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LOVE TO MAKE

HOME SEWING Part

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Window Blinds

May 2016

Sweet Baker Bears To Needlefelt

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Hello and welcome… Just recently we’ve been experiencing some beautiful weather – which certainly lifts the spirits after the long winter months – and with it our gardens have started to bloom. With that in mind do turn to our May Blossoms feature on pages 6, for our simple ideas to bring the joy of spring into your home. This month also brings part two of our ‘Window Style’ feature: fabric blinds. We show you how to measure up accurately, and make several types, from roller to rolling, and flat panels to folding – there’s a style to suit most windows and personal tastes (pages 9 to 20). On pages 23 to 31 we’ve revisited one of our childhood favourite pastimes – origami – with some stylish white-on-white home accessories, all based on different folding techniques. For those of you who love teddies, you’ll be thrilled with our needlefelted Baker Bears on pages 60 to 65, complete with baked goodies, including gateaux, cupcakes and bread rolls – they’re just irresistible! Each month we include many different types of crafts so that Love to Make can appeal to as many of you as possible – from complete beginners to the more ‘professional’. This month in ‘Try a new craft’ we focus on painting on canvas and, if there’s a craft you’re interested to learn that we haven’t included, do let us know – see the bottom of this page for details of how to get in touch. We’d love to hear from you! Until next month – Jane bolsover have fun crafting!

to help you with your makes we’ve added at-a-glance experience levels. Look out for this at the top of each ‘You Will Need’ section.

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Look what’s inside... So many brilliant projects for you

21-22 Make it tonight!

21 Button card

23-31 The origami home

36-37 Try a new craft: canvas painting

40-41 Knitted lacy cardigan

42-43 Crochet stool cover

8 Needle-felting workshops 32 Web news 38 Craft book reviews 44-45 Knitting and crochet workshops 50-51 Our latest subscription offers 58-59 Shop: summer knits and crochet patterns 66 Shop: knits with motifs 67-68 Complete stitch reference guide Send for 68-73 All your charts and templates for the makes in this issue pattern 74 Over to you… you share your makes with us

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54-57 Upcycle old drawers


6-7 Now’s the time... for May Blossoms

9-20 Window style part 2: blinds

19 Stencilled blinds

29 Perfect placemats

33 Arm candy bracelet

34-35 Cross-stitched pot holders

46-48 Appliquéd quilt

49 Découpage drawer knobs

52-53 A blossom bag

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Now’s the time… for May blossoms As our gardens prepare to burst into life with a riot of colour, here are five simple ideas to bring spring into your home Class glass Create your own iridescent vases in pastel shades to display freshly picked blossom branches.

1

Choose four shades of Pebeo Vitrea 160 glass paint, and using a palate, mix each one with gloss, or frosted medium to produce lighter shades, and finally, mix in some iridescent medium. De-grease some tall, heavybase highball glasses in hot soapy water and dry well. Paint each glass and leave to air dry for 24 hours. Place glasses into a cold domestic oven and once the temperature has reached 160ºC (320ºF) allow them to bake for 40 minutes. After baking, the colours are dishwasher safe.

2

Luxe linen Inexpensive bedding can be made more luxurious when stamped with flowers and trimmed with coordinating organza ribbons.

www.timeincukcontent.com

1

Choose two shades of fabric paint and select two different widths of organza ribbon to match. Pin, tack and machine stitch your ribbon bands just below the deep hemmed edge of the sheet and along the opening end of a pillowcase, turning under the short cut ribbon ends to neaten. Trace the flower templates printed

2

6 Love To Make

on page 68 and cut out. Transfer shapes on to a sheet of high-density foam rubber and cut out using a craft knife. Stick foam rubber shapes to small pieces of wood, using double-sided sticky tape to form two stamps. Alternatively, buy ready-made flower stamps. Slip a sheet of polythene under the fabric that you are going to decorate, to stop the paint bleeding through. Then using our photo as a guide, and following the manufacturer’s instructions, carefully stamp a border of flowers across the sheet and pillowcase, keeping the design parallel to the ribbons.

3


Bird song Create an attractive spring floral display for your home using either fresh blossom branches from your garden, or for a more long-term display use artificial cherry or apple blossoms. Arrange stems in a vase with a narrow opening and let them splay outwards, then clip an assortment of colourful artificial birds to the branches – a large selection are available online at etsy.com.

Spell it out These gorgeous fabric letters look fabulous on a sideboard or chest.

1

Buy papier mâché découpage blanks. For each letter cut two rectangles of pretty print fabric 4cm larger all round than the letter. Trace around letter blank onto thin wadding using a marker pen and cut out. Finally, draw around the letter on to a piece of cardboard; cut out. Apply a thin layer of glue to the front of each letter blank and stick wadding in place. Leave to dry. On reverse side of each letter blank, run strips of double-sided tape around edges. Place letter blank wadding side

2

Petal power down, centrally on to fabric rectangle and fold back the fabric hems, using the sticky tape to hold in place. Clip into corners to help fabric fold back and use more doublesided tape if necessary. Cover cardboard backing panel with the remaining fabric rectangle, as before. Then, using rubber solution glue, stick backing to the letter. Leave to dry. Cut a long straight strip of fabric to the depth of your letter. Apply strips of double-sided tape around outer edges of your fabriccovered letter and carefully stick the strips around to cover up the side edges. Overlap ends to finish and trim away excess fabric.

3

4

These coasters are perfect for prettying up a table.

1

On a dry sunny day gather clean flowers, free of spots and blemishes. Place the flowers face down in a heavy book lined with parchment paper. Close the book, weight it down, and leave undisturbed for seven to 10 days.

2

For each of the coasters you will need two glasslook cast acrylic disks: 3mm thick x 100mm diameter. Arrange the pressed flowers on one disk and place a second on top. Hold the two disks together using narrow strips of masking tape, then seal them around the edge using a clear silicone sealant. Wipe and leave to dry before using.


Woman’s Weekly Events

Fun Needle-Felting Workshops J

oin felting experts Judy Balchin and Roz Dace as they run this year’s needle-felting workshops. These full-day workshops are brilliant for complete beginners or for anyone keen on needle-felting, which is an easy technique to pick up. You just need a needle and a pile of fluff and, once you’ve learnt the basic method, you can make almost anything.

Monday 6 June

Monday 19 September

You will be making a cute little mouse with choices of colour (12cm high)

Make your own little jointed teddy bear with coloured fibres and embellishments (12cm high)

10am Meet & greet, with tea and coffee 10.30am Introduction and a short demonstration on needle-felting technique 10.45am Start needle-felting the different body parts 11.30am Tea/coffee break 11.45am Finish the body parts and add facial features 1pm Lunch 2pm Joint your teddy bear 3pm Tea/coffee break 3.15pm Needle-felt a costume and add embellishments 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop ends

Back popu by demanladr !

NEW

for 2016

and LTM05

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£79

per pers on workshoeach p

D Judy is a designer who’s written numerous craft books and articles. She attended Cardiff and then Maidstone College of Art, where she studied graphic design, before starting work as a designer at the BBC. D Roz has always loved creative writing, drawing, painting and all crafts. For many years, she was Search Press’s editorial director, commissioning practical art and crafts books for international markets.

Wee Woolly Mouse Teddy Bear 10am Meet & greet, with tea and coffee 10.30am Introduction and a short demonstration on the needle-felting technique 10.45am Start needle-felting the different body parts 11.30am Tea/coffee break 11.45am Finish the body parts and assemble your mouse 1pm Lunch 2pm Finish mouse and add facial features 3pm Tea/coffee break 3.15pm Needle-felt a costume and add embellishments 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop ends

To book, call 0800 024 1qu2o1te2*

Winter Woolly Polar Bear

Christmas Penguin

Monday 14 November

Needle-felt this penguin (15cm high). Judy and Roz show you how to create the figure and add the hat and hot-water bottle

Come and needle-felt a polar bear (9cm high). Using a wool-sculpting technique, Judy and Roz will show you how to add his scarf and earmuffs

10am Meet & greet, with tea and coffee 10.30am Introduction and a short demonstration on needle-felting technique 10.45am Start needle-felting the different body parts 11.30am Tea/coffee break 11.45am Finish the body parts and assemble your bear 1pm Lunch 2pm Finish bear and add facial features 3pm Tea/coffee break 3.15pm Add earmuffs, scarf and snowballs 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop ends

Monday 28 November

10am Meet & greet, with tea and coffee 10.30am Introduction and a short demonstration on the needle-felting technique 10.45am Start needle-felting the body parts 11.30am Tea/coffee break 11.45am Finish the body parts and assemble your penguin 1pm Lunch 2pm Finish penguin and add facial features 3pm Tea/ coffee break 3.15pm Make hotwater bottle and hat 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop ends Back popu by demanladr !

