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Volume: XIV Part I Section: 2 Chapter: 11 Page No:

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Chapter 11: Community Development Block Nichar 1. Data TABLE NO:10 HORTICULTURE CROPS Apple Apricot/Chulli Behmi Jack Fruit Pears Walnut

AREA

299.5 8.5 2 2 20.5 2

VARIETIES (LOCAL/ IMPROVED) LOCAL % 80 100 100 0 100 100

IMPROVED % 20 0 0 100 0 0

IRRIGATED/ UNIRRIGATE IRRIGATED % 100 100 100 100 100 100

UNIRRIGATED % 0 0 0 0 0 0

MEAN FYM 39.57 3.33 0 0 6 2.5

MEAN YIELD 12.27 1.41 1 0 0 0

MEAN SALE 20342.92 1444.44 250 0 0 0

CHEMICAL FERTILIZERS YES%

NO%

74 0 0 0 33.33 0

26 100 100 100 66.67 100

PESTICID ES YES % 34 0 0 0 0 0

NO % 66 100 100 100 100 100

SOURCE OF PLANT MATERIAL LOCAL % 90 100 100 100 100 100

GOVT. % 10 0 0 0 0 0

NO % 0 0 0 0 0 0

AVAILABILITY OF TECHNICAL GUIDANCE YES% 64 33.33 0 100 100 0

NO% 36 66.67 100 0 0 100

TABLE NO:11

AGRICULTURE CROPS Barley Bithi Cholavi Fafra Kadu Maize Mustard Ogla Paddy Potato Rajmash Tulsi Urd Wheat

AREA 61 3 3.5 9 12.5 45.5 1 9 12 33 35 3 3 74

VARIETIES (LOCAL/IMPROVED) LOCAL% IMPROVED% 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0

IRRIGATED/UNIRRIGATE IRRIGATED% UNIRRIGATED% 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100

Comprehensive CAT Plan of Satluj River Basin

MEAN FYM 6.89 7.5 3.5 5.4 4.35 7.4 4 3.86 7.25 5.52 4.39 8 4.25 7.78

MEAN YIELD 1.68 1.32 0.93 1.56 1.44 1.42 0.2 1.45 1.71 3.31 1.59 1.85 0.67 1.62

CHEMICAL FERTILIZERS YES% NO% 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100 0 100

AVAILABILITY OF TECHNICAL GUIDANCE YES% NO% 48.65 51.35 100 0 0 100 0 100 20 80 48.28 51.72 100 0 0 100 62.5 37.5 38.46 61.54 39.39 60.61 100 0 100 0 47.37 52.63


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TABLE NO:12 VEGETABLE CROPS

VARIETIES (LOCAL/IMPROVED) LOCAL% IMPROVED%

AREA

Brinjal Cabbage Capsicum Carrot Cauliflower Chilli French Beans Garlic Lady Finger Peas Saags Tomato

2.1 15.7 0.7 1.5 10.8 0.2 8.5 5 1 16.1 0.5 4.5

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

MEAN FYM

IRRIGATED/UNIRRIGATE IRRIGATED% UNIRRIGATED%

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

CHEMICAL FERTILIZERS YES% NO%

MEAN YIELD

2.4 3.67 2.75 4.5 4.64 0.8 5.1 3.75 3 5.35 1.5 2.25

0.95 0.76 0 0.67 1.11 0 0.71 0.2 1 1.18 40 0.44

0 11.11 0 0 9.09 0 40 0 0 7.69 0 33.33

AVAILABILITY OF TECHNICAL GUIDANCE YES% NO%

100 88.89 100 100 90.91 100 60 100 100 92.31 100 66.67

60 33.33 50 0 45.45 0 0 0 0 46.15 0 0

40 66.67 50 100 54.55 100 100 100 100 53.85 100 100

TABLE NO:13 LIVES STOCKS

NO OF LIVES

Bullocks Cows Donkey/ Mules Goat

20 74 5 122

Heifers Poultry Sheep

4 15 254

HEALTH CARE YES NO% % 0 100 2.56 97.44 0 0 33.3 3 0 0

NATURAL/AI SERVICE NATUR BOTH AI% NO% AL% % 0 0 0 100 33.33 51.29 15.38 0

BREED LOCAL IMPROV % ED% 90 10 56.41 43.59

STALL FEEDING/GRAZING OR BOTH STALL GRAZING BOTH NO % % % % 0 40 50 10 64.1 12.82 23.08 0

MEAN CONCEN TRATE FED 0.7 2.04

MEAN LACTA TION

AVAILABILITY OF TECHNICAL GUIDANCE

MEAN YIELD

YES%

NO%

0 427.1

0 1961.54

60 74.36

40 25.64

100 100

0 85.71

0 0

50 14.29

50 0

100 100

0 0

0 0

100 100

0 0

0 0

1.25 0.86

0 0

0 0

50 57.14

50 42.86

66.67 100 100

33.33 100 92.86

33.34 0 0

0 0 7.14

33.33 0 0

66.67 100 100

33.33 0 0

66.67 100 0

0 0 100

33.33 0 0

0 0 0

0.33 0.2 0.5

0 0 0

0 0 0

66.67 100 85.71

33.33 0 14.29

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TABLE NO : 14 NO OF HOUSE HOLDS STUDIES CAST CATEGORY(BUDHA)

