issues of CDM project financing.

August

Consent of Instructor

ED82.9004

Science of Climate Change and Environment Co-benefit

Human-induced changes to the Earth climate become a topic of the intense interest. This course equips engineers and scientists with fundamental scientific knowledge on the Earth climate system and how it changes, potential effects of the climate change, as well as climate and environmental co-benefits of the emission control measures. This course investigates Climatology; Earth climate system; Modelling climate; Monitoring climate; Science of climate change: greenhouse effect, short-lived and long-lived climate forcers; Effects of climate change; Co-benefits of emission mitigation: energy and environment; Climate and environment co-benefit: climate and air quality; Cocontrol approach and co-benefit quantification.

January

None

CE74.9002

Climate Change and Water Resources

Climate change and hydrological cycle; observed and predicted impacts of climate change in water; climate change modeling; environmental, social and economic implications of climate change in water; adaptation to climate change in water sector; policies, trans-boundary river systems, laws and international conventions on climate change and water.

January

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD) Code

Course

Description

ED82.9005

Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security

More than 800 million people in tropical and sub-tropical countries are currently food insecure despite of increasing availability of food per capita. Their situation is expected to worsen, and the number of food insecure people is likely to increase, as in changing extreme weather events the small-scale household of tropical and sub-tropical areas will be exposed further to increased climate risks and will make them more and more vulnerable to these risks. Linkages between agriculture and food security, impact of climate change and adaptation and mitigation options and in particular the scaling issues linking information at the plot, farming systems, landscape regional and global scale would be able to address the concern of millions of small-scale household in general, and of sustainable agricultural production systems in particular. This course aims to integrate the approaches of natural and social sciences to minimize the knowledge gaps in translating research findings into actions and policies that are effective in minimizing food insecurity, production vulnerability and human and economic costs of climate change for small-scale farming households of Asia. This course investigates basics and updates on the discourse of food security, agricultural production and climate change with special emphasis on smallscale household of tropical and subtropical regions; finding the ‘missing link’ between agriculture, food security and climate change; various strategies and approaches designed/forwarded to meet the challenges of food security and agricultural production under the climate change scenario, and the institutional arrangements for integrating and addressing the climate change and food security.

ED82.9006

Sustainable Infrastructure Development in the Context of Climate Change

In view of the importance and roles of developing and managing infrastructure in the globe including Asia, this course is designed to provide a graduate level understanding of the policies, programs and projects of various types of infrastructure development with a focus on risk and adaptation strategies to climate change. The main objectives of this course are: to strengthen theoretical knowledge on concepts of sustainable infrastructure development; to improve capability and capacity of mastering the knowledge through closing connection with case studies with a focus on adaptation of infrastructure planning, design and other management dimensions including economic and financial aspects; and to improve students’ practical ability in developing and managing sustainable infrastructure. The conceptual, policy and practical aspects of the course seek to enable the students to contribute to improved planning and management of the infrastructure development in the context of climate change.The course investigates concepts and overview of infrastructure development, Specific sectors and applications of sustainable infrastructure development, Risk as-

Semester Offered Prerequisite January

None

None

175


Program Field of Study — Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD) Code

176

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

sessment and management strategies for infrastructure risk reduction, Risk assessment and management strategies for infrastructure risk reduction, Adaptation of infrastructure development and management to climate change, Economic and environmental aspects of infrastructure development in the context of climate change, Policy tools and management aspects for sustainable infrastructure development, Applications and cases for adaptation of infrastructure development and management to climate change in Asia.

August

None

ED76.9005

Land Use and Climate Change

Climate change impacts are inevitable although may vary in its magnitude from place to place. Land use being one of the major causes of climate change and the fact that enormous land use change occurring in Asia driven by several reasons, particularly for the need of meeting the food demands. Given the crucial role of land, the issue is becoming more complex in the face of food insecurity, poverty alleviation and emerging issue of climate change impact. This course intends to introduce the students intrinsic linkage between land use and climate change to amply equip them with the knowledge of the land use change and climate change science, role of land use on mitigation and adaptation of climate change impacts. This course investigates land use and land use change; Impacts of land use change; Climate change; Relation between land use and climate; Mitigation of and adaption to climate change impacts

InterSem

None

ED82.9008

Community and Climate Adaptation

The main objective of the course is to focus on development concepts, poverty and different approaches to community adaptation to climate change. The course deals with the concepts of development, poverty, community adaptation to climate change.

InterSem

None

ED82.9009

Coastal Ecosystems and Climate Change: Issues and Strategies

Coastal ecosystems provide good and services to millions of people but they are threatened by climate change. Coral reefs, sea grass beds and mangroves are severely affected by high temperatures, sea level rise, floods and other events. It is necessary that students learn how climate change affects coastal ecosystems and how to mitigate and adapt to climate change in order to maintain ecosystem goods and services for the people. The course investigates coastal ecosystems, goods and services, climate change issues and effects on coastal ecosystems, mitigation and adaptation strategies.

August

None


Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management (DPMM) The aim of this academic program is to instill the necessary interdisciplinary capacities to manage and minimize the effects of disasters in people on the front lines of disaster response and preparedness. Upon completion of the program, graduates will have gained a profound scientific understanding of natural and human-made disasters. They will be able to assess risks properly, construct disaster management plans using appropriate tools and techniques, and apply suitable measures to mitigate risk. They will possess the skills necessary for handling complex emergency situations and to communicate with various stakeholders and policy makers on issues associated with disaster preparedness, mitigation and management. Given these skills and expertise, program graduates will be ready to play a leading role in protecting lives from the forceful rising tide of disasters. For more info: http://dpmm.ait.asia/ Professional Master’s Degree Program is a one-year academic program requiring 33 credits, spanning two semesters and a summer period of twelve weeks. August and January semesters provide lecture courses with the summer period reserved for an internship at disaster-related institutions in addition is working out a project report of mutual interest to the student and the internship provider. This program is aimed at those who are currently working at disaster-related institutions and who would like to expand their knowledge base as well as to acquire new skills including the ability to meet the present and future performance challenges. Candidates for this program should have completed a bachelor’s degree and have gained at least 3 years of work experience in disaster related areas. Interested students may shift to the regular master’s degree program if they meet its requirements. Master’s Degree Program is 22 months academic program requiring 50 credits which include 28 credits of coursework and 22 credits of master’s thesis study. The program is aimed at those who are looking for a career in disaster preparedness, mitigation and management, and at the faculty and staff of universities and research institutions. Students are expected to do a thesis directly related to aspects of natural or humanmade disasters in their home countries. After successfully completing this program, these students may pursue further studies in the Doctoral Degree Program on “Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management”. Doctoral Degree Program is designed for faculty and staff of universities and for senior staff of government and international agencies. The program requires 84 credits, i.e., 18 credits of coursework and 66 credits of dissertation research study. Students are expected to have gained a recognized Master’s degree in the subject areas relevant to, or related with disaster preparedness, mitigation and management. Doctoral dissertations are expected to produce new, regionally relevant findings, solutions, or technologies for disaster preparedness, mitigation and management problems. The faculty from AIT and collaborating institutions jointly supervise doctoral students. Post-Graduate Certificate Program is a one-semester program that spans 15 weeks with a course load of 12-15 credits (4-5 courses of three credits each). This program is offered both in January and August semesters. The credits earned in this program can be transferred to the AIT professional master’s or regular master’s degree program in “Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management”, as well as to programs in other appropriate fields of study.

177

177


Program

(DPMM)

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management

178

Code

Course

Description

IN84.01

Managing Disasters

Disasters are extraordinary events that require special knowledge and skills to tackle the damage, casualties and disruption they cause. The field of disaster management is relatively new and rapidly evolving and as the world population grows and urbanization spreads, more and more individuals and infrastructures are getting exposed to potentially damaging disaster events and the threat of large-scale losses. Disaster management began to grow beyond the ‘response and relief’ environment and its focus is shifting to risk analysis, communications, risk prevention/mitigation, and social and economic recovery. This requires a new skill base for disaster managers and this course is aimed at providing students necessary knowledge and skills in disaster management by covering all the components of the disaster cycle (mitigation/prevention, preparedness, response and recovery) and beyond. This course covers the principle and practices in disaster management which can be adapted to jurisdiction of various sizes, at various levels and various situations.

August

None

IN84.11

Mitigation of Earthquake Disasters

The earthquake has wide range effects and can be devastating to people. To effectively minimize the earthquake disasters, its mitigation concept is inevitably involved in many branches of sciences. The course provides the essential knowledge on the natures and evaluations of each earthquakes impact including ground shaking, earthquake-induced landslide, liquefaction and tsunami. Consequently, the course introduces the measures, emergency response and recovery plans, strategies for protection and loss estimation and risk and vulnerability analysis against these disasters.

January

None

IN84.12

Floods and Droughts

Floods and droughts are one of the most destructive natural phenomena in Asia and around the world. They can cause serious damage to life, properties, public utilities and infrastructures. They hamper social and economic growth of developing countries. Knowledge on hydrology of floods and droughts; understanding on their causes, frequencies and magnitudes are required to achieve effective management and mitigation measures of floods and droughts.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(DPMM)

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management Code

Course

Description

IN84.13

Georisk Engineering

Geotechnical Engineers are increasingly challenged to solve problems arising from the impact of human activities on the geological environment but also from natural geo hazards. The economic impact resulting from geological hazards, in particular in developing countries, is significant. The purpose of this course is to educate students so that they are able to understand the principles and reasons of geological risks. They will be educated to identify and quantify the geo risk and the engineering precautions to avoid or prevent the hazards and mitigate impacts resulting from such risks.

None

IN84.14

Tsunami Science and Preparedness

The course will provide students with the fundamental knowledge of tsunami science, understanding of its consequence as catastrophic destruction to human and to reduce the damage by appropriate mitigation and preparedness.

None

IN84.15

Energy Technologies for Disaster Warning and Management

Reliable energy supply is a prerequisite to effectively manage both pre and post disaster situations. Effective warning systems in predisaster situation can greatly reduce the devastating losses and suffering to human, livestock and others. A reliable energy supply is therefore absolutely essential for the warning and communication systems for evacuation. In a post-disaster situation, source of energy and appropriate technologies to deliver them will be important to save lives and to start rehabilitation. This course is particularly designed for managers and practitioners to give an overview of suitable energy technology options for disaster warning systems and how to meet the energy needs in a post disaster situation. This course also provides basic knowledge on how to quickly set up temporary energy supply systems. Demonstration of such systems will also be covered in laboratory and case studies.

None

IN84.16

Climate Prediction and Early Warning Systems

Weather and climate, which is nothing but the state of the atmosphere at any given time, plays an important role in our present and future environment. Early warning System consists of climate prediction and translation of this severe weather/climate information into potential hazards understood by the users. The course is designed in five simple modules covering basic understanding of earth’s atmospheric system, techniques of weather and climate forecasting and the generation of Early Warning System with application in various hydro-meteorological hazards.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

January

None

179


Program

(DPMM)

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management

180

Code

Course

Description

IN84.21

Remote Sensing and GIS for Disaster Mitigation

This course introduces the basic principles of Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) and the major applications for disaster monitoring and management.

August

None

IN84.22

Geospatial Technologies for Disaster Risk Management

Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) is a very effective tool for spatial information acquisition and management. While remote sensing has become operational information extraction system with affordable data cost, GIS provides flexibility in integrating various information and studying spatial dependency in disaster related phenomena comprehensively and affectively. These two technologies are popular in developed countries and getting popularity in the region too. This course will equip students with tools that will assist them in assessing the existing situation of a disaster and vulnerability and identifying factors that need to be considered in planning, decision making in disaster risk reduction.

January

None

IN84.31

Human Conflicts and Humanitarian Emergency Management

The main objective of the course is to focus on nature and causes of human conflicts. It aims at searching possible solutions to the problems arising out of the conflicts: both short and long-term with particular emphasis on the roles of the development workers and policy makers.

August

None

IN84.32

Health and Ecological Risk Management in Disaster Situations

The course deals with the risks natural and human-made disasters which pose danger to the society and ecosystems. Wide varieties of chemicals are discharged into the environment intentionally or accidentally and cause widespread pollution. They may gradually bio-accumulate in the environment or cause immediate and acute toxicity of humans. Natural or human-made, typhoons, Bhopal chemical disaster or the Avian flu pandemic, the disasters necessitate prevention of the spread of diseases and illnesses as the first priority of the governing authorities. The provision of water supply, basic sanitation services and waste management are essential elements of any disaster management/mitigation programs and special skills/ technologies are needed to handle and mitigate the ensuing problems.

None

IN84.33

Coastal Resiliency and Natural Disaster Preparedness

This course is designed to present students with a background on the concepts and issues associated with Coastal Community Resilience. It will provide them with an understanding of the tools necessary to assess CCR within a community and then introduce techniques for designing and implementing an effective resiliency enhancement program. The curriculum will also analyze natural and anthropogenic factors influencing Coastal Community Resilience. The focus is on the human dimension of coastal hazards rather than disaster science.

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program

(DPMM)

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management Code

Course

Description

IN84.34

EIA Framework for Disaster Management

UN experts reviewing bitter lessons learned from the last tsunami disaster have noted that one of the major errors of our tackling the event was that the tool of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) was not incorporated into the existing Disaster Management Plan. This course deals with the EIA framework providing a platform for all other disaster-related tools. The platform facilitates their application in a holistic way combining specific and strategic issues through, e.g., the Rapid and the Strategic Environmental Assessments (REA, SEA).

IN84.35

Planning and Implementation of Disaster Emergency Management

The course focuses on critical issues and associated post disaster phenomena for analysis and planning in meeting emergencies and needs of the affected areas and communities. This will provide scope for working out preparedness measures for the future to deal and cope up with the disaster impacts efficiently and effectively. The discussions will confine to most common disasters with higher frequency of occurrence such as flood, drought and cyclones, etc. The course participants will be trained for undertaking practical works relating to planning and implementation of emergency management using a practicum on identified natural disaster(s).

January

None

IN84.36

Community-Based Disaster Risk Management

The CBDRM course provides an opportunity for participants to understand the concepts behind disaster risk reduction, studying past trends in disaster risk and occurrence; looking at current activities implemented by organizations, NGOs and practitioners, and appreciating the importance of community participation in the disaster risk reduction and management process. The course covers aspects as diverse as stakeholder analysis, vulnerability and resource assessment, participatory approaches in CBDRR, risk reduction implementation, advocacy and challenges faced. In addition to the regular class lectures and discussions, a 2-day field visit is included for practical learning.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

181


Program

(DPMM)

Field of Study — Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management

182

Code

Course

Description

IN84.9002

Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance

API: DMHA or the Asia Pacific Initiative on Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance is a hybrid online disaster training course via video conferencing and content on an ecourse management system. This course is offered through a multiple site video teleconference system that connects all participating educational institutions with students on their respective campuses. The video teleconference connections are established through Internet protocol and network bridging. More than ten institutions around the globe continue to collaborate and share resources in the planning, organizing and delivering of the course. It has a website that has several sections starting with an introductory seminar covering a broad range of topics related to Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (DMHA). Presentations originate from participating member institutions, and include contributions from academics, practitioners, government policy makers and international organizations. Additional materials and resources are found in the website, and whenever possible, include live links to source information.

Semester Offered Prerequisite August

None


Energy and Environment (E-E) The Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) and the Sriwijaya University (UNSRI) have agreed through the Memorandum of Understanding signed on 24 October 2008 to enable cooperate in the areas of academic offerings, research activities and dissemination. Following this, the two institutions have agreed to jointly develop and offer a dual degree Masters degree program “Energy and Environment”. This program has been developed promote AIT – UNSRI cooperation, and will prepare trained professionals in the Energy and Environment field who will be conferred the master’s degree by the two institutions. The dual degree master’s program will be initially offered in the interdisciplinary field of Energy, and Environmental Engineering and Management at AIT’s School of Environment, Resources and Development and at UNSRI’s graduate school, starting from 2009. The students who fulfill the requirements for graduation will receive both the AIT Master’s degree and the UNSRI masters degree, Master Technique. No other certificate/degree will be provided.

Preferred Background Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Physics and Chemistry

183


Program Field of Study — Energy and Environment (E-E)

184

Code

Course

Description

ED72.01

Energy Resources and Technologies

Considering that energy is a critical need of the society, it is important that energy graduates should have an understanding of: i) the reserve position of fossil energy resources in quantitative terms as well as in terms of its lifetime, ii) the importance of renewable energy and its availability, iii) the working principles of different renewable energy technologies, and (iv) applications of energy technologies in the economic sectors.

August

None

ED72.02

Energy Audit and Thermal Energy Conservation

Efficient use of energy is one of the most attractive means to address the growing demand for fossil fuel utilization and the associated environmental problems. This course presents energy auditing methodology and techniques for thermal energy management in different energy systems.

August

Consent of Instructor

ED72.03

Rational Use of Energy in Industry

As an important input to the industrial growth, energy provides considerable scope for its management through both technical and nontechnical means. This course presents an approach that introduces economic energy utilization in industrial enterprises for producing the required goods and services efficiently while taking into consideration financial, environmental, social and other constraints. At the same time, conflicts that may arise due to the differences in macro and micro perspectives related to energy use are dealt with to find acceptable solutions.

August

None

ED72.04

Organization and Finance of a Power Utility

Efficient organization and well-managed finance are essential for a successful electric utility. This course is intended to give an overview of the organization and management of power utilities. It is designed to introduce new concepts and technologies in utilities operation, particularly on management decision making.

August

None

ED72.05

Demand-Side Management

An emerging trend in reducing cost and optimizing resource use in an electric utility is to promote efficiency of electricity use and to encourage customers to shift away from the system load peak while filling the system load valley. Concurrently there is a global development of the electric utility service towards deregulation. This course is intended to introduce concepts and practices in management of customer demand, and evaluation methodology of program success. It examines the methodologies for assessing the impact of energy efficiency and load management technologies on the utility’s load shape. It would also examine the development of deregulation in the electric utility service and the emergence of integrated energy services in the industry.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy and Environment (E-E) Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

ED72.06

Design and Management of Energy Systems

There is a trend of energy facilities being outsourced by industry and building owners so that they can focus on their main areas of businesses. Professionals required to handle these energy facilities should have adequate skills to provide reliable energy services at competitive costs. A good understanding of the fundamental thermodynamic and engineering concepts, and techno-economic optimization techniques are essential for efficient designing and operation of such facilities. This course is intended to bridge thermal technology with systems engineering, and is application oriented. A review of the fundamental concepts of energy and energy analysis of thermal processes is first demonstrated and then the students are exposed to the mathematical tools for characterization of the performance of energy equipments and optimization t o o l s . Energy recovery by pinch technology will be discussed. Management of energy systems is also an important aspect to provide trouble free service to the industry.

August

None

ED72.08

Power Distribution Systems

Distribution System is an important portion of power systems due to its high investment and its direct effect on customer. This course is intended to give an overview of the characteristics of distribution systems, power quality requirements, and protection measures. The planning and design considerations are also introduced.

August

None

ED72.11

Rural Electrification and Distributed Generation

Rural electrification, which is requires huge investment, is an important concern in Asian electric power utilities. Distributed generation is one new option being promoted to solve rural electrification problems along with the some other problems of urban distribution systems. The issues such as system capacity investments, grid expansions, etc. also benefit through distributed generation. This course is intended to provide the knowledge on the importance and benefit of rural electrification, availability of resources, distributed generation technologies, technical and financial feasibility of applying distributed generation to rural and urban areas.

August

None

ED72.12

Energy Statistics and Energy Demand Forecasting

Comprehensive knowledge of the overall energy system, which covers both commercial and traditional energy sources, from primary production to transformation and end-uses is indispensable for energy planners/economists. Similarly, energy demand analysis and forecasting constitute basic elements of energy planning and policy formulation. The course aims at providing training on energy accounting frameworks, equipping students with statistical data analysis skills and providing an in-depth understanding of the energy demand analysis and forecasting methodologies.

January

None

185


Program Field of Study — Energy and Environment (E-E)

186

Course

Description

ED72.13

Development and Evaluation of Energy Projects

Understanding the project cycle is important because of lumpy nature of most energy projects and their wide socio-economic and environmental impacts. Its importance has increased in the era of deregulated and privatized energy industries, and in view of global concern about sustainable development of energy projects. The main objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts and methodologies for project identification, project preparation, project evaluation and project financing.

January

None

ED72.15

Energy Price Theory and Applications

Energy pricing is one of the most important policy instruments in energy resource planning and demand management. This course is designed to expose the students to the foundations of price theory and their applications to energy pricing and policy analysis.

August

None

ED72.17

Energy Management in Buildings

To enable essential but practical understanding of the energy processes in buildings. The course covers the external and internal energy processes in the control of the built environment. It also examines emerging technologies for energy management.

August

None

ED72.19

Biomass Conversion

Biomass is one of the most important sources of energy in the developing countries, and provides 14% of the world’s energy. This course deals with the technologies of converting biomass into upgraded fuels as well as direct combustion.

January

Consent of Instructor

ED72.20

Workshop on Energy Issues and Communication

Students need to be trained in preparing reports and in developing presentation skills. This course aims to make students aware of diverse issues in the field of energy that cannot be covered in conventional classroom lectures, and to improve their skill in preparing reports and making professional presentations.

January

Consent of Instructor

ED72.22

Power Sector Management Under Deregulation

The organization of the electric sector in the world has been changing dramatically to allow for competition among generators and to create market condition in the sector, seen as necessary conditions for increasing the efficiency of electric energy production and distribution, offering a lower price, higher quality and secure product. This course is aimed at providing a basic understanding to different types of power system restructuring process of the world with special emphasis to the Asian countries.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy and Environment (E-E) Code

Course

Description

ED72.24

Electricity Economics and Planning

This course is designed to develop an in-depth understanding of key economic and other concepts related to electric utility planning and to expose the students to modern approaches of electricity planning, electricity pricing and environmental implications of alternative power development plans.

August

None

ED72.25

Energy Economic Modeling and Policy Analysis

Formulation of economically efficient strategies and development plans for energy system requires a sound understanding of energy supply and demand options as well as the interrelationships between the energy sector and the economy. Models of energy and economic systems facilitate such an understanding. The course is designed to expose the students to major energy-economic modeling approaches and their applications to energy technology assessments and energy and environmental policy analysis.

January

None

ED72.28

Solar Energy

The market for solar systems is mature and expanding, both in thermal (for heating, cooling and power generation) and in photovoltaic applications (for lighting, water pumping and rural electrification). Concerns regarding the environmental effects of large scale fossil energy use is expected to the further development of solar energy systems in the future. This course is aimed at providing the students with an understanding of the basic processes in the established solar energy technology. Specifically, this course will deal with the solar radiation estimation techniques, the principles of operation, performance analysis and application of solar thermal conversion devices and direct solar electricity converters. Current and future applications of solar thermal and photovoltaics will also be discussed.

January

None

ED72.29

Design of Solar Systems for thermal and Electricity Generation Application

As the market for solar thermal and photovoltaic systems expands in Asia, engineers and scientists need to be able to apply modern techniques for designing efficient and cost effective solar energy based systems. The aim of this course is to present the methods available for the design of solar thermal systems and photovoltaics. The sizing aspects applied to water heating, air heating, drying, cooling and photovoltaics will be discussed for specific end use applications in both urban and rural communities, as well as for buildings and industry.

January

ED72.28 Solar Energy

Semester Offered Prerequisite

187


Program Field of Study — Energy and Environment (E-E)

188

Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

ED72.30

Energy, Environment and Climate Change: Issues and Strategies

This course aims at exposing the students to the problem of climate change (currently a matter of significant global concern) as well as to technological and policy options to mitigate greenhouse gases (GHG). It is also aimed at equipping the students with approaches to carry out assessments of GHG emission mitigation projects and their economic analysis. Furthermore, the course covers the key features of international conventions on climate change including the clean development mechanism (CDM).

August

None

ED72.31

Electrical Energy Management

The objectives of the course are to provide a review of energy relations in electromagnetic field and electric network, to present the characteristics of electrical energy use in major equipment, to provide a foundation for an integrated view of efficiency in electricity use.

January

None

ED78.01

Environmental Chemistry & Laboratory

The purposes of the course are in preparing engineers and scientists to help those engaged in basic research, to carry out apply research, and to conduct pilot plant and plant scale studies.

August

None

ED78.05

Waste Reduction and Recycling

With the enormous quantity of wastes being generated by human activities, the practice of waste treatment alone will not be effective in solving pollution problems. This course covers rationale and strategy of waste reduction and recycling, technologies and management criteria, uses of the reclaimed products and health impacts.

January

None

ED78.07

Solid Waste Management

This course is to provide knowledge of engineering principals and issues concerning solid waste management.

August

None

ED78.08

Environmental Quality Management

There is a need to enhance understanding and to introduce techniques and policy for management of highly interrelate and interdisciplinary environmental protection factors.

January

None

ED78.10

Environmental Health and Sanitation

The problems of water supply, drinking water, sanitation and health in rural areas of developing countries are still serious. This course aims to create concern about the severity and fatality of water borne diseases. In this course, the role of hygienic education to prevent the transmission of water borne as well as fecal contaminant diseases is highly emphasized. Integrated approach to health and sanitation problem in developing countries has been made throughout the course including the suggestions and solutions for a proper behavioral and strategic plan on this respect.

January

None


Program Field of Study — Energy and Environment (E-E) Code

Course

Description

ED78.17

Advanced Processes for Wastewater Treatment Reuse and Recycle

To familiarize the environmental engineers with principles, design and operation of various advanced processes for treatment, reuse and recycle of wastewater.

January

None

ED78.18

Toxic Organics and Trace Metals in Ecosystem

This course was designed to provide the students understand the pathways and effects of toxic organics (POPs focus) and heavy metals on the ecosystems. Environmental fate and exposure concentration of such toxics as well as how to reduce/stabilize to control their toxicity are included. Impacts of the toxics on soil/sediment health need to be emphasized.

January

None

ED78.19

Environmental Impact Assessment

The objective of this course is to introduce EIA concept and elaborate EIA procedure and methodology, development and implementation, emerging issues and gaps. It consolidates the understanding of EIA as a useful tool in decisionmaking process and in management of development projects. This course combines lectures with actual training in EIA using selected case studies with focus on priority sectors of development in the region. Knowledge of cumulative environmental impact assessment philosophy will also be introduced.