NEW

for 2016

To book, call 0800 024 1212* quoting LTM05 or complete the coupon

Book By Phone MasterCard or Visa cardholders can book a workshop on 0800 024 1212. *Lines open Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm, but closed bank holidays. Call charges from mobiles and non-BT landlines may vary. Use The Coupon Complete the coupon. Payment may be made by cheque, crossed and made payable to Woman’s Weekly Shop. Where are the workshops held? At our HQ: Blue Fin

Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU. The workshops do not include lunch but there is a canteen or you can bring your own and there are also food outlets close to the office. Should your chosen date already be sold out, you will, if possible, be offered an alternative date. Terms and conditions Tickets will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Woman’s Weekly has the right to change the itinerary of the day. Please note, tickets

Woman’s Weekly Needle-felting Workshops, Code LTM05 Please complete this coupon and send it, along with your cheque, to: Woman’s Weekly Customer Care, Blue Fin Building, Room 6C05, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU Workshop Wee Woolly Mouse Teddy Bear Winter Woolly Polar Bear Christmas Penguin

Date 6 June 2016 19 Sept 2016 14 Nov 2016 28 Nov 2016

Price £79 £79 £79 £79

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Total

GRAND TOTAL £

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Window style

Beautiful

Blinds This month we bring you part two of our three-part special, showing you how to create beautiful window treatments for your home. Here’s all need to know to get started to make fabulous blinds, and in the June issue we’ll show you how to measure up and make gorgeous curtains

Love To Make 9


B

linds are an extremely popular and versatile way to dress a window. Aesthetically, they are a cleanedged form of window treatment, but they have many practical advantages too. They are an economical alternative to curtains, as they are usually made from one piece of fabric, and are often the best choice for kitchens and bathrooms where full-length curtains are not practical. They can be made to fit any size of window, and are particularly good for small ones as they do not block out too much light when raised.

Blinds through the ages were made

Words: Jane Bolsover

The earliest forms of blind to protect valuable furnishings and curtains in grand houses from the destructive effects of the sun. They were more like screens with a piece of fabric stretched over a wooden frame which was attached to the window and occasionally hinged to swing back. By the eighteenth century, blinds were more sophisticated and were used as window dressings in their own right. A forerunner of the Austrian blind had a simple cording system, which pulled a loose curtain up into simple swags at the top. These blinds were used in elegant Georgian windows to both add drama and soften the view. The mid-eighteen century saw the birth of the roller blind, when the spring was invented. These blinds were often highly decorated with paintings and borders. By the nineteenth century, blinds had become an indispensable part of elaborate window treatments. Fussy festoon blinds, that retained their ruched appearance when let down were very popular. Festoon and Austrian blinds had a big revival during the 1980s, when the nation became obsessed with filling their home with frills and bows! Today, with such wide range of blinds available, from roller to Roman, Venetian to split cane, and even paper pleated, you can find a style to compliment any type of architecture and to suit any taste, giving a clean plain solution for window dressings. 10 Love To Make

Preliminaries For Blind Making

Plain flat blinds, when lowered, cover the window with a neat rectangle of fabric, and have the advantage that they roll up or fold away into a relatively inconspicuous strip of fabric, letting in the maximum amount of light. However, to get a professional result you must pay attention to detail, especially when measuring up and making sure that the blind hangs square and true. Blinds can be hung either inside (recess-fixed) or outside (face-fixed) your window by means of a blind support, which is made from a timber batten (see right).

Positioning blind supports A recess-fixed blind is held in place with a support screwed to the top of the window recess. For a face-fixed blind, the support is screwed to the wall and normally positioned 12.5cm above the top of the window and extends beyond the sides by the same amount.

Measuring for blinds The way you measure for blinds depends on whether the blind is to be recess- or face-fixed. The diagram below shows where to measure in order to work out how much fabric you will require for the different types of blind.

B A

Measuring for a face-fixed blind

1

To calculate the finished length of a face-fixed blind, measure from the wall across the top of the timber support and down to 5cm below the windowsill (measurement D).

2

To calculate the finished width, measure the length of the timber support (measurement B), and add 12mm.

How much fabric do I need for my blind? Now that you have taken your measurements and made adjustments for clearance, you must add on the correct hem allowances before you can calculate your fabric quantities. Below is a general guide for unlined blinds, but lined blinds, and different styles may require different hem allowances, so please refer to individual instructions for details.

1

To work out the cut width of the blind, take the width measurement and add 10cm for the side hems.

C

D

Example: For a 99cm-wide blind, add 10cm for hems = 109cm cut width.

2

To work out the cut length of the blind, add 2.5cm to measurement C or D for a top hem and 7.5cm for a base hem; this will allow for a 5cm double-turned hem.

Measuring for a recess-fixed blind

1

To calculate the finished length of a recess-fixed blind, measure from the top of the timber support and subtract 1cm for clearance, so that the blind will hang just short of the sill: measurement C.

2

To calculate the finished width, measure the width of the recess (measurement A) and subtract 2cm, so that the blind does not touch the sides of the window, which would restrict its operation.

Example: For a 140cm-long blind, add 10cm in total for the hem allowances = 150cm cut length.

3

To calculate the amount of fabric you will need, divide your blind’s cut width by your fabric width. You will usually only need one width of fabric. If two widths are required, cut the odd width in half lengthwise and join each part width on to the outside edges of the blind, so that you have a full width in the centre.

4

Multiply the cut length of your blind by the number of fabric widths.


FABrIc quAnTITIes For BlInds To work out how much fabric you need, fill in your window measurements on this chart and add or subtract hem allowances and clearances as appropriate.

room 1

room 2

room 3

room 4

1

length from support to base of blind

Add 2.5cm top hem allowance, or as instructions state Add 6cm base hem allowance, or as instructions state Subtract 1cm clearance for a recess-fixed blind Add all measurements together to obtain total cut length (A)

2

Measure width of support

Add 10cm for side hems, or as instructions state Subtract 2cm clearance for a recess-fixed blind Add 12mm for a face-fixed blind Add all the measurements together to obtain the cut blind width (B)

3

Work out fabric quantity

Note the width of your fabric (c) Divide B by C to work out how many fabric widths required (d)

Total fabric quantity = A x d

Points to remember

l Very few windows and walls are perfectly straight or ‘true.’ If your walls are particularly out of alignment, fitting a recess blind (see left) is a bad idea, as they simply will not hang well. Go for a face-fixed blind, or curtains, instead. l do not choose check-patterned fabrics, especially if your windows are not perfectly straight – they will just emphasise the problem. l If you have a really wide window, make several blinds instead of just one; it is much harder to get one large blind to sit exactly straight when it is pulled up.

Making a blind support If you are making a blind, you will need to make a timber support from which to suspend your blind. To get the perfect-looking finish, paint it to match your décor.

1

For either a recess-fixed or a facefixed blind, cut a piece of 2.5 x 5cm timber to the finished width of your blind (see left). For a recess-fixed blind, drill a hole in the wider underside of the timber 8cm in from the ends. For a face-fixed blind, drill a hole in the wider face side of the timber support 8cm in from each end. Paint the timber with two or three coats of paint, leaving it to dry between coats.

2

Using a staple gun, staple the hook side of a length of hook-and-loop fastener tape (Velcro) to the support. For a facefixed blind, staple the tape to the top narrow edge of the support; for a recess-fixed blind, staple the tape to the narrow front edge of the support.

3

If you are making a rolling or flat blind, screw your blind support in place. For a Roman blind, you will need to add screw eyes. Using a bradawl, mark the positions of the screw eyes on the underside of the support; one at the centre and one 5cm in from each end. Add a fourth one 2.5cm in from the cordoperating side. Hang the support.

