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2016/2017 Member Directory


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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Member Directory The Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce 2016/2017

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Publisher: The Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce ul. Bielańska 12, Senator Building, 00-085 Warsaw, Poland Editor: Elro van den Burg, Anna Kozińska, Ilona Wiśniewska Graphic Design: Studio Szkarada * jacek@szkarada.com Catalogue: Ilona Wiśniewska Proofreading: Simon Clare: smnclare@gmail.com

All information in this catalogue has been verified. However, the NPCC is not liable for any changes that might have occurred recently. © Copyright: The Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Table of Contents

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A Word from the Ambassador

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A Word from the Chairman

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About the NPCC

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Board Members

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Committee Members Wielkopolska and Łódź

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Staff

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About the Embassy

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About the NPCH

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About the Polish Chamber of Commerce in the Netherlands

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Keynote article: Stability in uncertain times

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Company Directory

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Indexes

289

Index – in alphabetical order

290

Index – by sector

296

Index – by province

302

Notes

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


A Word from the Ambassador Trade between the Netherlands and Poland is flourishing like never before. Since Poland’s accession to the EU, we have seen our mutual trade figures more than triple in ten years and the level of trade currently amounts to around 10 billion euros. Also, in the first half of 2016, exports to Poland grew by 3.7% compared with the same period last year. This shows a trend which is expected to continue and, based on such foundations, it pleases me to see that trade relations between our two countries are as strong as ever. Even in today’s globalised society, where the sharing of information can happen at the click of a button, it can still prove to be difficult to navigate the business landscape. Consequently, with trade between the Netherlands and Poland being of such considerable proportions, it is important to facilitate connections between Dutch and Polish companies as much as possible. With this in mind, I very much welcome the initiative of the Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce in publishing this Members Directory. By providing an overview of the rich variety of members of the Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce, many of them being Dutch companies and Dutch entrepreneurs, this directory contributes to the visibility of Dutch – Polish economic cooperation and opportunities. It gives me great satisfaction when I see the diversity of companies and entrepreneurs. The Netherlands is known for its innovation and creative solutions, something which is clearly reflected in the membership of the Chamber. Poland offers great opportunities for business and cooperation. Of all the countries that entered the EU in the last ten years, it is clear that interest in trade with Poland is extremely strong for Dutch businesses. I can assure you that the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands remains fully committed to supporting Dutch entrepreneurs and businesses in their work in Poland and strives to enlarge this group. We would also like to support the further strengthening of the Polish business climate. In this process, we have been working, and continue to work, closely with our valued partner, the Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce. I wish the Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce success in all its many activities. Ron J.P.M. van Dartel Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


A Word from the Chairman

Dear Members and Friends of the NPCC, We are delighted to present the second edition of our Members Directory. Since the first edition, the membership of the NPCC has grown significantly and this directory now provides you with information about 197 companies. Membership of the NPCC helps you to grow your business through expanding your network. The NPCC offers monthly business drinks in Warsaw, regular get-togethers in Poznań and Łódź as well as other cities in Poland, educational meetings with experts in various fields, meetings with members of other chambers, and an annual black-tie charity event with Indonesian food - the Rijsttafel. Furthermore, the NPCC also provides various ways in which you can reach out to other members and beyond, such as this booklet, our quarterly magazine ‘Bulletin’, our website (nlchamber.com.pl), and our presence on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. The NPCC office led by Elro van den Burg provides hands-on support to new and existing businesses in Poland through matchmaking and by putting you on the right track for problem-solving. Please enjoy this guide and use it to your company’s advantage.

Remco van der Kroft Chairman of the Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


About the NPCC

The number one goal of the Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce is to help businesses of all sizes to grow and prosper, and can be summarised in the following mission statement: • Promotion of the economic and business relations between companies from the Republic of Poland and the Kingdom of the Netherlands; • Protection and representation of the interests of its members related to their business operations. The NPCC offers its members a broad platform to do business in Poland. On average, we (co-) organise 60 events annually. These are: •

Educational events: seminars or meetings with government officials and top experts in fields of interests for those doing business in Poland.

Networking events: events that bring together a large number of members for networking purposes.

Kick-starting new entrants: Commercial activities to kick-start the business of new companies in Poland, such as matchmaking sessions.

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


About the NPCC Advocacy Representing around 240 companies, we are the voice of our membership in the international business community in Poland and we act as an advocate and leader for their business interests. We work directly or together with our partners to play an active role in the event of any important legislation or political activity that may help or hinder local businesses in order to protect our members’ interests. Our most important partners are the Netherlands Embassy in Poland, the Group of International Chambers of Commerce (IGCC), the Netherlands Polish Council for Trade Development (NPCH) and the Polish Chamber of Commerce in the Netherlands (PCCNL).

