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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE

WELCOME LETTER

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WELCOME LETTER


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SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES CARL ANDERSON is one of the leading experts on teaching writing to students in grades K-12 in the United States. Mr Anderson was an elementary and then a middle school teacher, and taught students of diverse backgrounds in city, rural, and suburban schools in New York City, Bardstown (KY) and Northbrook (IL). In 1994, he joined the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University, which was founded and is directed by Lucy Calkins. As a Project staff developer for eight years, Mr Anderson worked side-by-side with teachers in elementary and middle school classrooms in New York City and surrounding suburbs, demonstrating how to have writing conferences, as well as coaching teachers as they conferred with students. Mr Anderson is the author of two Heinemann books, How’s It Going? A Practical Guide to Conferring With Student Writers (2000) and Assessing Writers (2005), as well as a new book series with Heinemann firsthand, Strategic Writing Conferenes Grades 3-6 (2009). Today, he works as a consultant in schools across the US, where he concentrates on helping teachers learn to have effective writing conferences that change students’ lives as writers. You may see Mr Anderson confer with a student on his Heinemann website: www.strategicwritingconferences.com. ERMA ANDERSON is a former high school physics and mathematics teacher and Albert Einstein Distinguished Fellow in the United States Senate. She was a Senior Program Officer with the National Research Council assisting in the development of the National Science Education Standards and a Christa McAuliffe Fellow with the National Foundation for the Improvement of Education. She has worked with the National Science Teachers Association on several projects including the Mentoring Initiative e-Mentoring for Student Success (eMSS), development of sciLINKS (www.sciLINKS.org) and Project Manager of Scope, Sequence and Coordination of Secondary School Science. She was a consultant and advisor to the Council for Basic Education’s Schools Around the World (www.sa-w.org) project, developing and implementing the Evidence to Excellence protocol and a series of professional development activities that use student work from nine participating countries to enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics and science. She has facilitated work-

shops for Educational Field Studies, National Institute of Medicine, United States Forestry Service, National Park Service, Kidsnet, school districts, and states. Currently she is a science/mathematics consultant with the Office of Overseas Schools AERO Project and the US High School Redesign Project. <ermaander@gmail.com>

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As Vice President for Leadership Education and Diversity, GENE BATISTE serves on the senior leadership team of the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS). He is responsible for providing leadership in the creation and implementation of products and services that support and expand NAIS’s commitment to developing independent school leaders and to developing and sustaining inclusive independent school communities. Mr Batiste holds a BS degree in the social sciences from Wiley College and a MEd degree in urban education and public school administration from North Texas State University. He is a currently in the Mid Career Doctorate in Educational Leadership Program at the University of Pennsylvania. Mr Batiste came to NAIS in 2000 after serving as Assistant Head of School and Upper School Director at Crossroads School (MO). As the first African American appointed to the faculty of St. Mark’s School of Texas, Mr Batiste also directed the school’s diversity efforts as Director of Intercultural Affairs from 1990-1999. From 1985-1990 he was the Chair of the Department of Social Sciences at Hillcrest High School in Dallas, where he also directed the school’s Pupil Assistance Support System (PASS) for students returning to school following inpatient or outpatient drug and alcohol abuse treatment. In 1990 Mr Batiste received the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Dallas Independent School District. For seven summers he served as Headmaster of the Youth Opportunities Unlimited (Y.O.U.) program at the University of North Texas—a dropout prevention program for at-risk youth. For 19 years Mr Batiste was a principal artist and chorister with The Dallas Opera while serving on the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee of the Board for ten years. He was recently appointed to the board of trustees for the School for Ethics and Global Leadership (SEGL), a semester program for upper school juniors located in Washington, D.C. <batiste@nais.org>

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JOVELYN A. CASTRO (Jovy) works with Women’s Education for Advancement and Empowerment (WEAVE) as

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE the Women’s Capacity Development Coordinator cum Field Coordinator in Mae Sod, Tak, Thailand. Ms Castro has a wide array of working experiences in various sectors such as non-government organizations, multi-national companies, government organizatiosn and academic institutions. She has extensive background in marketing and was involved in student recruitment during her six-years working for an academic institution. Ms Castro’s stint at WEAVE gave her a profound understanding of the situation of the vulnerable women and children along the ThaiBurma border. This gave her the impetus to use her business & management skills and knowledge to capacitate the women through the provision of appropriate trainings among WEAVE’s partner organizations. She holds the degrees of Doctor in Management (DM) and Master in Business Administration (MBA). <jovy@weave-women.org> JOHN G. GABRIEL is the author of the best-selling book, How to Thrive as a Teacher Leader (ASCD; 2005) as well as the co-author of the recently released, How to Help Your School Thrive (ASCD; 2009). His other publications include, What It Takes to Make a Teacher Leader (EQ; 2005) and Top 12 Classroom Management Dos and Don’ts (Teachhub.com; 2008). He received his bachelor’s degree from Mary Washington College, graduating with honors in English and Education; his Master’s degree in Educational Leadership is from George Mason University. A dynamic leader, Mr Gabriel has demonstrated improvement in standardized test scores while working as a department chair and as an assistant principal. A nationally known speaker and presenter, Mr Gabriel has presented workshops at national conferences and conducted retreats and workshops for school districts as well. He currently works as an assistant principal at Park View High School in Loudoun County, Virginia. <John.Gabriel@Loudoun.k12.va.us> SUSAN GRANT holds a PhD in Neuroscience, having trained in an MD/PhD program at the University of Maryland. She specializes and has done research in neurolinguistics, the study of the relationship between brain and language development. She also holds a Master of Science and Maryland license in Speech and Language Pathology. Dr Grant has been in private clinical practice for more than

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25 years, diagnosing and developing treatment plans for children with speech-language, reading and learning disabilities. She was the founding board member and board president of a middle and high school, college preparatory program for students with learning disabilities. Dr Grant lectures and has presented many workshops nationally and internationally on the applicability of brain research to good teaching practice, language and reading acquisition, and learning disabilities. She is a member of the Advisory Committee on Exceptional Children and Youth for the State Department Office of Overseas Schools. <drsrgrant@aol.com>