August

None

ED78.20

Industrial Waste Abatement and Management

The objective of this course is to present for both environmental engineers and managers an overall view on industrial waste abatement and management strategies and techniques.

January

None

ED78.21

Water Quality Management

Industrialization and population increase have led to increased water consumption. On the other had, unchecked industrial and municipal discharges have severely deteriorated the water quality. The course emphasizes how water resource should be managed to maintain the quality.

January

None

ED78.22

Air Pollution Modeling and Applications

This course provides fundamental aspects of mathematical modeling for air pollution and practical applications of models for planning and managing air quality in various meteorological and topographical conditions.

InterSem

ED78.37: Air Pollution Engineering and Management, or equivalent.

ED78.23

Hazardous Waste Technology and Management

August

None

Due to rapid industrialization hazardous waste disposal is becoming a serious threat to human health and the environment. This course aims to provide fundamental knowledge on hazardous substances and wastes, waste minimization and technologies for hazardous waste treatment, including remediation of hazardous waste contaminated sites. Hazardous waste management and regulatory aspects commonly used for hazardous waste control are covered.

Semester Offered Prerequisite

189


Program Field of Study — Energy and Environment (E-E)

190

Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

ED78.24

Design of Air Pollution Control Systems

This course aims at the combination of theoretical knowledge with practical applications of air pollution control techniques. It provides basic principles enabling selection of optimum control device/control system for a particular application. Practical designing cases are demonstrated to equip students with important basic technical requirements of actual air pollution control systems. Emission control of climate forcing agents is also included

August

ED78.25

Principles of Cleaner Production

Cleaner production (CP) which is a continuous application of an integrated preventive environmental strategy to processes, products and services improves eco efficiency and reduce risks to humans & environment. Application of CP helps to use resources efficiently, increase energy efficiency, reduce costs and wastes, and thus improve industry productivity. The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of CP practice and technologies in the important sectors of the economy, methodologies and tools to apply CP to use energy efficiently, reduce pollution and minimize wastes. Detailed examples and case studies to explain the concept will be presented.

January

None

ED78.35

Wastewater Treatment

Water and wastewater treatment by biological process is one of the most important fields of environmental engineering. In this course, students will be given basic knowledge about biological water and wastewater treatment methods.

August

Consent of instructor

ED78.36

Drinking Water Treatment

To provide environmental engineers, principles, design criteria and conceptual design of various physico-chemical unit processes encountered in conventional and advanced water treatment.

August

None

ED78.37

Air Pollution Engineering and Management

Rapid urbanisation and industrialisation create increasing numbers of sources of harmful air pollutants leading to new dimensions in air quality management. This course equips engineers and scientists with fundamental theoretical and practical knowledge to understand the complexity of the air pollution problem, multiple effects of air pollution, and principal tools for effective air quality management.

August

None

ED78.37: Air Pollution Engineering and Management, or equivalent


Energy Business Management (EBM) There is a need for a new breed of highly trained specialized professionals who are capable of efficiently managing the energy companies in the increasingly globalized business environment. The professional Master’s program in Energy Business Management is designed to produce such human capital. The main focus of the new academic program is to give students in depth exposure to modern management approaches and skills needed to face the challenge of managing the changing energy business paradigms and energy markets. As energy business is increasingly linked with international financial markets, it becomes necessary to tap both domestic and foreign sources of financing for major energy production to meet the fast growing energy needs. This further stresses the need to have professional with sound engineering and management. This program is tailor made to fulfill this importance human capital need.

Preferred Background Engineering, Science, Economics, Management, Business, Public Administration or equivalent

Professional Master’s Degree Program The professional Master’s degree program is a one-year academic program requiring 30 credits (24 credits coursework and 6 credits project). The courses will be offered during Friday and weekends. Courses will be offered on a modular basis. 1 credit will be completed in 1 week. The exams will be conducted after 4 weeks for the completed courses. ie. During a period of 15 weeks, 12 credits could be completed.

191


Program Field of Study — Energy Business Management (EBM) Code

192

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

ED72.01

Energy Resources and Technologies

Considering that energy is a critical need of the society, it is important that energy graduates should have an understanding of: i) the reserve position of fossil energy resources in quantitative terms as well as in terms of its lifetime, ii) the importance of renewable energy and its availability, iii) the working principles of different renewable energy technologies, and (iv) applications of energy technologies in the economic sectors.

August

None

ED72.06

Design and Management of Energy Systems

There is a trend of energy facilities being outsourced by industry and building owners so that they can focus on their main areas of businesses. Professionals required to handle these energy facilities should have adequate skills to provide reliable energy services at competitive costs. A good understanding of the fundamental thermodynamic and engineering concepts, and techno-economic optimization techniques are essential for efficient designing and operation of such facilities. This course is intended to bridge thermal technology with systems engineering, and is application oriented. A review of the fundamental concepts of energy and energy analysis of thermal processes is first demonstrated and then the students are exposed to the mathematical tools for characterization of the performance of energy equipments and optimization tools. Energy recovery by pinch technology will be discussed. Management of energy systems is also an important aspect to provide trouble free service to the industry.

August

None

ED72.11

Rural Electrification and Distributed Generation

Rural electrification, which is requires huge investment, is an important concern in Asian electric power utilities. Distributed generation is one new option being promoted to solve rural electrification problems along with the some other problems of urban distribution systems. The issues such as system capacity investments, grid expansions, etc. also benefit through distributed generation. This course is intended to provide the knowledge on the importance and benefit of rural electrification, availability of resources, distributed generation technologies, technical and financial feasibility of applying distributed generation to rural and urban areas.

August

None

ED72.12

Energy Statistics and Energy Demand Forecasting

Comprehensive knowledge of the overall energy system, which covers both commercial and traditional energy sources, from primary production to transformation and end-uses is indispensable for energy planners/economists. Similarly, energy demand analysis and forecasting constitute basic elements of energy planning and policy formulation. The course aims at providing training on energy accounting frameworks, equipping students with statistical data analysis skills and providing an indepth understanding of the energy demand analysis and forecasting methodologies.

January

None


Program Field of Study — Energy Business Management (EBM) Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

ED72.13

Development and Evaluation of Energy Projects

Understanding the project cycle is important because of lumpy nature of most energy projects and their wide socio-economic and environmental impacts. Its importance has increased in the era of deregulated and privatized energy industries, and in view of global concern about sustainable development of energy projects. The main objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts and methodologies for project identification, project preparation, project evaluation and project financing.

January

None

ED72.19

Biomass Conversion

Biomass is one of the most important sources of energy in the developing countries, and provides 14% of the world’s energy. This course deals with the technologies of converting biomass into upgraded fuels as well as direct combustion.

January

Consent of Instructor

ED72.20

Workshop on Energy Issues and Communication

Students need to be trained in preparing reports and in developing presentation skills. This course aims to make students aware of diverse issues in the field of energy that cannot be covered in conventional classroom lectures, and to improve their skill in preparing reports and making professional presentations.

January

Consent of Instructor

ED72.22

Power Sector Management Under Deregulation

The organization of the electric sector in the world has been changing dramatically to allow for competition among generators and to create market condition in the sector, seen as necessary conditions for increasing the efficiency of electric energy production and distribution, offering a lower price, higher quality and secure product. This course is aimed at providing a basic understanding to different types of power system restructuring process of the world with special emphasis to the Asian countries.

January

None

ED72.24

Electricity Economics and Planning

This course is designed to develop an in-depth understanding of key economic and other concepts related to electric utility planning and to expose the students to modern approaches of electricity planning, electricity pricing and environmental implications of alternative power development plans.

August

None

ED72.29

Design of solar systems for thermal and electricity generation applications

As the market for solar thermal and photovoltaic systems expands in Asia, engineers and scientists need to be able to apply modern techniques for designing efficient and cost effective solar energy based systems. The aim of this course is to present the methods available for the design of solar thermal systems and photovoltaics. The sizing aspects applied to water heating, air heating, drying, cooling and photovoltaics will be discussed for specific end use applications in both urban and rural communities, as well as for buildings and industry.

August

ED72.28 Solar Energy

193


Program Field of Study — Energy Business Management (EBM)

194

Code

Course

Description

ED72.30

Energy, Environment and Climate Change: Issues and Strategies

This course aims at exposing the students to the problem of climate change (currently a matter of significant global concern) as well as to technological and policy options to mitigate greenhouse gases (GHG). It is also aimed at equipping the students with approaches to carry out assessments of GHG emission mitigation projects and their economic analysis. Furthermore, the course covers the key features of international conventions on climate change including the clean development mechanism (CDM).

August

None

ED72.9006

Productive Uses of Energy

Energy is a prerequisite for sustainable development and poverty alleviation. Productive use of energy is an important aspect in the design and implementation of energy projects, especially in rural areas. Focuses on productive use of energy more importantly for renewable energy projects is geared recently in the recognition of the fact that the provision or access to energy is not the endgoal rather is an attempt to make the energy input work directly and economically for rural economic development. The course is designed to give students an understanding on issues of how to maximize social and economic benefits, and improve economic sustainability of rural energy projects through Productive Use of Renewable Energy

January

Consent by instructor

ED72.9020

Rational Use of Energy in Building

The building sector accounts for 30-40% of world’s primary energy consumption and is responsible for about 33% of total global CO2 emission. Buildings also provide the highest economic GHG mitigation potential. This course is intended to introduce essential and practical understanding of energy processes and rational use of energy in buildings. The course covers the external and internal energy processes involved in the control of the built environment. It also examines emerging technologies, policies and measures, to lower the building sector’s dependence on fossil energies and enhance the integration of renewable energy.

August

None

ED72.9019

Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Power Grid

The increasing number of renewable energy sources (RES) and distributed generators (DG) requires new strategies for the operation and management of the electricity grid in order to maintain or even to improve the power supply reliability and quality in future. One major objective of this course is to develop an appropriate methodology to assess renewable energy sources from a utility perspective and is compatible with the technical and economic assessment techniques employed by utility engineers and planners

August

Consent by instructor

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy Business Management (EBM) Semester Offered Prerequisite

Code

Course

Description

SM60.33

Managerial Accounting

This course aims at developing skills to understand, evaluate and use financial information in business decision making. The course will introduce participants to the vocabulary of financial and cost accounting. It will develop in the participants an understanding of the important tools and techniques used in analyzing financial information. It will also develop in the participants the necessary skills to apply these tools and techniques in the context of business decisions through the use of context relevant case studies. Evaluation components will include a project which will sensitize the participants to the issues involved in collecting relevant financial data and vetting them for quality before applying the relevant analytical tools.

August

SM60.34

Corporate Finance

The purpose of this class is to give students a thorough introduction to financial management that blends relevant theory with practical applications. This course explores the fundamental financial and operating decision undertaken by corporate management.

January

SM60.43

Human Resources Management

Formal organizations, private and public organizations in the manufacturing and service sectors alike, are currently faced with rapid changes due to government deregulation and the globalization process. Business firms in particular need to develop its competitive advantage, increase its competitiveness in this fierce competitive environment. One of the key competitive advantages for firm is its human resources.

August

This course is concerned with the effective management of human resources at work from a strategic perspective. It discusses the human resource management as a system and examines ways human resource management can create values to the firm, how to improve human resource productivity and job satisfaction which will ultimately add to the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the organization. SM60.63

Managing Technology for Competitiveness

Technology is a key resource of great importance for corporate profitability and sustainable growth. Understanding the strategic potential of technology has become a crucial issue in today’s competitive business environment. The ability of the modern-day managers to analyze and make strategic decisions with respect to the technologies has an important bearing on the competitiveness of the firms. The objective of this course is to provide the participants with necessary knowledge and tools to understand, anticipate, acquire, and use technology for attaining competitiveness at the market place.

January

195


Program Field of Study — Energy Business Management (EBM) Code

Course

Description The course gives a wider perspective of technology management, and is intended for students who need to have an overall knowledge about the subject and for those who wish to go on to take more advanced courses in the management of technology.

SM80.06

Innovation Marketing and New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to sustainable growth and profits in many industries. Successful innovations are those that benefit users more than established offerings. This course helps students learn how to manage the development of new products and services that meet customer needs in consumer and B2B settings. The focus of this course is on identifying and processing information from customers and creating customer value. It covers more thoroughly the quantitative tools like conjoint measurement and more practical exercises with the tools.

SM90.05

Project Management

This course aims at introduce the essential techniques and approaches in project management that include developing and planning new projects as well as effectively managing and controlling their implementation. Though group projects and case studies, the students will also be exposed to the real project experiences in both business and development sectors.

SM90.23

Supply Chain Management

Supply Chain is a set of entities involved with the flow of products, services, fund, and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption. In recent years, the competitive market has forced the business enterprises to invest and focus their attention on their supply chain. Additionally, the use of supply chain management principles has been widely recognized to improve the competitive position. Effective supply chain management has helped firms such as Dell, HP, and Wal-Mart set themselves ahead of their competition. Supply Chain Management views the supply chain in the integrated fashion in order to improve the performance of each entity (supply chain member) and the supply chain as a whole. Supply Chain Management is not about sacrifice for the greater good. But rather, it is how we can coordinate among supply chain members so that decisions made by them to maximize their own performance will also result in the maximized performance of the supply chain. Students who take this course will learn about fundamental supply chain management concept. They will be able to develop supply chain strategy in line with the firm’s strategy and understand how to manage supply chain performance drivers

196

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Field of Study — Energy Business Management (EBM) Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

such as inventory, sourcing, and transportation to support the supply chain strategy. In addition, they will develop managerial skills in supply chain coordination, and demand and supply planning. The course will prepare students as managers in a competitive environment to think supply chain and be able to manage it to enhance their firm’s competitive position. SM90.26

Management of Innovation

Success followed by failure and innovation followed by inertia is the pattern of a global problem faced by companies in any industry at any time. As short-term corporate success often increases the chances of long-term failure, managers must learn to sustain incremental improvement while at the same time leading radical change. In this course managers learn how to integrate the different techno-economic and behavioral factors that condition a firm’s creativity and innovation and how to design a strategy system for product/service and process innovation that allows their firm to benefit from increasingly faster technology and market changes.

January

SM91.71

Management of Information Systems

To provide a broad overview on the important technical and managerial issues of management information systems (MIS). This course is designed to provide students with a balanced view of management and technology. Students will learn how to apply information technologies (IT)/ information systems (IS) to solve critical business problems in the real business world.

January

SM91.72

International Technology Transfer

Rapid globalization and the liberalization of national economies have made international transfer of technology (ITT) a very important component of international business. ITT is, today, widely used by firms in both developing and industrialized countries as a means of gaining access to technologies to strengthen their competitiveness and growth. The main objective of this course is to provide the participants with the necessary knowledge and tools to plan, negotiate and implement ITT both from the perspective of a transferee and transferor of technology. Case studies would be an integral part of the course.

197


Greater Mekong Sub-region Development Studies (GMS-DS) The recent linkages in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries has not only increased economic cooperation among the countries, but has also highlighted that issues such as water, biodiversity, environment and development needs a regional approach rather than by individual countries. This means that decision makers and leaders both in the government, NGOs and industrial sector need to know about the region in this globalised world. The current education, training and research approaches in the context of human resource development, especially the mid-career professionals, are largely confined to country based studies. Thus, there is a need for a regional approach in dealing with development issues in GMS. Moreover, lack of human resources in many of the GMS countries do not allow many talented mid-career people, both in the government and NGOs, to obtain long-term education leave to upgrade their knowledge in order to respond to emerging challenges in the region. There is, therefore, an urgent need to provide flexible and contextualized program to this important group of future leaders. With ASEAN countries coming up as a more united body, it is more urgent than ever to develop capacity in GMS region. Utilizing the extensive research, teaching and outreach experience it has in GMS, Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) has embarked on a Certificate leading to Master’s Degree in GMS Development Studies (GMS-DS) program. This is a series of modular courses that will allow maximum flexibility to mid-career officers and scholars to improve their knowledge and skills for problem solving in the GMS. This could also be useful to students in the leading institutions in the GMS. All courses are offered by faculty members at AIT who have long been engaged in research, teaching and outreach activities in the region.

198


Characteristics of GMS Development Studies This program will have the following characteristics: 1. Modular approach The whole program will consist of a series of one-credit modules in parallel and in sequence. One module will consists of 8 days of teaching (2 hours each day) – total 15 hours of lecture (1 credit). 2. Development practice and solution orientation in GMS The major difference that GMS Development Studies has from other existing courses is in its practice and solution focus and its geographical focus, especially issues entailing cross-border and regional approached. 3. Accumulation of credit to lead to Master’s degree Each module will enable participants to gain credit from AIT. This can be accumulated so that the participants can utilize the credit earned through this program as a credit for Master’s degree at AIT, if they later decide to pursue a post graduate degree. 4. Geographical flexibility AIT serves as the Secretariat for the Greater Mekong Subregion Academic Research Network (GMSARN), which is a network of thirteen academic institutions in GMS. The course concepts have been discussed in this network in several occasions, and in the future, the courses are planned to be offered jointly with these member institutions.

199


Program Greater Mekong Sub-region Development Studies (GMS-DS) Code

Course

Description

IN88.9017

Energy resources, consumption and management in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS)

Energy is crucial to the sustained growth of the GMS. This region continued to grow at an average rate of over 6% since 1992 and its economy stood at $1.4 trillion in 2007. Poverty has also declined significantly: in 2003, there were 30 million less people living under $1 per day compared to 1990 - in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Viet Nam. In Guangxi and Yunnan provinces, poverty declined by 50% and 66% respectively in 2003-2004 compared to a decade earlier. Such rapid growth also brings with it rapid energy consumption that has risen at rates faster than the overall GDP. The distribution of energy resources as well as the energy consumption in the GMS is uneven - countries that have large demand for energy, such as Thailand and Viet Nam, do not have sufficient energy resources, while countries such as Lao PDR and Myanmar, have large potential energy supplies, in terms of hydropower and gas resources, but low economic activity. Energy consumption in GMS increased at 8%, and electricity consumption has risen at 9.5%. The average per capita electricity consumption in GMS is 870 kWh, but it varies significantly across countries. Subregional cooperation in energy among the GMS countries could help reap economic benefits through increased supply reliability, reduced reserve capacity requirements, and reduced system losses. Efforts at strengthening energy institutions through cooperation in data exchanges and training of energy professionals, are critical for the success of national rural electrification, and its strong antipoverty dimensions. This course aims to present the GMS energy issues to its stakeholders so that a regional approach in managing and utilizing energy resources would be beneficial to the citizens of GMS. The course investigates energy resources in the GMS region, current energy consumption trends, accessibility of modern energy in the various sectors, rural electrification issues in the GMS, energy policies in the GMS countries, and sub regional cooperation possibilities to optimally use the energy resources.

200

Semester Offered Prerequisite InterSem


Program Greater Mekong Sub-region Development Studies (GMS-DS) Code

Course

IN88.9016

Water Governance in the Greater Mekong Sub-region

Description Many waters, and not only the mighty Mekong River itself, are flowing through the Greater Mekong Sub-Region. Those waters affect in many ways the lives of the 300 million people living there, mostly through the provision of livelihoods, food and hydropower. This population and the countries of the GMS are facing many social, economic and environmental challenges in sharing, developing and managing water resources, and in delivering water services across the major river basins, as well as in the numerous sub-basins, watersheds, natural lakes, aquifers, wetlands, and human-built dams and reservoirs. In turn, urbanization and industrialization across the GMS are unmistakably strong trends, profoundly altering land and water uses, quality and quantity.

Semester Offered Prerequisite InterSem

None

This course first provides basic generic elements for the understanding and analysis of water governance systems, i.e. the range of political, social, economic, legal, organizational, institutional and administrative systems that are in place to develop and manage water resources, and the delivery of water services, at different levels of society. The course also proposes an overview of water resources and water related activities and issues in the GMS. More specifically, it intends to provide insights onto water governance in the GMS. This course reviews the situation, practices, challenges and prospects of water governance at country level, and at transboundary / regional levels in the GMS. Specific sectors and issues are addressed and analyzed, namely irrigation, hydropower and dam construction, management of transboundary waters, water and environmental policies, the origin and management of conflicts, the role of information and the media in water governance, and challenges to improved governance. Overall, the course promotes a systemic perspective over water resources development and management, and the use of interactive participatory teaching approaches such as role-playing games, case studies, simulations and guided discussions. The course investigates governance systems classification and features; elements of institutional analysis; elements of water policy analysis; status and potential of water resources in the GMS; National legislations on water resources; transboundary waters and international governance systems; irrigation policy; hydropower generation development; dam construction; monitoring-evaluation and information systems for water governance; strategies and prospects towards improved governance in the GMS.

201


Program Greater Mekong Sub-region Development Studies (GMS-DS) Code

Course

Description

IN88.9018

Aquatic Resources Management and Aquaculture Development in the Greater Mekong Sub-region

The food security of 70 million people living in the Mekong River Basin is based on rice and fish. The Mekong River stands third in the world as having the highest number of freshwater fish species and fourth in terms of tonnage caught. The freshwater capture fishery is one of the single most important economic activities in the basin. The average basin consumption of freshwater fish is 56 kg/person/year showing the importance of aquatic resources for people’s livelihood. However, these aquatic resources have been threatened by an array of human activities such as dam construction, expansion of navigation pathways, changes in hydraulic regimes and habitat destruction. This course reviews the status of aquatic resources in the GMS and its management approaches emphasizing holistic systems approach as a pre-requisite for the development of aquaculture and aquatic resource systems. It looks at key issues of sustainability of the aquatic resources in the GMS and both the positive and negative impact of human activities on the sustainable development aquatic resources in the region.

Semester Offered Prerequisite InterSem

None

InterSem

None

The course investigates aquaculture and aquatic resource systems classification; status and potential of aquaculture and aquatic resource systems in the GMS; systems approach and system modeling for understanding resource poor livelihood systems; aquatic resources as an entry point for poverty alleviation and sustainable development; institutions and support services; strategies for promoting the sustainable development of aquaculture and aquatic resource systems in the GMS. IN88.9022

202

People and their Development in the Greater Mekong Sub-region

Despite relentless efforts by the state, business and the non-state actors in reducing poverty, still a large number of people in the GMS region are poor. This course aims at familiarizing the students on the current debate on poverty, efforts to reduce it and look for outlining changes in policies and practices. The course deals with the concepts of poverty analysis and poverty alleviation in South-east Asia, Sectoral Approach to reducing poverty in the GMS, Experience of poverty alleviation programmes and policies in Asia, Regional Development in the GMS, The Non-state Actors in Development in the GMS.


Program Greater Mekong Sub-region Development Studies (GMS-DS) Code

Course

Description

IN88.9020

Gender Issues in Regional Economic Integration in the Greater Mekong Sub-region

In the past decades, GMS has move rapidly towards regional economic integration, through build-up of cross-border infrastructure as well as the facilitation of intra-regional trade. Such development has increased the movement of capital, goods and people across the border in the region. With the diversity in ethnicity and gender norms as well as disparity across the region, the benefit from regional economic integration can be experienced differently across different gender, class, ethnicity and age. This course discusses the regional economic integration policies and the effect of the policies to the people and their development in GMS. The policies and its effects are debated from a strong gender and equality perspective.

Semester Offered Prerequisite InterSem

None

The course investigates economic integration policies; cross-border trade and people’s mobility; economic integration, border development and diversity of people. IN88.9021

Sustainable Infrastructure Development in GMS: Overview and Specific Applications

In view of the importance of developing and managing infrastructure in the GMS, this course is designed to provide a graduate level understanding of the policies, programs and projects of various types of infrastructure in GMS countries. The main objectives of this course are: to strengthen theoretical knowledge on concepts of sustainable infrastructure development; to improve capability and capacity of mastering the knowledge through closing connection with case studies in GMS countries; and to improve students’ practical ability in developing and managing sustainable infrastructure in GMS. The conceptual, policy and practical aspects of the course seek to enable the students to contribute to improved planning and management of the infrastructure development in the GMS. The course investigates overview of infrastructure development in GMS, Specific sectors and applications of sustainable infrastructure development in GMS, Policy tools and management aspects for sustainable infrastructure development.

InterSem

Instructor’s consent

IN88.9023

Cross-border Migration in the Greater Mekong Sub-region

Populations of the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) are increasingly mobile, and much of this mobility is internal to this subregion. With the rapid integration of economic and transportation systems, including the creation of various economic corridors, mobility is bound to grow even more rapidly in the coming decade. This raises both important development and policy issues. With increased migration people can experience both important socio-economic benefits and become vulnerable to greater insecurities and exploitation, including the exploitation of migrant workers and increased smuggling and human trafficking.