In March 2016 the Netherlands Embassy together with the NPCC board and some of its larger members, such as Raben Group, Philips, Grupa Żywiec and ING Bank Śląski, were invited by the Deputy Prime Minister Morawiecki. During the meeting the NPCC discussed heavily debated proposals for retail and banking tax laws.

Referrals The Chamber office receives many enquiries every month from people looking for recommendations on the provision of goods and services. That is the kind of credibility we have after almost 20 years of operations in Poland. Membership assures you of a recommendation over any non-member company – every time. That is a legitimate edge over the competition!

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Board Members Remco van der Kroft Chairman

Elro van den Burg Board Member, Managing Director

Maurice Idsardi Treasurer

Paweł P. Mlicki Board Member

Guusje Korthals-Altes Board Member

Stefan van Herpen Board Member

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Board Members Jarek Skowroński Board Member

Tomasz Wielgus Board Member and chairperson committee Wielkopolska

Jasja van der Veen Board Member and chairperson committee Łódź

Marcin Klammer Board Member

Marc Goudemont Board Member

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Committee Members Wielkopolska and Lodz

Tomasz Wielgus Board Member and chairperson committee Wielkopolska

Rob Colenbrander Member committee Wielkopolska

Jasja van der Veen Board Member and chairperson committee Łódź

Sławomir Karasiński Member committee Łódź

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Staff

Elro van den Burg Board Member, Managing Director

Anna Kozińska Operations Manager

Karolina Brudek-Slegers Manager

Ilona Wiśniewska Project Manager

Contact details The Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce Bielańska St. 12, Senator Building, 00-085 Warsaw tel.: +48 22 279 46 67, e-mail: office@nlchamber.com.pl, www.nlchamber.com.pl

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


About the Embassy

Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands The Economic Section of the Netherlands Embassy in Warsaw supports Dutch entrepreneurs in doing business in Poland. • We provide general information on doing business in Poland, sector information and answers to specific trade questions. • The Embassy concentrates on the so-called Top Sectors - Water, Logistics, AgriFood and Life Sciences - by monitoring trends and facilitating contact between different stakeholders. • As well as concentrating on the Top Sectors, the Embassy focuses on cross-sectoral approaches to find solutions in the fields of the circular economy, design of urban space, resilient cities and climate change. • A Business Partner Scan can be carried out on request. The trade advisers of the Economic Section will analyse and assess which distributors could be of interest to you for potential cooperation. Are you eager to know more about our other responsibilities and what we could do for you? Visit our website www.nlembassy.pl for additional information.

Contact details

Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands

Economic Section

ul. Kawalerii 10

00-468 Warsaw

+48 22 559 12 39

war-ea@minbuza.nl

www.nlembassy.pl

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www.facebook.com/nlembassypl

Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


About the NPCH

Netherlands Polish Council for Trade Promotion (NPCH) The NPCH was founded by and for companies which are active, or have plans to become active, in Poland. Membership of the NPCH offers its members direct access to this network. The NPCH organises networking meetings, seminars and trade missions and it offers entrepreneurs the opportunity to collect relevant information, exchange experiences and build up their network. Since September 2016, the NPCH has been directly linked to VNO/NCW-MKB-Nederland, the largest employers’ association in the Netherlands. Membership of the NPCH is interesting both for companies which already have extensive experience of doing business in Poland as well as for companies which are still discovering the possibilities of the Polish market. The membership fee is €530 per year. NPCH Board Members Mr. B. van de Vrie Mr. F. van Gool Mrs. K. Figel Mr. P. Verheij Mr. J.W. Drijver Mr C. Werff Ms. H. Poppens Mr. T. Waźbiński Ms. M.C.J. van der Wilk

Mondriaan Management & Consultancy (Chairman) Otto Workforce (Vice-Chairman) Figel Law *European Company Lawyers* ING Bank Pit.Point.LNG InterEurope AG Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands Embassy of the Republic of Poland to The Hague VNO-NCW Netherlands

More information? If your company is interested in becoming a member of the NPCH or wishes to compete for the Dutch Polish Business Award, please contact: Ms. Marieke van der Wilk International Project Manager VNO-NCW P.O. Box 93002 2509 AA The Hague tel.: +31 (0)70 349 02 57 wilk@vnoncw-mkb.nl www.vno-ncw.nl