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THOMAS R. GUSKEY is Distinguished Service Professor, Educational Measurement and Evaluation at Georgetown College in Kentucky and is widely known for his research in education reform, assessment, grading practices, and mastery learning. A graduate of the University of Chicago, he has taught at all levels, served as an administrator in Chicago Public Schools, and was the first Director of the Center for the Improvement of Teaching and Learning, a national educational research center. His books have won numerous awards, and his articles have appeared in prominent research journals as well as Educational Leadership, Kappan, and School Administrator. He served on the Policy Research Team of the National Commission on Teaching & America’s Future, on the Task Force to develop the National Standards for Staff Development, and recently was honored by NSDC with the «Best Staff Development Evaluation for 2008» award for his work with high school teachers to develop strategies for teaching reading skills in content classes. He co-edits the Experts in Assessment Series for Corwin Press and was featured on the National Public Radio program, “Talk of the Nation.” Most recently, he edited the book, Practical Solutions for Serious Problems in Standards-Based Grading (Corwin Press). <guskey@uky.edu> CLAY HENSLEY is the Associate Director for International Services at the College Board. His primary responsibility is to support schools outside the U.S. that use College Board programs, such as SAT, AP and PSAT/NMSQT. He also actively promotes the recognition of AP at universities worldwide. Prior to joining the College Board nine years ago, Mr Hensley taught English literature and studio art at Serramonte del Rey High School in Daly City,

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE CA. He has also taught at the university-level. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN, and a Masters of Fine Art in painting from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. In his spare time, Mr Hensley is an exhibiting artist based in New York City. <CHensley@collegeboard.org> HEIDI HAYES JACOBS, president of Curriculum Designers, Inc, has served as an education consultant to thousands of schools and districts nationally and internationally on curriculum reform, assessment analysis and strategic planning. Her books, Interdisciplinary Curriculum: Design and Implementation, and Mapping the Big Picture: Integrating Curriculum and Assessment K-12 (both ASCD), have been bestsellers. More recently, she authored, Getting Results with Curriculum Mapping (ASCD, 2004). Dr Jacobs’ newest book, Active Literacy K-12: Cross-disciplinary Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening in Every Classroom, was released in April 2006 by Eye-on-Education, Inc. She has served as an adjunct associate professor at the Department of Curriculum and Teaching at Teachers College, Columbia University, NYC, since 1981. She has worked with the College Board, NBC Sunday Today Show, PBS Teacherline, the Discovery Channel, Children’s Television Workshop, CBS National Sunrise Semester, ASCD, The Kennedy Center, Carnegie Hall, New York City Ballet Education Department at Lincoln Center, Peace Corps, the National School Conference Institute, the Disney Company, Prentice-Hall Publishing, NESA, EARCOS, Tri-Association, IB, ECIS and state education departments. She has been interviewed and featured in the New York Times and Educational Leadership, among other publications and radio shows. Dr Jacobs has published curriculum materials with Prentice Hall, Milton-Bradley, the Electric Company, and Bowmar Publishing. ASCD has two video series developed focusing on Dr Jacobs’ curriculum models. In addition, Video Journal of Education features a series on her work, including the Aurora Awards platinum awardwinning, Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Across the Curriculum video series. <curricdes@aol.com> CATHRYN BERGER KAYE, MA, a former classroom teacher, is president of CBK Associates--International Education Consultants. Ms Kaye is the author of The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action, Second Edition (Free Spirit Publishing, 2010) and a new interactive workbook series, Service Learning for Kids: How to Take Action. In addition

to being a leader in service learning across the globe, Ms Kaye is known for on-site program development and highly engaging workshops and keynote addresses that inspire and promote civic participation and high level academic achievement. She has extensive experience working in K-12 settings, and with university faculty and youth serving organizations -- both in the United States and abroad. Ms Kaye addresses civic responsibility, student leadership, literacy, respectful safe school communities, and effective teaching strategies. Her next book is Going Blue: A Kid’s Guide to Protecting Our Oceans and Waterways, authored with Philippe Cousteau of EarthEcho International (August 2010). Ms Kaye travels more than 100 days per year providing her expertise. She lives in Los Angeles, California. <cbkaye@aol.com>, www.abcdbooks.org

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PINCIRI KIWIROTKUL (Cynthia) serves as one of the Field Staff members for the Income Generation Project in Product Development for WEAVE. Ms Kiwirotkul has over ten years of experience working with displaced women and men from Burma. She worked with several NGO’s including Medecins Sans Frontiers (Doctors Without Borders) specializing in sanitation projects at refugee camps located around the Thai/Burma Border as well as with Borderline focusing on their income generation programs. She is a graduate of Noe Bu Academy School in Thailand. <cynthia_weavems@yahoo.com>, www.weave-women.org MARC LEVINSON joined the National Business Officers Association (NBOA) as Associate Director in 2007 after six years as Business Manager at Alexander Dawson School in Lafayette, Colorado. Prior to entering the independent school world, Mr Levinson spent three years as Director of Operations and Finance at Sounds True, a Spoken Word Audio Publishing company and three years in a similar position at Community Food Share, Boulder County’s Food Bank. Much of his career has been in the food service industry, owning and operating a number of successful restaurants in Boulder and Denver, Colorado, as well as providing executive direction for a natural foods grocery store. Mr Levinson currently is a member of the Board of Trustees of Watershed School and the Chair of its Finance Committee, and a member of the Board Facilities Committee of Alexander Dawson School. He holds a

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE bachelor’s degree in Political Science and an MBA (Organizational Development) from the University of Colorado at Boulder. <marc@nboa.net>, www.nboa.net CAROLYN McKANDERS, MA, MSW, is an independent educational consultant specializing in individual, group and organizational development. She is Co-Director of the Center for Adaptive Schools, an organization whose mission is to help schools develop and sustain professional collaborative cultures by developing technical and social resources to realize continuing student improvement. Ms McKanders’ passion is promoting quality human relationships through communication, collaboration, and leadership skills development. She has 28 years of experience in Detroit Public Schools as a teacher, counselor and staff development specialist. Her expertise includes providing polarity management training that helps organizations identify and manage competing tensions inherent in social systems. <cmckanders@aol.com> JOHN MOORE, Senior Partner at Rubicon International, has led numerous technology initiatives in Taiwan, China, Japan, Thailand, Western Europe and other parts of the world on a wide variety of topics, including curriculum design and mapping, research-based teachinglearning strategies, and effective educational leadership. Mr Moore has contributed his expertise to K–12 schools across the nation and internationally to build a solid understanding of curriculum management best practices and to improve teaching and learning through effective curriculum processes. Mr Moore has presented at national and international workshops and conferences on organizational strategies for curriculum renewal and has taught for six years at the university level. Mr Moore has a Bachelors of Science degree from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and completed a Masters of Arts degree at the University of Michigan. Rubicon is an educational technology services firm known for its leadership in the field of curriculum management. The firm partners with public and private schools throughout the world to plan and implement Web-based curriculum mapping using Atlas, the curriculum management program developed by Rubicon. Seamless integration with Akili, the firm’s standards-based assessment and report card capability, provides a curriculum management system based on worldwide best practices. <jmoore@rubicon.com>