InterSem

None

203


Program Greater Mekong Sub-region Development Studies (GMS-DS) Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

The lack of a comprehensive policy framework, the prohibitive cost of registration and documentation as well as defective or nonexistent protection mechanisms has encouraged flows of illegal migration, increasing the vulnerability of migrant populations. Female migrants in particular often face discriminatory treatment and potential sexual exploitation. As a majority of domestic workers, they are often denied protections by State agencies because labor laws do not apply or because law enforcement agencies are reluctant to interfere in the private sphere of one’s home. Institutional responses have been slow and their terms dominated by receiving countries. This course aims to examine mobility in the GMS, its impacts on migrants and receiving populations and the management responses and instruments this rapidly increasing mobility calls for in the GMS. IN88.9024

Regional development policies and regionalization processes in the New EU Member States (Eastern Europe) and in Greater Mekong Sub-region

When one compares the EU and the ASEAN, one immediately encounters many obstacles that have already been noted in several studies that stress the fundamental differences between both regions. These differences address values and identities as well as institutions, interests, and finally geopolitical constraints. However good reasons to compare are numerous : forms of regionalization, necessity to attract FDI and reformed property rights make them closer to each other. Moreover considering recent challenges linked to the worldwide crisis since 2008 and to climate change, energy and migrations that all countries in the world confront, the issues that the EU and ASEAN face are the same. Finally both regional entities recently integrated much poorer states : New EU members states and CLMV have deeply modified both EU and ASEAN. By focusing on transforming processes and regional developments in Eastern Europe and in GMS the course highlight various “bottom up” dynamics of development that legitimize the comparison between these both regions. The first part is dedicated to the presentation of the geographical and historical dimensions of both regional areas (EU / ASEAN). The second part covers the period 1990 – 2010 and analyses the different economic and social transformations. The third part focuses on the regional policies, the institutions and the tools of development in Eastern Europe and in the GMS. The fourth part is the conclusion focused on the comparison between “europeanisation” and (an hypothetical) “aseanisation” The course investigates economic, social and territorial cohesion; regional development; regional policies; and cross border cooperation

204

InterSem

None


Professional Master’s Degree in Water Technology and Management (PM-WTM) This Program is jointly developed by Environmental Engineering and Management FOS, and Metropolitan Water Authority (MWA), Bangkok, as a response to industry’s need for development of technical water production professionals who could work in the regional and international water business sector. PM-WTM aims to provide middle and senior level managers and policy makers with an advanced knowledge and skills in water technology and management. It is designed to upgrade their skills while familiarizing them with know-how through unique continuing professional education, specifically tailored to meet the needs of the region for the fast and environmentally sustainable growth and development. It will also provide them with pragmatic options to tackle the diverse dimensions of emerging water issues in the region. The medium of teaching is English. The program is completed within12 months. In the first two semesters, students will take basic and advanced courses selected out of the regular courses offered at AIT in consultation with an academic/thesis advisor. During the third semester, students will be expected to carry out their project study. A specialty of this program is the hand-on experiences to be delivered by senior officers of Metropolitan Waterworks Authority of Thailand where its facilities of about 3.5 million m3/day could be produced for Bangkok people. Students will conduct an international field trip - study visit to large companies in neighboring countries such as Singapore, Malaysia, China, Taiwan, or South Korea. The students will also have numerous opportunities to apply the knowledge obtained in classrooms to practical needs through various field trips to small and large industries. Concurrently, they, meeting the standards of AIT, will also conduct their own research projects according to their agency or company’s interest. The target group of students for this program is professionals from the metropolitan and provincial water-related authorities, who have interest to improve their technical knowledge in the field of water technology and management. As per a vision of MWA, we will have participants mostly from GMS region in the first couple years and other Southeast Asian countries in the following years. Hence, the Professional Master’s Degree in Water Technology and Management (PM-WTM) of the Asian Institute of Technology provides students with the first-hand experience in unique teaching and research methodologies as well as with the knowledge of scientific and technological advanced issues. It also addresses pragmatic options to tackle various emerging water technology issues in Asia brought about by the changes in trends or activities.

205


Program Professional Master’s Degree in Water Technology and Management Code

Course

Description

ED78.08

Environmental Quality Management

Basic concepts of environmental management; environmental issues and priorities; environmental management approaches; environmental standards and criteria setting; environmental indicators and indices; environmental information systems; environmental organization; enforcement and economic aspects of environmental control; environmental monitoring.

August

None

ED78.14

Membrane Technology in Water and Wastewater treatment

Generation introduction to membrane technology; comparison of various membrane types and configurations; recent development in membrane technology, common membrane technologies; microfiltration, ultra filtration, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, membrane bioreactors, scale-up operation of membrane systems, anti fouling techniques; experimental demonstration; computer applications in design of industrial membrane systems; case studies.

August

None

ED78.15

Design of Water Supply and Wastewater Systems

Planning of urban water supply systems; Planning of urban wastewater systems; Basics of Hydraulics; Design of Water Supply Network and Wastewater Collection Systems.

January

Content of instructor

ED78.19

Environmental Impact Assessment

Concepts and organization of ecosystems; predicting impact; procedures for environmental impact assessment; integration with development planning procedures; impact assessment of water resources, transportation, power production mining, and other relevant projects; urbanization, industrialization, and resource conservation considerations; design concepts and alternative strategies for impact reduction; monitoring.

January

None

ED78.21

Water Quality Management

Fresh water resources and ecosystems; sources of water pollution and types of wastes; assessment of water quality in rivers and lakes; lake eutrophication, water quality monitoring and management planning; case studies.

January

None

ED78.36

Drinking Water treatment

Physical principles and design criteria used in separating liquids and solids from liquid, particularly those having application in water and waste treatment systems: screening, filtration, size/volume reduction, mixing, sedimentation, flotation, flocculation, dissolved air flotation, adsorption, absorption, evaporation, drying, centrifugation, ozonation and membrane filtration .

August

None

ED78.04

Aquatic Chemistry

Diprotic acid-base system; ampholyte chemistry; buffer intensity; neutralization capacity; solubility equilibrium; activity of solid phase; coagulation of metals; oxidation-reduction potential; pE-pH diagrams; chemistry in sediments; biological redox reactions; environmental chemistry; pollution and water quality; global chemical cycles.

August

None

206

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Professional Master’s Degree in Water Technology and Management Code

Course

Description

CE74.54

Integrated Water Resources Management

Concepts, principles and tools of integrated water resources management (IWRM); status and management of the water resources; applications of mathematical models for IWRM; economics of water resources; water policies, goals and strategies for IWRM; institutional arrangements; participatory approach; data and information systems; and case studies.

August and January

None

ED78.9024

Rural Water Treatment and Supply

Rural water supply, sustainable development, water resources, simple treatment technologies, financing and economics of rural water supply, sustainable rural water supply, pollutants in water, disinfection, cultural and gender issues in water supply, appropriate water supply technologies, sector planning, O& M issues in rural water supply.

August

None

ED78.9025

Water Business Management

Energy issues in water treatment plants, Demand side management, drinking water treatment, water related business, small and medium scale business, water treatment technology optimization, O&M planning

January

None

ED78.9026

Water Distribution Systems and Network Design

Planning of water distribution systems in urban and rural areas; Basics of hydraulics of network design; Water network simulation; Optimization of water distribution network.

Inter-Semester

Content of instructor

Semester Offered Prerequisite

207


School of Management 210

Business Administration

Business Administration

210

Executive MBA (Bangkok)

227

227 Executive MBA (Bangkok)

International Executive MBA (Vietnam) IEMBA-VN

243

International Executive MBA (Vietnam) IEMBA-VN

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

255 Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

208

243

255


Business Administration (MBA) Overview: The Master of Business Administration (MBA) curriculum is a comprehensive program designed to provide conceptual, analytical and personal skills to help prepare participants to be effective managers in an international business environment. It is interdisciplinary, combining elements from engineering, economics, social psychology and management fields. The curriculum provides MBA participants to design their own study plans, an attractive feature for prospective employers of AIT MBA graduates. In addition to the strong foundation courses, the MBA program offers a wide range of electives which allow participants a choice of either specializing in an area or selecting a wide range of courses. Our MBA program encourages participative learning and uses a variety of interactive learning methodologies so that the students are able to learn latest management concepts, techniques and tools, and more importantly, to develop skills and attitude of listening and understanding others, holistic thinking, collective decision making, communicating and negotiating.

AOS: ●● ●● ●● ●● ●● ●● ●● ●● ●●

Technology Management Finance Marketing Human Resource Management International Management Public Management Entrepreneurship Strategy Sustainable Business

Preferred Background

Hold a bachelor degree (4 years) or its equivalent, in an appropriate field of study from an institution of recognized standing Have undergraduate grades well above average Possess acceptable level of English proficiency Have some work experience(not mandatory but considered a distinct advantage)

• • •

Study Plan The MBA program is a 2 year full time 48 credit program including 26 credit of required courses and 22 credits of elective courses. The students have the option of research study 10 credits or project 6 credits or an all course work option. The MBA participants are eligible to apply for a dual degree and exchange program with partner institution in Europe and Asia. The participants leave for dual degree or exchange program in the 4th semester of the MBA program. Participants opting for the dual degree will be awarded 2 masters degree from AIT and the partner university. The duration of dual degree arrangement is 5 semesters ( 3 semesters in AIT and 2 semesters in partner institution).

209


Program Required Courses — Business Administration (MBA)

210

Code

Course

Description

SM60.03

Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics

Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility should be integral components of a management school’s educational program. In addition to studying ethics for management and leadership decision-making, this subject is important for introducing MBA students to strategies of best conduct, comprised of standards and guidelines governing the behavior of members of the business profession. This course will investigate current challenges and opportunities facing managers and companies in areas of corporate responsibility and ethical governance. Through case studies we will examine and critically evaluate contemporary developments in ethical responsibility with respect to environmental protection, community development and employee welfare. Also, the integration of social values into corporate objectives and the balancing of those objectives with responsibility to shareholders and communicating a vision of corporate social responsibility. The main purpose of this course is to develop MBA students analytical skills in understanding and applying ethical concepts to real-life management problems and practical situations.

January

None

SM60.04

Business Communications

Communication skills are of critical importance for MBA students and future managers in order to work effectively in the business world. Effective communication is the bridge between managers and all others with whom they must interact to be successful in their professional lives. This course examines key business communication concepts and fundamentals, considers techniques and strategies to develop communication skills and provides practical opportunities for students to improve these techniques and skills.

August

None

SM60.12

Business Statistics

Statistical methods deal with proper use of quantitative data analysis in gaining insights and understanding of the complex business environment, and thus help making managerial decision in the face of uncertainty in all areas of business activity. This course aims at providing students with the essential concepts, techniques and skills required to become informed and intelligent consumers of business statistics.

August

None

SM60.22

Managerial Economics

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation in managerial economics to enable the students to better understand the economic issues related to the firm and industry. The application of economic techniques will also be emphasized in order to assist the students to apply them to solve managerial problems.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Required Courses — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM60.33

Managerial Accounting

This course aims at developing skills to understand, evaluate and use financial information in business decision making. The course will introduce participants to the vocabulary of financial and cost accounting. It will develop in the participants an understanding of the important tools and techniques used in analyzing financial information. It will also develop in the participants the necessary skills to apply these tools and techniques in the context of business decisions through the use of context relevant case studies.

August

None

SM60.34

Corporate Finance

The purpose of this class is to give students a thorough introduction to financial management that blends relevant theory with practical applications. This course explores the fundamental financial and operating decision undertaken by corporate management.

January

SM60.33 Managerial Accounting

SM60.42

Organizational Behavior and Structure

Organizations today are experiencing rapid changes due to the globalization process, economic growth, technological advancement, demographic changes and increased diversity of the workforce. To be able to manage the change processes and business performance well, we need to understand the behavior of individuals and groups within the organization. Supervisors and managers in particular need to understand the conceptual tools available and be able to apply them in the organizational processes such as leadership, power and influence, decision-making, team, communication, negotiation and conflict management.

August

None

SM60.43

Human Resources Management

Formal organizations, private and public organizations in the manufacturing and service sectors alike, are currently faced with rapid changes due to government deregulation and the globalization process. One of the key competitive advantages for a firm is its human resources. This course is concerned with the effective management of human resources at work from a strategic perspective. It discusses the human resource management as a system and examines ways human resource management can create values to the firm, how to improve human resource productivity and job satisfaction which will ultimately add to the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the organization.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

211


Program Required Courses — Business Administration (MBA)

212

Code

Course

Description

SM60.52

Marketing Management

Marketing is the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitable. Marketing is foremost not a functional area but the philosophy of customer focused Management that has to be realized in many functional areas throughout the company. Marketing management is fundamentally about understanding customer value, developing appropriate solutions in form or products and services for them and communicating and delivering value efficiently and conveniently. This course introduces the holistic concept of customer focused corporate strategy and the basic tools that managers need to plan, organize and execute the customer value creation process of a firm.

August

None

SM60.65

Quantitative Methods for Management

This course aims at introducing the basic quantitative methods commonly used in analyzing the different decision and negotiation situations under both deterministic and probabilistic environment. Comprehensive case studies are used to develop competencies to apply the techniques in modeling, analyzing and solving real world problems in business.

August

None

SM60.66

Operations Management

To provide students with basic concepts and techniques in managing manufacturing or service operations in an enterprise. The practical aspects will be emphasized through case studies / project works to relate the recent theoretical developments with real business environment.

January

None

SM60.67

Managing Technology for Competitiveness

Technology is a key resource of great importance for corporate profitability and sustainable growth. Understanding the strategic potential of technology has become a crucial issue in todays competitive business environment. The ability of the modernday managers to analyze and make strategic decisions with respect to the technologies has an important bearing on the competitiveness of the firms. The objective of this course is to provide the participants with necessary knowledge and tools to understand, anticipate, acquire, and use technology for attaining competitiveness at the market place. The course gives a wider perspective of technology management, and is intended for students who need to have an overall knowledge about the subject and for those who wish to go on to take more advanced courses in the management of technology.

January

None

SM60.82

Strategic Management of a Firm

Organizations use the strategic management approach to understand competitive forces and to develop competitive advantages. Companies are extending the scope of strategy formulation to successfully compete in the 21st centurys dynamic and challenging competitive landscape. Dynamic strategic management process is the full set of commitments, decisions and actions required for a firm to achieve strategic competitiveness and earn aboveaverage-returns. The magnitude of this challenge is greater today as a result of technological revolution and increasing globalization.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM80.01

Business-to-Business Marketing

This course provides an understanding of the issues related to marketing industrial products as well as the approaches to business-to-business customer relationship management. The aim of this course is to give the students insights in the differences of industrial marketing to consumer marketing and the problems the companies face when selling industrial goods compared to consumer goods. The focus will be analyzing strategies of product development, market research, segmentation in industrial markets and managing the sales force.

August

SM60.52 Marketing Management

SM80.02

Brand Management

Brand Management introduces the student to an understanding of the value of brands for customers. It is discussed in what circumstances that brand value is more or less pronounced. Students learn about the theories of branding and the course should give an opportunity to discuss competing concepts of branding. Instead of focusing on one common branding philosophy, a variety of theoretical Descriptions for brands is introduced. The assessment of brand management is discussed by inclusion of readings of critiques and case studies. Recent new directions of brand management are discussed.

August

SM60.52 Marketing Management or equivalent

SM80.03

Management Planning and Control Systems

The course focuses on the design and implementation of the management planning and control systems for organizations. It aims to help students to understand the process of planning, evaluation, and control and strategy implementation. It is an integrative course drawing concepts from managerial accounting, organization behavior and strategic management.

August

SM60.34 Corporate Finance and SM60.82 Strategic Management of a Firm

SM80.04

Advanced Financial Statement Analysis and Business Valuation

This course is intended to expose the participants to Financial Statement Analysis in a strategic context and to enable participants to extend the analysis to forecasting and projecting firm performance, culminating with a valuation of the firm. It also helps students to develop an ability to understand financial statements and to assess performance of firms.

August

SM60.33 Managerial Accounting SM60.34 Corporate Finance

SM80.05

Financing of Technological Ventures

This course is intended to give an understanding of the thinking of the financing community so that individuals and companies that have a promising new business idea are more successful in raise financing, especially venture capital financing. The objective of the course is to provide an overview of financial management of technological ventures. Special emphasis is given to ventures with high up-side potential, which are typically characterized by high risk and a highly volatile operating environment.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite

None

213


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA)

214

Code

Course

Description

SM80.06

Innovation Marketing and New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to sustainable growth and profits in many industries. Successful innovations are those that benefit users more than established offerings. This course helps students learn how to manage the development of new products and services that meet customer needs in consumer and B2B settings. The focus of this course is on identifying and processing information from customers and creating customer value.

August

SM60.52 Marketing Management

SM80.07

Integrating Technology and Business Strategy

Understanding the strategic potential of technology has become a crucial issue in todays competitive business environment. Technology is what it takes to compete and win in the global market-place. The central importance of product and process innovations to competitive advantage in the international market highlights the close connection between technology and business strategies. Case studies show that most successful firms have an ingrained culture of innovation. Furthermore, considering recent developments, the course is based on the premise that more and more the value of a product or service is determined by the technology that goes into it. The objective of this course is to provide the participants with necessary knowledge and tools to integrate technology and business strategy for attaining growth and competitiveness. Case studies and company project on strategy formulation would be an integral part of the course.

August

SM60.67 Managing Technology for Competitiveness or Instructors consent

SM80.08

International Marketing and Export Management

International Marketing is concerned with the management of marketing activities across countries. Since the international penetration of markets abroad are more and more imperative, the main goal of international marketing is the commercialization of a firms products and services outside its home market. This course tackles the main problems of international marketing, which is the unfamiliarity of a manager with foreign markets and the international variety of national environments which deters the straightforward use the domestic marketing strategy abroad. In this course students will discuss various strategies that help the international marketer to cope with the international varying market contexts. The course emphasizes exporting as a foreign market entry mode but non-export modes are also discussed.

August

SM60.52 Marketing Management

SM80.09

International M&A, Alliances and Joint Ventures

Industry consolidation and co-opetition are the new strategies to improve competitive strengths of firms. In many global industries the incidence of mergers and alliances is increasing at a very fast pace and the managers are required to learn techniques of acquisition, post merger integration and negotiating and managing alliances.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM80.10

International Technology Transfer and Negotiation

Rapid globalization and the liberalization of national economies have made international transfer of technology (ITT) a very important component of international business. ITT is, today, widely used by firms in both developing and industrialized countries as a means of gaining access to technologies to strengthen their competitiveness and growth. The main objective of this course is to provide the participants with the necessary knowledge and tools to plan, negotiate and implement ITT both from the perspective of a transferee and transferor of technology. Case studies would be an integral part of the course.

August

SM60.67 Managing Technology for Competitiveness or consent of the instructor

SM80.11

Knowledge Management

Business organizations have become increasingly aware of the importance of their intellectual capital, like any other asset, to improve their competitive advantage. The challenge they face is to determine within a vast sea of information what is “valuable” for their organization and share the right information with the right people who need it. Although technology can support corporate KM initiatives, it should not begin there. Successful Knowledge Management (KM) must be tied to the strategic objectives of the organization, directly linked to what people know, their competency, intuition, ideas, and motivations and focus on how their knowledge can support corporate and business objectives. To add value, KM must draw upon pooled expertise, relationships, and alliances that rely on two-way exchange of ideas by bringing in experts from the field to advise managers on recent trends and developments. Finally, the corporate knowledge base must be constantly tested, updated, revised, and sometimes even “retired” when it is no longer practicable.

January

None

SM80.12

Leadership Communication

MBA students need to understand specialized methods of communication to be successful and effective leaders in their future business careers. Leadership communication consists of a variety of expanding interactional skills starting from core strategy development to using these skills in complex organizational situations. Business leaders also need managerial skills that will allow them to communicate to a larger audience; to lead an organization and address the broader community. The main objective of this elective course is to develop MBA students communication skills so that they will become successful future leaders in their companies and careers.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

215


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA)

216

Code

Course

Description

SM80.13

Marketing Research

In competitive markets where customers have choices, marketing decisions must be based upon current information about customers and environmental factors that determine the benefit of a companys offerings. Marketing research is concerned with all means of the collection of information about consumers, customers and the public that can help a company to create value. In this course students will get to know some of the most fundamental market research approaches in theory and practice. The course is organized in order to give students as much opportunities to experiences the advantages and shortcomings of modern approaches to market research.

August

SM60.52 Marketing Management

SM80.14

International Finance

The focus of this course is on international financial management and markets. International financial markets have developed rapidly over the past decades, due to increased international trade and cross-border mergers and acquisitions. The global financial markets offer many opportunities for firms such as export growth, foreign direct investment and global sources of financing. On the other hand, the international financial markets can expose firms to additional risk as well, as illustrated during the Asian Crisis and the Argentine Crisis of 2002. The aim of this course is to deepen students knowledge about the international financial markets and international financial (risk) management. The main topics of the course are the global financial environment, foreign exchange markets, management of foreign exchange risk, financing the global firm and foreign investment decisions. Special attention will be paid to emerging markets and international financial crises of the past.

August

SM60.34 Corporate Finance

SM80.15

Customer Service Management

This course aims at providing an appreciation of the characteristics of service operations and their managerial implications. Various approaches and techniques are introduced to allow managers of service organizations in both private and public sectors to measure and improve their performance both in productivity and quality as well as the customer satisfaction.

January

None

SM80.16

Project Management

This course aims at introduce the essential techniques and approaches in project management that include developing and planning new projects as well as effectively managing and controlling their implementation. Though group projects and case studies, the students will also be exposed to the real project experiences in both business and development sectors.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM80.17

Research and Development (R&D) Management

The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of research and development (R&D) management in an individual business enterprise and in a public research institute. Basic concepts of research and development, useful frameworks and best practices for research and development management, as well as characteristics of technological innovation are discussed. Case studies are used to enhance the analytical skills of the participants and to link the concepts introduced during the course with their implementation and with the general management of a business enterprise. The course will enhance the success of future managers regardless of whether their careers will be in research and development management or in general management.

August

None

SM80.18

Management of Information Systems

To provide a broad overview on the important technical and managerial issues of management information systems (MIS). This course is designed to provide students with a balanced view of management and technology. Students will learn how to apply information technologies (IT)/ information systems (IS) to solve critical business problems in the real business world.

August

None

SM80.19

Valuation, Mergers & Acquisitions

The objectives of this course are to deepen the understanding of different approaches of valuation of a firm and to comprehend the financial evaluation of mergers & acquisitions. This course will also help students to understand the strategic and managerial issues vis-Ă -vis mergers & acquisitions.

January

Financial Management and excellent knowledge of use of Excel.

SM80.20

Managing and Implementing Electronic and Mobile Commerce

Every company wants to have a web presence and that trend will continue. Fortunately, creating a website is easy; unfortunately implementing the electronic commerce system and selling products over the Internet is not. This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities of electronic and mobile commerce by exploring the technology (from a managerial point of view), economic, and regulatory issues related to the implementation phase of E-Commerce and M-Commerce.

January

None

SM80.21

Financial Futures, Options and Derivatives

The objective of this course is to introduce the properties of the most commonly used derivative instruments and to provide a theoretical framework for understanding derivatives. Apart from theory, emphasis will be put on the application of options at firms and financial institutions for hedging purposes and financial engineering.

January

SM60.34 Corporate Finance

Semester Offered Prerequisite

217


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA)

218

Code

Course

Description

SM80.22

Sales Management for Services

This course provides in-depth coverage of management of the sales function for services, primarily in B2B context. Sales is one of the most important functions in any company which markets its services. Services depend very much on the interaction between supplier and customer, and most of this interaction is with sales reps. Good sales management is critical and managers must know the key elements of how to manage the sales force.

January

SM60.52 Marketing Management

SM80.23

Information Technology in Public Organizations

The story of the 1990s was the story of information technology (IT) in business. Regardless of one’s career path, an essential component of any organizations is an understanding of the role of IT in business, organizations and society as a whole. The IT component is especially important for those who work in the public sector as their work will involve and may impact the economy as a whole. People who work in the public sector should be aware of the IT technologies and applications available to them and the implications of choosing and implementing such technologies. They should also be able to think critically about IT, and to be able to discuss the roles of IT intelligently. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to IT for students headed for work in public or nonprofit organizations. This course is therefore heavy on the hands-on technology but will also cover some substantive topics related to the management of IT. Students will gain an understanding of some important issues related to IT planning and management and some systems analysis skills. The class will rely in part on case studies. The majority of the materials are on public sector IT.

August

None

SM80.24

Country Risk Assessment

Country risk is a broad concept that comprises an underlying combination of economics, finance, geopolitics, sociology, and history issues. As the new global economy raises the level of uncertainty and complexity for the international firms cross-border strategy, country risk analysis has become today an essential component of strategy decisions regarding export, investment, partnership, mergers, as well as takeovers. The course aims at providing students with a solid understanding of the concepts, historical perspectives, theoretical debates and methodologies surrounding country risk assessment in the global economic system. Risk analysis and forecasting will be approached as management tools. The course is composed of lectures, case studies, briefings by group mates, and debates.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM80.25

Managing Human Resources in Multinational Corporations

Globalization has led to a free-flow of investment across borders. Multinational companies which operate in various different cultures need to balance the home and host countries’ human resource management practices to gain competitive advantage and become a global company.

August

SM60.43 Human Resource Management

SM80.26

Comparative Industrial Relations

Work is the central concern for the most part of our lives. Workplace is where we spend most of our time to earn a living. Thus, what takes place in the workplace will also influence our terms and conditions of employment. Rules and regulations in many workplaces may be established unilaterally by employers, some bilaterally by employer and employees together, some by technology, and some governed by laws administered by government agencies. In many cases, where workers are active in improving their terms and conditions of the workplace, they may organize to collectively bargain with the employers. In such social relationship restructuring process, each party will need to have good faith in bargaining. It is the objective of this course to familiarize students with the industrial relations system models to be able to understand the social system at large and design the work relations system at the enterprise level.

August

None

SM80.27

Performance Management

Organizations experience today more rapid changes due to economic growth, technological advancement, demographic changes and increased diversity of the workforce. With the globalization process and the new information and communications technologies (ICTs), it is necessary that managers are able to manage organization performance effectively. This course focuses on people performance management.

January

SM60.42 Organizational Behavior and Structure

SM80.28

Corporate Environmental Management

This course is designed to help companies meet the dual challenges of achieving the complex goal of environmental excellence together with business success, in other words an effective management of eco-efficiency. The course provides an overview of the changing business environment related to environmental protection. It presents concepts, methods and skills needed to integrate the concept of sustainable development and eco-efficiency into the decision making process of domestic or international companies following the ISO 14000 series of international environmental standards.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

219


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA)

220

Code

Course

Description

SM80.29

International Economics

The objective of this course is to provide conceptual and analytical skills to students interested in international business and international economic relations. The course will deal with both international trade and international financial theories and policies.

January

SM60.22 Managerial Economics

SM80.30

International Operating Environment of Business

The course will provide better understanding to students as to the forces - external and internal, economic and non-economic- that impact on business operations. Government policies, as they affect business, will also be covered in this course.

August

SM60.22 Managerial Economics

SM80.31

Management of Innovation

Success followed by failure and innovation followed by inertia is the pattern of a global problem faced by companies in any industry at any time. As short-term corporate success often increases the chances of long-term failure, managers must learn to sustain incremental improvement while at the same time leading radical change. In this course managers learn how to integrate the different techno-economic and behavioral factors that condition a firms creativity and innovation and how to design a strategy system for product/service and process innovation that allows their firm to benefit from increasingly faster technology and market changes.

August

SM60.67 Managing Technology for Competitiveness

SM80.32

High Tech Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development

The objective of this course is to provide an understanding and appreciation of the interrelationships between the management of modern industrial technology and entrepreneurship, and the role of entrepreneurship in the management of technological innovation and technology-based economic development. In addition, this course will enable students to design and present to venture capitalists a business p l a n of a new technology start-up firm.

