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LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012

LOCAL IS FOR LOVERS

E-CO OUTLOOK

Lindsay Zodrow brings local artists together.

E-CONNECT

E-MERGING CREATIVE

TREND-E BIZ

Kelsey Humphreys lifts local brands.

EMERGE CREATIVE BUSINESSES

$6.99 US/$7.99 CAN


CONT ENT

4


EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

E-HIGH LI GH TS

LOCAL IS FOR LOVERS | PG 25

KEEPING IT LOCAL | PG 36

Lindsay Zodrow brings local artists together with creative retail.

MIO (Made In Oklahoma) opens up all new opportunities for local business owners.

E-MERGING CREATIVE | PG 30 There’s a new marketing gal in town, and she is doing some heaving brand lifting.

CREATIVE TOOL | PG 40 VELVET MONKEY SALON’S uses more than a electric shaver to make a buzz.

PHOTO L EF T: Ke l s ey H u m p h rey s , t h i s q u a r t e r’s E - m e rg i n g C re a t i v e , h a rd a t w o r k .

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 5


CONT ENT

PHOTO TOP: C h e c k o u t D IY g e n re s a n d i t s h i s to r y o n p g . 2 2.

Q UA RTE RL - E

CONTRIBUTORS | PG 8 EDITOR’S E-VICE | PG 9 Nichole Thompson shares her thoughts on OK biz this quarter,

E-CONNECT | PG 14 Collected Thread’s Lindsay Zodrow gives answers to our reader’s DIY questions.

E-CO OUTLOOK | PG 19 This quarter we focus on tips for this growing retail market.

TREND-E BIZ | PG 22 A look at DIY’s history and its genres.

RESOURCES | PG 46 From books to helpful websites, check out our quarter’s business resources.

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EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

GOOD COFFEE...GOOD CONVERSATION | 1015 N. BROADWAY OKC2012 73102 OCTOBER-DECEMBER | 7


8


EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

E-CO O UTLOOK RETAIL FOCUS: MARKET TIPS FOR FALL 2012

By Nichole Thompson

ployment rates, consumer spending, and retail monopolies in Oklahoma; as well as great tips to survive it!

EMPLOYMENT ocumunum inat,

C R E AT I V E : + 7%

look at the market outlooks in em-

R E TA I L: + 5%

are considering a venture, take a

F OO D & B E V.: + 10 %

Whether you are a retail expert or

Employment

consupi onsulis noc re in vivilne rfecus peris esis loccio int rem verfinc

Edelum andam eticonstrae ina, et praredea nirtiem quonequiu is An

CREAT I V E: + 20%

SPENDING quit, tam et etors C.

RETAI L: + 10%

pori confir li sent.

F O O D & B EV.: + 2%

re misse crecribulto tam nihili, C. Ci

verimpo nsimaionsus, nin se consum abuterum tere estiamd iumuntemure

Consumer Spending

ala norus, Cupplis consuliaeque rem diu stil unteres sicessus.Bis? Ad aucte nonoste llatili eroxima ximoen-

vesilis.Losulatus audees etiaelabem sa noculis, ses cremerti, nonsus eti-

C RE ATIV E: 1

terum ilibut plinato tes atioritilium

RETAIL : 15

STATE RETAIL SERVICES In

F OOD & B EV.: 20

tius? Pat forsus, ens es ex nium.

am im Romnesto tatidesula rem, se, C. Marioca equitem mei publicerum.

State Retail Services*

*Locations per sq. mile.

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 19


1968 |

Genres & T imeline

The W ho l e Ear th C atatl o gue

1970s |

Thi s Ol d Ho use pr e m i e r s.

1979 |

music

DIY hom e im p rov e m e n t & p u n k

publ i she d.

m u sic be c om e s p op u la r

DIY

P i n te r e st l auc n he s .

zines | comics

crafts

design | screenprint

You rself is pu bl ished.

2006 |

Lu pto n’s D.I .Y: Desi gn i t

2011 |

recycle | reuse | reduce

10

games

1999 |

D I Y N e t o w r k c h a nne l l a u nc h e s .

1994 |

HGTV l aun c he s.


EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

TR END - E BI Z THE DIY BUSINESS THEN AND NOW

By Nichole Thompson

The DIY ethic refers to the ethic of self-

Do it yourself (DIY) is building, modifying,

sufficiency

or repairing something without the aid of

without the aid of a paid expert. Literally

experts or professionals. The popular cul-

meaning “do it yourself,” the DIY ethic pro-

ture phrase “do it yourself” had come into

motes the idea that anyone is capable of

common usage (in standard English) by

performing a variety of tasks rather than

the 1950s, in reference to the emergence

relying on paid specialists. The DIY ethic

of a trend of people undertaking home im-

requires that the adherent seeks out the

provement and various other small craft

knowledge required to complete a given

and construction projects as both a cre-

task. The term can refer to a variety of

ative-recreational and cost-saving activity.

disciplines, including home improvement,

through

completing

tasks

first aid or creative works. Subsequently, the term DIY has taken on a broader meaning that covers a wide range

Rather than belittling or showing disdain

of skill sets. DIY is associated with the in-

for those who engage in manual labor or

ternational alternative rock, punk rock, and

skilled crafts, DIY champions the average

indie rock music scenes; indymedia net-

individual seeking such knowledge and ex-

works, pirate radio stations, and the zine

pertise. Central to the ethic is the empow-

community. In this context, DIY is related

erment of individuals and communities, en-

to the Arts and Crafts movement, in that it

couraging the employment of alternative

offers an alternative to modern consumer

approaches when faced with bureaucratic

culture’s emphasis on relying on others

or societal obstacles to achieving their ob-

to satisfy needs. The abbreviation DIY is

jectives.

also widely used in the military as a way to teach commanders (hence how from this YouTube videoclip) or other types of units to take responsibility, so that they’d

DIY champions the average individual

be able to do things themselves just as a

seeking such knowledge & expertise.

preparation for their own future.

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 23


LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

When I opened, there wasn’t another shop that was strictly handmade in OKC.

24

PHOTO TOP: Li n d s a y Zo d ro w s h o w i n g o f f s o m e o f h e r s to re’s h a n d m a d e p o s t- c a rd s .


EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

collected thread

LOCAL IS FOR LOVE RS

By Nichole Thompson

handmade

cards

to

screen

Adam and Lindsay Zodrow’s

printed tees, locals can find

creative business, The Collect-

one of a kind items that they

ed Thread is cute, quirky, and

will cherish. Lindsay and Adam

all about the local scene. From

are all about the loving local.

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 25


LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

PHOTOS TOP, BOT TOM & RIGHT: F ro m h a n d m a d e to y s to c a rd s , C o l l e c t e d Th re a d h a s i t a l l i n t h i s u n i q u e l i t t l e s p a c e.

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EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

Why the name Collected Thread?

My husband, Adam, came up with the name. It was based off the idea of a bird collecting sticks and stuff for a nest. In the same way, we “collect” artists and designers and promote their work in the shop. Why did you decide to own a creative local business? More specifically,

why

did

you

choose a boutique?

I did a boutique instead of a larger store mainly because of the nature of handmade goods. The process to get handmade

items

is

much

more labor intensive that ordering something mass produced. It would be really difficult to stock a larger shop so I thought a boutique was perfect. I have always enjoyed making

things

and

when

I

opened, there wasn’t another shop that was strictly handmade in OKC. How did you come up this wonder fully fit logo for Collected Thread?

My next door neighbor, Dylan Bradway, who owns DNA Galleries with his wife, Amanda, designed it for me. He is an incredible graphic designer and artist. Was the Plaza District your first choice for location?

Yep! It was affordable and the district was so raw. I felt like we could make it what we wanted it to be, instead of having to fit into a mold that already existed. Our space is

I have always loved taking an everyday object and changing how you look at it.