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ALAN NOVEMBER is an international leader in education technology. He has helped schools, governments and industry leaders improve the quality of education through technology. His areas of expertise include planning across curriculum, staff development, new school design, community building and leadership development. He has delivered keynotes and workshops in all fifty states, across Canada, and throughout the UK, Europe, Asia and Central America. Mr November was named one of the nation’s fifteen most influential thinkers of the decade by Technology and Learning Magazine. In 2001, he was listed one of eight educators to provide leadership into the future by the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse. In 2007 he was selected to speak at the Cisco Public Services Summit during the Nobel Prize Festivities in Stockholm, Sweden. His writing includes numerous articles and two bestselling books, Empowering Students with Technology and Web Literacy for Educators. Mr November is co-founder of the Stanford Institute for Educational Leadership Through Technology and is most proud of being selected as one of the original five national Christa McAuliffe Educators. Each summer he leads the Building Learning Communities summer conference with world-class presenters and international participants. Visit novemberlearning.com/blc for more details.

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ANNE K. SODERMAN is Professor Emeritus at Michigan State University. She earned her PhD in Family Ecology with an emphasis on Child Development in 1979 from Michigan State University. Her most recent endeavor is serving as a Principal of 3e International Kindergarten in Beijing, China, where she is also conducting research on second language acquisition in children from 20 different nationalities. Dr Soderman has presented to national and regional professional organizations and consulted with numerous school systems and Title I groups about emergent literacy, childhood stress, early brain development, early childhood curriculum, authentic assessment, gender differences in emerging readers, portfolios and student-led conferencing, non-reading students in later primary, and developing critical thinking in young children. She recently co-authored the following books: Guiding Children’s Social Development, 6th Ed. (Thompson, 2009) (7th Edition in Press), Creating Literacy Rich Preschools and Kindergartens (Allyn & Bacon, 2008), Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum, 45h Ed. (Pearson, 2007) (5th Edition in Press), Scaffolding Emergent Literacy: A Child-Centered

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE Approach, Preschool through Grade 5, 2nd Ed. (Allyn & Bacon, 2005). Dr Soderman has taught and conducted research in over 30 international settings, most recently in Cameroon, Tanzania, Ghana, Kenya, the Czech Republic, China, Finland, Ireland, England and Bahrain. <soderman@msu.edu> SHARON STORRIER is the former Director of School Quality Services at OCM BOCES, a regional unit providing staff development to the city of Syracuse, New York, and the 23 surrounding school districts. Prior to this, Ms Storrier was a classroom teacher, reading specialist, Title 1 Coordinator, building and district level administrator. She has B.A., M.S. and C.A.S. degrees from the State University of New York. Her teaching experience includes working with elementary, middle, and high school students as well as adults. She has recently enjoyed working with the international schools in the Middle East. Ms Storrier is a national training associate for Cognitive CoachingSM and Adaptive Schools. She has worked extensively with administrators, teachers, colleges, and community groups to build collaboration and increase student achievement. She presents a myriad of workshops, including Cognitive CoachingSM, Adaptive Schools, Mentoring Matters, Collaborative Analysis of Student Work, True Colors Styles, Group Dynamics, Teachers Addressing the Language of Literacy with Kids (TALK), Presentation Skills, and Facilitation Skills. Ms Storrier works with administrators, teachers, instructional coaches, professional learning communities, school boards, networks and community groups. Her national and international work involves facilitating leadership retreats, problem-resolving sessions, and providing professional development for school districts and building faculties. She has a zest for learning and sharing her experiences with others. <sstorrier@twcny.rr.com>, www.cognitvecoaching.com, www.adaptiveschools.com MARCIA L. TATE, EdD, is the former Executive Director of Professional Development for the DeKalb County School System, Decatur, Georgia. During her 30-year career with the district, she has been a classroom teacher, reading specialist, language arts coordinator, and staff development director. She received the 2001 Distinguished Staff Developer Award for the State of Georgia and her department was chosen to receive the Exemplary Program Award for the state. Dr Tate received her bach-

elor’s degree from Spelman College, master’s degree from the University of Michigan, specialist degree in educational leadership from Georgia State University, and her doctorate in education from Clark Atlanta University. She is currently an educational consultant and has taught over 250,000 administrators, teachers, parents, and business and community leaders throughout the world. Dr Tate is the author of four best-sellers: (1) Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Instructional Strategies that Engage the Brain, (2) Sit & Get Won’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Professional Learning Strategies that Engage the Adult Brain, (3) Reading and Language Arts Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Literacy Strategies that Engage the Brain, (4) Shouting Won’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Techniques for Managing a Brain-compatible Classroom, and her latest, (5) Mathematics Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Numeracy Strategies That Engage the Brain. Dr Tate uses the 20 strategies outlined in her books to actively engage her audiences. <marciata@bellsouth.net>

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SHANE TEMPLETON is Foundation Professor of Literacy Studies in the Department of Educational Specialties at the University of Nevada, Reno. A former classroom teacher at the primary and secondary levels, Dr Templeton received his PhD in Education from the University of Virginia. His research has focused on developmental word knowledge in elementary, middle, and high school students, specifically in the areas of orthography and morphology. He is widely published in a number of research and practitioner journals, and is co-author of Words Their Way: Word Study for Phonics, Vocabulary, and Spelling Instruction and Vocabulary Their Way: Word Study for Middle and Secondary Students. His other books include Teaching the Integrated Language Arts and Children’s Literacy: Contexts for Meaningful Learning. His chapter on “Dispelling Spelling Assumptions: Technology and Spelling, Present and Future,” has recently been published in the International Handbook of Literacy and Technology. Since 1987, Dr Templeton has been a member of the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Dictionary. He is educational consultant on The American Heritage Children’s Dictionary and wrote the foreword to the recently-published Curious George’s Dictionary. Dr Templeton’s participation in the SEC is sponsored by Pearson Education. <wst@unr.edu> DEDE TISONE has over 20 years of experience as a public school teacher and visual arts specialist. The recipient of Fulbright-Hays fellowships to both China and India, Ms Tisone has a master’s degree in Art from San Francisco State University and is nationally certified in