Love To Make 11


Roman Blinds

Roman blinds are more formal and sophisticated than other types of blind. Although, when fully extended they lie flat against the window and need little more fabric than a roller blind, a Roman blind has added interest with its series of crisp, horizontal folds. To keep the folds in place, the fabric is usually supported by dowels or rods contained in pockets, or tape on the reserve of the blind. The blind is raised and lowered by cords threaded through a series of rings stitched to the rod pockets.

Unlined Roman Blind A BiT MoRe TRiCkY

You will need: For the blind: l Cotton or linen plains and prints (to calculate fabric quantity, see page 11) l Matching sewing thread l Sew-and-stick hook-andloop fastener (Velcro) the finished width of your blind l 6mm-diameter wooden dowels cut to width of blind minus 6cm l Roman blind tape l Fine Roman blind cord l Small plastic rings l Thin 25mm-wide wooden lath cut to width of blind minus 2.5cm l Acorn cord pull For the blind support and fixings (see Making a blind support, page 11) l 25 x 50mm timber batten, cut to width of finished blind l Four medium brass screw eyes l Cleat to secure cords l Screws l Staple gun Note: 1.5cm seam allowances are included unless otherwise stated

this). Press a 2.5cm double-turned hem down each side of the blind and pin, tack, and machine stitch in place.

2

Press over 2.5cm to the wrong side along the base edge, then press over a further 5cm to form a double-turned hem. Pin, tack, and machine stitch in place.

3

Press over 2.5cm to the wrong side along the top edge of the blind. Trim the hem allowance down to 1.5cm and tack in place. Pin the fluffy side of the hook-and-loop tape to the wrong side of the blind at the top edge, enclosing the raw edge. Machine stitch the tape in place along all edges, reverse stitching at each end to secure.

To make

1

Measure your window and calculate your cut blind size, then cut out your fabric. If you need to join fabric widths, use French seams (see page 68 for details of how to stitch 12 Love To Make

positioning the top edge of each piece along the chalked lines. Pin, tack, and machine stitch the tapes in place along the top edge only, starting and finishing 2cm in from each end of the tape and reverse stitching to secure.

5 4

To calculate and mark the spacing for the Roman blind tapes, see right. Cut lengths of tape to fit the width of your blind. Place the tapes on the blind,

Insert the wooden lath through the base hem channel and slipstitch the open ends closed. Insert the dowels through the casings in the


Positioning Roman blind tapes A Roman blind is operated by cords, which pull up the blind in a series of neat folds. To ensure that it folds up easily and gives support to the blind, wooden dowels are inserted into slotted tapes, stitched horizontally across the blind. It is essential that you space these tapes correctly.

Top of blind 10 cm clearance 2xf Tape position 2xf Tape position 2xf

(f ) plus 1 (for the distance between the base of the blind and the first tape position. In most cases, this will be 2 x 4 = 8 + 1. For example: For a blind 122cm long, subtract 10cm at the top = 112cm. Divide the remaining length by twice the number of folds + 1 (so if there are four folds this will be 9). Therefore the fold spacing will be 112cm ÷ 9 = 12.4cm.

Tape position

4

2xf Tape position f Base of blind

1

Decide on the number of folds you require – normally four for a standard-sized blind, but you may need less for a short one or more for a longer one.

2 With only straight seams to sew, an unlined Roman blind is easy enough for a complete beginner to make, so grab your sewing machine and have a go!

tapes. To neaten the raw ends, fold over a double-turned hem at each end and whipstitch the ends to secure (see page 68 for details of how to work slipstitch and whipstitch).

6

Lay the blind wrong side up on a flat surface. Sew a plastic ring to the loose edge of each Roman blind tape, placing them 5cm in from the side edges of the blind. Sew a third ring to each

From your blind length, deduct 10cm from the top for clearance. This will prevent the Roman blind tapes and rings catching on the supporting screw eyes, and will also allow the folds to lie evenly.

3

Divide the remaining depth of the blind by twice the number of folds

tape at the centre point. Knot a length of cord to each of the bottom rings and thread the cords vertically up through the rest of the rings.

7

Using the hookand-loop tape, attach your blind to the blind support. Working from the wrong side of the blind, thread the cords up through the screws eyes directly above,

Using a tape measure, mark the spacing positions for four rows of tape, on the reverse side of your blind (to form the four folds) with pins along each side hem – we show these as dark lines on our diagram. Then, lightly draw lines across the blind, joining the pins, using tailor’s chalk and a ruler. You are now ready to attach the tapes.

Tip... Draw a diagram and mark in your calculations to doublecheck they fit into the finished length of your blind.

Taken from Sewing Machine Basics by Jane Bolsover (Cico Books, £14.99)

then pass them across to the operating end, making sure that all cords go through the fourth screw eye.

8

Attach the cord pull to the loose ends of your cords and screw the cleat to the side of the window frame. To raise your blind, pull on the cord pull and secure the cords around the cleat in a figure of eight. Love To Make 13


Dress your windows with these gorgeous floral blinds – the perfect solution for French doors

French Dressing A BiT MoRe TRiCkY

You will need: For the blind: l Main and contrasting fabrics (to calculate fabric quantity, see page 11) l Lining fabric l Matching sewing thread l Sew-and-stick hook-andloop fastener (Velcro) the finished width of your blind l 6mm-diameter wooden dowels cut to width of blind minus 6cm l Roman blind tape l Fine Roman blind cord l Small plastic rings l Acorn cord pull For the blind support and fixings (see Making a blind support, page 11) l 25 x 50mm timber batten, cut to width of finished blind l Four medium brass screw eyes l Cleat to secure cords l Screws and staple gun Note: 1.5cm seam allowances are included

To make

1

Measure the finished length and width of your blind (see page 11 for details on Measuring for blinds). Cut main fabric to the finished length minus 4cm, by finished width minus 4cm. From contrast fabric, cut two side borders to finished length of blind plus 3cm, by 6.5cm wide. Cut the top and bottom borders to width of your main fabric piece, by 6.5cm wide.

2

Stitch the top and bottom borders to main fabric piece along the two short ends. Press seams open. Stitch the two side borders to long side edges of the main fabric. Press seams open. Cut out lining fabric to finished length and width of blind, adding a 1.5cm seam allowance to all sides. With right sides facing, stitch the lining to the blind around the three edges, keeping the top open. Clip corners, turn to right side and press seamed edges flat. Tack open edges together.

3

Working from the right side of the blind, topstitch through all layers of fabric, around the inside edge of all the borders. Press top edge of blind 1.5cm to wrong side. Pin the fluffy side of the hook-and-loop tape to the wrong side of the blind at the top edge, enclosing the raw hem edge. Machine stitch the tape in place along all edges, reverse stitching at each end to secure.

4

To calculate and mark the spacing for the Roman blind tapes, see page 13. Cut lengths of tape to fit the width of your blind. Place the tapes on the blind, positioning the top edge of each piece along the chalked lines. Pin, tack, and machine stitch the tapes in place along the top edge only, starting and finishing

14 Love To Make

2cm in from each end of the tape and reverse stitching to secure.


This pretty buttoning blind is ideal for windows where you need a ‘dressblind’, and don’t want to raise it up and down often

Button up This blind is a softer, unlined version of a Roman blind, which does not have any rods to support its folds. A BiT MoRe TRiCkY

You will need: For the blind: l Lightweight fabric (to calculate fabric quantity, see pages 11) l Matching sewing thread l Four x 20mm two-hole pearl buttons l Narrow satin ribbon l Sew-and-stick hook-andloop fastener (Velcro) the finished width of your blind

5

Insert the dowels through the casings in the tapes. To neaten the raw ends, fold over a doubleturned hem at each end and whipstitch the ends to secure (see page 68 for details of how to work this stitch). Complete the blind following steps 6, 7 and 8 of the Unlined Roman blind on page 12.

For the blind support and fixings (see Making a blind support, page 11) l 25 x 50mm timber batten, cut to width of finished blind l Screws l Staple gun

To make

1

Measure the finished length and width of your blind, but only add 6cm to the width for side hems and 5cm for the base hem (see page 10 for details of how to measure for blinds). Cut out blind and press a 1.5cm double-turned hem down each side edge; pin, tack and machine stitch in place.