GENERAL% GENERAL%

CAST CATEGORY(Hindu)

SC% ST% OBC %

ELECTRICITY CONNECTION MOTORABLE ROAD TO VILLAGE

YES% NO% YES% NO% YES%

DISPENSARY/MEDICAL FACILITY IN VILLAGE

NO% MEDICAL FACILITY DISTANCE (KM)

TAP WATER TOILET NO OF FAMILY MEMBER

YES% NO% YES% NO% TOTAL MALE TOTAL FEMALE DEGREE% +TWO%

EDUCATION(MALE)

MATRIC% MIDDLE% PRIMARY% ILLITRATE% DEGREE% +TWO%

EDUCATION(FEMALE)

MATRIC% MIDDLE% PRIMARY%

Comprehensive CAT Plan of Satluj River Basin

45 6.67 37.77 37.78 15.56 2.22 100 0 37.78 62.22 53.33 46.67 0.63 88.89 11.11 53.33 46.67 143 129 13.99 10.49 19.58 12.59 24.48 18.87 11.63 6.98 9.3 15.5 24.81


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31.78 2786320 5401202 713400 825550 216143.8

ILLITRATE% SERVICE AGRI/HOTI

ANNUAL INCOME

LABOUR MISC TOTAL ANNUAL INCOME

TABLE NO:14(A) MAHILA MANDAL %

MARKETING PATTERN OF PRODUCE

SOCIAL PARTICIPATION YOUTH CLUB SHG GRAM PANCHAYAT % % CHATAKAMBA %

31.11

4.44

4.44

NO%

2.22

PRIVATE%

57.79

97.78

NO%

SOURCE OF BORROWING

CO-OP%

BANK%

CO-OP %

0

86.67

0

2.22

RELATIVES%

11.11

FRIENDS %

ANY OTHER %

2.22

0

FUEL/FODDER MANAGEMENT FUEL/FODDER

Fuel Fodder

REQUIREMENT % YES%

100 97.78

FUEL SOURCE

Forest Forest & Gas LPG,Forest No Private

AVALIBILITY%

NO%

0 2.22

SOURCE TO COVER GAP %

FODDER SOURCE

44.44 2.22 46.68 4.44 2.22

Forest No Private

Comprehensive CAT Plan of Satluj River Basin

GAP %

27 42.96

72.89 55

SOURCE TO COVER GAP %

82.22 8.89 8.89


Volume: XIV Part I Section: 2 Chapter: 11 Page No:

INCOME GENERATING ACTIVITIES EXISTING

INTERESTED

No Yes

Khaddi, Fishery, Poultry, Mushroom, Sericulture, Sewing Bee Keeping

MINOR FOREST PRODUCE(MFP) EXISTINGNAME

ANNUALINCOME

No

SUGGESTION

0

Comprehensive CAT Plan of Satluj River Basin

Camp Required

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2. Analysis District Kinnaur Community Development Block Nichar The socio-economic conditions of Nichar Development Block are summarized in the following Tables. Table: 1

Ethnic Group & Religion, Study Area, 2009-10. (Per cent)

Religion Hindu Budhist

93.33 6.67

Category General 44.44 SC 37.78 ST 15.56 OBC 2.22 It can be observed from the Table-1 that in study area majority of the population was of Hindu community (93.33). The percentage of Buddhist was only 6.67. As far as caste category was concerned general category constituted the largest proportion accounting for 44.44 percent. Next in importance was scheduled caste category (37.78 per cent). The percentage of ST and OBC category was 15.56 and 2.22, respectively. Table: 2

Infrastructure Facilities, Study Area, 2009-10.