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE the teaching of Early Adolescence through Young Adulthood Art. She has traveled extensively throughout the world leading arts workshops and also facilitated the development of the AERO Visual Arts Standards. She is the National Board Subsidy Administrator for NESA and one of the founders of www.schoolloop.com. School Loop was engineered to connect people in education teams, to help students take responsibility for their learning, and to help school districts engage parents in their students’ success. <tisone@att.net> Called the “Pied Piper of Educational Technology” by The School Library Journal, TIM TYSON has worked in education for nearly 30 years as a teacher (middle school, high school, and college) and an administrator. He has a passion for meaningful, authentic student engagement, and technology is seen as a centerpiece for irresistible academic achievement through creative, global, project-based learning activities. He has now turned his attention to supporting the profession on a national and international level by sharing his passion and practical expertise for integrating technology into the entire school plan—a proven vision that works. In April, 2006, Leslie Connery, Deputy CEO and Conference Chair for ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education) referred to Dr Tyson’s work at Mabry Middle School (where he was principal before retiring) as “a national treasure.” He was invited to be the closing keynote speaker for NECC in June, 2007. Dr Tyson routinely teaches students, parents, teachers, curriculum specialists, and administrators empowering ways to use technology with an emphasis on making the classroom transparent and making our world a better place. He can often be heard saying, “If using these tools isn’t fun and empowering, then I have not accomplished my personal goal for you!” He has been quoted in USA Today and quoted or featured in a variety of professional magazines and journals. <tim@drtimtyson.com> ALICE UDVARI-SOLNER is a researcher, teacher, and independent consultant in education, and holds an appointment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. The graduate and undergraduate courses she teaches on the topic of accommodating diverse learners in general education settings are integral to the elementary, secondary, and special education teacher certification programs. Differentiation, the design of effective curricular adaptations,

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collaborative teamwork among educators and paraprofessionals, and systems change toward inclusive education are areas that are central to her research and teaching. Dr Udvari-Solner’s recent research has focused on the development of the Universal Design Process for Differentiation – a method used to promote co-planning among educators to design responsive strategies for diverse learners. She has written numerous journal articles, and her work has been featured in multiple texts which include: Creating the Inclusive School, Inclusive Urban High Schools, Restructuring for a Caring & Effective Education, and Creativity & Collaborative Learning. The use of active and collaborative learning strategies as methods of differentiation are the focus of her book from Corwin Press Inc., Joyful Learning: Active and Collaborative Learning in Inclusive Classrooms, coauthored with Dr Paula Kluth. <alice@education.wisc.edu>

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Based in London, CLIVE UNGLESS is Director of International Operations for finalsite, a software company specializing in web solutions for education and which works with over 800 schools and associations worldwide. Educated at Royal Holloway College, London University and the Royal College of Music, Mr Ungless began his career as a professional musician, playing with a number of ensembles including the renowned English Baroque Soloists. He worked for many years in international education in a variety of roles including Upper School Dean, IT Director, and Communications Director. Mr Ungless joined finalsite in 2007. He is an enthusiastic, but lately a rather lapsed, glider pilot and loves to fly when he can get time from his computer. He is married to Maura, has two children, Laurence and Antonia, and also Mishka - a very energetic Viszla! <Clive.Ungless@finalsite.com> JEFF UTECHT’s first presentation was at the NESA Spring Educators Conference in 2003 where he presented on the changes technology was creating in education. A lot has changed in technology since then and Mr Utecht has gone on to become a leader in the international educational community in Educational Technology. Currently, he is working as a Technology and Learning Coordinator for International School Bangkok. He has consulted with and presented at international schools around the world.

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE Mr Utecht has been teaching online educational graduate classes for various American universities since 2007. He regularly shares his thoughts on education and technology on his blog, thethinkingstick.com. Mr Utecht has recently been mentioned in the books, Reinventing Project-Based Learning, and Web 2.0, New Tools, New Schools. He recently wrote a chapter for the book, Wired For Learning: An Educatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Web 2.0. To learn more about Mr Utecht, visit: jeffutecht.com. <jutecht@gmail.com> GERALD WHEELER is Emeritus Executive Director of the National Science Teachers Association. Previously, he was a Professor of Physics at Montana State University, Director of the MSU Science/Math Resource Center, Professor of Physics at Temple University, and Program Director for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in the area of Public Understanding of Science and

Technology. Dr Wheeler received his B.S. in 1963 from Boston University with a major in science education and his Ph.D. at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook in 1972 in experimental nuclear physics. Between undergraduate and graduate school, he taught high school physics, chemistry and physical science and developed science modules for elementary school science. Dr Wheeler is a former President of the American Association of Physics Teachers, a Fellow of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the AAAS. His numerous publications include books, articles, abstracts, and reviews. Most recently, Dr Wheeler has been promoting telecomputer networks to bring resources to teachers and students. <globalscienceteacher@gmail.com>

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CONFERENCE EXHIBITION Academic Tributum International AVerMedia

Khalil Khodr

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Wan-Shu Chiang Yvette Wang

Berj Jamkojian Associates

Berj Jamkojian Nada Baghdadi

Buffalo State, SUNY

Carolyn Brunner William Irene Scott Johnson Leah Loveless Mark Norris

ETR Tours

Kiener Mirjam

finalsite

Clive Ungless

Follett International

Wendy Gutenkauf Paula Masad

George Mason University

Beverly Shaklee Jennifer Coarts

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Marwan Laflouf Bassam Baghdadi

Jennifer Nelson, LLC/CPI

Janet Wendland

Lehigh University, College of Education, International Programs

Dr. Roger Douglas

Les Elfes International

Julien Goetz

Pearson

Michal Dziewiatowski Eyad Darawsheh Vallapha Ninrat Rik Nitert Lara Mikulasovych

RIC Publications Scholastic Inc.