2

Press a 2.5cm to the wrong side along the base edge, then press over a further 2.5cm to form a double-turned hem. Pin, tack, and machine stitch in place.

3

Press a 2.5cm to the wrong side along the top edge of the blind. Trim the hem allowance down to 1.5cm and tack in place. Pin the fluffy side of the hook-andloop tape to the wrong side of the blind at the top edge, enclosing the raw edge. Machine stitch the tape in place along all edges, reverse stitching each end.

4

Sew four buttons to the right side of the blind at the top, along the lower stitching line of the hook-and-loop tape, creating a 12mm shank on each one (see page 68 for details of how to work a button shank). Place the outer ones 5cm from the side edge and the remaining two spaced evenly in between.

5

Now calculate and mark the spacing for the blind folds as shown in ‘Positioning Roman Blind tapes’ on page 13, but instead of drawing a line with chalk across the blind, use a row of pins. Cut the ribbon into four 5cm-lengths for each fold of your blind. Turn the blind right side up and machine stitch the ribbon loops along each fold position, to correspond with the button positions, folding the raw ends under to neaten, use image as a guide.

6

Using the hook-and-loop tape, attach your blind to the blind support, and use the buttons and loops to raise blind and reveal the window beneath. Love To Make 15


Rolling Blinds

Easy to make, a rolling blind gives you the opportunity to mix different fabrics together for an individual look

Rolling blinds are one of the simplest forms of blind to make. They can have a cording system rather like a Roman blind, or can be rolled up by hand. They are not made from stiffened fabric, like a roller blind, and so have a much softer feel. Here we show you how to make hand-rolled ones, which work best as ‘dress’ blinds, rather than ones you need to operate often.

Two-tone rolling blind This basic rolling blind uses ribbons or tapes for the ties. eaSY peaSY

You will need: For the blind: l Co-ordinating fabrics of your choice for the front and back of the blind (see page 11) l Ribbon, or tape four times longer than the length of the finished blind. l Matching sewing thread l Dressmakers’ chalk l Sew-and-stick hook-and-loop fastener (Velcro) the finished width of your blind l One 6mm-diameter wooden dowel cut to width of blind minus 6cm For the blind support and fixings (see Making a blind support, page 11) l 25 x 50mm timber batten, cut to width of finished blind l Staple gun and staples l Bradawl, screws, screwdriver and drill to attach batten

Fabric quantities Measure the area to be covered by the blind. If it’s going inside a recess, make it 1cm narrower than the recess to allow the finished blind to go up and down smoothly. Add 3cm to the width for seam allowances and 6cm to the length for the top and bottom hems.

To make

1

Cut out size required in fabrics ‘A’ (front) and ‘B’ (back) – don’t forget to add 3cm to the width and 6cm to the length.

16 Love To Make

Lay the two pieces of the blind right sides facing and raw edges matching. Pin and machine stitch a 1.5cm seam along sides and bottom edge. Cut off the corner seam allowances at right angles to reduce bulk. Turn through so the blind is the right way round and ease out corners. Press into shape.

2

With ‘B’ facing you, turn up bottom edge by 3cm to make a channel for the dowelling. Pin and machine stitch close to edge.

3

Lay the blind flat and measure up from bottom edge and mark the finished length across the blind with dressmakers’ chalk. Press the top edge down on the reverse side (B) along the chalk line. Open out the fold and trim the hem allowance so it measures 1.5cm.

4

Cut the ribbon or tape in half and mark the centre of each piece (remember you selected ribbon

that was four times the length of the finished blind). Position each ribbon about 20cm in from the edges with the centre of each ribbon over the pressed top edge. Pin in place.

5

Place the fluffy side of the hook-and-loop tape on wrong side of the blind at the top hem allowance matching one long edge with pressed top edge of the blind. Pin and machine stitch along both sides of hook-and-loop tape catching in the ribbons as you sew. Insert dowelling into base channel and slipstitch the ends of the channel closed to stop it coming out.

6

Using the hook-andloop tape, attach your blind to the blind support. Make sure ribbons hang down. Trim ribbons to required length and make a double-fold hem at ends to neaten. Roll up blind to required height and tie ribbons into bows to hold in place.


This blind is a more elegant version of the two-tone rolling blind, with contrast bordered edges, it looks fabulous in a living room

Border it A variation on the basic rolling blind, this one has contrasting borders and fabric ties. a BiT MORe TRiCkY

You will need:

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For the blind: l Main and lining fabrics (to calculate fabric quantity, see Fabric Quantities, on page 11) l Contrast fabric, a piece the same length as the cut blind x the fabric’s width l Matching sewing thread l Sew-and-stick hook-andloop fastener (Velcro) the finished width of your blind l One 6mm-diameter wooden dowel cut to width of blind minus 6cm For the blind support and fixings (see Making a blind support, page 11) l 25 x 50mm timber batten, cut to width of finished blind l Staple gun and staples l Bradawl, screws, screwdriver and drill to attach batten

Fabric quantities Measure the area to be covered by the blind. If it’s going inside a recess, make it 1cm narrower than the recess to allow the finished blind to go up and down smoothly. For this blind, do not add anything to width for seam allowances, but add 6cm for the top and bottom hems.

To make

1

Cut out the main fabric piece and the lining to the size calculated. Cut two binding pieces and two ties from the contrast fabric each the cut length of the blind x 9cm-wide.

2

Lay the two blind pieces flat with wrong sides facing and raw edges matching then, tack the two pieces together all around the edge.

3

Lay the blind out flat with right side uppermost. With right sides facing, pin and tack a contrast strip down each side of the blind, setting them back 1.5cm from the edge of the blind. Machine stitch in place 3cm in from the edge of the blind; reverse stitching at each end to secure. Fold the contrast strip over to cover the edge of the bind and press the seams flat.

4

Now fold and press the remaining long edge of each contrast strip 1.5cm to the wrong side. Fold each strip over to the lining side of the blind, bringing the new pressed edge up with the line of machine stitches. Pin in place and invisibly slipstitch the contrast strip to the machine stitches.

5

Fold one contrast tie strip in half along its length with right sides facing, and stitch the long edges together and across one short end, taking a 1.5cm seam allowance, and reverse stitching at each end to secure. Clip corners and turn right side out. Repeat with remaining tie. Press flat with the seam running down one side edge, and tuck in the raw edges at the opening ends to neaten. Slipstitch edges together, then topstitch down each long side to keep the ties flat.

6

Press a 1.5cm hem to the wrong side along the bottom edge of the blind, then fold up another 3cm to make a channel for the dowelling. Complete the blind following steps 4, 5 and 6 of the ‘Two-tone Rolling blind’, left, but use your contrast fabric ties instead of the ribbon. Love To Make 17


Roller Blinds

Roller blinds with a spring mechanism are one of the most space-efficient forms of blind. Usually fitted to the top of a window, they fill the window space with a fat rectangle of fabric when let down, and when rolled up they form a tight cylinder which sits neatly above the window. The fabric used for roller blinds must be stiffened for the blind to function properly. Stiffened fabric can be bought, or you can stiffen your own furnishing fabric with a special spray. Cotton and linen fabrics work best for this process.

Making a Roller blind

To make

eaSY peaSY

You will need: l Roller blind kit with a side pulley mechanism, cut to the required size and fitted inside or outside the window recess l Cotton or linen fabric (see Measuring and estimating fabric quantities, below) l Fabric stiffener (if required) l Matching sewing thread l Set-square, ruler, pencil and sharp scissors l Double-sided sticky tape, approximately 12mm-wide l Masking tape l Thin 25mm-wide wooden lath cut to width of blind minus 2.5cm

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Measuring and estimating fabric quantities Fabric that is stiffened by a spray may shrink so you will need to add at least 5cms to the width and length measurements to allow for this. The width of the blind is the same width as the roller excluding the end fixtures. There is no need to add any extra hem allowances, as the stiffened fabric will not fray. Fix up the blind brackets and cut the roller to length, following the manufacturer’s instructions. For the length of the blind, measure from the roller to the windowsill and add a minimum of 30cm for the roller to be covered with fabric and the channel allowance at the base.