Village Level

Family level

Motorable road to village Health facility in a village Average distance to be covered to get medical facility Electricity connection Tap water connection Toilet facility

Yes 37.78 53.33 0.63 K.M.* 100.00 88.89 53.33

(Per cent) NO 62.22 46.67

0.00 11.11 46.67

*Kilometre Table -2 exhibits that 37.78 per cent of villages were connected with motorable roads. As far as health facilities in villages are concerned only 53.33 percent villages were having medial facilities. On an average people had to cover 0.63 KM to get medical help. Table further indicates that 88.89 cent per cent households were having water connection and 46.67 percent households were going in open for defecation. As far as electricity connection is concerned all the sampled households were having electric connection in their houses. Table: 3

Distribution of selected families according to gender, Study Area, 2009-10. (Number)

Gender Male 143 Female 129 Total 272 Average size of family 6.04 Sex ratio* 902 *Number of females per thousand males The information on average size of family and gender- wise classification of sampled households has been presented in Table – 3. It can be observed form the table that on overall level, the average family consisted of 6.04 members. In the study area sex ratio was 902.

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Volume: III Part I Section:2 Chapter:11 Page No:

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105

Educational Level, Study Area, 2009-10

(Per cent) Educational Level Male Female Illiterate 19.87 31.38 Primary 24.48 24.91 Middle 12.59 15.60 Matriculate 19.58 9.40 Sr. Secondary 10.49 6.98 Degree 13.99 11.73 Table -4 represents the educational level of sampled population of the study area. As regards the literacy of the family members, it was found to be higher among males as compared to females. The proportion of illiteracy in females was more. The majority of the females (31.38 per cent) were illiterate. The proportion of the female population having studied up to primary, middle, matriculation and sr. secondary standards was 24.91, 15.60, 9.40 and 6.98 per cent, respectively. It can be seen from the table that only 11.73 per cent of the female population were having education up to degree level. Among the males, majority of the population (24.48 per cent) were having education up to primary level. About 13.99 per cent of male population had education up to degree level. The percentage of illiterate was 19.87 among males. Table: 5

Distribution of Family Income, Study Area, 2009-10

Sr. No 1.

Particulars Horticulture/Agriculture

2.

Service

3.

Labour

4.

Miscellaneous Total

(Average) Annual family Income (Rs.) 120026 (55.53) 61918 (28.64) 18345 (8.49) 15853 (7.34) 216142 (100.00)

Note: Figures in parentheses represent percentages. In order to get an insight unto the annual family income as a whole an analysis was carried out on the basis of family as a unit. The major constituents of family income in the study area were agriculture/horticulture and service. A perusal of Table – 5 reveals that on an average, the total annual family income, per household, was worked out to be Rs. 2, 16,142. The major source of annual family income was agriculture/horticulture. It contributed about 55.53 per cent towards total family income. Next in importance was service, as it contributed about 28.64 per cent. The contribution of labour was 8.49 per cent. The contribution of miscellaneous was only 7.34 per cent. Table: 6 Social Participation, Study Area, 2009-10 (Per cent) Participation (42.21) Mahila Mandal 31.11 Self Help Groups 6.66 Youth Clubs 4.44 Cooperatives 0.00 No Participation (57.79) Table – 6 shows the average social participation of households in study area. Overall only 42.21 per cent were participating in Mahila Mandals, Self Help Groups and Youth Clubs with 31.11, 6.66 and 4.44 percentages, respectively. The participation in cooperatives was nil.

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Table: 7

Marketing Pattern of Produce, Study Area, 2009-10 (Per cent) Private 100.00 Government 0.00 Cooperatives

0.00

Table – 7 reveals that all the respondents were selling their produce to private parties. Table: 8 Source of Borrowings, Study Area, 2009-10 (Per cent) Bank 86.67 Relatives 11.11 Friends 2.22 Cooperative Society 0.00 Any other 0.00 The source of borrowings by the sampled households is presented in Table – 8. The majority of the respondents (86.67 per cent) had taken loan from banks. The percentage of respondents who had taken loan from relatives and friends was 11.11 and 2.22 percent respectively. Table: 9 Income Generating Activities, Study Area, 2009-10 (Activities) Existing Interested Khaddi Khaddi,Sewing, Bee Keeping, Fishery, Mushroom, Poultry, Sericulture Table – 9 presents the existing and those income generating activities in which people were interested for future. Khaddi was the only existing income generating activity in the study area, but the people showed interest in Sewing, Bee Keeping, Fishery, Mushroom, Poultry and Sericulture. Table: 10 Fuel/Fodder Management, Study Area, 2009-10 (Per cent) Requirement Availability Gap Sources to cover gap by household Fuel 100.00 27.00 73.00 Forests (80.00) LPG (20.00) Fodder 97.78 42.96 57.04 Forest (82.00) Purchase from private parties (18.00)