Michelle Alwan Bassem Badran

Search Associates

Michael Williams

Space Camp Turkey

Beth Mitchell Gencel

Tadley Asia Limited / RebWeb

Darrell Tadley

Village Camps

Nick Tranter

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Education for Advancement and Empowerment (WEAVE)

Jovelyn A. Castro Pensiri Kitvirotkul Suntree Kireepirak

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... AROUND BANGKOK

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“THE EXOTIC ALLURE OF BANGKOK” By R.W. Apple, Jr. Excerpted from the International Herald Tribune, Nov. 28, 2003 Remarkably, Bangkok remains one of the most exotic cities in the world, just as it was when I first arrived there, bug-eyed, in 1966. . . It has never lost its ability to astonish. . .Day and night, the color and exuberance of Thai life envelope the visiting farang, or foreigner. In the gilded, polychrome palaces and wats, or temples. In the food markets, afloat and ashore. In the rich, supersaturated colors of the coveted Thai silks. In the national sport, kick boxing. . .In the fiercely contested kite-flying contests, held in the spring. And in the frequent festivals, large and small, which emphasize sanuk, or fun, rather than ritual. The first thing I would do, on a two- or three-day get-acquainted stop in Bangkok, is hire a long-tail boat — the “tail” being formed by the long shaft that links an auto engine to a propeller — and take a tour through the klongs (canals) around the city.

Bangkok - River Boat Wat

It is like a motoscafo trip in Venice, only better. Forget about the fake floating markets and the hokey snake farm, and concentrate on how people live, in houseboats and shacks, palaces and rude lean-tos. . .This is an older, simpler and sweeter Bangkok. . .

prepared food is as authentic as any in the city. . .

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No one should leave town without visiting the Grand Palace and its Emerald Buddha, which is really jadeite but impressive all the same, and to drink in such superb decorative details as the 112 gilded garudas (half-men, halfbirds) and the graceful aponsis (half-women, half-lions). And at the National Museum, despite many run-down, illdisplayed artifacts, there are real masterpieces, like the 14th-century bronze walking Buddha. . . One of Bangkok’s top places to shop is the Gaysorn Plaza, a marble mall. The Fendis and the Diors of the world are there, but so are quality antiques dealers like Triphum and Lamont & Altfield, a shop named Ayodha specializing in fine silks, celadon and handsome baskets, and Cocoon, the Marimekko of Southeast Asia. . . Forty years ago, Thai food was all but unknown outside of Thailand. Since then it has conquered the world. For the most part the places abroad serve at least slightly Westernized food, and that genre is well represented in Bangkok, too, at elegant places like Sala Rim Naam, across the river from the Oriental and owned by it. . .Pen, a lively spot with plastic tables and fierce prices, serves stunning seafood. Nobody speaks English. . .but our favorites were deep-fried parrotfish; charred giant river prawns the size of small lobsters. . .and for dessert, sticky rice and the mango of a lifetime. . .On a far grander scale is Celadon, in a pretty pavilion on stilts on an island in one of the Sukhotai Hotel’s ponds. . .And the Blue Elephant, housed in a nearby colonial mansion, serves classics like pla grai curry, made with fish and turmeric, along with such impressive innovations as durian cheesecake. . . For better and for worse, [Bangkok] is a modern city now, but somehow its allure endures.

You’ll also want to visit the 200-year-old Chinatown, a noisy quarter packed with signs, shrines and stalls selling everything from fabrics to herbal medicines, plus the Pak Khlong Market, with the best flowers in Thailand (go at 9 a.m.). . . On a Saturday or Sunday, take the Skytrain north to the Chatuchak Weekend Market, which sells everything imaginable, and the adjacent Aw Taw Kaw food market, open daily. . .On sale are not only an amazing range of fruits and vegetables but also fish and shellfish galore. . .The

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... AROUND BANGKOK

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SHOPPING IN BANGKOK Bangkok is one of Southeast Asia’s most popular shopping centers. Locally produced products are the best buys: hilltribe embroidered cottons, wood carvings, jewelry, audio tapes, videos, watches, porcelain, silk and tailoring of clothes are most popular. If you can’t buy it in Thailand, you can’t buy it! SHOPPING AREAS Department stores are open from 10:00am-9:00pm daily. Mah Boon Krung Center: Phayathai and Rama 1 Rd. Clothes and accessories. Tokyo Dept Store, two cinemas and fast-food places.

Silom Village: 286 Silom Road near Rama IV. Charming shopping plaza with handicrafts, silk, clothes, antiques, leather and indoor/outdoor restaurants, Thai music/dance shows.

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SILK Many shops are along lower Silom Road, New Road and at the River City Shopping Area. Jim Thompson: Surawongse Rd and Rama IV. Finest silk, ready-made clothing, and gift idems. A bit more expensive but reliable. The «Jim Thompson House» is also interesting to tour. Ask the hotel’s Concierge for information.

River City: Next to Royal Orchid Sheraton. 2370077-8. Arts, antiques, tailors, hair salon.

Shinawatra: 67 S. Sathorn Rd, near Soi Suan Plu. 2869991--4. Silk materials and ready-to-wear. Neckties, handkerchiefs, scarves. 9:00am-9:00pm Mon-Sat.

Siam Centre/Discovery Centre: Siam Square, Rama 1 and Phyathai Rds. Two connected plazas. A 10-15 minute walk from Central World Plaza (formerly World Trade Center).

TAILORS James Fashion: Ten percent discount for NESA delegates, plus free transport! Mobile: 081-312-7718, ask for Ms Tiew, manager.

Seacon Square: Srinakarin Rd, other side of the city. Largest shopping plaza in Asia. Robinson’s, Lotus department stores, YOYO Land, indoor amusement park, food court, supermarket and 14 theaters! Dry cleaners in the basement.

Alex’s Fashion: 117-121 New Rd, Bangrak 44 (beside Shangri-La Hotel), 237-3229, 237-3216

Baiyoke Plaza & Pratunam Market: Near Indra Regent Hotel, Pratunam. Great clothes bargains, cheapest t-shirts in Bangkok. Emporium: Sukhumvit Rd next to Queen Sirikit Park. Newish and one of the ‘glitziest’ shopping centers in Bangkok. Small designer outlets, a big department store and supermarket.