1

Press the fabric to remove any creases then stiffen the fabric following the manufacturer’s instructions, allow to dry and press again.

sided adhesive tape along the top edge of the blind, along the marked line.

2

Trim the fabric to the required size using a set square to make sure all the sides are absolutely square. Lay the fabric on a flat surface, wrong side uppermost and fold up a 4cm hem along the bottom edge. Stitch in place close to the raw edge to form a channel. Slide the wooden lath into the casing.

3

Lay the blind on a flat surface and mark a line across the width, 12mm down from the top edge. If the blind is to roll down from behind the roller, mark this line on the right side of the fabric. If the blind is to hang down in front of the roller, mark the line on the wrong side of the fabric. Position a length of double

Tip... If the blind is to hang where it might get splashed or stained easily, it is worth adding extra length so that the bottom can be cut off when it gets dirty. This will add to the life of the blind. 18 Love To Make

4

Lay the roller on a flat surface making sure that the pulley mechanism is on the correct side. Remove the paper backing from the sticky tape and press the top edge of the fabric onto the roller. Make sure that the top edge of the fabric is aligned along the marked line on the roller. Cover the raw edge of the fabric with a strip of masking tape. Roll up the blind by hand, slot it into the brackets and pull the blind down. Work the blind up and down until the required tension is achieved.


Roller blinds create a flat unobtrusive panel and are ideal for windows where there isn’t much clutter, such as a kitchen or bathroom. They are very easy to make using a specialist kit

Let’s get stencilling eaSY peaSY

You will need: l Shop bought plain roller blind l Stencil of your choice, we chose an agapanthus l Two complementary colours of fabric paint l 20mm stencil brush l Dish or small saucer l Re-positioning spray mount l Newspaper l Kitchen paper

window and lay it out on a flat surface. It is best to secure your stencil to the blind, so that both hands are free: use low-tack spray, which allows for re-positioning. Protect your surface with newspaper, then spray the back of the stencil lightly. Re-spray when the stencil will not stick any more (you should be able to move the stencil a few times before this is necessary).

To stencil

2

Place your stencil on the right side of your blind, sticky side down, where you want the first design to sit. Then, shake and stir the first paint colour, pour a little in your dish. Dip the brush into the paint, taking up a small amount on the very end of the bristles, Circle the brush vigorously on to a wad of kitchen paper to make the paint travel up the bristles.

1

Fit blind to window following the manufacturer’s instructions then remove the roller blind from your Stencilling is a great way to add your own artistic touch to a plain readymade roller blind with out the need for lots of skill

3

Dab brush on to clean kitchen paper, checking there are no blotches and that the brush only leaves a misty impression. Apply the paint through stencil with a circling motion for a smooth effect and a gentle dabbing for a stippled effect – or use a combination of both techniques. Repeat with your second colour, on other areas of the stencil then, remove and reposition it for the next motif.

4

When you have finished stencilling leave the paint to air dry and then set it by ironing with a dry iron. Roll up the blind by hand, slot it back into the brackets and pull down. Work the blind until the required tension is achieved. Love To Make 19


Flat blinds A flat blind is probably to most basic form of blind possible, being simply a rectangle of fabric that can be hemmed and hung up at a window with hooks. Because it is so simple, producing one does not require great sewing skills, and if you use an iron-on hemming tape it can even be a no-sew option. As a flat blind has no cords of mechanism to raise and lower it, you can be creative and individual in the way that the blind is hung and pulled away from the window.

Hook it up The following flat bind is fully lined, which is a great way of introducing two contrasting or coordinating fabrics, into your room. easy peasy

you will need: You will need for the blind: l Co-ordinating fabrics of your choice for the front and back of the blind (see Fabric Quantities, below) l 36mm-diameter two-part click together eyelets for curtains l Matching sewing thread l Iron-on interfacing l Dressmakers’ chalk l Five hooks, nails or decorative hanging pegs, for attaching the blind l Timber support (optional)

Fabric quantities and cutting out Measure the area of the window to be covered by the blind. Add 3cm to the width and length for seam allowances. Cut out one piece of fabric for the front of the blind and one piece for the back to the measurements calculated. Cut out two 8cm-wide strips of interfacing to the same width as your cut blind.

To make www.timeincukcontent.com

1

Iron the interfacing pieces to the wrong side of the lining at the top and bottom of the blind then, lay the two pieces of fabric right sides together and raw edges matching. Pin and machine stitch a 1.5cm seam around all edges of the blind, leaving an opening along the top edge for

20 Love To Make

Flat blinds are a fun idea for teenager’s rooms. Simply hung with large eyelets punched along the top and bottom edges, they give plenty of scope for hooking up the panel in interesting ways

turning through to the right side.

2

Cut off the corner seam allowances at right angles to reduce bulk. Turn through so the blind is the right way round and ease out corners. Press into shape and slipstitch the opening edges closed, see page 68 for details of how to work this stitch.

3

Lay the blind out flat right side up, and place the eyelets along the top and bottom edges of the blind within the interfaced sections, making sure that they are evenly spaced. Mark the positions using chalk and then carefully cut away the fabric from inside the eyelets. Do not worry about fraying, the rings will hide any untidy edges. Insert the rings following the manufacturer’s instructions.

4

Attach your hooks, nails or pegs to the top of your window frame, or timber support, to correspond with the top eyelets. Now you can experiment with different ways of looping up your blind to reveal the window.

Tip... For hook-up blinds made from heavier fabrics it is best to use curtain eyelets designed to work with curtain poles, which are stronger, but for lightweight fabrics you can use smaller metal sail eyelets.

Coming next month The final part of our Window Style special, how to measure windows accurately, and make up beautiful curtains for your home.


Easy Makes

Make It Tonight! These great ideas are perfect gifts for family and friends

Time for tea Button card

Coil up coasters Hair scrunchy

Love To Make 21


These fun coasters may take longer than one evening to make, due to drying time

Scout vintage fairs for white handkerchiefs and create this pretty embroidered picture

1

1

Trace the teacup template from page 68, and cut out one piece from the handkerchief, centring the embroidered design. Press under a 5mm hem to the wrong side around all edges of the teacup shape.

Snip one end of the cord at a 45 degree angle, and wrap a piece of masking tape around the other end to stop it unravelling.

Pour the PVA glue into a saucer, then dab the cut end of the cord into the glue and curl it back around itself a little, You will need pinching it tightly. Wrap the coiled end ◆ 2m of 4mm with masking tape and leave to dry. white cotton When dry, remove masking tape piping cord for from the coiled end and attach to the each coaster ◆ PVA glue cardboard using a pin. Use a paintbrush to ◆ Piece of A4 card, add glue to the inside of the cord, coiling covered with a it around itself as you go. Keep glueing polythene bag, or and coiling until the cord almost runs dustbin liner out. Remove masking tape at the ◆ Masking tape finishing end, and trim at 45 degree ◆ Pins angle, as before. Continue gluing to the ◆ Emulsion paint end of the cord. Leave to dry. in colours of Paint the coasters with emulsion paint choice and when dry, coat with a 50/50 ◆ Paint brush ◆ Old saucer mix of PVA and water to make them ◆ Drop of water splash resistant.

3

4

2

Insert the remaining handkerchief into the frame and trim away any ◆ Teacup template excess fabric from around the frame. on page 68 Pin the teacup shape centrally in ◆ White lawn the centre of the hoop, making sure embroidered handkerchief that the hoop screw adjuster is at the ◆ 15cm wooden top; stitch in place using a small running embroidery hoop stitch (see page 68 for details of how to ◆ Complimentary work this stitch). Next using the image as coloured sewing a guide, work two rows of small running thread stitches to represent the teacup handle. ◆ Scissors Finally, tie a length of velvet ribbon ◆ Pins around the hoop screw adjuster, to ◆ 12mm-wide velvet ribbon to form a hanging loop. match the sewing thread

You will need

3

4

Hair scrunchy

Button card

This is a great way to use up leftover fabric, or pretty Jelly Roll patchwork scraps

Use an assortment of buttons to make this pretty card, perfect for birthdays or special occasions

1

1

2

2

Fold the fabric strip in half along its length, right sides together, and sew along the length to make a tube. Secure a safety pin to one end of the tube and push it through the inside of the tube to the other end to turn right side out.