August

SM60.67 Managing Technology for Competitiveness

SM80.33

Cross-cultural Management

This course explores the variety of ways that culture influences organization and management, particularly, the interactions of managers and employees of different national and cultural backgrounds. A comparison of North American, European and Asian cultural perspectives are examined. Specifically the course will look at the implications of culture on technology, organizational design, managerial approaches, organizational and individual performance and human resource dimensions. These provide the background in which people from different cultures interact.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM80.34

Asian Business Environment

This course is a survey of the business environment of Asia including its economic dynamic and socio-cultural political and characteristics as they affect business. The three major regions within Asia (East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia) are considered. Special emphasis on current and emerging trends and now business organizations can respond. A seminar/workshop approach will be used.

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

This course also investigates overview of the Asian business development; characteristics of Asian business organizations; regional analysis: East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia; Asian business strategies problems and prospects facing Asia. SM80.35

Project Finance and Risk Management

The objectives of the course are: (a) to introduce to the participants the concepts, approaches and framework of Project Financing, (b) to expose them to various aspects related to the project financing and evaluation and (c) to make them understand the risks in project financing and explain the risk mitigating measures. Real case studies will be used to enable the participants to gain the required knowledge regarding the project financing and risk management of infrastructure projects.

August

SM60.34 Corporate Finance

SM80.36

Game Theory and Competitive Strategy

Description: Game theory is the scientific analysis of conflict and cooperation between multiple strategic agents. The tools of game theory have become standard in many disciplines including economics, strategic management, political science, and international relations. A basic understanding of game theoretic concepts is a valuable asset for today’s managers and leaders.

August

None

August

None

This course also investigates static games, dominant strategies, nash equilibrium, repeated interactions, sequential games, cooperative games, players, added value, rules, tactics, and scope of games, social choice. SM80.37

Modern Approaches to Public Sector Management

In the recent past, any country, any government is exposed to new challenges such as technological changes, urban life-styles and globalization, world-wide competition and liberalization. Governments react differently to these challenges, almost all countries have introduced reforms. One major reform concerns the shift from rigid, hierarchical public administration to more flexible forms of management, often ‘borrowed’ from the private sector. Thus, the principles of ‘strict hierarchy’, ‘being strictly rule driven’, ‘public service provision’, ‘strategy definition solely by the politicians’ and ‘the life-

221


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

long profession of the bureaucrat’ have often been softened or even given up. Students are acquainted with some of the basic concepts, approaches ad techniques of public sector management, the key management issues that public agencies face nowadays. It will discuss the innovations that are occurring during a time here tax-payers, politicians and policymakers are demanding changes in the way public sector organizations operate. The course is structured around five major themes: after an introduction of some ‘basics’ (i), the traditional model of bureaucracy is discussed (ii). The present (modern) management includes strategic thinking and other means that enable agencies to operate effectively (iii). A short overview examines new public management and how agencies seek input and respond to ‘stakeholders’ (iv). Finally, the student will be familiarized latest development of public reforms SM80.38

Project Finance

According to World Bank reports cited in Esty (2004) (see below), Asian countries would require 2 trillion USD of infrastructure investment over the next 10 years. Over the same period Latin American countries would need 50 billion USD of investments in infrastructure. This investment will be possible only with private sector involvements. Private sector has historically used project financing to finance large infrastructure projects. Knowledge of project finance can help the MBA play an important role in this field of infrastructure development.

August

SM80.39

Decision and Negotiation Analysis

This course aims at introducing the basic frameworks and approaches to help analyzing the complex decision and negotiation situations. Basic and common decision models are then used to solve these problems, or to improve existing solutions, with assistance of simple spreadsheet-based tools. The students will also acquire some insights of actual decision making behavior and judgment biases, and thus learn to improve the quality of their decisions.

August

This course also investigates normative, descriptive and prescriptive decision making; optimization approach of decision making; linear and nonlinear programming: modeling, spreadsheet-based solutions and simulations; multiple criterion decision making; decision analysis with risks and uncertainties; negotiation analysis; distributive and integrative negotiations; negotiation games; fairness and efficiency in negotiations; spreadsheet-based analysis in negotiations; behavioral decision analysis, common judgmental biases and prospect theory.

222

None


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM80.40

Corporate Governance

Business Organizations are under a cloud of criticism for poor Corporate Governance (CG). Poor CG has resulted in spectacular business failures, affecting not just shareholders but a variety of stakeholders. The problems of poor CG are endemic to not only emerging markets but also to developed economies. Managers, and particularly the top management, are often blamed for poor CG and its consequences. A more balanced view is to blame not only the managers but also the shareholders, the Board, the regulators and some other key stakeholders. Students of business need an understanding of the issues underlying CG, if they have to present themselves and also act as responsible corporate citizens. To achieve this end, most leading business management programmes include CG as an important course in their curriculum.

January

SM80.41

Managing Public and Development Project

Development projects are more and more recognized as building blocks in designing and executing development strategy. Effectively managing such projects requires leaders of the public organizations to develop adequate project management competencies and to create an enabling environment for success. They should be able to adapt the project management techniques developed in engineering and private sector, and at the same time should be able to apply the specific techniques and approaches drawn from the development work.

August

None

SM80.42

Knowledge Enabled Customer Relationship Management

In today’s digital economy, businesses increasingly realize that knowledge is their ultimate sustainable edge, customers are their key assets, and customer & channel relations their fountainhead of adaptability. Therefore they are turning towards integrating customer relationship management and knowledge management with high hopes of weathering the complexity, unexpected competitor innovations, shifting market and uncertainty that surround them. This course is about customer-centric knowledge management particularly in e-business environment. The main objective of this course is to provide the participants with necessary knowledge of the fundamental concepts and applications of knowledge management in customer relationship management.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite SM60.33 Managerial Accounting; SM60.34 Corporate Finance.

223


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA)

224

Code

Course

Description

SM80.43

Business Solutions to Global Challenges

This advanced course extends students’ understanding knowledge related to corporate social responsibility with an emphasis on private sector engagement on global challenges facing the world. It aims to provide students with practical tools the enhance opportunities and reduce risks associated with issues such as climate change, the environment, poverty, health and human rights.

January

None

SM80.44

CSR Business Performance

Many leading industrial sector companies are adopting CSR principles within their DNA, both in terms of strategic risk management for protecting the value of the company, as well as exploring the opportunities CSR can bring to future market growth in terms of new and revitalised products and services. Collectively, this has brought the issue of business performance in CSR to the forefront. This course will prepare students to be able to respond pro-actively to the challenges faced. They will be able to recognise, understand and assess the organisational criteria for implementing and exacting CSR business performance within your department and managerial function. They will also get to understand the issues and pitfalls when designing, developing or implementing a CSR business performance management system for your company

August

CSR & Business Ethics, or consent of the course instructor

SM80.45

Management Systems for Sustainability

This course gives students a thorough overview of concepts, issues, approaches and tools related to sustainable development from a business perspective. It aims to provide students with an understanding of how to approach sustainability strategically through the application of management systems. It will examine how businesses can devise and implement sustainable business strategies that take into consideration economic, governance, social, and environmental aspects of sustainable development.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Electives — Business Administration (MBA) Code

Course

Description

SM80.46

Sustainable Supply Chain Management

Students who take this course will learn about integrating sustainability into managing the supply chain. Students will be able to analyze an extended supply chain for its social and environmental impacts and how these impacts are linked to the supply chain’s economic performance (profitability). They will have opportunities to discuss with guest speakers from leading companies that have implemented sustainability initiatives in their supply chains. The course will prepare students as managers in today’s competitive environment to think beyond conventional supply chain and recognize that managing their supply chains to maximize the long-term economic performance cannot be without the social and environmental performances.

January

None

SM80.9020

Business for Social Sustainability

The purpose of this class is to give students a thorough understanding of how business developed and its impact on the social structures of the world. It examines social and business trends during the history of the human race and identifies successful paradigms of commerce. Once we understand what underpins successful business and commerce and how that can underpin a healthy society we then go about examining business concepts, paradigms and philosophies that actually

August

None

SM80.9029

Business Strategy: Influences of Climate Change and Social Responsibilities

How can businesses respond to become providers of solutions for humanity’s most critical hour? This course encourages students to use their talents to explore the roots of business and ecological decline and based on understanding the causes, generate sustainable solutions. If they want to be in the forefront of change and leadership this course will equip them with the material and understanding to challenge old paradigms and lead new ones.

Intersem/August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

225


Executive MBA (Bangkok) The Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) is a professional Master Degree program for mid-to-senior level managers/administrators. Participants can complete the program in a minimum of 12 months if they follow a fast track strategy, alternatively some participants will complete the coursework in 12 months and then take another 1-3 months to complete a company research project (regular track). The EMBA program follows a holistic approach by integrating knowledge and practice across various types of market contexts, business functions and strategies.

AOS

Dual specialization in International Business and Management of Technology

Preferred Background

Bachelor’s degree from a recognized academic institution or corporate university Minimum 5 years work experience as an executive or senior staff Proof of proficiency in English

• •

Study Plan The program consists of16 courses at the AIT campus, 2 international courses (one week intensives) in another Asian country and one residential course (one week intensive) in Hua Hin or Phuket, Thailand. The program coursework is normally completed within one year based on a requirement of 48 credits. All EMBA candidates are required to complete 19 courses (40 credits) and write a final company project (8 credits). Out of the 19 courses, 17 are 2 credit courses and 2 case research courses are 3 credits each, on Strategic and Functional Issues. Two courses will be organized as one week intensive courses in Korea, China, India or another Asian country. All Classes will be held at the AIT Campus on Fridays (18:00- 21:00 hrs) and Saturdays (09:00- 12:00 hrs and 13:00- 17:00 hrs).

226

226


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.01

Business Communication

Communication skills are of critical importance for MBA students and future managers in order to work effectively in the business world. Effective communication is the bridge between managers and all others with whom they must interact in their professional lives. This course examines key business communication concepts and fundamentals, considers techniques and approaches to develop and improve communication skills and provides practical opportunities for students to experiment and develop these techniques and skills.

January

None

SM90.02

Project Management

This cause will provide an introduction of the essential techniques and issues in developing and planning new projects, effectively managing and controlling their implementation with emphasis on large-scale projects.

January

None

SM90.03

EMBA Project

The basic purpose of the research study in the EMBA program is to create an opportunity for the participants to identify, analyze, research and find possible solutions to a specific problem that they face in the context of their present job or are likely to dace in the future.

SM90.04

Business Communication

Communication skills are of critical importance for executive MBA students in order to manage effectively in the corporate world. Effective communication is the bridge between managers and all others with whom they must interact to be successful in their professional lives. This course examines key business communication concepts and fundamentals, considers techniques and strategies to develop communication skills and provides practical opportunities for students to improve these techniques and skills.

InterSem

None

SM90.05

Project Management

SM90.07

Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility

Semester Offered Prerequisite

January This course will investigate current challenges and opportunities facing companies in areas of corporate responsibility and good governance. Through case studies we will examine and critically evaluate contemporary developments in corporate responsibility with respect to environmental protection, community development and employee welfare. Also, the integration of social values into corporate objectives and the balancing of those objectives with responsibility to shareholders and communicating a vision of corporate social responsibility. The purpose of the course is to enable participants to analyze, evaluate, and formulate business decisions in the light of ethical and societal considerations.

August

None

227


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK)

228

Code

Course

Description

SM90.10

Business Communication and Ethics

Communication skills and ethical issues are of critical importance for business leaders and executives in order to work effectively and successfully in the business world. Effective communication is the bridge between managers and all others with whom they must interact in their professional lives. This course examines key business communication concepts and fundamentals and considers techniques to develop and improve communication skills. It will also investigate ethical principles of correct conduct comprised of standards governing the behavior of a person or members of the business profession. Students will develop analytical skills in understanding, communicating and applying ethical concepts to real-life business problems and practical situations.

January

None

SM90.11

International Business - Managerial Perspective

This course is designed to provide an overview of international business practices and processes. It seeks to help participants in developing attitudes and skills of an effective international manager.

InterSem

None

SM90.12

Strategic Analysis

Organizations need to understand their external environment to determine the opportunities and threats that they face in global, regional and national contexts. To achieve expected levels of profitability and growth the companies need to analyze and build their strengths and weaknesses to exploit the opportunities and shield from threats. The process of external and internal analysis requires strategic managers to be able to apply latest tools, techniques and frameworks.

InterSem

None

SM90.14

Strategic Marketing for Products and Services

In this course the long-term decision making process and the analysis and selection of the competitive position of firms in marketing is discussed. Strategic marketing is the process of creating satisfied customers through the integration of all business functions and through the continuous search for a sustainable competitive advantage. The objective of this course is to develop analytical skills in the formulation and implementation of market driven strategies for an organization. A major theme of this course is the Asian context. The strategies that are successfully pursued in Asia are often different to those in the United States. For example, the notion of relationships are more pronounced or in product policy more companies are successful the imitative strategies. This course offers a forum for the discussion of strategic decision making in this special situation in Asia.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.15

Strategic Brand Management

Branding is a centerpiece of marketing strategies in the consumer product sector and more and more in the B2B sector as well. Strategic Brand Management introduces the student to an understanding of the value of Brands. The focus is on the business process of building and maintaining brand equity. This is presented and reinforced through readings, case studies, and a course project for practical application and experiential learning. Students learn about the theories of branding and the course should give an opportunity to discuss competing concepts of branding. Instead of focusing on one common branding philosophy, a variety of theoretical Descriptions for brands is introduced. Recent new directions of brand management are discussed.

January

Marketing Management or equivalent

SM90.20

Management & Transfer of Technology

Technology is a key resource of great importance for corporate profitability and sustainable growth. Understanding the strategic potential of technology has become a crucial issue in todays competitive business environment. Moreover, rapid globalization and the liberalization of national economies have made international transfer of technology (ITT) a very important component of international business. ITT is, today, widely used by firms in both developing and industrialized countries as a means of gaining access to technologies to strengthen their competitiveness and growth. The ability of modernday managers to analyze and make strategic decisions with respect to technologies has an important bearing on the competitiveness of the firms. The main objective of this course is to present the basic concepts and theories that will be needed to understand, anticipate, acquire and use of technology for attaining a competitive edge at the market place. The course gives a wider perspective of management of technology and provides the participants with the necessary knowledge and tools to plan and implement ITT both from the perspective of a buyer and seller of technology.

January

None

SM90.21

International Transfer of Technology

Rapid globalization and the liberalization of national economies have made international transfer of technology (ITT) a very important component of international business. ITT is, today, widely used by firms in both developing and industrialized countries as a means of gaining access to technologies to strengthen their competitiveness and growth. The main objective of this course is to provide the participants with the necessary knowledge and tools to plan and implement ITT both from the perspective of a buyer and seller of technology.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite

SM60.71 Managing Technology for Competitiveness

229


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.22

Managing Technology in a Firm

In the face of rapid globalization and liberalization, understanding the strategic potential of technology has become a crucial issue in todays competitive business environment. Moreover, rapid globalization and the liberalization of national economies have made international transfer of technology (ITT) a very important component of international business. The ability of the modern-day managers to analyze and make strategic decisions with respect to the technologies has an important bearing on the competitiveness of the firms.

Semester Offered Prerequisite InterSem

None

The main objective of this course is to provide the participants with necessary knowledge and tools to appreciate, anticipate, acquire, and use technology for attaining a competitive edge at the market place. The emphasis would be to relate the practical experiences of the participants with the theories, and frameworks developed for deeper understanding.

230

SM90.23

Supply Chain Management

Most manufacturing firms spend over three quarters of their turnover on raw materials, purchased parts and components, and inbound logistics. Effective supply and logistics management provides a manufacturing firm the added competitive advantage by reducing costs, and improving quality and delivery performance. The objective of this course is to prepare managers to develop and implement strategies and actions necessary to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of supply and inbound logistics functions in manufacturing organizations.

August

SM60.61 Operations Management

SM90.25

High Tech Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development

The objective of this course is to provide new entrepreneurs with strategic tools of planning and designing the business concept for their company; to help them understand typical success and failure factors most frequently encountered by new start-up firms in technology intensive industries. At the end of this course the students will • understand the relevant concepts in strategic management of a new high-tech start-up firm; • be aware of critical success and failure conditions commonly encountered in founding and running a new high-tech venture; • understand that a Business Plan is more than a piece of paper to get the money • know the important features and the structure of a sound Business Plan and how to use it and update it when internal conditions of the new company and its external operating environment are changing; • have developed the skills of writing a convincing Business Plan; • have trained to sell their individual Business Plans to VCs and other potential investors.

August

Financial management and Marketing background and / or knowledge about a new technology with high potential for commercialization


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.30

Financial and Management Accounting

This course aim at developing reasonable skills to understand, evaluate and use financial information aimed at both managers and external stakeholders. Use of accounting information for planning and control is emphasized. This course will be founded on relevant international accounting standards rather than individual country practices.

January

None

SM90.31

Managerial Accounting

This course aim at developing reasonable skills to understand, evaluate and use financial information aimed at both managers and external stakeholders. Use of accounting information for planning and control is emphasized. This course will be founded on relevant international accounting standards rather than individual country practices.

January

None

SM90.32

Management Control Systems

This course aims at developing skills for designing, implementing and operating an effective control system for different organizational contexts. This course will draw upon knowledge and skill in the area of managerial accounting, organization behavior and strategic management.

August

SM60.31 Managerial Accounting

Semester Offered Prerequisite

SM60.41 Organizational Behavior and Structure

SM90.33

International Capital Markets

The deregulation and the globalization of financial markets has opened up new avenues for firms and the investor community. This course will introduce students with the opportunities and characteristics of capital markets. By completing this course students will be able to study the role of international financial markets, its evolution in terms of markets and instruments for funding and hedging operations.

August

SM60.32 Financial Management

SM90.34

International Finance

The focus of this course is on international financial management and markets. International financial markets have developed rapidly over the past decades, due to increased international trade and cross-border mergers and acquisitions. The global financial markets offer many opportunities for firms such as export growth, foreign direct investment and global sources of financing. On the other hand, the international financial markets can expose firms to additional risk as well, as illustrated during the Asian Crisis and the Argentine Crisis of 2002. The aim of this course is to deepen students’ knowledge about the international financial markets and international financial (risk) management. The main topics of the course are the global financial environment, foreign exchange markets, management of foreign exchange risk, financing the global firm and foreign investment decisions. Special attention will be paid to emerging markets and international financial crises of the past.

January

SM60.34 Corporate Finance

231


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK)

232

Code

Course

Description

SM90.35

Managerial Accounting

This course aim at developing reasonable skills to understand, evaluate and use financial information aimed at both managers and external stakeholders. Use of accounting information for planning and control is emphasized. This course will be founded on relevant international accounting standards rather than individual country practices.

InterSem

None

SM90.36

Financial Strategy of Firms

This is an advanced level finance course enabling students to integrate financial policy with corporate strategy and other management functions. It focuses on the process of resource allocation and funding strategies, corporate restructuring (mergers and acquisitions, divestment and management buyouts), valuation and value-creating strategies.

August

SM60.31 Managerial Accounting

Semester Offered Prerequisite

SM60.32 Financial Management

SM90.37

Corporate Finance in the Global Context

The focus of this course is on corporate financial management in the national and international context. The main aim of the course is to deepen students’ knowledge about financial decision making with a particular emphasis on the global context. The topics of the course are the global financial environment, investment and financing decisions, value creation, foreign exchange risk management and the financial management issues in the emerging markets.

August

SM90. Financial & Management Accounting

SM90.38

Management Control System

The course focuses on the design and implementation of the management planning and control systems for profit and non-profit organizations. It aims to help students to understand the process of strategy implementation. It is an integrative course drawing concepts from managerial accounting, organization behavior and strategic management.

January

Financial & Management Accounting, Strategic Management

SM90.41

Human Resource Management

Organizations improve through the more effective and efficient use of their resources, of which the contribution of people to the organization is essential. This course will enable future managers to effectively manage people at work. They will also be able to examine ways to improve people’s productivity and to increase people’s satisfaction, which will ultimately add to the overall efficiency of the organization.

January

None

SM90.42

Cross-cultural Management

This course explores the variety of ways that culture influences organization and management, particularly, the interactions of managers and employees of different national and cultural backgrounds. A comparison of North American, European and Asian cultural perspectives are examined. Specifically the course will look at the implications of culture on technology, organizational design, managerial approaches or- ganizational and individual performance and human resource dimensions.

January

None


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.43

International Human Resource Management

Globalization has brought about changes in the business landscape throughout the world. Business firms, whether multinational companies, joint ventures or indigenous firms need to develop and balance the discrepancies in their human resource management practices to maintain their competitiveness.

August

SM60.41 or consent of instructor

SM90.44

Management of Change

In order to cope with the new and complex operating conditions, managers have to develop a set of critical skills that allow them to translate change strategies into effective actions. This encompasses key initiatives to enhance organizational efficiency and competitiveness of the organization. This course is designed to provide future managers with understanding of core issues confronting organizations today and discusses about the change process, namely why change, change what, and how to change effectively.

August

None

SM90.45

Comparative Industrial Relations

Rules and regulations in many workplaces may be established unilaterally by employers, others by technology, and others governed by laws administered by government agencies. This course will familiarize students with the industrial relations system model to be able to understand the social system at large and design the work relations system at the enterprise level.

January

None

SM90.46

Organizational Culture and Change

SM90.50

International Marketing

This course examines concepts and theories relating to the understanding of the marketing management field. Marketing encompasses a broad range of activities. This course is designed to give students the background needed for managing the marketing plan adapted to their own environment.

August

None

SM90.51

Marketing Management

This course examines concepts and theories relating to the understanding of the marketing management field. Marketing encompasses a broad range of activities. This course is designed to give students the background needed for managing the marketing plan adapted to their own environment.

August

None

SM90.52

Service Marketing and Management

The course is designed to give to the students the concepts and tools used by service leaders to deliver more value to their customers, employees and shareowners. The course is based on a new business logic -The Service Profit Chain -that can help managers to understand why some service organizations have superior performances. The main objective is to develop service leaders.

January

SM61.51 Marketing Management

Semester Offered Prerequisite

January

233


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK)

234

Code

Course

Description

SM90.53

Business to Business Marketing

This course provides an understanding of the issues related to marketing of industrial products as well as the important business-to-business approach. The aim of this course is to give the students an understanding of the challenges and problems the companies face concerning the industrial marketing management. The focus will be analyzing methods of product development, product introduction, segmentation and organizational buying and selling behavior as well as marketing strategies and tactics.

January

None

SM90.54

International Marketing Research

In competitive markets where customers have many choices, marketing decisions must be based upon current information about customers and other external environment factors. Marketing research is the formal function which gathers marketing information for use in marketing decisions. In highly competitive companies world-wide, marketing research is integrated into marketing strategy and tactical marketing implementation.

August

SM60.51 Marketing Management

SM90.55

Marketing High Tech Services

This course will provide students with the tools and specialized knowledge for developing and executing marketing strategy in the high tech market. Selected cases are analyzed to isolate the unique challenges that confront the marketing strategist in high-technology markets. A set of conceptual and analytical skills is provided to advance the student’s decision-making capabilities in the business-to-business market environment.

August

SM60.51 Marketing Management

SM90.56

Sales Management for Services

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a comprehensive sales and marketing approach to building long-term customer relationships and improving business performance. This course is designed to provide in-depth coverage of management of the sales function for services. Managers must thoroughly understand sales management in order to remain competitive in the global, increasingly technological economy.

January

SM60.51 Marketing Management or consent of the instructor.

SM90.57

Customer Relationship Management

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a comprehensive sales and marketing approach to building long-term customer relationships and improving business performance. This course integrates marketing strategies with necessary IT knowledge for effective customer management.

January

SM70.92 Managing and Implementing Electronic and Mobile Commerce

SM90.58

Management of E-business

Electronically mediated technologies are transforming firms, markets, products and processes with remarkable speed. This provides managers with new challenges and valuable opportunities. Managers have to be capable of managing electronic businesses.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.60

Innovation & Techno Entrepreneurship

Success followed by failure and innovation followed by inertia is the pattern of a global problem faced by companies in any industry at any time. As short-term corporate success often increases the chances of long-term failure, managers must learn to sustain incremental improvement while at the same time leading radical change. The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the role of entrepreneurship in the management of technological innovation and technology-based industrial development. In this course managers learn how to integrate the different techno-economic and behavioral factors that condition a firms creativity and innovation and how to design a strategy system for product/service and process innovation that allows their firm to benefit from increasingly faster technology and market changes. In addition, this course will enable students to design and present to venture capitalists a business plan of a new technology start-up firm.

August

None

SM90.61

Operations Management

To provide students with basic concepts and techniques in managing the operations of a production unit and/or a service enterprise. The practical aspects will be emphasized through case studies / project works to relate the recent theoretical developments with real business environment.

January

None

SM90.62

Service Quality, Customer Satisfaction and Value Measurement

The course will provide students firstly a theoretical framework to understand the concept of service quality, customer satisfaction and customer value in service and secondly the tools to measure the different concepts. These concepts and tools are analyzed based on an understanding of customer behavior on service settings.

August

None

SM90.63

Management of Innovation

Success followed by failure and innovation followed by inertia is the pattern of a global problem faced by companies in any industry at any time. As short-term corporate success often increases the chances of long-term failure, managers must learn to sustain incremental improvement while at the same time leading radical change. In this course managers learn how to integrate the different techno-economic and behavioral factors that condition a firm’s creativity and innovation and how to design a strategy system for product/service and process innovation that allows their firm to benefit from increasingly faster technology and market changes.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite

SM60.71 Managing Technology for Competitiveness or consent of course instructor

235


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK)

236

Code

Course

Description

SM90.64

R&D Management

This course will provide a better understanding for management in R&D that will create or enhance the continuity of innovative capability and progress in technological advancement of business enterprises and economy. This course will also help future managers to manage the process of project implementations, establishment of organizations and development of human resources.

January

SM60.71 Managing Technology for Competitiveness or consent of instructor.

SM90.65

High Tech Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development

The objective of this course is to provide an understanding and appreciation of the interrelationships between the management of modern industrial technology and entrepreneurship, and the role of entrepreneurship in the management of technological innovation and technologybased economic development. In addition, this course will enable students to design and present to venture capitalists a business plan of a new technology start-up firm.