Queen Thai Silk: 199 Sukhumvit Road, near Soi 15, three-minute walk from the Asok BTS station, Ruamchitt Plaza, beside Clinton Plaza. 02-2651-0082-3. Quality ladies’ wear in hand-woven Thai silk and cotton, excellent workmanship. Kingston Tailor: (formerly ‘Gift Thai Silk’) 166/2-3 Silom Rd, 233-6450

Gaysorn Plaza: Ploenchit Rd, opposite World Trade Center. Upmarket plaza with well-known designer stores and good restaurants. Planet Hollywood next door. Oriental Place: Soi Charoen Krung 38. 2660186-95. Behind Oriental Hotel, worth going for arts and antiques. Chitralada, one of the best Thai handicrafts outlets, is located here. Central World Plaza (formerly World Trade Center): Radjadamri Rd. Eight floors of shops, two department stores, Thailand Duty Free Shop and Tower Records. Gaysorn Plaza is opposite.

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE Marty’s: 178/1 Sukhumvit Rd, opposite Ambassador Hotel. 251-1669, 252-6290. (Mon-Sat 10-8pm, closed Sun) Sin Do Tailor: 1294-96 New Rd, between the Shangri-La & Oriental Hotels. 233-5070 Nice Silk Ltd: No.111 River City Shopping Center, 1st floor, 237-0077, ext. 111 Mazzaro Tailors: 9/1 Soi Wat Suan Plu, Charoen-krung Road, near the Shangri-La Hotel (near New Road), 235-3626, 233-8925, 630-6643—4, mazzaro@thai.com JEWELRY New Road between the Shangri-La and the Sheraton and lower Silom Road are full of jewelry stores. Ask for a certificate of authenticity. Gold is sold by the “Baht” (not the currency), equal to 15.16 grams. Charge for workmanship is added. Call to ask if free transport is provided. Calling first to confirm location and opening hours is recommended.

New Universal Gems Ltd: 1144-46 New Rd. 234-3514 Supermarket of Gems: 919 Silom (near Holiday Inn)

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Ulthai Gems: 28/7 Soi Ruam Rudee, Ploenchit Rd. 2538582 MARKETS & STREET VENDORS Patpong at Night: Handicrafts, clothes, watches, cassettes/videos at good prices. You must bargain. Soi La Lai Sap: On Soi next to Bangkok Bank on Silom. Great prices on clothes, tapes, etc. China Town: Sampeang Lane, 15-min tuk-tuk ride. Stroll Sampeang Lane. Also: Nakorn Kasem (Theives Market) and Pahurat (Indian Market). Chatuchak Weekend Market (open until dark): Adjacent to Chatuchak Park and Skytrain stop. Clothes, produce, “antiques”, pets, plants, Thai crafts and housewares at Asia’s largest open-air market. HANDICRAFTS Chitralada: Under the auspices of the Foundation of Queen Sirikit to promote indigenous handicrafts. Outlets in Bangkok: Oriental Place, Royal Thai Decoration Pavilion, Grand Palace, Bangkok International Airport, Vimanmek Mansion, Amporn Palace, Thaniya Plaza, Silom Road, Royal Garden Riverside Hotel Plaza, Charoen Nakorn Road, Amari Watergate, Petchburi Rd. Golden Tortoise Antiques & Golden Deco: 4 Sukhumvit, Soi 49-4. 391-2842, 259-6641

Some reliable jewelry stores: Gems Gallery: 198/23-24 Rama VI Road, Samsen Nai. 279-3127--9, 279-2917--8. The world’s largest gems and jewelry wholesaler—huge showroom. Charlie’s Reliable Jewelers: 5/2-3 Sukhumvit Soi 4. 2514376, 252-5448

Narayana Phand: Narayana Phand Pavilion Building, Radjadamri Rd, 2524670-9. The biggest Thai handicrafts center. Reasonable prices. Open 10:00-8:00pm. Rasai Siam: 23 Sukhumvit Rd. Elegant arts and crafts in a traditional Thai house at fair prices.

Chartered Gems: 292 Silom Rd. 233-9320 Mee Seng Gemcutters: 1282/2-3 New Rd. 233-7840 Alex and Co: 14/1 Oriental Lane. 234-3908 Johnny’s Gems: 199 Fueng Nakorn Rd (off New Rd). 222-1756. Call for free transport.

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Master Gems: 1299 New Rd. 233-0283. Mr Anon.

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DINING IN BANGKOK Thai food, contrary to popular myth, is not fiery hot (although some dishes are spicy). Its beauty is the variety and assortment of flavors: rich curries and tangy soups, spicy salads, stir-fried dishes and succulent seafood—all eaten with liberal helpings of fragrant rice. Restaurant and night spot suggestions are below. Calling first to confirm location, operating hours, etc, is recommended. PUBS AND BARS Spasso’s: Grand Hyatt Erawan Hotel, Rajadamri Rd. Upmarket bar, Italian restaurant and night spot with live music. Pricey, but it’s the place to ‘be seen’ weekends.

Holiday Inn, near Shangri-La) 236-7045, 266-6994. Traditional Thai house converted into restaurant. Delicious Thai food. Reservations necessary.

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Baan Khanitha: Soi Ruam Rudee, off Wireless Road. The building used to be the Egyptian Embassy! Some of the best Thai food—go for the “Tom Yum Soup”. Reservations needed. 01-258-4181, 02-258-4128 Thon Krueng: 239 Soi Thonglor 13 (Sukhumvit 55), near Skytrain stop “Thong Lo”. Great Thai, Chinese and seafood. 391-8703 / 8719 / 8720 / 3227