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


About the Polish Chamber of Commerce in the Netherlands

Polish Chamber of Commerce in the Netherlands www.pccnl.nl

The Polish Chamber of Commerce in the Netherlands is an independent, autonomous organisation with a membership of companies engaging in business operations specific to the Polish and Dutch markets in terms of commercial interest. Our goal is to provide active assistance in the development of the business operations of our member companies, and we offer related services to all entrepreneurs interested in engaging in broadlyunderstood business operations in either - or both - of the two countries. We wish to provide our member companies with opportunities to establish new business contacts, attend training courses and seminars, and access market analyses and current economic information. We offer assistance to importers and exporters from both Poland and the Netherlands. We aspire to become a lobbying platform for Polish business people, and to act as a venue to bring together ambitious Polish projects in the Netherlands. We wish to promote Polish business and Polish brands in the Netherlands, altering their image and displaying the best of all Polish ideas and concepts. We want to raise the awareness of Poland’s economic potential, and develop Polish-Dutch business co-operation. We want to be part of your success! NPCH Board Management Board Marcin Lewandowski Joanna Schuhholz Jarosław Solowski Radosław Prończuk Elżbieta Lewandowska

President Executive Director

Polish Chamber of Commerce in the Netherlands Herengracht 582, 1017CJ Amsterdam, Tel. +31 (0) 20 227 00 08, info@pccnl.nl, www.pccnl.nl

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Keynote Article

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017


Keynote Article

Stability in uncertain Times Mateusz Walewski, Senior Economist, PwC Poland

such as demographic shifts, the digital transformation and other what lies ahead for Poland? And how will decision makers respond, in order to maintain Poland good standing with foreign investors?

The country appears to have established its position as an important player in the region. Forming a link between the Western EU countries and Eastern partners, such as Russia. Poland is also one of the leading trade, commerce and investment hubs in the CEE (Central and Eastern Europe) region – certainly being the largest economy.

The current situation Poland has been enjoying at least a decade of solid economic growth, developing faster – in terms of GDP increase – than the original EU countries. On average the difference was 2% in Poland’s favour, which allowed us to converge to EU standards. Even in times of the

However, with a more and more unstable macroenvironment, political changes and megatrends – Figure 1

Poland’s GDP growth rate 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 1990

1995

2000

2005 Poland

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017

2010 Old europe

2015

2020


Keynote Article economic downturn, while most European countries struggled with recession, Poland maintained close to 2% GDP growth (See Figure 1) This positions Poland as a stable and attractive market. Cumulated growth has reached 40% between 2005 and 2015, one of only 3 countries to achieve this. But will this trend last longer? What shapes the future? We can observe forces and trends affecting Poland’s economic situation both in a positive and negative way. As can be observed on fig. 2 above the growth fundamentals – attractive labour cost, a flexible

economy, a very limited indebtedness – especially in relation to other European countries – and access to EU Funds outweigh, in our opinion, potential negative factors. Attractive labour costs and the flexibility of our economy, its capability to adapt have been widely discussed, so we will not focus on these subjects. An interesting aspect for foreign investors, especially while taking into consideration long-term investment plans by foreign investors, concerns the level of debt. In Poland the ratio of public debt to the GDP is approximately 51%, while in older European countries – especially the Western economies – the ratio sometimes exceed 120%. This is visualized in fig. 3 below. The low level of debt is a key differentiator between Poland and the rest of our region. Lower

Figure 2

Balance chart Worries Growth fundamentals • Attractive labour costs • Flexible economy • Limited indebtedness • EU Funds

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017

•P  olitical situation (both on EU and local level) •P  robably less positive financial fundamentals •R  ating uncertainty • Short-term fluctuations


Keynote Article Poland and Majority of CEE are much less indebted

Public debt as % of GDP

Over 120%

100-120% 80-100% 40-60%

Below 40%

60% EU threshold

60-80%

Figure 3

debt means greater stability, especially in the long run. Exchange rates tend to be less prone to sudden changes and therefore investment in Polish assets and/or securities is less risky. Poland’s investment attractiveness is increased by the various forms of subsidies and tax incentives available to investors. As the biggest beneficiary of the EU cohesion policy, the country will receive over 82 billion EUR in 2014-2020. The funds will be distributed centrally as well as through 16 regional programs on voivodship level. A bulk of those funds will be aimed at entrepreneur support. The core types of projects eligible for funding will be R&D and the creation of R&D centers, commercialization of innovations stemming from R&D

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017

projects and the investment in the development of SME. Call for entries are already on their way, and are very popular with entrepreneurs. Apart from these incentives there are 14 special economic zones (SEZ) in Poland providing tax exemptions for new investments. SEZ offer land which the investor can purchase, while larger projects can also extend to private land chosen by the investor. The level of exemption varies, depending on the level of qualified costs – but can amount up to 70%. Companies can also apply for property tax exemptions, which are granted by the local municipality. The various forms of financial support are cumulative and their total cannot exceed certain thresholds.