August

SM60.71 Managing Technology for Competitiveness

SM90.66

Total Quality Management

All companies, whether in manufacturing or service operation businesses, need to focus on understanding and responding to customer needs. Total quality management, when adequately and successfully implemented, enables companies to serve their customers better and gain competitive advantage in the market place. The objective of this course is to prepare prospective managers for playing a leading role in planning for and implementing total quality management in manufacturing and service organizations.

August

None

SM90.67

Strategic Supply Chain Management

Most manufacturing firms spend over three quarters of their turnover on raw materials, purchased parts and components, and inbound logistics. Effective supply and logistics management provides a manufacturing firm the added competitive advantage by reducing costs, and improving quality and delivery performance. The objective of this course is to prepare managers to develop and implement strategies and actions necessary to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of supply and inbound logistics functions in manufacturing organizations.

January

SM60.61 Operations Management

SM90.70

Enterprise Resource Planning

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems provide comprehensive management of financial, manufacturing, sales, distribution and human resources across the enterprise. The ability of ERP systems to support data `drill down’ and to eliminate the need to reconcile across functions is designed to enable organizations to compete on the performances of the entire supply chain. To utilize these capabilities managers have to learn how to manage processes in the ERP environment. This course will help students to understand how integrated operational systems work.

August

SM60.61 Operations Management, SM71.92 Managing and Implementing Electronic and Mobile Commerce

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.71

Managing Technology for Competitiveness

The main objective of this subject is to present the basic concepts and theories that will be needed to understand, anticipate, acquire, and use technology for attaining a competitive edge at the market place. The subject will be of particular relevance to those who are likely to be involved in integrating technology strategy with business strategy at the firm level, and for those planning to pursue a career in operations management, engineering management, or international business.

January

None

SM90.80

Business Negotiations

Most successful managers have one thing in common - they have excellent negotiating skills. Understanding the complexity of negotiation processes and the psychology of negotiators on the either side of the table involves information gathering, analysis and judgment. The role of pre negotiation strategy is important in opening and closing negotiations successfully. The course seeks to develop skills in preparing for negotiations, participating in negotiations and finally follow up actions on negotiated settlement.

August

None

SM90.81

Strategic Management of a Firm

This course will enable students to use the strategic management process to understand competitive forces and to develop competitive advantages. They will be able to extending the scope of strategy formulation to successfully compete in the 21st century’s dynamic and challenging competitive landscape.

January

SM61.72 International Business

SM90.82

International Joint Ventures and Alliances

Joint ventures and alliances are the main vehicles for global expansion of firms especially in the Asia Pacific region. The strategy development, partner selection, launch, expansion and withdrawal phases of joint ventures and alliances involve complex decision making processes involving more than one parent company from diverse cultures. These processes demand unique leadership and cultural skills including rational approaches in managerial behavior. The state of practices and the body of knowledge in the field of joint ventures and alliances is changing fast and serves as the basis of training and educating managers.

August

SM61.72 International Business

SM90.83

Managerial Decision Making

The complexity of decision processes in an international firm requires highly advanced skills in decision making both at the level of an individual and team. This course simulates conditions and contexts for the participants to develop these skills.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

237


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK)

238

Code

Course

Description

SM90.84

Business Simulation

As the managers grow in their career, they are called upon to make holistic decisions encompassing ubiquitous operations of their firms in global markets. The complexity of their assignments increases. Under the circumstances, managers can be trained through simulators to handle complex and uncertain situations. The purpose of this course is to model the industry dynamics and operations of competing firms, experiment with model and make informed decisions.

August

SM71.81 Strategic Management of a Firm 2 (2-0)

SM90.85

Decision and Negotiation Analysis

Making effective decisions requires the managers to rely not only on intuitions and experiences but also on good analysis of the complex decision situations. The challenge is further complicated when more than one parties participate and interact in negotiations with conflicting goals, resources and strategies. This course aims at introducing the basic frameworks and approaches to help managers analyzing the different decision and negotiation situations under both deterministic and probabilistic environment. Basic and common decision models are then used to solve these problems, or to improve existing solutions, with assistance of simple spreadsheet-based tools. Through real and comprehensive case studies and negotiation games, students develop competencies in analyzing, modeling and solving real world problems in business. The students will also acquire some insights of actual decision m a k ing behavior and judgment biases, and thus learn to improve the quality of their decisions.

January

Qualification

SM90.86

Strategic Brand Management for Goods and Services

This course is designed to help students to understand the importance of branding in an environment where services and products risk to become commodities. It also provides concept of branding, strategic process of building a strong brand in the service sector, and lessons learnt from branding champions in the consumer goods.

August

SM60.51 Marketing Management

SM90.9001

Selected Topic: International Business Dispute Management in Asia

Business executives need a specialized form and method of communication to be successful and effective leaders. Leadership communication consists of a variety of expanding interactional skills starting from core strategy development to using these skills in complex organizational situations. Business leaders also need managerial skills that will allow them to communicate to a larger audience; to lead an organization and address the broader community. The main objective of this specialized elective course is to develop executive MBA’s communication skills so that they will become more successful leaders in their companies and professions.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK) Code

Course

Description

SM90.9002

Selected Topic: Leadership Communication

Dispute is probably the most feared legal threat in an international business transaction. It can affect the transaction itself and damage the partners relationships. Dispute involves energy and stress and is always time consuming. It has a high economic and social cost and may also result in the loss of business opportunities. In the Asian context, business disputes pose a series of problems and challenges. They are related to the internationalization and/or harmonization of the legal environment for business on the one hand and to the ongoing legal and judicial reforms in many Asian countries on the other hand. In addition, for cultural reasons, Asian prefer to settle disputes in a more consensual rather than confrontational way as their western pairs. In that context, Dispute Management is fundamentally different from Dispute Resolution. The first one consists in adopting a strategic approach in considering the probability of the dispute as a risk to take into consideration by the managers, especially in international business. The second one consists in going through specific proceedings to resolve a current dispute. The purpose of the present course is to enable the students - taking into consideration the Asian context - to have a managerial and pro-active approach to dispute involving international business transactions. The course will give the opportunity to students to: “ Develop a better understanding of the culture difference between consensual and confrontational ways of dispute resolution “ Identify potential disputes; mitigate risk of dispute by contract implementation management “ Draft effective dispute resolution clauses “ Discern and select the most appropriate dispute resolution mechanism, amicable, non-adjudicative or adjudicative, according to the best interests of the parties “ Manage domestic, regional and international arbitration “ Conduct Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), such as negotiation, conciliation, mediation and ombudsman “ Be acquainted with Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) mechanisms.

SM90.9003

Selected Topic: Knowledge Management

August

SM90.9004

Selected Topic: Project Management

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite August

Basic Legal knowledge Review (see questionnaire).

239


Program Executive MBA Bangkok (EMBA-BKK)

240

Code

Course

Description

SM90.9005

Selected Topic: Case Research on Functional Issues

An in depth understanding of the past, present and future of a company improves the effectiveness of a manager. The awareness of the strategic issues faced by the company brings a new perspective to the manager and allows him to relate with the rest of the organization. The course will follow the case research methodology involving field work both inside and outside the company. The fieldwork will be conducted within the frameworks for strategic audit, SWOT and industry analysis and will involve interviews, analyzing company and industry reports.

SM90.9006

Selected Topic: China and Globalization

January

SM90.9007

Selected Topic: Case Research on Strategic Issues

InterSem

SM90.9008

Selected Topic: International Operation Strategy

January

SM90.9009

Selected Topic: Management Information Systems

InterSem

SM90.9010

Selected Topic: Advanced Marketing Research

InterSem

SM90.99

Case Research on Strategic Issues

January

SM90.992

Case Research on Strategic Issues

InterSem

SM90.99B

Case Research on Functional Issues

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite January

None


International Executive MBA (Vietnam) IEMBA-VN Introduction The International Executive MBA program marks a deeper strengthening of the ties between AIT and Vietnam, emphasizing the commitment of AIT to human resource development in Vietnam. The main focus of the International EMBA program is the middle and senior managers in Private and Public companies, Joint-ventures and Representatives Offices in Vietnam to transfer state-of-the-art managerial knowledge and to offer a practical insight into current business practices. The program approaches in business and management are global, relevant to Asia Pacific context, and applicable in Vietnam. This program is designed to fit the needs in Vietnam. Therefore, the International Executive MBA emphasizes three dimensions: the situation of companies operating in Vietnam; the operational environment for companies based in Asia and Pacific particularly in ASEAN; the global perspective US, Europe and Japan as they relate to Asia and Pacific trends, including Vietnam. The program has been launched in Hanoi (since 2000), in HCMC (since 2004), in Dong Nai (since 2007), and in Vung Tau (since 2008). Along with the iEMBA Program in International Business and Management of Technology (IB&MOT), the iEMBA Program in Human Resource Management (HRM) and Public Policy Management (PPM) will also be conducted in Vietnam.

AOS

• • •

Dual Specialization in International Business and Management of Technology Public Policy and Management Human Resource Management/Human Resource Development

Eligibility To be eligible for admission to the International Executive MBA Program, the applicant should:

• Hold a bachelor’s degree in an appropriate field of study from an institution of • • •

recognized standing; Have above average grades at the undergraduate level; and Possess an acceptable level of English proficiency: TOEFL 500, IELTS 4.5, or pass the Entry Test of AIT In addition, the applicant should have a minimum of four to six years relevant work experience with at least two years at the management or senior professional level.

Study Plan The program includes total 15 courses (8 Required Courses and 7 Elective Courses), 1 Case Research Practicum and Final Project for the IEMBA program spread over 3 semesters or 18 months.

241

241


IEMBA-Vietnam Degree program- Proportion of Credits and Courses Courses/ Credits EMBA Research study Required courses (8) 24

SM90.30 Financial & Management Accounting 3(3-0) SM71.42 Cross Cultural Management 3(3-0) SM60.62 Managing Technology for Competitiveness 3(3-0) SM70.02 Project Management 3(3-0) SM90.20 Management & Transfer of Technology 3(3-0) SM90.50 International Marketing 3(3-0) SM90.60 Innovation & Techno Entrepreneurship 3(3-0) SM71.81 Strategic Management of a Firm 3(3-0)

Case Research Practicum (1)

SM91.89 Case Research Practicum 4(1-9)

4

Elective Courses (7) EMBA Project Total

14 6 48

Elective Courses EMBA Project Equivalent to 720 contact hours.

List of Elective Courses SM91.01 SM91.31 SM91.41 SM91.43 SM91.44 SM91.53 SM91.54 SM91.61 SM91.63 SM91.65 SM91.66 SM91.67 SM91.71 SM91.73 SM91.87 SM91.9001 SM91.9002 SM91.9003 SM91.9004 SM91.9005 SM91.9006 SM91.9007 SM91.9008 SM91.9009 SM91.9010 SM91.9011 SM91.9012 SM91.9013

242

Business Communication 2(2-0) Management Control Systems 2(2-0) Organization Behavior and Structure 2(2-0) Managing Human Resource in Multinational Corporations 2(2-0) Management of Change 2(2-0) International Marketing Research 2(2-0) Service Marketing and Management 2(2-0) Operation Management 2(2-0) International Business 2(2-0) Total Quality Management 2(2-0) Asian Business Environment 2(2-0) High-Tech Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development 2(2-0) Management of Information Systems 2(2-0) Management of Innovation 2(2-0) Business Simulation 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Leaderships 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Decision and Negotiation Analysis 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Investment 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Supply Chain Management 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Solving Complex Problems 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Contract & Risk Law for Managers 1(1-0) Selected Topic: Financing Energy Projects: Power Sector 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Energy Value Chain 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Transmission System Operator 3(3-0) Selected Topic: Power Market Operations 3(3-0) Selected Topic: Renewable and Alternative Energy Technologies 2(2-0) Selected Topic: International Investment and Portfolio 2(2-0) Selected Topic: Internet Marketing

242


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN Code

Course

Description

SM71.42

Cross-Cultural Management

This course explores the variety of ways that culture influences organization and management, particularly, the interactions of managers and employees of different national and cultural backgrounds. A comparison of North American, European and Asian cultural perspectives are examined. Specifically the course will look at the implications of culture on technology, organizational design, managerial approaches, organizational and individual performance and human resource dimensions. These provide the background in which people from different cultures interact.

August

SM71.81

Strategic Management of a Firm

This course will enable students to use the strategic management process to understand competitive forces and to develop competitive advantages. They will be able to extending the scope of strategy formulation to successfully compete in the 21st century’s dynamic and challenging competitive landscape.

January

SM91.01

Business Communication

Communication skills are of critical importance for MBA students and future managers in order to work effectively in the business world. Effective communication is the bridge between managers and all others with whom they must interact in their professional lives. This course examines key business communication concepts and fundamentals, considers techniques and approaches to develop and improve communication skills and provides practical opportunities for students to experiment and develop these techniques and skills.

August

None

SM70.02

Project Management

This cause will provide an introduction of the essential techniques and issues in developing and planning new projects, effectively managing and controlling their implementation with emphasis on large-scale projects.

January

None

SM91.31

Management Control Systems

This course aims at developing skills for designing, implementing and operating an effective control system for different organizational contexts. This course will draw upon knowledge and skill in the area of managerial accounting, organization behavior and strategic management.

January

None

SM91.41

Organization Behavior and Structure

This course provides a framework for understanding organizational structure, behavior and change to adapt external environment and the need for better performance of an organization. It also helps develop a practical perspective on organizational development strategies and enhance the managers skills in designing and changing organization.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

243


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN

244

Code

Course

Description

SM91.43

Managing Human Resource in Multinational Corporations

Multinational companies which operate in various different cultures tend to emphasize the human resource management approach consistent with their home country but in the meantime they also need to adapt to local HRM practices to be able to compete in their markets. This course, unlike the basic human resource management course, focuses on the increasing role of human resource management in enhancing the competitive advantage of international firms.

August

None

SM91.44

Management of Change

In order to cope with the new and complex operating conditions, managers have to develop a set of critical skills that allow them to translate change strategies into effective actions. This encompasses key initiatives to enhance organizational efficiency and competitiveness of the organization. This course is designed to provide future managers with understanding of core issues confronting organizations today and discusses about the change process, namely why change, change what, and how to change effectively.

InterSem

None

SM91.51

International Marketing Management

This course examines concepts and theories relating to the understanding of the marketing management field. Marketing encompasses a broad range of activities. This course is designed to give students the background needed for managing the marketing plan adapted to their own environment.

August

None

SM91.53

International Marketing Research

In competitive markets where customers have many choices, marketing decisions must be based upon current information about customers and other external environment factors. Marketing research is the formal function which gathers marketing information for use in marketing decisions. In highly competitive companies world-wide, marketing research is integrated into marketing strategy and tactical marketing implementation.

January

None

SM91.54

Service Marketing and Management

The course is designed to give to the students the concepts and tools used by service leaders to deliver more value to their customers, employees and shareowners. The course is based on a new business logic -The Service Profit Chain -that can help managers to understand why some service organizations have superior performances. The main objective is to develop service leaders.

InterSem

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN Code

Course

Description

SM91.61

Operations Management

To provide students with basic concepts and techniques in managing the operations of a production unit and/or a service enterprise. The practical aspects will be emphasized through case studies / project works to relate the recent theoretical developments with real business environment.

August

None

SM91.63

International Business

This course is designed to provide an overview of international business practices and processes. It seeks to help participants in developing attitudes and skills of an effective international manager.

August

None

Total Quality Management

All companies, whether in manufacturing or service operation businesses, need to focus on understanding and responding to customer needs. Total quality management, when adequately and successfully implemented, enables companies to serve their customers better and gain competitive advantage in the market place. The objective of this course is to prepare prospective managers for playing a leading role in planning for and implementing total quality management in manufacturing and service organizations.

January

None

SM91.65

SM91.66

Asian Business

This course is a survey of the business environment of Asia including its economic dynamic and socio-cultural political and characteristics as they affect business. The three major regions within Asia (East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia) are considered. Special emphasis on current and emerging trends and now business organizations can respond. A seminar/workshop approach will be used.

InterSem

None

SM91.67

High-Tech Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development

The course will provide students firstly a theoretical framework to understand the concept of service quality, customer satisfaction and customer value in service and secondly the tools to measure the different concepts. These concepts and tools are analyzed based on an understanding of customer behavior on service settings.

August

None

SM91.71

Management Information Systems

This course intends to provide a broad overview on the important technical and managerial issues of management information systems (MIS). It will also provide students with a balanced view of management and technology. Students will learn how to apply information technologies (IT)/ information systems (IS) to solve critical business problems in the real business world.

August

None

SM91.73

Management of Innovation

Success followed by failure and innovation followed by inertia is the pattern of a global problem faced by companies in any industry at any time. As short-term corporate success often increases the chances of long-term failure, managers must learn to sustain incremental improvement while

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

245


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN Code

Course

Description

Semester Offered Prerequisite

at the same time leading radical change. In this course managers learn how to integrate the different techno-economic and behavioral factors that condition a firms creativity and innovation and how to design a strategy system for product/service and process innovation that allows their firm to benefit from increasingly faster technology and market changes.

246

SM91.87

Business Simulation

SM91.89

Case Research Practicum

January

SM91.9001

Selected Topic: Leaderships

August

SM91.9002

Selected Topic: Decision and Negotiation Analysis

August

SM91.9003

Selected Topic: Investment

InterSem

SM91.9004

Selected Topic: Supply Chain Management

As the managers grow in their career, they are called upon to make holistic decisions encompassing ubiquitous operations of their firms in global markets. The complexity of their assignments increases. Under the circumstances, managers can be trained through simulators to handle complex and uncertain situations. The purpose of this course is to model the industry dynamics and operations of competing firms, experiment with model and make informed decisions.

Supply chain management is a set of approaches for coordinating activities related to planning, implementation, and control of goods and information flows from the front end to the back end of the supply chain in such a way that the total system wide cost is minimized while satisfying the service level requirement. The objective of this course is to impart to the students basic knowledge on supply chain management, which includes key issues on inventory control and management, supply contract, bullwhip effect and the value of information sharing, distribution strategy, strategic alliance, procurement strategy, pricing strategy, etc.

August

InterSem

None


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN Code

Course

Description

SM91.9005

Selected Topic: Solving Complex Problems

In todays rapidly changing environment, management personnel, whether in companies, in non-profit organizations of within governmental departments, are constantly confronted with decision problems with far-reaching consequences. Survival and long-term success will often depend on finding the right solution. This course focuses precisely on such complex decision problems. The aim is to provide support to management for their successful resolution.

SM91.9006

Selected Topic: Contract & Risk Law for Managers

SM91.9007

Selected Topic: Financing Energy Projects: Power Sector

This course is designed to increase participants understanding of the process which leads to the creation of suitable financial structures for energy projects. The course background is based on the international prerequisites of pre-feasibility studies of energy projects in order to obtain sufficient funding under financial strain and with political and economical risks involved.

August

SM91.9008

Selected Topic: Energy Value Chain

This course is designed to introduce executive participants to the economics of electricity generation, transmission, and distribution. The course will discuss the value-chain of electricityand analyze the economic Description for the recent market reform exercise undertaken by regulators from various countries. The experiences of California and Ontario will be discussed and problems encountered by these earlier liberalization attempts will be used to highlight important challenges and constraints for Vietnamese energy policy makers and managers, and the Vietnamese regulatory authority.

August

SM91.9009

Selected Topic: Transmission System Operator

This course aims at developing reasonable skills to understand the role of the Transmission System Operator (TSO) in a Norwegian, Nordic and European perspective.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite InterSem

None

August

None

247


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN Code

Course

Description

SM91.9010

Selected Topic: Power Market Operations

This course gives a description of the most modern electricity market in the world – the Nordic Market at Nord Pool. The market is both a physical and financial market, and is a market common for the Nordic countries. The market was originally set up by the Nordic TSO`s.

Semester Offered Prerequisite InterSem

None

August

None

The course gives an overview of the Nordic market, with focus on the development towards a free market system, the connection with the EU internal energy market, the success factors and the remaining challenges for future development. The physical market, spot price based, is described and price calculation, price setting, price areas and experiences with the Elspot price are in focus. The financial market is described and comprises both questions on how to create liquidity in such a market, as well as describing the financial products and how to trade them. The financial products include forward and future contracts, option contracts as well as CfDs(Contracts for Differences). Trading carbon is placed focus on, both the framework conditions and Nord Pool`s trading solutions. The clearing of financial contracts is described, clearing routines, settlement and control, security requirements, secure participant interface (PI) and Clearing Report Application (CRA). SM91.9011

Selected Topic: Renewable and Alternative Energy Technologies

The purpose of this course is to take a strategic assessment of renewable technologies or non-fossil fuel alternatives such as nuclear or hydro. As a strategic assessment the emphasis will be on the future and focuses on the potential implementation of these technologies in the context of Vietnam’s power requirements to 2025 and beyond. Related to the macro-environment for renewable and alternative technologies approaches such as PESTE (Political, Economic SocioCultural, Technological Ecological) or SWOT analysis will be used. For specific technologies an assessment based on the social, economic and environmental impacts, costs and benefits will be used.

248


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN Code

Course

Description

SM91.9012

Selected Topic: International Investment and Portfolio

SM91.9013

Selected Topic: Internet Marketing

This course aims to provide a strong understanding of functioning of capital market and how securities of different types are traded and valued in the capital markets across the world. The course covers different valuation models and approaches in security analysis. It provides a framework for understanding, practicing fundamental and technical analysis and the skills used in tracking market behaviour of securities’ prices. The course investigates securities markets, nature and types of securities, bond markets, bond valuation, bond yields, equity markets, equity valuation, fundamental analysis, technical analysis, valuing alternative investments, Option pricing, derivatives in portfolio management, option valuation, option trading strategies, futures market, valuation of forward contract, portfolio theory, asset allocation strategies, portfolio performance measures. With the advent of online advertisements, search engines and web2.0 initiatives, the internet has become one of primary mediums for companies to reach out to targeted customer segments. Though online marketing has been looked at as a minor channel or an extension of conventional marketing, its importance and the use of more refined and rapidly changing technology has made the internet a domain which requires full attention of marketers. The purpose of this course is to introduce contemporary marketing approaches in the internet to enable students to utilize the internet to its full advantage.

SM70.02

Project Management

This course will provide an introduction of the essential techniques and issues in developing and planning new projects, effectively managing and controlling their implementation with emphasis on large-scale projects.

August

None

SM90.30

Financial & Management Accounting

This course aim at developing reasonable skills to understand, evaluate and use financial information aimed at both managers and external stakeholders. Use of accounting information for planning and control is emphasized. This course will be founded on relevant international accounting standards rather than individual country practices. This course also investigates conceptual basis of accounting; understanding financial statements- balance sheet, income statement and funds flow statement; financial statement analysis; financial and management accounting; costs and their classification; cost behavior; cost volume profit analysis; cost objects and cost determination; planning and control; control through variance analysis; accounting information for decision making.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite January

SM90.30 Financial & Management Accounting

InterSem

249


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN

250

Code

Course

Description

SM60.62

Managing Technology for Competitiveness

The main objective of this subject is to present the basic concepts and theories that will be needed to understand, anticipate, acquire, and use technology for attaining a competitive edge at the market place. The subject will be of particular relevance to those who are likely to be involved in integrating technology strategy with business strategy at the firm level, and for those planning to pursue a career in operations management, engineering management, or international business. This course also investigates basic concepts and emerging issues in management of technology, technological resources and capabilities, technology assessment and forecasting, developing technology strategy, acquiring technology

January

None

SM90.20

Management & Transfer of Technology

Technology is a key resource of great importance for corporate profitability and sustainable growth. Rapid globalization and the liberalization of national economies have made international transfer of technology (ITT) a very important component of international business. ITT is, today, widely used by firms in both developing and industrialized countries as a means of gaining access to technologies to strengthen their competitiveness and growth. The course provides the participants with the necessary knowledge and tools to plan and implement ITT both from the perspective of a buyer and seller of technology. This course also investigates basic concepts and frameworks on management of technology, the components of process and product technology, technological capabilities and competencies of the firms, influence of technological change on different aspects of corporate strategy, the process and stage of technology transfer, factors influencing the success of technology transfer, mechanisms for buying and selling technology, technology transfer within the firm.

January

None

SM90.50

International Marketing

This course examines concepts and theories relating to the understanding of the marketing management field. Marketing encompasses a broad range of activities. This course is designed to give students the background needed for managing the marketing plan adapted to their own environment. This course also investigates the marketing concepts, marketing in the strategic decision making process, relationship with R&D and production, marketing analysis; marketing policies in a competitive environment; marketing consumers and organizations; distribution mix; marketing of service products.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program International Executive MBA (Vietnam) - IEMBA-VN Code

Course

Description

SM90.60

Innovation & Techno Entrepreneurship

Success followed by failure and innovation followed by inertia is the pattern of a global problem faced by companies in any industry at any time. As short-term corporate success often increases the chances of long-term failure, managers must learn to sustain incremental improvement while at the same time leading radical change. The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the role of entrepreneurship in the management of technological innovation and technology-based industrial development.

Semester Offered Prerequisite August

None

In this course managers learn how to integrate the different techno-economic and behavioral factors that condition a firm’s creativity and innovation and how to design a strategy system for product/service and process innovation that allows their firm to benefit from increasingly faster technology and market changes. In addition, this course will enable students to design and present to venture capitalists a business plan of a new technology start-up firm. This course also investigates characteristics and success factors of new technology firms; strategies and business plan for entrepreneurial firms; types and characteristics of technological innovation, managerial models and strategies for innovation; organizing for learning and managing knowledge processes; strategic technology alliances; benchmarking innovation output and management.