Saxophone: 3/8 Phayathai Rd, Victory Monument, 2465472, 248-2100. Jazz and blues music. Serves food. About Cafe: Maitree Jid Road. One of the ‘coolest’ places, full of artists and photographers. Brown Sugar: Soi Sarasin. Popular, cozy jazz bar with entertaining ‘jamming’ sessions nightly and spicy Thai food. Bull’s Head: Sukhumvit Soi 35. Pub with ‘beer and cigarette’ feel; popular with Brits, but locals enjoy authentic decor. Delaney’s: Soi Convent. Bangkok’s first Irish pub. Richly decorated in “authentic” Irish decor and memorabilia. Bourbon Street: Washington Square, Soi 22 Sukhumvit. 259-0328 Henry J. Bean’s: Amari Watergate Hotel, Petchburi Road. Good food. 653-9000, ext. 350 TGI Friday: Sukhumvit, Soi 1. Pub with good food. Cheers Pub: Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza, 981 Silom. Also serves food. 238-4300 THAI RESTAURANTS Recommended by NESA’s friends in Bangkok. Call first to confirm address and operating hours: Cabbages and Condoms: Soi 12 Sukhumvit. 251-5552. Great food. Profits go to family planning for hilltribes. Nice handicraft shop. Ban Chiang: 14 Srivieng Rd (next to Silom Club, behind

Sala Rim Naam: Riverside, opposite Oriental Hotel. Bangkok’s best Thai dinner and dance show. Operated by Oriental Hotel. Classical Thai dances, lively atmosphere. Diners sit at low tables and must remove shoes. Good food. Reservations needed. Thaanying: Genuine, ‘royal’ Thai cuisine, 10 Pramuan Rd, off Silom, 236-4361, 235-0371 Lemongrass: 5/1 Soi 24, Sukhumvit. 258-8637 Bussaracum: 35 Soi Pipat 2 (off Convent Road). 2358915 Celadon Thai: Sukhothai Hotel, South Sathorn Road. 287-0222 Spice Market: Regent Hotel, Rajadamri Road. Tel: 2516127

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Thai Room: 30/37 Patpong Rd. 233-920. One of Bangkok’s oldest restaurants. Also Mexican, Chinese and European food.

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SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE Noodle Hut: 148 Silom Road Seafood Market Corner: Soi 16 Sukhumvit. 258-0218. Select your own and have it cooked to your taste. River City Seafood: River City. 237-0077 OTHER RESTAURANTS Himali Cha Cha: 1229/11 Charoen Krung Rd, (between Silom & Surawong Rds), 235-1569, 630-6358. Muglai Muslim, north Indian and vegetarian food, since 1979. D.P. Cafe: Soi Lang Suan. Art deco, casual eating, drinks. Next door is “DP Wardrobe”, the only boutique stocking Vivienne Westwood clothing.

One Convent Road: Convent Road. Stylish restaurant with warm, pleasant atmosphere, good food.

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Moghul Room: 1/16 Soi 11 Sukhumvit. 253-4465. Good Indian food. Shangarila Restaurant: 154/4-7 Silom. 234-9147. Good Chinese food. Silver Palace: 5 Soi Pipat, Silom. 235-5118. Good Chinese dim sum lunch. Lord Jim’s: In Oriental Hotel. 236-0400. Excellent lunch buffet.

Bobby’s Arms: Patpong Rd. Reasonably-priced drinks, good British-style food and lively ambiance. Quite popular. Whole Earth Restaurant: 93/3 Soi Lang Suan, Ploenchit Rd. 252-5574. Vegetarian cuisine, classical guitar in the evenings. Planet Hollywood: Next to Gaysorn Plaza, Ploenchit Rd. Well-known restaurant attracts youngish crowd and tourists, because of the huge portions! Riva’s: Sheraton Grande Sukhumvit Soi 12. Emulating Spasso’s, interesting nightclub and slightly eccentric restaurant. Hard Rock Cafe: Siam Square. Usual format - popular, loud and lively atmosphere.

USEFUL THAI WORDS In polite conversation, the word “Krup” is added for men, and “Kha” for women to most words, phrases or sentences. Hello Thank you Good morning Good afternoon Good evening Where is Fine thanks I cannot speak Thai How much does it cost? Very expensive Goodbye Where is the bathroom?

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sa-wat-dee (Krup/Kha) kop khun sa-wat-dee sa-wat-dee sa-wat-dee tee nai sabai dee kop khun poot Thai mai dai raka tao-rai? paeng mak la kon hong naam yu nai?

Perhaps the most famous Thai saying is “mai pen rai”, which means “nevermind” or “think nothing of it”.

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NESA AWARDS Stanley Haas/Luke Hansen Student Award: In the spirit of Dr Stanley Haas, the late executive director of NESA, and Luke Hansen, a remarkable student who died in an accident, this award recognizes middle school students at NESA member schools who are a credit to themselves and their schools and who have consistently and significantly contributed to the welfare of others. Three finalists receive cash awards of $500 each. The top finalist attends NESA’s Spring Educators Conference (with an accompanying adult) and briefly addresses conference delegates. This year’s (2009-2010) winners were: Sophia Abu Ghazaleh (American Community School, Amman, Jordan), Benjamin Blackstone (Cairo American College, Egypt), Rose Pennington (Saudi Aramco Schools, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia). As the winner, Sophia is here in Cairo, at NESA’s invitation, to accept the award. Application deadline: December 1

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Margaret Sanders International Schools Scholarship: The late Margaret Sanders established a scholarship fund to help graduates of international schools attend college. Four scholarships of $5,000 are granted to applicants who demonstrate, through school activities and community involvement, persistence and motivation, resourcefulness, and acceptance of other cultures and points of view. One candidate from among the NESA regular member schools is put forward for consideration by the Margaret Sanders Foundation. This year’s NESA candidate, Daniel Martelly from the American School of Bombay, Mumbai, India, was one of the four winners! Application deadline: December 1 NESA Community Service Awards: Funds raised through a charity raffle at each Spring Educators Conference are matched up to $1500 by the NESA Board and are available for grants toward student service projects sponsored by NESA regular member schools. Grants range from $500-$750 depending on that year’s raffle income. NESA regular member schools may apply for grants towards projects that serve the less fortunate in their community and are jointly supported and run by students and faculty. NESA Teacher Reps will be selling raffle tickets throughout the Spring Educators Conference – check out the great prizes in the Exhibition area! Schools awarded grants will be announced at Monday morning’s plenary session. Application deadline: December 1 - February 1 NESA Call for Papers: The annual Call for Papers highlights scholarship and professionalism among educators at NESA regular member schools and is a forum for sharing and exchange of ideas regarding a particular theme. The winner is invited as NESA’s guest to its annual Spring Educators Conference, and has an opportunity to briefly comment on his/ her paper to colleagues. All submissions are published in the online journal, “Voices from NESA”, posted on the NESA website. This year’s winner is Christopher Waite from Ras Tanura Elementary School-Saudi Aramco Schools, Saudi Arabia. Read Chris’ essay on the NESA website: www.nesacenter.org/call-for-papers/. Application deadline: December 1 NESA Math League: The NESA Math League started in 1988 to promote interest and enthusiasm for math and to develop problem-solving abilities through friendly school-versus-school competition. Last year, 36 schools spanning the entire NESA region took part in the challenges. The competition takes place four times a year, from September to March; the top five scorers in each division (grades 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12) are submitted for the school’s team score. Certificates and plaques are presented to the top scoring schools at NESA’s Spring Educators Conference (see the NESA website for a list: www.nesacenter.org/nesa-math-league/). Art Radtke at The American School of Dubai is the NESA Math League Coordinator: <aradtke@asd.sch.ae>. Finis Engleman Award: Dr Finis Engleman was an outstanding educator of international stature and the moving force behind the birth of NESA. The NESA Board of Directors established this award, which is bestowed on an individual or group that has provided outstanding and sustained service to the NESA region and beyond. The Board presented the 2009 award to the NESA Professional Development Advisory Committee (PDAC). See the inside back cover for a list of PDAC members.