You will need ◆ 6.5cm x 64cm strip of fabric ◆ 23cm of 6mmwide cottoncovered elastic ◆ Scissors ◆ Two large safety pins ◆ Matching thread ◆ Sewing machine

Pin a safety pin to the end of the elastic, and with another pin attach the elastic to one tube end. Insert the elastic through the inside of the tube and when it comes out of the other end, knot the two ends together. This will cause the fabric to scrunch up.

3

To secure the fabric, fold a 1cm hem to the inside of the tube at one end. Overlap this with the raw edge at the other end of the tube, moving the knot out of the way. Using a sewing machine, stitch through all layers of fabric and elastic at once, working close to the fold. Secure the threads. Twenty to Make, Jelly Roll Scraps, by Carolyn Forster (Search Press £4.99). See page 38.

22 Love To Make

Cut 3mm-wide straight strips of green paper or card. Cut to varying lengths and glue to card front, to represent flower stems, spacing them equally apart.

You will need ◆ White card blank and matching envelope ◆ A scrap of green paper, or thin card ◆ Assortment of pretty buttons ◆ Glue spots, or double-sided sticky tape ◆ Hole punch ◆ Craft knife ◆ Ruler ◆ Cutting mat ◆ Glue

Using the hole punch, make several green dots, and glue them to each side of the stems, to form leaves.

3

Finally using the glue spots, or small pieces of double-sided tape, stick the buttons to the top of the stems to form flower heads.

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2

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Time for tea

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Coil up coasters


Insprational

The Origami Home Over the next 9 pages we show you traditional folding techniques to create some beautiful pieces for your home

What is origami?

Origami is the art of paper folding, often associated with Japanese culture. In modern usage, the word origami is used as an inclusive term for all folding practices, regardless of their culture of origin. The goal is to transform something that’s flat, usually paper, into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques.

Love To Make 23


Plates With Shapes eASY PeASY

You will need l Templates on page 69 l 21cm diameter china plates l Soft pencil l Plastic tape measure l Pebeo Porcelaine 150 pen in anthracite l White spirit l Light box, optional

To make

1

Wash crockery with detergent and dry well. Then clean thoroughly with white spirit to remove any remaining grease residue.

2

Enlarge the templates on page 69 until the straight line indicated by each design, measures 5cm. Using a lightbox or window, trace the design through to the back of the paper using a soft pencil.

3

Lay the design on top of your plate, with the pencil lines underneath and

24 Love To Make

Decorate plain white china with origami style designs, for a clean contemporary look for your dining table

trace over the design again to transfer the design to the plate.

4

Shake your Porcelaine pen well and press tip repeatedly to start the ink flow. Using the plastic tape measure as a guide, lay it against the design lines as you work and draw your pen along the edge to ensure that you keep your lines straight. Use masking tape to hold the tape measure in place if it starts to slip.

5

Allow the design to air dry for 24 hours, then bake in an oven at 150ºC or Gas Mark 2 for 35 minutes. NOTE: Read manufacturer’s instructions thoroughly before you begin.


These asymmetrical shelves, reminiscent of origami folded paper, have a clean modern twist, and are a great way to display lightweight items in an office space

On the Shelf A biT More TriCkY

You will need l A sheet of 3mm-thick plywood, see note for cut sizes* l Two 22cm x 44cm rectangle of 3mm-thick plywood for the large shelf unit l Zinc plated corner braces l Two part epoxy-resin glue l 70mm-wide reinforced gummed paper tape l Clear gel glue l Acrylic, or emulsion paints in white and a selection of pastel colours – we used soft grey, pale pink and soft taupe l Small paint brush l Small foam roller l Small paint tray l Masking tape l Fine grade sandpaper l Flush mounted hanging brackets *Note: Ask you local hardware store to cut your shelves to size, to ensure that you get good clean edges without any splintering. All shelves are made from 22cm squares of 3mm plywood and 22cm side triangles. With the exception of the large shelf, which is comprised of triangle 44cm-wide x 22cm high, and a rectangular base 44cm x 22cm.

To make

of zinc plated corner braces to the inner joints and support the pieces whilst they dry. Then, use the reinforced gummed paper tape bent at right angles and glue a piece to place both the inside and outside of the joins (covering the corner braces), with gel glue and leave to dry.

2

Give the shelves a white wash of paint for an undercoat, then pour some of the first colour that you want to paint your shelves in to the paint tray. Draw diagonal lines across the square shelves and stick a strip of masking tape along the line to stop the paint from bleeding across. Using the paint roller and a small paintbrush, give the shelves two coats of paint. Leave to dry.

3

Remove masking tape, and mask the other side, if you want to use a second colour on the same shelf unit. Be as creative with the colours as you like.

1

Lightly sand the edges of the cut plywood to ensure there are no rough edges. Then following the diagrams above, assemble the different shaped units as desired. To do this, glue a couple

4

When dry, use flush mounted hanging brackets stuck to the back of the shelves, using epoxy resin glue. Love To Make 25


Cabinet of Curiosities Create your own original works of art with these entomologiststyle origami boards, featuring the various stages of traditional paper folding, up to a completed design

A biT more TrickY

You will need l Five shoe box lids l 35mm-wide artists gummed tape l Grey acrylic paint l A small foam roller l Small paint tray l The half-tint pastel papers l White layout paper (75g) l Sticky fixers l Spray adhesive

To make

1

Stick artists gummed tape all around the edges of the lids to strengthen them. Leave to dry, then paint grey all over using the foam roller, making sure that the paint is not too wet otherwise the tape may curl and lift.

2

Cut pieces of coloured paper for the inside of the lids and stick in place using the spray adhesive.

3

Prepare the origami folding stepby-step of the boat, fortune-teller, crane, butterfly and penguin, as shown right, using white paper. Arrange them on the lids in the order of progression,

26 Love To Make

and stick in place using the sticky fixers, leaving the corners free and letting them stand out as 3D shapes.

Fortune teller

Penguin


crane

Pencil Pots A biT more TrickY

You will need l Template on page 69 l 0.75mm-thick mount board or cardboard l craft knife l metal ruler l cutting mat l Acrylic paint in pastel colours, we used white, pale pink, soft grey and soft taupe l Small foam roller l Small paint tray l clear glue gel

boat Halfway between a toy and paper folding origami, these pencil pots will test your geometry skills and are great for children to make. Composed of a triangle, this clever assembly switches from 2D to 3D by folding and a few tabs stuck together

To make

1

Enlarge the template on page 69 using a photocopier to get triangles that measure approximately 8cm, 6.3cm or 5.5cm, this will determine the size of your finished pot.

2

Lay the enlarged template on top of your cardboard and trace on the design. Using the craft knife cut out the shape along the outer edges.

3

Using the foam roller, apply a light coat of white paint all over the shape. Leave to dry.

4

Carefully scribe along the straight inner lines, and along the tabs, using a pair of sharp scissors, taking care not to cut too deeply through the card, to facilitate folding. Paint the two faces of cardboard with your chosen finished colours and leave to dry.

5

When dry, form the pot by folding and gluing the tabs using glue gel. Cut away some triangular sections, as you desire, to allow for a top opening, see image as a guide.

butterfly

Love To Make 27


Flight of Fancy a BiT MoRE TRiCkY

You will need l Bird templates on page 69 l Ready-made tote bag l 50cm of ivory cotton fabric l 20cm of grey cotton fabric l Matching sewing thread l Cotton perlĂŠ embroidery thread in dark grey l Fine cotton piping cord l Sewing needle l Embroidery needle l Pins

To make

1

Enlarge the template on page 69, using a photocopier until the short straight line beneath the templates, measures 5cm. Cut out a long strip of grey fabric the width of the birds wing, plus 1cm for hem allowances. Press a 5mm hem to the wrong side down each long side of the strip.

2

Lay the fabric strip over the small bird template along the wing, fold under the top of the strip diagonally, so that it is level with the top of the wing, pin in place. Continue folding the strip

and pinning it until you have formed the shape of the bird, following the lines on the template. Using tiny whipstitches, sew the folds together to create the bird shape (see page 68 for details of how to work this stitch). Press the bird flat, and trim away any excess fabric from the back.

3

Repeat steps 1 and 2 to create the remaining two birds using ivory fabric. Arrange the birds on top of the bag and pin them to the front layer only. AppliquĂŠ the birds to the bag, using small whipstitches.