251


Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) The PhD program at the School of Management is committed to advanced studies and research by candidates who will devote themselves to academic and research activities in universities and research centers across Asia. The PhD program caters to the needs of the academic institutions in Asia and personalities who want to open up an academic career. It is thus ideally suited for the development of educators and education administrators. Besides acquiring a well-recognized, reputable research degree, during their academic venture at AIT PhD students tap into the School’s unique international resources. The School has a rich, diverse community from around the world; the PhD students can draw on a cross-cultural faculty from multiple disciplines. They study and work together in a class of international students and they learn to support each other. Teamwork and collaboration is fostered, and this companionship can be part of the academic network that is so vital for a research oriented academic. In addition AIT PhD students gain access to an extensive alumni network around the world. With its PhD program AIT offers universities in Thailand and around Asia a unique opportunity for faculty development. Universities and research institutions who send their faculty or staff members to AIT take advantage of the PhD program’s emphasis on excellence in research, teaching and education management in Asia. Participation of universities’ faculty in the PhD program encourages and supports the upgrading, extending and enriching of the home institute’s or future employing institute’s own undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as their research activities. AIT strives to accommodate specific needs of all universities with specific arrangements.

AOS:

• Technology Management • Finance • Marketing • Human Resource Management • International Business • Entrepreneurship • Strategy Eligibility

• • •

252

Strong academic record on the graduate level in management or economics (minimum GPA of 3.50 or equivalent) Submission of a brief dissertation research proposal including the required research facilities, if necessary Applicants with strong academic credentials in fields other than management are encouraged to apply. They are required to take additional coursework at AIT.


Participants who do not meet the PhD admission requirements might enter in the Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) program first which can qualify for entry in the PhD program

Study Plan A PhD study is expected to take a minimum of three years. The first year of the program consists of intensive formal course work that prepares the student for his own research. Upon completion of the course work, an individual student research thesis program is assigned based on approved topics in the field of study and in-line with the priorities of the School. AS part of the program’s requirements, participants publish their research in an international refereed journal. The 2008/2009 PhD program has been enriched considerably with a carefully selected PhD course program that is focused on improving research, teaching and education management proficiency. These courses prepare a student for the individual research project, the publication of the research and an academic career. In addition to the courses required for all PhD students, non-AIT graduates select two courses in his or her specific field of study. The courses are at the same time are an added value to a research degree. The coursework requirement must be completed before the student advances to candidacy. Participants in the PhD program work closely with the AIT’s faculty both in the classroom as well as during the individual research for the thesis. Within the first two semesters, a program committee consisting of three members including the adviser is appointed for the student. The student works closely under his or her adviser’s supervision. Participants have also the option to be associated with the faculty as Teaching or Research Assistants during the course of their studies.

DBA Program The Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) is a doctoral program for senior professional managers/administrators. It combines coursework and research investigations. The mission of the DBA Program is to create the body of knowledge embedded in practice, and the ultimate vision is to develop and disseminate management theories, grounded in the Asian business practices and experiences, including case studies and industry analyses. The DBA curriculum is designed based on the needs and preferences of industry experts. It is interdisciplinary, integrative and adopts a holistic approach. The required course work is structured into three perspectives: Research Methodology, Knowledge Building and Research Specialization including Thesis writing component. The program will provide an opportunity to practising managers to investigate the ongoing practices of the Asian companies and develop new contextual theories, or theories that will complement those built around the practices of the Western companies. There are several companies in Asia which have excellent performance and have deviated from established practices in the West. Hence, they provide excellent opportunity for research and developing new management paradigms or theories entrenched in Asian practices.

253


AOS

• Market Models • Strategy • Technology • Management Control • Marketing • Organization Behaviour • Finance A participant can carry out research in any one area integrating it with strategic management and other managerial functions.

Preferred Background

• • •

• • •

Minimum 10 years’ work experience, of which at least 3 years’ experience in senior management/administrative position. Candidates with significant experience in senior positions but less than 10 years of overall experience may be considered. MBA/EMBA from recognised academic institutions or corporate universities. Other Master’s degree subject to the completion of MBA-level required courses as specified by the DBA program faculty. However, for students with 15 years’ work experience, of which 7 years’ experience in senior management/ administrative position, the additional completion of MBA-level required courses, may be exempted. Proof of proficiency in English language. A letter from CEO/head of organizations supporting the candidate’s application and research work. A write-up on research motivation and proposed research theme.

Study Plan The program consists of 84 credits which includes 24 credit of course work and 60 credit thesis. 3-5 years in duration

254


Program Business Administration (DBA, PhD) (SOM) Field of Study — School Wide Course Code

Course

Description

SM62.06

Communication and Academic Writing for Research (DBA)

This course aims to develop and enhance students’ ability to communicate their research data and results in both written and oral form. The communication of scholarly research is somewhat different than managerially oriented writing. This course has the objective of helping new DBA students to improve their writing and presentation skills so that they become successful at publishing / presenting their research for conferences and to thoroughly understand how to write a literature review and structure a DBA dissertation. Formats and styles for writing proposals, theses and international refereed journal articles will be examined. Opportunities to develop these written and oral research communication capabilities will be provided. By the end of the course, students should have an expanded ability to communicate their research data and results with academic quality and rigor.

InterSem

None

SM62.03

Qualitative Research Methods in Management (PhD and DBA)

This course covers research methods with an emphasis on qualitative research techniques. It includes topics on observational field research, case histories, narratives, and case studies, interviewing, principles of action research, evaluation and grounded theory. It examines the strengths of alternative methods and the connection between qualitative and quantitative research methods.

August

None

SM62.04

Communication for Management Research (DBA)

This course aims to develop and enhance participants ability to communicate their research data and results in both written and oral form. Communication of scholarly research is somewhat different than managerially oriented writing. This course has the objective of helping new DBA students to improve their writing and presentation skills so that they become successful at publishing and conference presentations. Formats for both thesis writing and internationally refereed journal articles will be examined. By the end of the course, participants should have an expanded ability to communicate their research data and results with academic quality and rigor.

August

None

SM62.05

Communication for Business Research and Teaching (PhD)

The course aims to develop and enhance participants ability to communicate effectively as a researcher and a teacher. Students in the PhD. program who will be taking up academic careers in teaching and research need to have a thorough understanding of current pedagogical techniques and research skills. The course provides participants a wide range of approaches to the dynamics of teaching, learning and research in the context of management. The communication and presentation of doctoral research data and results particularly in oral form will also be a focus of this course. Strategies for effective communication and defense of research proposals and research data will be emphasized.

August

Semester Offered Prerequisite

255


Program Business Administration (DBA, PhD)

256

Code

Course

Description

SM62.07

Qualitative Research Methods (PhD)

This course covers research methods for a PhD thesis in the field of business administration with an emphasis on qualitative research techniques. It includes topics on observational field research, case histories, narratives, and case studies, interviewing, principles of action research, evaluation and grounded theory. It examines the strengths of alternative methods and the connection between qualitative and quantitative research methods and shall enable PhD students to choose the most appropriate research methods for their theses.

January

SM62.09

Academic Writing for Business Research (PhD)

Communication is a fundamental skill that a researcher needs in order to work effectively. Without good communication skills, good ideas can be useless, because research will not be published and therefore, no one will know about the ideas. This course aims to develop and enhance new PhD students skills in writing up their research for international journal publication. Formats and styles of different academic journals will be examined. The publication process and the necessary information and skills to successfully develop and publish quality research articles are discussed. The second part of the course is a paper writing workshop in which each participating student is asked to write an academic working paper.

January

SM62.10

Research Design and Data Collection (DBA)

The course examines the process of research in business and management and the collection and representation of data. Students will learn a structured approach to the research process from defining the research question through the selection of methods to producing a final thesis. In the first part, research methodologies are discussed with the emphasis on relating theory to practice. In the second part of the course concepts of data collection are discussed including survey techniques, interviews and experiments. The course is conducted as a workshop for a critical review of published research from a student-centered perspective.

August

None

SM62.11

Data Analysis and Interpretation (DBA)

The course aims at providing the doctoral students with statistical techniques and skills for analyzing quantitative data that may be required for their research. The emphasis is on practical uses of these tools in real databases in order to discover and prove new scientific facts and relationships. Some mistakes most commonly committed in the process are discussed.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

SM 62.12 Foundation for Management Research I, SM 62.13 Qualitative Research Methods.


Program Business Administration (DBA, PhD) Code

Course

Description

SM62.12

Foundation for Management Research (PhD)

The course examines the process of research in business and management of a PhD study. PhD students will learn a structured approach to the research process from defining the research question through the selection of methods to producing a PhD thesis. In the first part, research methodologies are discussed with the emphasis on relating theory to practice. In the second part of the course concepts of data collection are discussed including survey techniques, interviews and experiments. The course is conducted as a workshop for a critical review of published research in order to enable the PhD student to develop his or her own conceptual framework and data collection approach.

August

SM62.13

Quantitative Data Analysis (PhD)

The course aims at providing PhD students with expertise about statistical techniques and skills for analyzing quantitative data that may be required for their research. The emphasis is on the appropriate choice and application of estimation techniques and tests of primary and secondary data in order to discover and prove new scientific facts and relationships. Some mistakes most commonly committed in the process are discussed.

January

SM62.12 Foundation for Management Research

SM62.20

Theories and Models of Markets (DBA)

The underlying objective of this course is to develop understanding of the evolution and functioning of markets using diverse theories of economics, behavioral science, sociology and political science. The behaviors of markets will be examined on the basis of a business simulation to demonstrate the impacts of different models.

August

SM60.21 Managerial Economics or equivalent SM60.32 Financial Management or equivalent SM71.81 Strategic Management of a Firm or equivalent

SM62.30

Advanced Corporate Finance (DBA)

The objectives of course are to explore the important elements and research issues in corporate finance decision making, to present strategic finance issues integrating with strategy and other functional areas and to develop in participants the competence to manage complex strategic decisions, through interplay of corporate finance and its linkage to competitive strategies.

August

SM60.32 Financial Management or equivalent

SM62.31

Advanced Management Control System (DBA)

This course intends to provide three different perspectives for the study of Management Control Systems (MCS) including Structures; Procedures; and Context. It will also develop skills for designing, implementing, and operating an effective control system for different organization contexts.

August

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite None

257


Program Business Administration (DBA, PhD)

258

Code

Course

Description

SM62.40

Advanced Organization Behavior and Development (DBA)

This course aims at developing a deeper level of appreciation for the issues and trends in Organizational Behavior. It is assumed that the participants have exposure to the basic issues through formal exposure as well as their experiences of practices. This overview of the field would enable them to find connections with practice and help them in developing an integrated perspective on management.

August

None

SM62.50

Advanced Marketing Management (DBA)

The class is designed to evaluate and practice case research in the field of marketing management. It shall provide students with the skills to identify and relate theoretical concepts to strategic marketing practices of a company. Though an intensive case study course, the purpose is to analyze cases thoroughly from a conceptual viewpoint and to reflect on the issues of generalization, contingency and research methods. In particular, the impact of the Asian context on marketing management practices compared to those in the US and how to incorporate contextual factors in marketing research is a major theme of the course. The course requires the student to integrate basic issues in marketing management such a product policy, pricing, and distribution decisions. It might be required for students to review these basic concepts before registering to the class.

August

SM60.51 Marketing Management or equivalent

SM62.70

Advanced Strategic Management of Technology (DBA)

In the face of rapid globalization and liberalization, understanding the strategic potential of technology has become a crucial issue in todays competitive business environment. The ability of the modern-day managers to analyze and make strategic decisions with respect to the technologies has an important bearing on the competitiveness of the firms. The main objective of this course is to provide the participants with necessary knowledge and tools to appreciate, anticipate, acquire, and use technology for attaining a competitive edge at the market place. The emphasis would be to relate the practical experiences of the participants with the theories, and frameworks developed for deeper understanding.

August

None

SM62.80

Advanced Strategic Management (DBA)

The course is designed to develop understanding of context and practices of strategy and the nature of theoretical traditions in the field of strategic management. Through seminars and case studies the students will discover the external and internal challenges faced by strategic leaders and entrepreneurs in strategizing and implementing strategic change. The real life exercises will help the participants to acquire necessary skills and competences of strategists.

August

SM71.81 Strategic Management of a Firm or equivalent

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Program Business Administration (DBA, PhD) Code

Course

SM62.81

Management of Education (PhD)

Description This course offers a broad-based examination of the role of educational management, centering on the core work of teaching and learning, and exploring how that central work is supported by the administrative, political, and ethical systems of a school. That work is deepened as administrators support educators and students, as a learning community, and in the search for best practice in academia and adult education. Case studies will be used to investigate these themes. Students are asked to research real issues in their workplace or another educational setting, using the concepts and approaches developed in the course, and to propose improvements to those issues.

Semester Offered Prerequisite January

None

259


International Undergraduate Program Engineering and Technology

Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

Computer Science

Information Technology

262/303

267/311

271/311

Electronics Engineering

Industrial Engineering

Information and Communication Technology

275/308

279/299

283/311

Mechatronics

Telecommunications Engineering

287/302

291/309

Humanities, Social Science, Communication

295 260

Math and Science

General Engineering

Projects

297

298

315


International Undergraduate Program Engineering and Technology www.ug.ait.asia

Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) Degree Program AIT takes pride in offering a new four-year Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) Program. The undergraduate program is ideal for those aspiring to an international career in engineering. The BSE degree involves six fields of study: Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Telecommunications Engineering, Mechatronics, Electronics Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. While maintaining a strong disciplinary identity within each of these core areas of expertise, undergraduate engineering at the Asian Institute of Technology opens up a number of study skills for students that integrate all five engineering fields. AIT’s philosophy is to produce engineers with effective competency to work efficiently both in terms of theory and application. Our curriculum is designed for students to gain in-depth understanding of their chosen field of engineering, and for them to apply their knowledge towards real-life applications. Emphasis is always given to honing problem solving and decision-making skills based on scientific methodology.

Bachelor of Science (BSc) Degree Program For those students interested in acquiring deep knowledge and skills in science and technology, AIT also offers a new four-year Bachelor of Science (BSc) Program. The BSc program is just as academically rigorous as the BSE but places more emphasis on understanding of the scientific foundations and use of existing technology to solve real-world problems. The BSc degree involves two fields of study: Computer Science and Information Technology. Our science and technology graduates not only master today’s technology, but also acquire a deep life-long understanding of the universal foundations of their field. This foundation never becomes obsolete – it enables our graduates to keep up with and understand the real essence of new technology, even as the pace of technological change accelerates every year.

261


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

Civil and Infrastructure Engineering The Civil and Infrastructure Engineering field study at AIT focuses on the design, construction, and management skills that professional civil engineers require, providing a solid foundation in the theory and practice of civil and infrastructure engineering. The undergraduate degree covers specializations such as structural engineering, construction, geotechnical and geo-environmental engineering, transportation engineering, and water engineering and management.

Careers Civil and Infrastructure Engineering graduates find employment in local, state, national, regional, and international government organizations and engineering firms that require professionals specializing in land development, transportation, water resources, environment, construction, and related fields. The program also prepares students for continuing postgraduate studies.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 3 7 Sub-Total 10 26 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics & Chemistry 3 12 Sub-Total 8 27 Field of Study Specific General 7 21 Core 12 36 Sub-Total 19 57 Electives Technical Electives (Specializations) 6 18 Sub-Total 6 18 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis 2 2 Senior Student Project 2 10 Sub-Total 4 12 Grand Total 49 146

262


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code UG 101 UG 102 CS 101 UG 110 UG 103 UG 104

Course Title Mechanics Calculus I Introduction to Computers and Programming Engineering Drawing English Communication Skills I Praxis I Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

4 None 3 None 5 None 3 None 3 None 1 None 19

Year I Semester II Code UG 105 UG 106 UG 111 UG 109 UG 107 UG 108

Course Title Electromagnetism & Optics I Calculus II Engineering Mechanics Chemistry English Communication Skills II Praxis II Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

4 None 3 UG 102 3 None 4 None 3 UG 103 1 UG 104 18

Year II Semester I Code UG 201 UG 202 CIE 202 CIE 201 IE 202 CIE 203 UG 203

Course Title Linear Algebra Applied Mathematics Laboratory Fluid Mechanics Soil Mechanics Strength of Materials Surveying Material Science Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 UG 102 1 UG 102, CS 101 3 None 3 None 3 UG 111 3 None 3 None 19

263


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

Year II Semester II Code UG 205 UG 204 CIE 204 CIE 205 CIE 206 UG 206

Course Title

Credits

Calculus III Probability and Statistics Foundation Engineering Structural Analysis I Hydrology Foreign Language Level I Sub total

Prerequisite

3 UG 106 3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 2 None 17

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship I (12 weeks)

Credits 3

Prerequisite Third Year Status

Year III Semester I Code CIE 301 CIE 302 CIE 303 CIE 304 UG 302 UG 301

Course Title Structural Analysis II Numerical Methods Hydraulics Design Introduction to Transportation Engineering Engineering Economics Foreign Language Level II Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 CIE 205 3 None 3 CIE 202 3 None 3 None 2 UG 206 17

Year III Semester II Code CIE 305 CIE 306 CIE 307 UG 303 UG 304 UG 305

264

Course Title Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Highway Engineering Project Scheduling in Construction Environmental Studies Humanities Technical Writing Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 3 UG 107 18


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship II (12 weeks)

Credits 3

Prerequisite Fourth Year Status

Year IV Semester I Code UG 401 UG 402

Course Title Capstone Project I Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Technical Elective I Technical Elective II Technical Elective III Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

5 Fourth Year Status 2 None 3 3 3 16

Year IV Semester II Code UG 403 UG 404

Course Title Capstone Project II Engineering Professional Practice Technical Elective IV Technical Elective V Technical Elective VI Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

5 Fourth Year Status 2 None 3 3 3 16

265


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Technical Elective Courses Water Engineering and Management Code

WEM 401 WEM 402 WEM 403 WEM 404 WEM 405 WEM 406 WEM 407

Course Title Water Resources Engineering Water Supply and Wastewater Engineering Fundamentals of Coastal Engineering Groundwater Engineering Water Resources Planning and Management Irrigation Engineering Hydrological Modeling

Prerequisite CIE 202, CIE 206 None None None CIE 206, UG 302 None CIE 206

Structural Engineering Code

STE 401 STE 402 STE 403 STE 404 STE 405

Course Title

Prerequisite

Advanced Structural Analysis Computer Analysis of Structure Design of Steel Structures Introduction to Structural Dynamics Advanced Reinforced Concrete Structures

CIE 301 CIE 301 None None CIE 305

Geotechnical Engineering Code GTE 401 GTE 402 GTE 403 GTE 404 GTE 405

Course Title Fundamentals of Earth’s Physics Environmental Geology Computational Geotechnic Introduction to Soil Dynamics Finite Element Applications in Geoengineering & Geoexploration

Prerequisite None None None None None

Transportation Engineering Code

266

TRE 401 TRE 402 TRE 403 TRE 404 TRE 405 TRE 406

Course Title Transportation Pollutant Emission and Control Pavement Engineering Roadside Design and Management Sustainable Transportation Traffic Operations Transportation Planning

Prerequisite None CIE 306 None None None None


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science

Computer Science As the Asian domestic IT industry grows, and as Western companies increasingly outsource software development work to Asia, there is an ever-increasing need for software professionals with deep knowledge of software systems and applications who can work as technical leaders and project managers. The Computer Science field of study at AIT aims to fulfill these needs. Our graduates are are well versed in the foundations of information technology, with skills ranging from algorithm and software architecture design to the development of embedded systems, business automation systems, Web applications, mobile application development, and intelligent systems.

Careers Computer Science graduates find employment as software engineers, software architects, and software project managers in a diverse range of industries including finance, manufacturing, business services, telecommunications, and defense. Many computer science graduates start their own companies in order to commercialize ideas for new high-tech products, applications, and services. Our graduates are also well prepared for postgraduate study.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 2 5 Sub-Total 9 24 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics 2 8 Sub-Total 7 23 Field of Study Specific General 5 14 Core 10 33 Sub-Total 15 47 Electives Technical Electives 10 30 Sub-Total 10 30 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis 2 2 Senior Student Project 2 10 Sub-Total 4 12 Grand Total 47 142

267


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science

Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code UG 101 UG 102 CS 101 UG 103 UG 104

Course Title Mechanics Calculus I Introduction to Computers and Programming English Communication Skills I Praxis I Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

4 3 5 3 1 16

None None None None None

Credits

Prerequisite

4 3 4 3 1 15

None UG 102 CS 101 None UG 104

Credits

Prerequisite

3 4 3 3 1 3 17

CS 101 UG 105 None UG 102 UG 102, CS 101 None

Year I Semester II Code UG 105 UG 106 CS 102 UG 107 UG 108

Course Title Electromagnetism & Optics I Calculus II Objected Oriented Programming and Web Applications

English Communication Skills II Praxis II Sub total

Year II Semester I Code CS 201 EL 202 CS 202 UG 201 UG 202 EL 203

268

Course Title Computer System Architecture Electrical Circuits Discrete Mathematics Linear Algebra Applied Mathematics Laboratory Digital Logic Design Sub total


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science

Year II Semester II Code CS 203 CS 204 UG 204 UG 205 UG 206 EL 204

Course Title Operating Systems Data Structures and Algorithms Probability and Statistics Calculus III Foreign Language I Electronic Circuits Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 3 2 3 17

CS 201 CS 102, CS 202 None UG 106 None EL 202

Credits

Prerequisite

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship II (12 weeks)

3

Fourth Year Status

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 2 3 3 17

CS 202

Year III Semester I Code CS 301 CS 303 UG 301 UG 302

Course Title Theory of Computation Technical Elective I Logic in Computer Science Foreign Language II Technical Electrive II Engineering Economics Sub total

CS 202 UG 206 None

Year III Semester II Code CS 305 CS 304 UG 303 UG 304 UG 305

Course Title Programming Languages and Compilers Analysis of Algorithms Technical Elective II Environmental Studies Humanities Technical Writing Sub total

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

Prerequisite CS 301 CS 204, CS 202 None None UG 107

269


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science

Intersemester Code

Course Title

Credits

Internship II (12 weeks)

3

Prerequisite Fourth Year Status

Year IV Semester I Code UG 401 EL 402 UG 402

Course Title

Credits

Capstone Project I Microprocessors and Embedded Systems Technical Elective IV Technical Elective V Technical Elective VI Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Sub total

5 3 3 3 3 2 19

Prerequisite Fourth Year Status EL 203

None

Year IV Semester II Code UG 403

Course Title

Credits

Capstone Project II Technical Elective VII Technical Elective VIII Technical Elective IX Technical Elective X Sub total

5 3 3 3 3 17

Prerequisite Fourth Year Status

Technical Elective Courses Code CS 411 CS 412 CS 413 CS 414 CS 415

270

Course Title Computer Graphics Artificial Intelligence Microprocessor Systems Computer Security Machine Learning

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 3 3

UG 106, CS 101 CS 204, CS 101 None CS304 UG 201, UG 204


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information Technology

Information Technology The Information Technology program at AIT is a specialization of the Computer Science program. Students acquire a solid foundation in the theoretical foundations of information technology then further deepen their skills in information systems, networking, database design, software engineering, and Web applications.

Careers Similar to Computer Science graduates, our Information Technology graduates find employment as software engineers, software architects, and software project managers, but with a particular focus on applications of information technology to increase business efficiency and create innovative new products and applications.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 2 5 Sub-Total 9 24 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics 2 8 Sub-Total 7 23 Field of Study Specific General 5 14 Core 10 33 Sub-Total 15 47 Electives Technical Electives 10 30 Sub-Total 10 30 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis Senior Student Project Sub-Total Grand Total

2 2 2 10 4 12 47 142

271


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information Technology Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code UG 101 UG 102 CS 101 UG 103 UG 104

Course Title Mechanics Calculus I Introduction to Computers and Programming English Communication Skills I Praxis I Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

4 3 5 3 1 16

None None None None None

Credits

Prerequisite

Year I Semester II Code UG 105 UG 106 CS 102 UG 107 UG 108

Course Title Electromagnetism & Optics I Calculus II Objected Oriented Programming and Web Applications

English Communication Skills II Praxis II Sub total

4 3 4 3 1 15

None UG 102 CS 101 None UG 104

Year II Semester I Code

Course Title

CS 201 EL 202 CS 202 UG 201

Computer System Architecture Electrical Circuits Discrete Mathematics Linear Algebra

UG 202 EL 203

Applied Mathematics Laboratory Digital Logic Design Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 4 3 3 1 3 17

CS 101 None None UG 102 UG 102, CS 101 None

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 3 2 3 17

CS 201 CS 102, CS 202 None UG 106 None EL 202

Year II Semester II Code CS 203 CS 204 UG 204 UG 205 UG 206 EL 204

272

Course Title Operating Systems Data Structures and Algorithms Probability and Statistics Calculus III Foreign Language I Electronic Circuits Sub total


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information Technology

Intersemester Code

Course Title

Credits

Internship II (12 weeks)

Prerequisite

3

Fourth Year Status

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 2 3 3 17

CS 202 CS 102 CS 202 UG 206 CS 203 None

Credits

Prerequisite

Year III Semester I Code CS 301 IT 302 CS 303 UG 301 IT 301 UG 302

Course Title Theory of Computation Human Computer Interaction Logic in Computer Science Foreign Language II Computer Networks Engineering Economics Sub total Year III Semester II

Code CS 303 CS 304 IT 303 UG 303 UG 304 UG 305

Course Title Programming Languages and Compilers Analysis of Algorithms Object Oriented Analysis and Design Environmental Studies Humanities Technical Writing Sub total

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

CS 301 CS 204, CS 202 CS 102 None None UG 107

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship II (12 weeks)

Credits

Prerequisite

3

Fourth Year Status

Course Title

Credits

Prerequisite

Capstone Project I Internet Technology Database Design Software Architecture Design Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Microprocessors and Embedded Systems Sub total

5 3 3 3 2 3 19

Fourth Year Status IT 301 CS 102 CS 102 None EL 203

Year IV Semester I Code UG 401 IT 401 IT 402 IT 403 UG 402 EL 402

273


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information Technology

Year IV Semester II Code UG 403 IT 404 IT 405

Course Title

Credits

Prerequisite

5 3 3 3 2 16

Fourth Year Status IT 402 CS 102

Credits

Prerequisite

Capstone Project II Technical Elective II Information Systems Development Web Application Engineering Technical Elective III Sub total

Technical Elective Courses Code IT 411 IT 412

274

Course Title Spreadsheet Modeling & Decision Support Systems Information Retrieval and Data Mining

3 3

None CS 204, IT 402


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Electronics Engineering

Electronics Engineering The Asian region’s ever-growing industrial sector has increased demand for expertise in electronics to a critical level. The undergraduate program in Electronics responds to the needs of various countries in Asia, many of which are in transition from labor-intensive to high-tech economies. The curriculum focuses on acquiring knowledge in basic electronics, circuit design, and industrial electronics applications. The curriculum was designed in partnership with the regional electronics industry and collaborating universities from around the world.