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2009-2010 NESA TEACHER REPRESENTATIVES Meredith Harbord Ghinwa Dimachki Lindsey Shoemaker Stephanie Slough David Nelson Nabila Hamadeh Nira Naik Beth Kaye Burrows Jyotsna Nanda Tina Ratliff Jim Cook Jerri-Lynn Hainstock Kerry Simpson Anne Boudreau Paige Spilles Scott Brink Kristin Locke Catherine Roback Justin Walsh Katrina Theilmann Evelyn LeRose Flor Martin Monique Boivin Michele Watkins Mahmud Shihab Joy Will International Schools Group, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia Salma Iqabal Tracy Bosch Abeera Atique Kayla Buschini Borden Hasiuk Ellen Youngs Marsha Joshi Katherine Maloney Liz Shrestha Heather Crutchfield Don Tingley Roxanne Giampapa Walter Gammon John Royce Dennis Reiersgard Omneya El Naggar Amal Amera Maala Thomas Amy Seefeldt

ABA-An IB World School, Muscat, Oman Al-Bayan Bilingual School, Hawalli, Kuwait American Community School of Abu Dhabi, UAE American Community School, Amman, Jordan American Community Schools of Athens, Greece American Community School at Beirut, Lebanon American Embassy School, New Delhi, India American Embassy School, New Delhi, India American International School-Chennai, India American International School/Dhaka, Bangladesh American International School/Dhaka, Bangladesh The American International School in Egypt, Cairo The American International School of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia The American International School, Kuwait, Salmiya The American International School of Muscat, Oman The American International School of Muscat, Oman American International School-Riyadh, Saudi Arabia American School of Bombay, Mumbai, India American School of Doha, Qatar American School of Doha, Qatar American School of Dubai, UAE American School of Kuwait, Hawalli Bahrain Bayan School, Isa Town Cairo American College, Egypt International College, Beirut, Lebanon International School of Islamabad, Pakistan

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Dammam Academy Dhahran Elementary/Middle School High School Jubail Academy Yanbu International School Karachi American School, Pakistan Kodaikanal International School, India Lahore American School, Pakistan Lincoln School, Nepal Modern English School, Cairo, Egypt The Overseas School of Colombo, Sri Lanka Pinewood International School of Thessaloniki, Greece Qatar Academy, Doha Robert College, Istanbul, Turkey Saudi Aramco Schools, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Schutz American School, Alexandria, Egypt The Universal American School, Hawalli, Kuwait Walworth Barbour American Intâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l School in Israel, Even Yehuda Woodstock School, Mussoorie, India

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED STUDENT LEARNING A Guide for Planning NESA Conferences & WELCOME Institutes LETTER STRANDS

1. Assessment

2. Curriculum

3. Instruction

SAMPLE AREAS OF FOCUS Examples: 1. Selecting and using appropriate assessment tools 2. Collecting the “right” data 3. Analyzing data 4. Using data to drive decision-making (Linking data to instruction) 5. Connecting assessment with grades 6. Reporting and communicating evidence of student learning Examples: 1. Building a standards-based curriculum 2. Mapping the curriculum 3. Designing quality units 4. Incorporating the “meta-curriculum” to address the affective domain 5. Integrating technology across the curriculum 6. Articulating “essential understandings” and “big questions” Examples: 1. Differentiating instruction 2. Enhancing instruction with technology 3. Utilizing research-based “Best Practices” 4. Teaching to improve critical thinking 5. Planning for interdisciplinary Learning 6. Using developmentally appropriate and ‘brain friendly’ methods

4. Professional Growth

Examples: 1. Building and sustaining “ Professional Learning Communities” 2. Developing protocols that support professional collaboration 3. Utilizing facilitation skills in professional contexts 4. Insuring that professional development activities are linked to school-wide goals & student learning 5. Fostering various forms of professional collaboration focusing on student learning 6. Promoting the “critical friends” model of professional interaction.

5. Leadership

Examples: 1. Providing leadership training at all levels (teacher leaders, board members, administrators, etc.) 2. Using supervision and evaluation as a tool for growth 3. Formally Inducting professionals and board members new to the school 4. Fostering a positive school culture and providing a safe environment for all 5. Understanding and facilitating the change process 6. Providing for sound management of the school in all areas (e.g., security, planning, finance, building, recruiting)

6. Deepening Understanding

Examples: 1. Humanities (English/language arts, social studies, world languages, fine & performing arts, etc.) 2. Science and mathematics 3. Literacy 4. Middle School 5. Technology, media and information 6. Counseling, special needs, learning support Examples:

1. The Cutting Edge SPRING EDUCATORS CONFERENCE 2. What’s Coming? 7. Special Topics and Keynotes

3. 4. 5. 6.

st

21 Century Schools How Kids Think The Latest in Educational R & D Developing World Citizens

Created by the NESA Professional Development Advisory Committee Updated: January, 2008

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IDEAS TO THINK ABOUT - STRATEGIES TO IMPLEMENT WELCOME LETTER

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