Keynote Article Changes in forecasts in EU GDP growth according to the IMF 2,4% 2,3%

2,4% 2,3%

Changes in forecasts in Polish GDP growth according to the IMF 3,8%

3,8%

3,7%

3,7%

3,6%

3,6%

3,5%

3,5%

2,2%

2,2%

2,1%

2,1%

3,4%

3,4%

2,0%

3,3%

3,3%

3,2%

3,2%

3,1%

3,1%

2,0% 1,9%

1,9%

1,8%

1,8%

3,0%

3,0%

1,7%

1,7%

2,9%

2,9%

2,8%

2,8%

2,7%

2,7%

2,6%

2,6%

1,6%

1,6%

1,5%

1,5%

1,4%

1,4% 2014

2014 2015

2015 2016

2016 2017

2017 2018

2018 2019

2019 2020

2020 2021

2,5% 2021

X2015 X2015 IV2016 IV2016 X2016 X2016

2,5% 2014

2014 2015

2015 2016

2016 2017

2017 2018

2018 2019

2019 2020

2020 2021

2021

X2015 X2015 IV2016 IV2016 X 2016 X 2016

Figure 4

It is worth mentioning, that Poland offers government grants. In case of major investments (at least 500 million PLN and creating 500 new jobs or 750 million PLN and creating 200 jobs) as well as investment carried out in priority sectors (automotive, home appliances and electronics, aviation, biotechnology, agriculture and food processing) the investor can receive non-repayable financial aid for each job created and between 2 and 12,5 percent of the investment qualified costs. The final level of support depends on the assessment of the project’s specific parameters. Having said that – and we want to emphasize that the above mentioned strengths of the Polish economy outweigh the negative forces, there are indeed worrying signal which need to be considered.

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017

Firstly, the IMF has recently released amended forecasts, indicating a deterioration in the predicted growth of our national income, as can be seen in fig. 4. The main influencers of declining growth are, as said: • Political changes, which cause uncertainty among foreign investors • Strong correlation between Polish and German economy • Short-term fluctuations There are two key pieces of information regarding the new government (Law and Justice party won the 2015 general elections and formed the first single-party


Keynote Article 5 pillars of the economic development of Poland Strong Polish economy 1

2 Reindustrialization Partnership for the strategic branches of the economy National Intelligent Specializations Clusters and industrial valleys

3 Development of innovative companies New “Business Constitution” Friendly legal environment Review of research institutes Start in Poland

4 Capital for development Growing savings European funds Polish Development Fund

5 Foreign expansion

Social and regional development

Export Support Division at PDF

Comprehensive demografic programme

Financial offer Strong Polish brand

Juncker’s plan, EBOR, EBI, AIIB

Review of business diplomacy

Pact for rural areas Effective regional policy Education

Foreign investments

Efficient state • e-Administration • Intelligent public procurement

• End of “departmental Poland” • Energy - security, availability, price

Figure 5

majority government since 1989) foreign investors need to consider. 1. The first steps of new government concentrate in the short run on „quick winners” in social , fiscal and industrial policy area 2. The core long-term strategy of the government is incorporated in the so-called “Morawiecki Plan”, put forth by Minister of Development Mateusz Morawiecki. The major propositions in the social policy focus on increased spending and equal distribution of wealth. The flagship program is “Family 500+”, which guarantees a monthly subsidy of 500 PLN (approx. 125 EUR) for every second and next child. Additionally the

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017

ruling party proposes an increase in minimum wages and support for SMEs: reduced CIT, favorable public procurement, export promotion, construction of cheap residential buildings for young urbanites, reduction of retirement age. These are the short term goals, but they require substantial funding. In the short run the government plans to finance the increased spending by additional budget incomes resulting from reduction of the shadow activities - in particular by the reduction of the scale of criminal activities related to VAT and excise frauds. The government seems to be successful in these polices, as the VAT gap in 2016 is expected to be reduced by around 0,3% of GDP (around 4 billion zloty), similar tendencies are observed for excise incomes.