Careers

Graduates of Electronics Engineering can enter many career paths in areas such as research, design, development, manufacturing, quality assurance, marketing, sales, technical support, consultancy in the electronics and telecommunications industry, computer manufacture, hardware design, and system planning.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 3 7 Sub-Total 10 26 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics 3 12 Sub-Total 8 27 Field of Study Specific General 12 37 Core 10 30 Sub-Total 23 69 Electives Technical Electives 3 9 Sub-Total 3 9 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis 2 2 Senior Student Project 2 10 Sub-Total 4 12 Grand Total 49 147 275


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Electronics Engineering Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code UG 101 UG 102 UG 101 UG 103 UG 104 UG 110

Course Title

Credits

Mechanics Calculus I Introduction to Computers and Programming English Communication Skills I Praxis I Engineering Drawing Subtotal

4 3 5 3 1 3 19

Prerequisite None None None None None None

Year I Semester II Code UG 105 UG 106 UG 109 UG 107 UG 108 UG 111

Course Title

Credits

Electromagnetism & Optics I Calculus II Chemistry English Communication Skills II Praxis II Engineering Mechanics Subtotal

4 3 4 3 1 3 18

Prerequisite None UG 102 None UG 103 UG 104 None

Year II Semester I Code UG 203 UG 201 UG 202 EL 203 EL 201 EL 101

276

Course Title Material Science Linear Algebra Applied Mathematics Laboratory Digital Logic Design Semiconductor Devices Electrical Circuits Subtotal

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 1 4 3 4 18

None UG 102 UG 102, CS 101 None UG 105 None


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Electronics Engineering

Year II Semester II Code UG 207 UG 204 EL 202 UG 206 UG 205 UG 209

Course Title

Credits

Electromagnetism & Optics II Probability and Statistics Electronic Circuits Foreign Language I Calculus III Signals and Systems Subtotal

3 3 3 2 3 3 17

Prerequisite UG 105 None El 101, EL 201 None UG 106 UG 205

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship II (12 weeks)

Credits

Prerequisite

3

Third Year Status

Credits

Prerequisite

Year III Semester I Code EL 301 UG 302 EL 302 EL 303 UG 301 EL 304

Course Title Electrical Instruments and Measurement Engineering Economics Semiconductor Fabrication Advanced Electronic Circuits Foreign Language II Power Electronics Subtotal

4 3 3 4 2 3 19

None None UG 105 EL 202 UG 206 EL 202

Year III Semester II Code MT 304 UG 303 TC 304 TC 305 UG 305 UG 304

Course Title Industrial Control Systems Environmental Studies Communication Engineering Data Communication and Networks Technical Writing Humanities Subtotal

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

None None TC 202 UG 204 UG 102 None

277


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Electronics Engineering

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship II (12 weeks)

Credits

Prerequisite

3

Third Year Status

Course Title

Credits

Prerequisite

Analog Integrated Circuits Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Digital Communications Technical Elective I Capstone Project I Subtotal

3 2 3 3 5 16

Year IV Semester I Code EL 401 UG 402 TC 401 UG 401

EL 202 None TC 304 None Fourth Year Status

Year IV Semester II Code EL 402 UG 404 UG 403

Course Title Technical Elective II Embedded Systems Technical Elective III Engineering Professional Practice Capstone Project II Subtotal

Credits 3 3 3 2 5 16

Prerequisite EL 203

Fourth Year Status

Technical Electives Code ELX 01 ELX 02 ELX 03 ELX 04

278

Course Title Solar Electricity System Operational Amplifier Design VLSI Design High Frequency Electronics

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3

None None

3

None


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Industrial Engineering

Industrial Engineering The Industrial Engineering field of study prepares students for manufacturing management and decision support positions in industry and the public sector, by equipping them with a broad range of decision making skills for a variety of applications. The IE curriculum reflects the objective of imparting fundamental knowledge to develop the ability to address complex industrial issues, emphasizing how to design, run, control, and optimize production systems.

Careers IE graduates can take up careers in any manufacturing sector as product designers, process engineers, project managers, and plant managers. Graduates can also pursue further study in the M.Eng. and D.Eng. degree programs in Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at AIT or other world-class universities in order to undertake advanced research and development work.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 3 7 Sub-Total 10 26 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics 2 12 Sub-Total 8 27 Field of Study Specific General 9 28 Core 9 27 Sub-Total 23 55 Electives Technical Electives 7 21 Sub-Total 7 21 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis 2 2 Senior Student Project 2 10 Sub-Total 4 12 Grand Total 49 147 279


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Industrial Engineering

Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code UG 101 UG 102 CS 101 UG 110 UG 103 UG 104

Course Title Mechanics Calculus I Introduction to Computers and Programming Engineering Drawing English Communication Skills I Praxis I Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

4 None 3 None 5 None 3 None 3 None 1 None 19

Year I Semester II Code UG 105 UG 106 UG 109 UG 107 UG 108 UG 111

Course Title Electromagnetism & Optics I Calculus II Chemistry English Communication Skills II Praxis II Engineering Mechanics Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

4 None 3 UG 106 4 None 3 UG 103 1 UG 104 3 None 18

Year II Semester I Code UG 201 CS 201 UG 202 IE 201 UG 203 IE 202 EL 202

280

Course Title Linear Algebra Computer System Architecture Applied Mathematics Laboratory Introduction to Manufacturing Processes Material Science Strength of Materials Electrical Circuits Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 UG 102 3 CS 101 1 CS 101 3 None 3 None 3 None 4 None 20


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Industrial Engineering

Year II Semester II Code

Course Title

UG 204 Probability and Statistics UG 205 Calculus III UG 304 Humanities MT 201 CAD/CAM IE 203 Operation Research I UG 206 Foreign Language I Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 None 3 UG 106 3 None 3 None 3 None 2 None 17 Intersemester

Code

Course Title

Credits

Internship II (12 weeks)

3

Prerequisite Third Year Status

Year III Semester I Code IE 301 IE 302 IE 303 IE 304 UG 302 UG 301

Course Title Safty Engineering Production Planning and Control Industrial Work Study Maintenance Engineering Engineering Economics Foreign Language II Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 2 UG 206 17

Year III Semester II Code IE 305 IE 306 MT 304 UG 303 UG 305

Course Title Quality Control Industrial Plant Design Industrial Control Systems Environmental Studies Technical Elective I Technical Writing Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 3 None 18

281


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Industrial Engineering Intersemester Code

Course Title

Credits

Internship II (12 weeks)

Prerequisite

3

Fourth Year Status

Credits

Prerequisite

Year IV Semester I Code UG 401 UG 402

Course Title Capstone Project I Technical Elective I Technical Elective II Technical Elective III Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Sub total

5 Fourth Year Status 3 3 3 2 None 16

Year IV Semester II Code UG 403 UG 404

Course Title

Credits

Prerequisite

Fourth Year Status 5 3 3 3 2 None 16

Capstone Project II Technical Elective IV Technical Elective V Technical Elective VI Engineering Professional Practice Sub total Technical Elective Courses

Code IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE IE 282

411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426

Course Title Mathematical Modeling and Optimization Statistical Analysis of Experiments Supply Chain Management Simulation Factory Automation Industrial Instruments and Measurement Eco-Design Computer Aided Engineering Engineering Metrology Packaging Technology and Design Operation Research II Applied Probability and Statistics for Engineering Industrial Management Industrial Cost Analysis and Budgeting Ergonomics Biomechanics

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Prerequisite UG 201 UG 204 None None None UG 204, UG 205 None MT 201 None None IE 203 UG 204 None UG 302 IE 303 None


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) program aims to meet the growing international demand for specialists in the application of computer science, information technology, networking, telecommunications, and software engineering. The program emphasizes an interdisciplinary mix of computer science and telecommunications knowledge in its curriculum. It instills in students the necessary foundations and skills for a career in today’s fast-paced computing and telecommunications industries.

Careers ICT graduates command some of the highest starting salaries among the engineering disciplines, with many receiving multiple job offers. Possible career paths include mobile application development, hardware and software systems research and development, network engineering, telecommunication system engineering, software development, engineering management, and sales/marketing.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 3 7 Sub-Total 10 26 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics 2 8 Sub-Total 7 23 Field of Study Specific General 7 20 Core 8 27 Sub-Total 15 46 Electives Technical Electives 9 27 Sub-Total 9 27 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis 2 2 Senior Student Project 2 10 Sub-Total 4 12 Grand Total 45 141 283


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code

Course Title

CS 101 Introduction to Computer and Programming UG 101 Mechanics UG 102 Calculus I UG 104 Praxis I UG 103 English Communication Skills I Subtotal

Credits

Prerequisite

5 4 3 1 3 16

None None None None None

Credits

Prerequisite

Year I Semester II Code

Course Title

UG 105 Electromagnetism & Optics I CS 102 Objected Oriented Programming and Web Applications UG 106 Calculus II UG 108 Praxis II UG 107 English Communication Skills II Subtotal

4 4

None CS 101

3 1 3 15

UG 102 UG 104 UG 103

Year II Semester I Code UG 201 CS 202 TC 201 EL 201 UG 203 UG 202 EL 202

284

Course Title Linear Algebra Discrete Mathematics Introduction to Telecommunications Semiconductor Devices Material Science Applied Mathematics Laboratory Electronical Circuits Subtotal

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 19

Prerequisite UG 102 None CS 101, CS 202 UG 105 None UG 102, CS 101 UG 105


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Year II Semester II Code UG 207 UG 205 UG 204 EL 204 UG 208 UG 206

Course Title

Credits

Electromagnetism & Optics II Calculus III Probability and Statistics Electronic Circuits Signals and Systems Foreign Language I Subtotal

3 3 3 3 3 2 17

Prerequisite UG 105 UG 106 None EL 202 None None

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship II (12 weeks)

Credits

Prerequisite

3

Third Year Status

Credits

Prerequisite

Year III Semester I Code TC 301 CS 201 TC 301 UG 302 UG 301

Course Title Telecommunication Systems Computer System Architecture Antennas and Propagation Technical Elective II Engineering Economics Foreign Language II Subtotal

3 3 3 3 3 2 17

TC 201 CS 101 UG 207 None UG 206

Year III Semester II Code TC 304 TC 305 UG 304 UG 303 UG 305

Course Title Communication Engineering Data Communications and Networks Technical Elective III Humanities Environmental Studies Technical Writing Subtotal

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

Prerequisite UG 208 UG 204 None None UG 107

285


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Intersemester Code

Course Title

Credits

Internship II (12 weeks)

Prerequisite

3

Fourth Year Status

Credits

Prerequisite

Year IV Semester I Code UG 401 UG 402

Course Title Technical Elective IV Technical Elective V Technical Elective VI Capstone Project I Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Subtotal

3 3 3 5 2 16

Fourth Year Status None

Year IV Semester II Code UG 403 UG 404

Course Title

Credits

Technical Elective VII Technical Elective VIII Technical Elective IX Capstone Project II Engineering Professional Practice Subtotal

3 3 3 5 2 16

Prerequisite

Fourth Year Status None

Technical Elective Courses Code

Course Title

Credits

Prerequisite

IE 411 Switching and Transmissions in 3 UG201 Telecommunications IE 412 Microwave Communications 3 UG204 IE 413 Satellite Communications 3 None IE 414 Information Theory and Coding Techniques 3 None

286


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Mechatronics

Mechatronics Mechatronics at AIT provides students with expertise to not only build components of engineering technologies but also to become system integrators. Mechatronics provides students with new insights into the field of automation through an integrated consideration of mechanics, electronics, and information technology. The undergraduate program in Mechatronics covers control theory, robotics and flexible automation, industrial control systems, electromechanical machine design, and manufacturing engineering principles.

Careers Mechatronics graduates can take up careers in the robotics, electronics, aerospace, chemical, defense, automotive and manufacturing industries, as design engineers, software engineers, project planners, product designers, or project managers.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 3 7 Sub-Total 10 26 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics 2 12 Sub-Total 8 27 Field of Study Specific General 9 28 Core 9 27 Sub-Total 23 55 Electives Technical Electives 7 21 Sub-Total 7 21 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis 2 2 Senior Student Project 2 10 Sub-Total 4 12 Grand Total 49 147

287


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Mechatronics

Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code UG 101 UG 102 CS 101 UG 110 UG 103 UG 104

Course Title Mechanics Calculus I Introduction to Computers and Programming Engineering Drawing English Communication Skills I Praxis I Sub total

Credits 4 3 5 3 3 1 19

Prerequisite None None None None None None

Year I Semester II Code UG 105 UG 106 UG 111 UG 109 UG 107 UG 108

Course Title Electromagnetism & Optics I Calculus II Engineering Mechanics Chemistry English Communication Skills II Praxis II Sub total

Credits 3 3 3 3 2 1 15

Prerequisite None UG 102 None None UG 103 UG 104

Year II Semester I Code UG 201 UG 202 IE 201 EL 202 CS 201 IE 202 UG 203

288

Course Title Linear Algebra Applied Mathematics Laboratory Introduction to Manufacturing Processes Electrical Circuits Computer System Architecture Strength of Materials Material Science Sub total

Credits 3 1 3 4 3 3 3 20

Prerequisite UG 102 CS 101 None None CS 101 UG 111 None


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Mechatronics

Year II Semester II Code

Course Title

UG 205 Calculus III UG 204 Probability and Statistics UG 202 Signals and Systems UG 201 CAD/CAM EL 204 Electronic Circuits UG 206 Foreign Language Level I Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 3 3 2 17

None None None EL 202 None

Intersemester Code

Course Title Internship II (12 weeks)

Credits 3

Prerequisite Third Year Status

Year III Semester I Code

Course Title

MT 301 UG 302 MT 302 MT 303

Mechanical Vibration Engineering Economics Mechanics of Machinery Mechanical Design

CIE 202 UG 301

Fluid Mechanics Foreign Language Level II Sub total

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 3 3 2 17

UG 111 None UG 111 UG 111 UG 111 UG 206

Year III Semester II Code MT 304 MT 306 UG 303 UG 304 UG 305

Course Title Industrial Control Systems Electromechanical Machine Design Technical Elective I Environmental Studies Humanities Technical Writing Sub total

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

Prerequisite None None None None None

289


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Mechatronics

Intersemester Code

Course Title

Credits

Prerequisite

3

Fourth Year Status

Internship II (12 weeks)

Year IV Semester I Code

Course Title

Credits

Technical Elective II Technical Elective III Technical Elective IV UG 401 Capstone Project I UG 402 Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Sub total

3 3 3 5 2 16

Prerequisite

Fourth Year Status None

Year IV Semester II Code

Course Title

Credits

Technical Elective V Technical Elective VI Technical Elective VII UG 403 Capstone Project II UG 404 Engineering Professional Practice Sub total

3 3 3 5 2 16

Prerequisite

Fourth Year Status None

Technical Elective Courses Code MT 411 MT 412 MT 413 MT 414

290

Course Title Pueumatics and Hydraulics Robotics Engineering Electric Drive PLC and SCADA Control Systems

Credits 3 3 3 3

Prerequisite None None None None


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Telecommunications Engineering

Telecommunications Engineering A lack of efficient telecommunications networks and the disparity between rural and metropolitan areas in telecommunications capacity are some of the most serious impediments to sustainable development and growth in the Asia-Pacific region. Telecommunications engineering at AIT seeks to address this situation by stressing learning and research covering a broad range of systems in fixed and wireless networks, including satellite communications. The major research areas include digital and mobile communications, network planning, teletraffic engineering, and optical network technologies.

Careers Graduates of the Telecommunications Engineering program assume a variety of roles with telecommunications operators and equipment manufacturers, including research and development, network engineering, and management.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Code

Courses

Credits

General Courses Humanities and Social Sciences 2 6 English & Foreign Languages 5 13 General Education 3 7 Sub-Total 10 26 Basic Science Mathematics 5 15 Physics & Chemistry 3 12 Sub-Total 8 27 Field of Study Specific General 7 21 Core 12 36 Sub-Total 19 57 Electives Technical Electives (Specializations) 6 18 Sub-Total 6 18 Internships Internships 2 6 Sub-Total 2 6 Projects Praxis 2 2 Senior Student Project 2 10 Sub-Total 4 12 Grand Total 49 146

291


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Telecommunications Engineering

Typical Study Plan Year I Semester I Code CS 101 UG 101 UG 102 UG 110 UG 104 UG 103

Course Title

Credits

Introduction to Computers and Programming 5 Mechanics 4 Calculus I 3 Engineering Drawing 3 Praxis I 1 English Communication Skills I 3 Subtotal 19

Prerequisite None None None None None None

Year I Semester II Code

Course Title

UG 105 Electromagnetism & Optics I UG 109 Chemistry UG 106 Calculus II UG 108 Praxis II UG 107 English Communication Skills II UG 111 Engineering Mechanics Subtotal

Credits 4 4 3 1 3 3 18

Prerequisite None None UG 102 UG 104 UG 103 None

Year II Semester I Code UG 201 CS 202 TC 201 EL 201 EL 202 UG 203 UG 202

292

Course Title

Credits

Linear Algebra 3 Discrete Mathematics 3 Introduction to Telecommunications 3 Semiconductor Devices 3 Electrical Circuits 4 Material Science 3 Applied Mathematics Laboratory 1 Subtotal 20

Prerequisite Calculus I None CS 101, CS 202 UG 105 UG 105 None UG 102, CS 101


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Telecommunications Engineering

Year II Semester II Code

Course Title

UG 207 Electromagnetism & Optics II UG 205 Calculus III UG 204 Probability and Statistics EL 204 Electronic Circuits TC 202 Signals and Systems UG 206 Foreign Language I Subtotal

Credits

Prerequisite

3 3 3 3 3 2 17

UG 105 UG 106 None EL 202 None None

Credits

Prerequisite

Inter-Semester Code

Course Title

Internship I (12 weeks) 3 Fourth Year Status Subtotal 3

Year III Semester I Code TC 301 CS 201 TC 302 TC 303 UG 302 UG 301

Course Title

Credits

Telecommunication Systems 3 Computer System Architecture 3 Digital Signal Processing 3 Antennas and Propagation 3 Engineering Economics 3 Foreign Language II 2 Subtotal 17

Prerequisite TC 201 CS 201 TC 202 UG 207 None UG 206

Year III Semester II Code TC 304 TC 305 MT 305 UG 305 UG 304 UG 303

Course Title

Credits

Communication Engineering 3 Data Communications and Networks 3 Automatic Control 3 Technical Writing 3 Humanities 3 Environmental Studies 3 Subtotal 18

Prerequisite TC 202 UG 204 None UG 107 None None

293


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Telecommunications Engineering

Intersemester Code

Course Title

Credits

Internship II (12 weeks)

3

Prerequisite Fourth Year Status

Year IV Semester I Code TC 401 TC 402 TC 403 UG 401 UG 402

Course Title

Credits

Digital Communications 3 Optical Communications 3 Teletraffic Engineering 3 Capstone Project I 5 Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship 2 Subtotal 16

Prerequisite TC 304 UG 207 TC 301 Fourth Year Status None

Year IV Semester II Code TC 404 UG 403 UG 404

Course Title

Credits

Wireless and Mobile Communications 3 Technical Elective II 3 Technical Elective III 3 Capstone Project II 5 Engineering Professional Practice 2 Subtotal 16

Prerequisite TC 301 - - Fourth Year Status None

Technical Elective Courses Code TC 411 TC 412 TC 413 TC 414

294

Course Title Switching and Transmissions in Telecommunications

Microwave Communications Satellite Communications Information Theory and Coding Techniques

Credits 3 3 3 3

Prerequisite TC 301 UG 207 TC 201 TC 304


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Humanities, Social Science, Communication Code

Description

Rationale

UG103

English Communication Skills I

This course provides an introduction to communication models and analysis, the characteristics of engineering communication, and ethics. The course engages students in the writing process and techniques for searching for information, team/group work, peer assessment, and making oral presentations. It includes a comprehensive review of English structure.

September

None

UG107

English Communication Skills II

This course covers communication strategies, effective presentations, research writing (extended essays), seminar presentations, and writing for the Web and multimedia presentations. The course engages students in exploring and communicating in academic as well as in professional engineering contexts. Students conceive, develop, and present their own content relating engineering purposes to social and environmental issues.

January

UG103

UG206

Foreign Language I

This course introduces basic grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary of the language with special emphasis on oral comprehension and conversation. Multimedia tools are used to enhance learning.

September

None

UG301

Foreign Language II

This course provides a systematic study of the language with particular attention to grammar review, vocabulary growth, conversation, and reading comprehension.

January

UG206

UG302

Engineering Economics

This course provides an understanding of the theory and methods of economic analysis especially those needed for engineering. Topics include cost concepts, the time value of money, comparison of alternative investments, depreciation and income tax, replacement analysis, decision making under risk and uncertainty, and break-even analysis.

September

None

UG303

Environmental Studies

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of human interaction with the environment. Of central concern are the impact of technology on natural environments and its implications for human welfare. The course seeks to apply the different perspectives of the humanities, social sciences, biology, and the physical sciences to environmental and natural resource issues.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

295


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Humanities, Social Science, Communication

296

Code

Description

Rationale

UG304

Humanities

The course presents a study of the human condition in the framework of world cultures. Literature, history, and the fine arts (music and the visual arts) and are the primary areas of investigation. Beginning with the earliest individuals and moving toward the present establishes a sequence that illuminates the shifting values of humankind over time.

January

None

UG305

Technical Writing

Students learn to write in a clear, concise style and to present information logically. Students will also learn to design documents in which format contributes to clarity, use graphics, and deliver oral presentations.

January

UG107

UG402

Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship

The course provides the engineering and technology specialist with an understanding of how innovative business ideas come about and how to turn an idea into a real product. Students learn how to recognize the opportunities produced by new technology, how to develop an effective competitive business model, how to develop a strategic business plan, and how to attract and utilize venture capital. In a semester project, students, in teams, develop a business plan for product based on the emerging technology in their field.

September

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Math and Science Code

Description

Rationale

UG101

Mechanics

This course provides a firm foundation in the concepts in mechanics, including measurements, basic statics, and dynamics.

September

None

UG102

Calculus I

This course provides a firm foundation in the concepts and techniques of calculus, including standard functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, differential equations, sequences, and series.

September

None

UG105

Electromagnetism & Optics I

This course develops basic background understanding of electromagnetism and mechanical waves.

January

None

UG106

Calculus II

This course provides knowledge and understanding of the main concepts and techniques of multivariable calculus, including vectors, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and higher order differential equations.

January

UG102

UG109

Chemistry

This course develops fundamental knowledge of physical, inorganic, and organic chemistry pertinent to engineering.

January

None

UG201

Linear Algebra

This course familiarizes students with the concept of a vector space, its algebraic properties, and the use of matrices and determinants in solving engineering problems.

September

UG102

UG202

Applied Mathematics Laboratory

This is an introductory course on the use of computers to solve engineering problems. On successful completion, students will have the ability to analyze engineering problems, develop algorithms to solve those problems, implement the algorithms in the MATLAB programming environment, and produce informative output in both numerical and graphical form. The problem-solving skills learned in the course can be utilized in upper-level engineering and science courses.

September

UG102, CS101

UG205

Calculus III

This final installment of the three-course calculus sequence covers advanced topics of particular importance in engineering applications.

January

UG106

UG204

Probability and Statistics

This course introduces students to the concepts of probability and statistics necessary to undertake basic modeling and statistical decision techniques in engineering.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

297


Undergraduate Course Descriptions General Engineering

298

Code

Description

Rationale

UG110

Engineering Drawing

This course develops a general understanding of engineering drawing as the common tool of communication in the field of engineering.

September

None

UG111

Engineering Mechanics

This course develops students’ ability to apply mechanics in solving engineering problems. Objects are modeled as rigid bodies without considering material properties. Based on the concepts of equilibrium of particles and the equilibrium of rigid bodies, all of the forces applied to objects can be determined by considering the balance of forces on the free body diagram model of objects.

January

None

UG203

Material Science

This course introduces students to material science and provides an understanding of the features and applications of materials.

September

None

UG207

Electromagnetism & Optics II

This is the second course in the electromagnetism and optics series. The topics include Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic wave propagations and polarization, waveguides and cavities, and radiation.

January

UG105

UG406

Engineering Professional Practice

This course develops understanding of issues related to the practice of engineering as a professional engineer. It develops the ability to organize and deliver effective written communications. Students learn to identify and explain the global, economic, environmental, and societal impacts of a specified engineering system. Students gain an understanding of the need for life-long learning, the key concepts and problem solving processes used in engineering management, the role of a leader, leadership principles, and attitudes conductive to effective practice of engineering.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Industrial Engineering Code

Description

Rationale

IE201

Introduction to Manufacturing Processes

This course introduces students to the wide range of manufacturing processes currently used in the manufacturing industry. Students develop a working knowledge and understanding of the factors involved in the operation of a manufacturing process.

September

None

IE202

Strength of Materials

This is an advanced engineering mechanics course in which the studied objects are treated as deformable bodies. By including the mechanical properties of material, real objects are deformed under applied forces. The course helps students understand the relationship between forces applied to a deformable body and the methods to determine internal stress, strain, and deformations induced in simple bodies such as bars, beams and columns.

September

UG111

IE203

Safety Engineering

This course introduces the basic principles of safety engineering and provides students with an understanding of the importance of safety in workplaces and all engineering activities.

January

None

IE301

Operations Research

This course introduces students to the major deterministic and non-deterministic models that facilitate decision making. The goal is to develop skills in identifying typical problems; formulating, solving, and interpreting appropriate models; and developing interactive feedback with the problem environment.

September

None

IE302

Production Planning and Control

This course is designed to introduce major production planning and control concerns and provide a set of practical tools for planning, implementation, monitoring, and control of the total manufacturing activity through the use of industrial engineering models and techniques in a cost effective manner.

September

None

IE303

Industrial Work Study

This course introduces the fundamental concept of industrial work study, which examines humans and their work in all their contexts for productivity and quality improvement. Topics covered in the course include methods study, charting techniques, time study, workstation design principles, job evaluation, and compensation.