4

Working on one bird at a time, lay the piping cord around the edge, and using the dark grey cotton perlĂŠ thread, couch them in place, overlapping the finishing ends slightly to neaten, see page 67 for details of how to work this stitch.

Decorate a plain tote with folded origami style birds, outlined with contrasting couched piping 50 Love To Make With WW

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These attractive placemats are created using fabric paints, pin tucks and embroidery to produce folded patchwork effect

A Perfect Setting haRdiSh

You will need l Template on page 69 l 40 x 52cm piece of plain cream fabric, lining fabric and heavy-weight iron-on interfacing, per placemat l Matching sewing thread l Stranded embroidery cotton in dark grey l Embroidery needle l Fabric paints in white, black, blue and taupe l Paint brush l Plastic palette l Chalk pencil or fade away marker pen

To make

1

Enlarge the template on page 69, using a photocopier until the short straight line beneath the template, measures 5cm. Lay the template on top of the main fabric piece, and using a ruler and the marker pen, transfer the hexagon shapes on to the fabric, and the central zigzagging design lines, marked in grey and back dotted lines on the template.

2

Fold and stitch very fine pin tucks around the sides of the hexagon shapes and the grey lines zigzagging across the piece. Press the piece flat from the wrong side.

3

Using the palette, mix five shades of grey, with the four different paint colours. Following the design lines on the template, paint sections on the front of the piece, using the five different shades of grey. Leave to air dry and then set

following the manufacturer’s instructions.

4

Using three strands of the embroidery cotton in your needle, work lines of backstitch across the piece as indicated with dotted lines on the template, see page 67.

5

Cut out the placemat around the shaped outer edge of the template, leaving a 1cm seam allowance. Iron the interfacing to the wrong side of the lining piece and trim to the same shape.

6

With right sides facing, stitch the lining to the main mat, taking a 1cm seam allowance and leaving a gap for turning through. Snip into the seam allowances on inward facing corners and trim outward corners. Turn to right side out, ease out the corners and press flat. Slipstitch the opening edges closed.

Love To Make 29


Take Cover hArdIsh

You will need l Two sheet of A3 paper for each vase cover l A sewing needle l White sewing thread l scissors l Craft knife l steel ruler l Pencil l Invisible sticky-tape. l empty jars or bottles

To make the medium vase cover

across the folds. Repeat with the second concertinaed piece of paper.

again in the direction of the arrow (along the dotted line on our diagram).

Valley

Mountain

1

For the medium vase cut two A3 sheets 22 x 42cm and lay them out horizontally. Fold each piece eight times in an accordion fashion, as shown in the diagram above, and crease firmly.

3

Open out the sheets flat and mark the folds on the reverse side, using a pencil. Fold along the lines, reversing the folds to form mountains and valleys as shown in the diagram above.

4

Stick the two folded sheets of paper together at the sides, using invisible tape and slip the vase cover over your jar.

3

Fold the top section again to the underneath in the direction of the arrow, so that it lies along the dotted line.

7.5 cm

Camera Press/ MCI/ Fabrice Besse

To make large cover

2

14.5 cm

With the paper still concertinaed, fold one piece diagonally, as shown in the diagram above, and crease firmly

30 Love To Make

1

Trim away 5cm on one sheet of paper to reduce it to 37 x 29.7cm. Lay it out vertically and fold it eight times in an accordion fashion, as for the medium vase.

2

Measure 22.5cm along from one end and fold the piece diagonally underneath, then fold the top section

4

Finally fold it one more time to the front in the direction of the arrow


Created in plain white paper these ‘accordion effect’ tubes will dress up any plain plastic or glass container. The folding is fairly simple to do, but like all origami it requires patience and meticulousness

Burn Bright eAsY PeAsY

You will need l Templates from page 69 l Pine, birch or ash wooden chopping board l Pyrography wood-burning pen and tips l Clay pot or pen holder l Artist’s graphite paper l A 2B pencil l Masking tape

To make

1

Enlarge the templates on page 69, to the desired size using a photocopier. Place the graphite paper, face down, on top of the wooden chopping board and secure it to the wood with a piece of

masking tape, and place your photocopy on top of the graphite paper and secure again with more tape.

2

Using a 2B pencil trace over the design lines with medium pressure. Remove the template and graphite paper and deepen the outlines on the wood with the same 2B pencil.

3

Now you are ready to get started. The pyrography pen will get hot quite fast; so make sure you attach the tip you’ll be working with before you turn on the machine. Give your pen a couple of minutes to get hot, resting it in a pen holding device or a clay pot to minimise the risk of accidental burning.

4

Now start to trace your pen around the design you want to draw. Use light strokes, as it’s easier to guide the pen and reduces errors. Remember also, the longer you hold the pen in one area, the darker and deeper the mark will get.

along the dotted line. You will have formed a sort of spiral.

5

Open out the sheet flat and mark the folds on the reverse side using a pencil. Fold along the lines, reversing the folds to form mountains and valleys as shown in the diagram above.

6

Repeat steps 1 to 5 with a second sheet of paper then, stick the two folded sheets of paper together at the sides and slip the cover over a jar or bottle.

7

Thread a needle and pass it through the folds at the top and bottom of the shape and around the centre where the zigzag pleats start, to help it keep its shape. Knot ends of thread together to secure.

These plain chopping boards have been decorated with origami designs, using the inexpensive and fun art of pyrography – decorating wood or other materials with burn marks applied from a heated ‘pen’

Love To Make 31


Join Us Online Visit the Woman’s Weekly website for great video guides

how to make piping for a cushion cover l Cushion covers look so professional with a piped edge and covering a length of piping cord with a strip of fabric is easy when you know how. l You can buy ready-covered cord, but with our simple guide you can learn how to make piping in any colour you want. l It’s essential to cut the fabric on the bias, so fold a square of fabric in half diagonally and cut along the fold so you have two triangles. l Using dressmaker’s chalk, mark 5cm in from the raw edge and then cut along this line. l Continue to cut strips until you have enough to go all the way around your cushion. See our full video tutorial at womansweekly.com/piping

If you enjoy relaxing with all kinds of crafts, our website has a stash of inspirational ideas.

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www.womansweekly.com 50 Love To Make With WW

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Arm Candy

Easy Make

Create this colourful bracelet, with a Caribbean twist, from simple dufflecoat toggles You will need l 46cm of 0.7mm strong elastic beading cord

l Ten x 40mm un-varnished wooden toggle buttons

l Five x 40mm flat dark walnut toggles l Five water-based marker pens, such as ‘Posca’ l Silver-plated crimp beads l Flat-nosed pliers l Scissors l Beading mat l Ruler

To make

1

Using the marker pens, colour your large toggles in any design you desire; we followed the grains of the wood and coloured striped sections. Ink from these pens dries quickly and the finish is permanent on porous surfaces.

2

Cut two 23cm lengths of strong elastic beading cord using scissors. Thread on the toggle buttons, alternating the flat walnut ones between sets of two coloured ones, through one of the two holes. Thread the other length of cord through the other set of holes so that the buttons all sit evenly in a line.

3

Once all the buttons are threaded on, put a crimp bead on one of the ends of cord, then thread the other end of the same piece through the crimp bead from the opposite direction. Try not to stretch the cord. Flatten the crimp bead using the flat-nosed pliers as close to the toggles as you can.

4

Test whether the crimp is holding the cord securely by stretching the bracelet gently; repeat the same crimping process on the second piece of cord. Cut off any excess cord ends using scissors.

This project is taken from Twenty to Make – Button Jewellery by Marrianne Mercer (Search Press, £4.99). See page 38.

Love To Make 33


Hot Pots

Choose vibrant prints and matching threads to make these cross-stitched plant pot covers to brighten up your shelves and windowsills a row of holes in the fabric. Mount the fabric in the embroidery hoop with tacking stitches centred.

a biT more Tricky

you will need for each embroidered pot cover l cross-stitch charts on page 70 l Pot-cover template on pages 71 l 50 × 30cm piece of 28-count ivory linen l 40 × 25cm rectangle of Liberty Tana Lawn l Dmc mouliné Special stranded cotton, one skein of the following colours: 3082 (wine), 3607 (bright pink), 351 (coral), 318 (light grey), 3348 (lime green), 502 (blue green) and 645 (dark grey) l 40 × 25cm rectangle of stiff, heavy-weight, sew-in interfacing l re-positioning fabric adhesive spray l matching sewing thread l Size 24 tapestry needle l Standard sewing needle l Fabric marker pen

2

The design is worked in crossstitch and backstitch. See our stitch guide on page 67 for how to work the individual stitches. If you are a beginner, practise the stitches first on some spare linen fabric.