Table – 10 shows the fuel and fodder management by the respondents in study area. It can be seen from the table that on average people were able to mange only 27.00 percent fuel from their own farms and to cover the gap, 80.00 per cent households were dependent on forests. As far as fodder is concerned, to cover the gap which was 57.04 percent, the 82.00 per cent households were dependent on forests and 20.00 per cent were purchasing the fodder from private parties. Suggestions Rural infrastructure like village roads, drinking water needs to be developed and strengthened. Health sub-centers may be provided with proper building and staff at Gram Panchayat level. The occurrence of school dropouts has been quite high as we move from primary to middle and similar pattern is clearly visible for higher education. In order to raise the socio-economic status, increase employment opportunities and generate self confidence, the top priority is to be given for their education. The education will help in providing their participation in economic activities and add to their Comprehensive CAT Plan of Satluj River Basin


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productivity. The overall literacy rate of women is low as compared to men folk. Keeping in view the active role played by women in home management special schemes should be introduced to get her more educated. Social participation should be encouraged. There is a need to educate the people about the importance of co-operatives, self help groups and youth clubs. Further, they may be motivated to establish these rural institutions. While using the People Rural Appraisal (PRA), it is noted that most of the people were not having knowledge about development activities. Thus, their participation in such institutions may be encouraged to improve their knowledge about developmental activities. All incumbents in study area are marketing their produce to private parties but resentment was also there among them that private parties are not purchasing their produce at proper rates. Government should do efforts in this respect. The banks already working in the study area has gained confidence among local people. But still some percentage of population in study area prefers to borrow money from friends and relatives. Bank people are required to make effort to win the confidence of these people also. In order to make the people economically better off, there is a need to introduce new income generating activities as suggested by them. Proper training should be imparted to them to start new activities. Existing income generating activitie should be strengthened by making them more trained. Women folk should be trained to improve their economic status. Improved economic status will lead to increase in empowerment of women and also enable them to participate increasingly in decision making in the family and society, which at present is more or less the exclusive domain of the men folk. There exists a gap in fodder requirement and which is mostly met with from forests. To meet put this gap new species of fodder trees and grasses and improved management practices (Agronomic practices and fertilization application) should be popularized. To cover the gap in fuel majority of people were dependent on forests for fuel wood. To release the pressure of forests alternative sources like solar energy, bio-gas should be encouraged. An investment in this direction can be cheaper and more eco-friendly source electrification. Pressure cookers should be provided to them on subsidized rates. Training should be imparted to women to save energy. Wood saving devices like improved chullas should be introduced.

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3. Costing DEVELOPMENT BLOCK NICHAR

Basic Statistics • •

No of MWs in the CD Block falling in Satluj Catchment Range of general slope of land

• • •

Farmers' owned land area Irrigated area Fodder supply against demand* • Green fodder • Dry fodder Improvement Expenditure to be met from CAT Plan •

• •

• • • •

77 % 83 % Rs. In Lakhs

Cost of 0.5% additional area(16 ha) to be brought under irrigation(@ Rs. 1.0 Lakh/ha) Cost of 1 % area (32 ha) to be brought under organic farming (@ Rs. 10,000/= per ha)(Only incentive portion)*** Rejuvenation of senile orchards {0.5 % of area (16 ha) @ Rs.15,000/= per ha} (Only incentive portion)*** Area expansion under Hort. Crops {0.5% of area (16 ha) @ Rs. 60,000/= per ha}( Only incentive portion)*** 0.5 % of area (16 ha) to be Bench Terraced (@ Rs.1,06,882/= per ha)**** One Community Water Storage Tank for 10 hectare command area in each Block*** One Farm Pond (125 CM) for each micro-watershed (26 Nos.) @ Rs. 2,96, 000/= per pond**** 0.5 % of farmers’ owned land (16 ha ) to be brought under grassland improvement (@ Rs. 1.0 Lakh/ha)***** One Natural Breeding Centre (NBC) in each micro-watershed (26 Nos.) @ Rs. 25,000/= per centre****** Cost of one Gosadan to accommodate 100 cattle heads 1. Recurring cost@ Rs.40/= per cattle per day 2. Recurreing cost of 4 attendants @ Rs. 120/=/per day/per attendant 3. Fixed cost for raising Gosadan structures Total

Source * ** *** **** ***** ******

26 ** 30 to 85%** 3153 ha** < 10 %**

Block Dev.Office/Distt. Statistical Office NERIL Survey Cost norms as per Hort.Tech. Mission, GOI/Deptt. of Hort. H.P. Deptt. of Agri. H.P norms Dept. of Ani. Husbandry, H.P. norms Mid Himalayan Project norms Comprehensive CAT Plan of Satluj River Basin

16.00

3.20 2.40

9.60

17.10 17.25 76.96 16.00

6.50

14.60 1.73 5.00 186.34


vol3 - Nichar