September

None

IE304

Maintenance Engineering

This course introduces the concepts and utilization of maintenance as applicable to industrial and service systems. The course also covers types of maintenances systems, maintenance activities, and performance measurement for maintenance system improvement.

September

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

299


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Industrial Engineering

300

Code

Description

Rationale

IE305

Quality Control

Quality is one of the key competitive advantages in many enterprises. It is a powerful strategic business weapon in highly competitive markets. This course introduces the basic concepts of quality control as well as the need to use statistical analysis in quality control and improvement. Advanced quality control techniques and various sampling techniques for quality inspection are also covered.

January

None

IE306

Industrial Plant Design

This course introduces the principles of industrial plant design and layout techniques that are important for decision making about facility planning and plant location.

January

None

IE411

Mathematical Modeling and Optimization

This course introduces basic methods for mathematical modeling, various types of models, and their limitations. Solution methodologies for each type of optimization model are discussed. Students learn how to use mathematical modeling and optimization software.

September/January

UG111

IE412

Statistical Analysis of Experiments

This course introduces students to various techniques for statistical analysis of experimental results.

September/January

UG204

IE413

Supply Chain Management

This course introduces the principles of supply chain management and a technical foundation for understanding the operation of supply chains. The course also covers fundamental theory of supply chain design, which includes strategies for customer service, quality, logistics, inventory management, and integrated supply chain management.

September/January

None

IE414

Simulation

This course introduces decision tools for the design and analysis of complicated real life systems when analytical or numerical techniques do not suffice. Emphasis is primarily on applications of discrete time simulation modeling for the analysis of complex manufacturing and service systems using case examples.

September/January

None

IE415

Factory Automation

This course introduces students to the concepts and components that constitute an industrial automation system in manufacturing. Basic knowledge of tools and methods used for realization, analysis and assessment of automation systems are also covered.

September/January

None

IE416

Industrial Instruments and Measurement

This course introduces the principles and applications of industrial instruments, particularly measuring and control systems, employed in various kinds of industrial processes and manufacturing.

September/January

UG204 UG205

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Industrial Engineering Code

Description

Rationale

IE417

Eco-Design

This course teaches students to address the negative effects of industrial production by looking at how products can be designed in such a way that they move towards environmental friendliness in terms of reduced resource use and reduced environmental impact during their whole life cycle, from raw material extraction, through production and use, to final disposal. The role of international and national regulations, organizations, and eco-labeling systems are also discussed.

September/January

None

IE418

Computer Aided Engineering

This course introduces the use of modern computational tools for engineering design and analysis. The primary focus is on product design with solid modeling and finite-element analysis.

September/January

None

IE419

Engineering Metrology

This course provides students with an understanding of the principles of engineering metrology, methods of measurement, and their applications in the manufacturing industry.

September/January

None

IE420

Packaging Technology and Design

This course provides knowledge of how to design and select optimal packaging methods for a specific product with desired properties. An overview of packaging technology, the interaction between packages and manufacturing equipment, and machines and container selection is also provided.

September/January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

301


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Mechatronics

302

Code

Description

Rationale

MT201

CAD/CAM

This course introduces computer aided design and manufacturing. Students learn to use parametric solid modeling and CAD in the design cycle to familiarize them with standard design elements and their integration into mechanical systems. The course also develops an understanding of computer aided design analysis and machining techniques and relates these to the design and manufacturing process.

January

None

MT301

Mechanical Vibration

This course introduces students to the concepts of free vibration of system, harmonic motion, viscous damping, stiffness, system modeling and vibration measurements.

September

UG111

MT302

Mechanics of Machinery

This course develop an understand the concept of velocity and acceleration analysis of mechanical devices.

September

UG111

MT303

Mechanical design

This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental of mechanical design, properties of materials, and design of simple machine elements.

September

UG111

MT304

Industrial Control Systems

This course provides students with a background in control and management of various types of engineering production systems. It introduces the methodology and strengths of push, pull, and TOC approaches to production and operations management, introduces the issues surrounding manufacturing control and management, and identifies future trends and areas of investigation in production control.

January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Code

Description

Rationale

CIE201

Soil Mechanics

This course introduces the civil engineering student to the fundamentals of soil mechanics, i.e., what soil is, its origin, and how it behaves under load. The course also introduces the basics of geotechnical engineering.

September

UG111

CIE202

Fluid Mechanics

This course shows how the principles of continuity, momentum, and energy concepts are applied to the analysis of fluid motion. Topics include properties of fluids, fluid statics, kinematics and dynamics, flow in open channels and pressure conduits (pipes) and turbines, fluid measurements, and similitude and dimensional analysis.

September

UG111

CIE203

Surveying

This course imparts necessary knowledge and skills to carry out surveying and levelling, and it introduces the relevant drawing techniques and computations for engineering applications.

September

None

CIE204

Foundation Engineering

This course introduces the subject of foundation engineering to civil engineering students. It teaches students how to solve certain fundamental problems related to consolidation, shear strength, and design of shallow and deep foundations. It also familiarizes students with relevant terms and soil tests so that they can work effectively with specialists in geotechnical engineering.

January

CIE201

CIE205

Structural Analysis I

Structural analysis combines the concepts from statics and mechanics of materials to determine internal forces of structural members and deflections of structural systems. Analysis methods for different types of statically determinate structures are introduced in this course.

January

None

CIE206

Hydrology

This course provides an understanding of the circulation of water and its constituents through the hydrologic cycle, hydrologic data collection, and hydrologic analysis.

January

None

CIE301

Structural Analysis II

Subsequent to Structural Analysis I, this course teaches students the classical analysis methods of statically indeterminate structures. This course covers the methods of consistent deformation and slope-deflection and introduces students to matrix methods, providing a foundation for the advanced study of modern structural analysis using computers.

September

CIE205

CIE302

Numerical Methods

Most problems in practical engineering applications are so complicated that they can only be solved numerically using computers. This course introduces students to a variety of numerical methods and algorithms for solving mathematical models of real word problems from the fields of civil engineering.

September

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

303


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

304

Code

Description

Rationale

CIE303

Hydraulic Design

This course provides background knowledge on design principles for dams and hydraulic structures and introduces hydraulic modeling for design improvement.

September

CIE202

CIE304

Introduction to Transportation Engineering

This course introduces students to the basic principles of transportation engineering that emphasize transportation from an overall systems perspective. The course provides knowledge of the basic elements of transportation and traffic practice including areas such as planning, operations, and design.

September

None

CIE305

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

This course provides students with a basic understanding of material properties of concrete, reinforcement, and their interaction. It also provides a basic understanding of standard methods of analysis and design of reinforced concrete members.

January

None

CIE306

Highway Engineering

This course introduces students to the basic principles of highway engineering. In addition, the course teaches the theory and criteria of traffic analysis, geometric design of highways, pavement design, highway materials, and highway construction and maintenance. The course presents a large number of practical problems in sufficient depth that the student will be capable of solving real highway- related problems.

January

None

CIE307

Project Scheduling in Construction

This course is a detailed study of planning, organizing, and controlling projects. Computer software is issued to practice the scheduling of projects. Emphasis is placed on time, resources, and capital considerations for the project.

January

None

WEM401

Water Resources Engineering

This course provides a firm foundation in the concepts in water resources engineering and prepares interested students for future careers in water supply, hydropower, and river engineering management.

September/January

CIE202, CIE206

WEM402

Water Supply and Wastewater Engineering

This course introduces students to the principles of public health engineering, water and wastewater treatment, water supply systems, wastewater disposal systems, stormwater systems, biosolids treatment and management, and water quality and contamination indicators.

September/January

None

WEM403

Fundamentals of Coastal Engineering

Coastal engineering has become increasingly important as more people live or work at or near the world’s coasts. Problems associated with coastal development will require the expertise and innovation of coastal engineers. This course provides basic knowledge of coastal engineering, which is concerned with the study of waves and currents and their effect on coastal structures.

September/January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Code

Description

Rationale

WEM404

Groundwater Engineering

In the modern world of expanding populations, climate change, renewable energy, and sustainability, groundwater is an ever more important resource that offers promising career opportunities. This course provides an understanding of groundwater occurrence, groundwater flow and contaminant transport mechanisms through saturated and unsaturated zones, modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, and groundwater resources evaluation and management issues.

September/January

None

WEM405

Water Resources Planning and Management

This course prepares interested students for future careers in floodplain, storm water, drought, and wastewater management. It provides a firm foundation in water excess management concepts, storm water control, water resource economics, linear programming for water resources, and integrated water resources management and planning.

September/January

CIE206, UG302

WEM406

Irrigation Engineering

This course provides students with fundamental knowledge of irrigation and drainage engineering. It covers the topics of basic soil-plantwater relationships, planning and design of irrigation and drainage systems, irrigation and drainage structures, flow measurements, and pump selection and operation.

September/January

None

WEM407

Hydrological Modeling

This course provides knowledge of spacies the use of mathematical models in hydrological analysis and provides an overview of several well-recognized and popular computer models for water resources development, planning, and management.

September/January

CIE206

STE401

Advanced Structural Analysis

This advanced course is designed for civil engineers that desire to be the builders of technology. It aims to equip students with methodologies and techniques in line with the fast development of computing technology in civil engineering. A semester project is assigned groups of students to develop a software module to solve a specific advanced problem in structural analysis.

September/January

CIE301

STE402

Computer Analysis of Structure

This advanced course is designed for civil engineers that want to master the modern technology of structural analysis. The course teaches students how to model and analyze real world structures using commercial software. A semester project on the analysis of large structures provides students with practical experience in modeling, analysis, and interpretation of results.

September/January

CIE301

Semester Offered Prerequisite

305


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

306

Code

Description

Rationale

STE403

Design of Steel Structures

This course is concerned with the behavior and design processes of steel members and structures. Students will gain practical and comprehensive experience through a semester project in the design of a simple steel structure.

September/January

None

STE404

Introduction to Structural Dynamics

This course provides a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior of structures as well as underlying principles of analysis.

September/January

None

STE405

Advanced Reinforced Concrete Structures

This is an advanced course on analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures. The course is designed for students looking towards a career in the structural engineering field. A semester project on the design of a multi-story and multi-bay reinforced concrete frame building is assigned to students to enhance their practical skills in analysis and design.

September/January

CIE305

GTE401

Fundamentals of Earth’s Physics

This course provides fundamental knowledge of Earth’s physics for those who would like to specialize further in geotechnical and earth resources engineering, geo-exploration and natural hazard preparedness and mitigation. It provides students with knowledge of the internal structure and dynamics of the earth considered in light of constraints from the gravitational and magnetic fields, seismology, and mineral physics.

September/January

None

GTE402

Environmental Geology

Environmental geology examines the interaction between human activity and the natural environment. The course provides knowledge of geologic processes and the physical constituents of the Earth that are necessary to understand environmental problems on a local, regional, and global scale. It plays a significant role in decision making concerning the use of water, minerals, energy resources, and our response to and preparedness for natural hazards. The main objective of the course is to equip students with an understanding of how geology interacts with major environmental problems and issues facing people and society.

September/January

None

GTE403

Computational Geotechnics

Nowadays, civil engineers need to use computer technology and software for their professional work and global competencies. Many general- or specific-purpose computer software packages are used in geotechnical analysis, design and practice. This course provides civil engineering students with basic knowledge ofhow to apply the finite element method to solve traditional soil mechanics problems as well as practical geotechnical engineering problems.

September/January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Code

Description

Rationale

GTE404

Introduction to Soil Dynamics

Civil engineers are increasingly challenged to solve the geotechnical problems under dynamic and seismic loading conditions. This course provides civil engineering students with basic knowledge of soil dynamics and geotechnical earthquake engineering.

September/January

None

GTE405

Finite Element Applications in Geoengineering & Geoexploration

This course introduces the basis of the finite element method and its application in solving a series of practical geo-problems, including consolidation analysis, groundwater flow modeling, heat flow, and electric flow analysis. The course is suitable for advanced undergraduate students, especially those who would like to pursue graduate study in geoengineering and geoexploiration.

September/January

None

TRE401

Transportation Pollutant Emission and Control

This course introduces students to the basic principles of analysis of air pollution sources and methods for controlling emissions, with a focus on transportation-related air pollution.

September/January

None

TRE402

Pavement Engineering

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of the design, construction, maintenance and repair, and management of highway and airfield pavement systems.

September/January

CIE306

TRE403

Roadside Design and Management

This course introduces students to the concepts of roadside design and management with a focus on safety treatments that minimize the likelihood of serious injuries when a driver runs off the road.

September/January

None

TRE404

Sustainable Transportation

This course introduces students to the concepts of sustainable development and sustainable transportation. The course describes practical techniques for comprehensive evaluation, provides tools for multi-modal transport planning, and presents innovative mobility management solutions to transportation problems.

September/January

None

TRE405

Traffic Operations

This course introduces students to the basic principles of traffic engineering and operations. Students learn to use capacity analysis procedures and become familiar with the Highway Capacity Manual. Students apply traffic engineering principles in a traffic impact study.

September/January

None

TRE406

Transportation Planning

This course provides an understanding of the nature of travel demand and methods used to plan for future transportation systems. The course introduces students to the basic concepts of transportation planning. It also covers transportation survey methods, data collection, and modeling.

September/January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite

307


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Electronics Engineering

308

Code

Description

Rationale

EL201

Semiconductor Devices

This course introduces students to the physics of semiconductors and the inner working of semiconductor devices and provides an understanding of new semiconductor devices and technologies. The topics include semiconductor fundamentals, diodes, BJTs, FETs, logic gates, and semiconductor device fabrication.

September

UG105

EL202

Electrical Circuits

This course develops a knowledge base in the fundamentals of electrical engineering, especially in the area of circuit analysis. The topics include circuit elements and Kirchhoff’s law, analysis of resistive circuits, network theorems, alternating current theory, three-phase circuits, electrical measurements, non-sinusoidal wave forms, and electrical installations.

January

None

EL203

Digital Logic Design

This course familiarizes students with the design and implementation of digital systems including combinational and sequential logic. Students gain hands-on experience through a small team design project.

September

None

EL204

Electronic Circuits

This course is designed to build fundamental engineering knowledge about analog and digital electronic circuit design and analysis. The topics include diode and transistor circuits, differential amplifiers, operational amplifiers, power electronic devices, logic and combinatorial circuits, sequential circuits, and other devices (PLA, RAM, ROM, and microcontrollers).

January

EL201, EL202

EL301

Electrical Instruments and Measurement

This course introduces the basic concepts of electrical instruments and measurement including electrical safety, analog and digital techniques in measurement, and signal-to-noise ratio enhancement techniques.

September

None

EL302

Semiconductor Physics

This course provides fundamental knowledge of the physics of modern semiconductor devices. Topics include quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, solid structure, and energy bands.

September

UG105

EL303

Electronic Circuit Design

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of electronic circuit design including electronic circuits, small signal amplifiers, and frequency responses of amplifiers.

September

EL202

EL304

Power Electronics

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of power electronic devices, power conversion, and motor control theory.

January

EL202

EL401

Analog Integrated Circuits

This course provides an understanding of the fundamental concepts in the theory, analysis, and design of analog integrated circuits. Basic design concepts, issues, and trade-offs involved in analog IC design are explored.

September

EL202

EL402

Microprocessors and Embedded Systems

This course provides active knowledge and understanding of microprocessors and the principles of microprocessor programming.

January

EL203

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Telecommunications Engineering Code

Description

Rationale

TC201

Introduction to Telecommunications

This course familiarizes students with telecommunication fundamentals, techniques, and applications. The topics include standardization, conventional telephone systems, traffic engineering, frequency and bandwidth, analog and digital signals and systems, basic concepts of transmission systems, cellular radio principles, and network protocols.

September

CS101, CS202 (Co-req)

TC202

Signals and Systems

This course provides fundamental engineering knowledge in signals and systems, classification and analysis of both continuous and discrete signals and systems, Fourier and Laplace transforms, LTI systems and frequency responses, stability analysis, and filter design. The theory is complemented by laboratory sessions.

January

None

TC301

Telecommunication Systems

This course familiarizes students with telecommunication systems and their industrial applications. The topics include PSTN, SONET/SDH, ADPCM, CELP, SS7, H.323, SIP, ENUM, DSL, WiFi, WiMax, satellite access, CDPD, GSM, IS-95, 3G (cdma2000 and WCDMA/UMTS), digital television, video codecs, H.320, H.323, and SNMP.

September

TC201

TC302

Digital Signal Processing

This course covers the theory and practical applications of digital signal processing in communication systems. The topics include discrete-time signals and systems, frequency domain representation, sampling, Fourier transforms, digital filters, and applications in mobile and wireless communications.

September

UG209

TC303

Antennas and Propagation

This course covers antennas and propagation effects, which in combination define the wireless channel. The topics include radio wave propagation, multipath mechanisms, antenna principles, antenna measurements, and antenna arrays.

September

UG207

TC304

Communication Engineering

This course covers the fundamentals of end-to-end communication links. The topics include baseband and passband modulation and demodulation, multiplexing, noise, signal detection, as well as radio, satellite, and optical transmission.

January

UG209

TC305

Data Communications and Networks

This course imparts a unified systems view of the broad field of data and computer communications. The fundamental principles of data communications are thoroughly presented and then applied in data communication networking. The topics include data bit encoding, data link layer, routing in packet switched networks, flow and congestion control, and local and metro area networks.

January

UG204

TC401

Digital Communications

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of digital communications and information theory. The topics include source coding, signal constellations, optimal detection for AWGN channels, block and convolutional codes, information theory, and Shannon channel capacity.

September

TC304

Semester Offered Prerequisite

309


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Telecommunications Engineering

310

Code

Description

Rationale

TC402

Optical Communications

This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of optical communications. The topics include optical fibers, light propagation in optical fibers, WDM, optical components, optical transmission and its performance, optical switching, all-optical networks, and passive optical networks.

September

UG207

TC403

Teletraffic Engineering

This course provides an overview of basic teletraffic theory for network dimensioning and performance characterization of switching networks, including the Internet. The topics include traffic flows, dimensioning of loss and delay systems, switching systems, traffic measurements, and traffic models.

September

TC301

TC404

Wireless and Mobile Communication

This course covers the practical and theoretical fundamentals of wireless communication. Technical concepts of design, implementation, and invention of wireless communication systems are included. The topics include radio propagation, modulation techniques, equalization, diversity, source and channel coding, and wireless standards.

January

TC201

TC411

Switching and Transmissions in Telecommunications

This course covers telecommunication switching and transmission. The topics include digital transmission, multiplexing techniques, switching systems and networks, time division switching, control of switching, and packet switching.

January/September

TC201

TC412

Microwave Communications

This course introduces the principles and design of microwave communication systems. The topics include fundamentals of microwave systems, microwave components, guided transmission of microwaves, microwave power devices, microwave circuits, microwave amplifiers, microwave receivers, microwave measurements, modem design, radio design, and the future of microwaves.

January/September

UG207

TC413

Satellite Communications

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of satellite communication principles and related technologies. Starting from orbital mechanics related to spacecraft development, the course covers satellite link design, signal processing and access techniques, types of networks, and finally concludes with system performance and reliability.

January/September

TC201

TC414

Information Theory and Coding Techniques

This course covers the basics of information theory and well known channel coding techniques. The topics include entropy, mutual information, channel capacity, the sampling theorem, fundamentals of coding and decoding, error detection and error correction codes, data compression, and reliable communications through unreliable channels.

January/September

TC304

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science and Information Technology Code

Description

Rationale

CS101

Introduction to Computers and Programming

This course develops fundamental computer programming skills in a modern object-oriented programming language.

September

None

CS102

Object Oriented Programming and Web Applications

This course introduces students to object-oriented design and development, with a focus on the Java programming language, design patterns, and Webbased applications.

January

CS101

CS201

Computer Systems Architecture

This course is a practical introduction to computer systems hardware with emphasis both on hardware design methods as well as the programmer’s view of the hardware platform, particularly in optimizing and debugging running programs.

September

CS101,TC101

CS202

Discrete Mathematics

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of topics that fall within the scope of discrete mathematics, as well as applications in computer science and information technology.

September

None

CS203

Operating Systems

This course gives students a strong understanding of the concepts underlying modern multitasking operating systems, including processes, threads, interprocess communication, scheduling, memory management, file systems, input/ output, distributed systems, and security. It covers the most important building blocks needed for the construction of complex, real-world software systems.

January

None

CS204

Data Structures & Algorithms

This course provides an introduction to the data structures used in computer programming and to the design and mathematical analysis of algorithms to solve problems. It emphasizes implementation, with multiple programming assignments.

January

CS101,CS102

CS205

Computer Security

This course provides students with key knowledge about the nature and challenges of computer security, especially the relationship between policy and security, the roles and application of cryptography, the mechanisms used to implement policies, the methodologies and technologies for assurance, vulnerability analysis and intrusion detection, and building secure systems.

January

CS203 (Co-Req)

CS301

Theory of Computation

This course provides students with exposure to the theory of formal languages, automata, and complexity theory.

January

CS202

Semester Offered Prerequisite

311


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science and Information Technology

312

Code

Description

Rationale

CS302

Embedded Systems

This project-oriented course builds skills in the specification, design, implementation, integration, and testing of embedded systems. The topics covered include embedded system hardware, embedded system software, interfacing, communications, control, design technology, and validation. It integrates knowledge from many different areas. Students work in groups to design, implement, and test a small embedded system.

CS303

Logic in Computer Science

CS304

Advanced Algorithms

CS305

Semester Offered Prerequisite September

None

September

None

In this course, students learn the theory and design of algorithms. The course enables students to analyze the complexity of an algorithm using different mathematical tools.

September

CS202, CS204

Programming Languages and Compilers

This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of the concepts that underlie programming languages, illustrating those concepts with examples from various languages. Language design and implementation and the ways in which they interact are explored together. Special emphasis is put on compilation and linking, as well as how data types are implemented in memory.

September

CS301

IT301

Computer Networks

This course provides an understanding of the concepts required for the design of computer networks. It also covers the fundamental principles, elements, and protocols of computer networks. It develops an understanding of various network protocols and their performance tradeoffs.

September

CS203

IT302

Human-Computer Interaction

Human-computer interaction (HCI) has become an area of great interest and concern. This course provides students with an understanding of the concepts of HCI and user interfaces, focusing on user interface design and technologies. Students gain an understanding of principles and acquire skills for designing interactive systems and Web-based applications.

January

None

This course provides an introduction to logicbased methods and their applications in programming and verification. Students develop an understanding of the basics of formal methods, formal languages and their applications in programming and verification.


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science and Information Technology Code

Description

Rationale

IT401

Internet Technology

This course covers fundamental issues in network protocol design and implementation, the principles underlying TCP/IP protocol design, the historical development of the Internet, Internet routing protocols (unicast, multicast, and unidirectional), algorithmic issues related to the Internet, multimedia communication (voice over IP, real-time protocols), measurement and performance, IPv6, quality of service, and applications.

September

IT301

IT402

Database Design

This course provides an understanding of the theory and practice of database design and database applications.

September

None

IT403

Software Architecture Design

Designing, developing, and evolving complex software systems requires a mastery of analytical and technical skills, as well as a knowledge of appropriate processes, architectures and design patterns. In this course, students learn industry best practices through study of architectural design patterns and put the principles to practice by designing and constructing an architectural prototype for a significant real-world software project.

September

None

IT404

Information Systems Development

Information Systems constitute the primary application of computers and related technology in enterprises and public organizations. The course shows how following a well-defined methodology helps to ensure the effective deployment of information technology in organizations. This includes determining and structuring requirements, project planning and execution, implementation, testing, and maintenance. Since information systems development is a process, students work in groups on real-life projects that conclude with the presentation of a prototype system.

January

None

IT405

Web Application Engineering

September

CS102

CS411

Computer Graphics

In this course, students learn to cope with the challenges of Web application development by using appropriate technology and a user-centered approach to the design and construction of large-scale Web applications. This course introduces computer graphics as a practical discipline. The underlying theory of computer graphics, as well as implementations of algorithms, will be presented in the context of a modern industry-standard graphics programming language and interface. Instruction shall be in a laboratory setting with continuous hands-on implementation of concepts and emphasis on the creation of animated and interactive scenes.

September /January

UG201, CS101

Semester Offered Prerequisite

313


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Computer Science and Information Technology

314

Code

Description

Rationale

CS412

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

This course introduces students to the methods for problem solving, reasoning, decision making, and learning in intelligent systems, as well as the logical and probabilistic foundations of these methods.

September /January

None

CS413

Microprocessor Systems

This course gives students insight into the architecture, programming, and interfacing of microprocessors. Concepts of system integration through support chips are also studied.

September /January

None

IT411

Spreadsheet Modeling and Decision Support

This course provides essential spreadsheet modeling concepts and skills needed to build and implement decision support system (DSS) applications to support problem solving and decision making. Students will receive hands-on experience with decision support software tools based on spreadsheets.

September /January

None

IT412

Information Retrieval And Data Mining

Data mining has emerged as an exciting and important discipline with the growth of massive digital data archives. The objective of data mining is to automatically process a data archive to find patterns that represent knowledge or, equivalently, information interesting to the user. This course provides an understanding of the fundamental concepts and applications of data mining and information retrieval.

September /January

None

Semester Offered Prerequisite


Undergraduate Course Descriptions Projects Code

Description

Rationale

UG104

Praxis I

This course is designed to expose students to the concepts and methods of engineering design and to encourage the development of teamwork, leadership, and communication skills via the formulation and execution of independent projects in groups.

September

None

UG108

Praxis II

This course builds on Praxis I by further developing students’ hands-on skills in solving engineering problems and further building teamwork, leadership, and communication skills through the execution of more ambitious independent engineering projects.

January

UG104

UG401

Capstone Project I

This course aims to train students in planning, design, and how to write research proposals and reports. The course enhances students’ writing, communication, and presentation skills. By the end of the course, students will complete a comprehensive research proposal.

September

None

UG403

Capstone Project II

In this course, students are trained to look at problems from different angles and to come up with solutions and explanations in a logical, scientific manner. Students solve a problem in their field using scientific methodology leading to specific conclusions.

January

UG401

Semester Offered Prerequisite

315


316


317


318

AIT Prospectus Course Catalogue 2012-2013  

AIT Prospectus Course Catalogue 2012-2013

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