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 27


LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

zoned commercial/ residential so we were able to live

store was a bit of a random

in the back of the shop for the first 2 1/2 years. This

thought. I had started a trav-

madeinspiration from Anthropologies window displays as

eling sale called Housewares

well. I feel like they have set a new bar for retail displays.

with a friend where we would set up once a month at a

What was your process from concept to opening day?

random business in OKC and sell our handmade items as

It was super quick. I took my first retail job the summer

well as other people’s work.

before we opened. I worked there maybe a month or two

The more we did it, the more

and then the shop abruptly closed. I was hoping to get

artists wanted to be a part

some really good retail experience there but it was super

of it. The store concept was

slow so I didn’t get to learn very much. During that time,

birthed out of this idea. It is

I did a ton of research, looking for artists and such. We

funny too because the con-

moved into the shop mid July and opened at the end of

cept of the store is so per-

August. I pretty much figured out everything as I went

fect for me. I love doing it so

along. I am sure having such little experience in retail

much more than I would a

has been a positive and negative thing. I like that i have

coffee shop.

learned things because of my experiences and not because someone told me. But I have messed up a ton as

The customer experience is

well.

in every sense of the word, AWESOME! What were your

After college, was owning your own business your first

thoughts

choice?

planning your business and the

Yes, but I always thought I would open a coffee shop. The

when

relationship

you

it

were

would

have with your customers?

The relationships with my customers is super important to me. I worked at a coffee

shop

in

Stillwater

throughout college called the Third Place where the whole concept was to create a safe place for people to hang out. I loved the community it created. People would come for coffee but also to talk, be known, to be welcomed, and maybe encouraged. My hope was that for my shop as well.

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PHOTO L EF T: A l o o k a t t h e fa l l c l o t h i n g l i n e


EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

I want people to come in the shop and feel comfortable and inspired to make their own stuff( but not copy what is in the shop). I want them to feel encouraged when they leave. I want them to

I want people to come in the shop and feel comfortable and inspired to make their own stuff.

feel welcome and valued. I don’t always do the best job with this but it is my hope.

PHOTOS TOP: Zo d ro w’s m o s t c h e r i s h e d p i e c e i n t h e s to re.

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 29


E-MERGING CRE ATIV E

E - M E RGI N G CREATI VE By Nichole Thompson

Hey there, I’m Kelsey Humphreys, thanks for stopping by! I’m a graphic designer turned

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PHOTO TOP: Ke l s ey H u m p h rey s h a rd a t w o r k o n C h e r r y B e r r y b u s i n e s s .


EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

marketer turned agency own-

journey with any fellow cre-

er. In 2012, I resigned from

atives or entrepreneurs who

an Associate Creative Direc-

are thinking about venturing

tor position I loved to start my

out on their own.

own business, Lever Branding & Marketing. I started a new

My personal motto for years

blog on my site to share my

has been ‘Lift up every per-

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 31


E-MERGING CRE ATIV E

That vision is to become the go-to branding and marketing partner for brands that love what their product or service provides to their customers.

son and project that comes your way.’ It’s

vice enriches the lives of their customers.

concise and meaningful. When I started to

Once I landed on lever, things sort of ex-

brainstorm the business I would soon have,

ploded in my brain. WeLiftBrands.com was

lever came to me because it is basically just

available. I have ideas for a new biz initiative

an extension of my personal motto. Lever

using “Does your business need a lift?” etc

exists to lift brands to the next level. To pas-

etc. The fulcrum of the lever made for an ob-

sionately assist business owners who are

vious solution to a super cool business card.

passionate about how their product or ser-

The concept has legs that I can use forever,

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PHOTOS TOP & RIGHT: A l o o k a t H u m p h rey s’ w o r k s p a c e.


EMERGE | LOCAL IS FOR LOV ERS

when naming blog posts, when coming up with

driving goal to be enriching

visuals for marketing materials, etc. Something

the lives of families. It’s not

to think about for you because it’s a lot easier

totally far fetched, but re-

to create an awesome website - and even com-

ally only makes sense if all

pany culture - around a concept rather than a

of Lever’s clients had prod-

last name or a bland name describing what you

ucts and services geared

do.

towards families.

Beyond the name, your brand needs a backbone that is personal and meaningful to you the own-

weliftbrands.com

er, and all of your employees. If your name is lacking then hone in on your mission statement. (Or call me so we can rename you and rebrand you!) No one really wants to work with - or buy from! - someone whose only goal is to make money. Now don’t misread that. I want to make money. I want to work with clients that want to make money. But there has to be a bigger goal. A goal that drives beyond profitability. It needs to make sense for who you are. If you make products for children your big goal should - duh - be about helping children or maybe parents/ teachers. It wouldn’t make sense for Lever’s OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2012 | 33


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