Keynote Article In the longer perspective the rapid development of the country and increased state income are expected to balance out the above mentioned funding. The plan is based on the following diagnosis of the current state of matters:

• New investment agency has been established, both to attract foreign investors and support domestic export

• insufficient development of locally owned innovation and expansion capabilities • inequality among the society and asymmetric distribution of benefits from the economic transformation • illusion of the Polish wealth observing just GDP statistics. • a double challenge of demographics and underdevelopment of rural regions of Poland • the most neglected region is the eastern part of the country which require heavy investments.

We have established, that the macroeconomic fundamentals of the Polish investment environment are solid, and that the reforms proposed by the government are all in all favorable for foreign investors. At the same time, the ambitious social policy proposed by the new government will require funding. In the short term this funding is intended to be obtained by tightening the fiscal system.

The Morawiecki Plan proposes 5 pillars for development as illustrated in fig 5 below. What does this mean for investors: The plan is set out until the year 2040, and its implementation offers a set of opportunities. The most important are: • Execution of investment measures announced in the Morawiecki’s Plan • Red tape cuts in procedures of particular importance for business • Introduction of e-administration tools • Continued development of the road and rail infrastructure in the EU financial framework 2014-2020

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Tax implications of the change

One of the major issues in the tax system in Poland is the so called VAT Gap, which is essentially a way to measure how much output VAT is not paid to the state treasury. According to PwC calculations the gap amounted to 3% of the GDP in 2015, an increase from 2.4% in 2014. If we were to take the situation from 2007, when the gap was estimated to be 0.6% of the GDP, the state budget would have approx. 42 billion PLN more. In comparison with the European Union the gap – which is a result of mistakes, but mostly fraud – is one of the highest. Research by the European Commission “Study to quantify and analyze the VAT Gap in the EU Member States – 2015” indicates that the level of the Polish VAT gap is above the European average. In nominal terms the gap will amount to 53 billion PLN. In order to reduce the VAT gap the Ministry of Finance has introduced several major initiatives aimed at


Keynote Article tackling the scale of tax fraud. The MF has introduced new legislation, such as the reverse charge for new goods or the work around split payment. There have also been actions taken to raise public awareness regarding tackling VAT fraud. But first and foremost, the tax administration has become more specialized and tax controls are much more effective than in the past. We see the trend reversing and the gap will decline in the coming years, but still there is a lot to be done in order to obtain needed funds. A major revolution, and another way to make the tax system more transparent and easier for the tax administration to monitor the correctness of declared tax burdens is the Standard Audit File for Tax (SAF-T). The goal of introducing SAF-T is to improve and deepen the process of tax and treasury audit and to identify main areas of non-compliance in tax reporting. SAF-T brought significant benefits to the tax authorities in countries in which this solution has been already implemented. The biggest benefits were observed in such areas as: • reduction of costs and duration of audit (ability to conduct audit remotely); • abnormalities specified on the whole sample – increased effectiveness; • ability to conduct audit of few taxes at once (eg. CITVAT comparison). The idea of SAF-T works worldwide in two models – on demand and as compulsory, periodic data handling to the tax authorities. Technologically SAF-T is based on a file in .xml form (according to OECD SAF-T 2.0 standard).

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Reporting will concern taxpayer’s tax books. The term „tax books” shall mean: accounting books, revenue and expense ledger, records and registers which must be kept by taxpayers on the legal basis for the tax purposes. As of July 2016 monthly VAT reporting is required in this format for large enterprises, and for SMEs from January 1st 2017. Summary In times of increasing political and economic uncertainty investors will need to pay even more attention to facts and data and analyze their planned investments based on thorough analysis. The factors to consider should primarily focus on those, which affect the investment in the long-term. In this respect the Polish economy offers many positive characteristics, such as low cost of labour and very limited indebtedness, as compared to other economies in the region. Until 2020 Poland will be one of – if not the largest – beneficiaries of EU Funds, accessible to foreign investors as well. Short term fluctuations are of course important and should not be omitted, but their weight in the overall decision process should be relatively limited. The government has proposed a plan reaching up until 2040, which offers many opportunities to investors, especially in areas such as technology, but also infrastructure, construction, engineering etc. Investors also need to look at, on the one hand, tax relief opportunities, such as SEZ, and on the other monitor changing legislation in order to remain compliant with tax regulations.


Company Directory

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Company Directory NPCC 2016/2017

Members directory booklet 2016/2017  

Members Directory of the Netherlands-Polish Chamber of Commerce is a booklet – catalog of all our Members with the description of a company...

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