3

Finished size: 9cm diameter by 11cm tall

To work the embroidery

1

Press the linen fabric, then mark the centre of your design by folding your fabric in half, then into quarters. Stitch two lines of tacking along the folds to form a central cross, worked through

Taken from Liberty Cross Stitch by Hélène Le Berre (Search Press, £10.99). www.searchpress.com

34 Love To Make

4

Starting at the centre of the design, work the stitches individually or in rows, according to the design, following the stitch chart and key. When the stitching is complete, remove the tacking threads then press lightly on the wrong side under a damp cloth taking care not to flatten the stitches.

Sewing and assembly

Tip... For a quicker make, choose two complementary print fabrics, instead of embroidering the linen fabric, and make up the plant pot cover as shown in ‘Sewing and assembly’, right

The charts on page 70 show the complete designs. Each coloured square represents one cross-stitch worked over two threads of fabric, using two strands of embroidery thread in your needle. The solid lines represent backstitch, using one strand of embroidery thread in your needle. The key with the chart indicates the colour of thread used. Arrows at the edges of the chart, which must match the tacking threads on your fabric, mark the centre of the design.

1

Spray the adhesive on to the wrong side of the print fabric and fix the stiff interfacing on top. Photocopy the pot-cover template on page 71 and cut out. Trace around the outer edge of the pot-cover template onto the interfacing and cut out the shape.

2

Position the embroidered linen on the other side of the interfacing, ensuring that the motifs are in the desired position and then pin together through all layers of fabric. Trim the linen fabric away, leaving a 1.5cm

hem allowance around the outer edges.

3

Fold over a 5mm hem to the wrong side around the linen and press, then fold the allowance over the interfaced fabric and pin it in place through all layers. Slipstitch hems in place around all sides.

4

Bring the two short straight edges together, with linen against linen, and join the two edges together with tiny whipstitches. Turn the pot cover right side out and insert a plant pot.


Stitchcraft

Love To Make 35


Painting On Canvas Create your own masterpiece with our striking anemone trace-off design, easy-to-use acrylic paints and a ready-made artist’s canvas

T

o start, trace our anemone design on to a canvas and paint in the colours as labelled. Any pencil marks left on the canvas can easily be rubbed out with a clean eraser, and should you have any paint mishaps, you can carefully scrape off any paint spots from the canvas with a craft knife. To give a professional finish, we continued the design over the edges of the canvas and gave each section two coats of paint for good, even coverage. We left the background plain, but you could paint it to match your decor and change the flower colours to suit. a biT mOre TriCky

you will need l Template on page 71 l 25 x 20 x 4cm box canvas (artist’s canvas) l acrylic paint in deep pink, mid pink, light pink, black, mid green and light green l Fine, medium and large artist’s paintbrushes l Tracing paper l Fine black felt-tip pen l Sharp Hb pencil l Scissors l masking tape

Design: Cheryl Owen. Photos: Stewart Grant

Transferring the design Use a photocopier to enlarge the anemone design template on page 71 by 200%. Trace the design, omitting the numbers, on to tracing paper using a fine black felt-tip pen. Trim the design along the solid outer lines. Turn the tracing over and redraw the template with a sharp HB pencil. There is no need to redraw the broken lines. Use masking tape to tape the tracing, right side up, on to the box canvas, matching the broken lines on the tracing to the right-hand and lower

36 Love To Make

edges of the canvas. Redraw the design with a sharp HB pencil to transfer to the canvas, omitting the stamens at this stage. Fold the right-hand side and lower edges of the tracing over the edges of the canvas and transfer the rest of the design. Remove the tracing.

To paint the design

medium paintbrush. Mix mid green with a little black paint to make a dark green shade and use to paint E. Leave to dry, then apply second coat. Use black paint to paint the stamens freehand with a medium artist’s paintbrush, referring to the photo. Alternatively, replace the template and transfer the stamens and then paint them. Using a fine artist’s paintbrush and a tiny amount of black paint, carefully paint fine lines outwards from the black centre of the anemone to the stamens.

1

Referring to the design template, paint all areas marked A with deep pink paint. Use a fine artist’s paintbrush for narrow areas and to outline. Then use medium and large paintbrushes for the larger areas. Leave to dry then apply a second coat for an even coverage. Use the same method to paint areas marked B with mid-pink paint and areas C with light pink paint. Remember to continue painting petals on the right-hand edge of the canvas.

2

Paint areas marked D with two coats of black acrylic paint, using a

3

Paint areas marked F mid green with two coats of paint, using the fine and medium paintbrushes, then paint the G areas light green, again with two coats. Remember to continue painting the leaves on the lower edge of the canvas. Leave the canvas to dry fully.


Try a new craft

Tips... l if you feel a bit unsure about painting straight on to the canvas, trace the design on to thick paper and practise your painting skills on paper first. l Due to the canvas texture,

you’ll need to apply more than one coat of acrylic paint for an even coverage. l if you need to blend colours to achieve the right shade, start with the darkest. For example, mix deep pink with a little white paint to make a

mid pink, add more white for a light pink shade. l remember to wash out brushes immediately after you’ve finished using them. Should you spill any acrylic paint on your clothes, wash straightaway to avoid staining. Love To Make 37


Bookshelf

body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy

From needle-felting, to découpage, jewellery to embroidery, here’s a round up of some brilliant craft books we have featured, plus more…

How to Make LittLe NeedLeFeLted teddy Bears

tweNty to Make – ModerN decouPage

By Louise crosbie body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy By Judy Balchin (search Press,body copy rozbody dacecopy body copy body copy body copy body copy & £4.99) (search body copy Press, In this latest £8.99) offering from the Judy and Roz brilliantly priced have created 18 gorgeous needleTwenty to Make series, Louise felted bears for you to make, from Crosbie has taken everyday items ballet bear to Santa bear. They are such as doorknobs, a wooden tray so appealing that you’ll want to and a picture frame and completely have a go at all of them! There are transformed them using clear step-by-step instructions and découpage papers, old book pages templates so you can measure each and paper napkins. Découpage body part as you make it, ensuring has had a big resurgence in that your bear fits together properly popularity recently, and it’s easy to when it’s complete. The projects see why. The craft has been given are small, with plenty of tips, so a complete facelift with some not too daunting for a beginner. fabulous papers, adhesives and We thoroughly recommend this finishing products now available. brilliant book. Turn to page 60, We love this author and if anyone is where we have featured the Baker unsure about découpage, this book Bears for you to make. is a great place to start!

tHe HaNd-stitcHed FLower gardeN By yuki sugashima (search Press, £12.99) This book provides over 45 beautiful floral designs to embroider, plus 20 projects to make, giving endless possibilities for you to mix and match motifs and create designs of your own too. Split into four chapters following the seasons, the flowers for each section are shown stitched on to a plain linen background, followed by a selection of stylish projects, incorporating the motifs, with full clear step-by-step instructions. Comprehensive tools, materials and stitch guide can be found at the back. This book will give you an endless source of inspiration.

My HaNdMade weddiNg By Marrianne Mercer (search Press, £12.99) This inspirational book charts the journey of author Marrianne Mercer, as she went on an 8-month journey, planning and creating her own wedding. Full of loads of crafty tips and ideas for making everything from the invitations, to the flowers, veil, confetti, cake and decorations, saving the couple big bucks for the future, rather than spending it all on one day. Even if you are not getting married, this book still gives you a whole host of ideas that can be used for any occasion. We particularly fell in love with the story behind this book and the process Marrianne went through to create her perfect day.

tweNty to Make – ButtoN JeweLLery By Marrianne Mercer (search Press, £4.99) This recent title from the Twenty to Make series is great if you want to start making button jewellery. It features 20 stylish projects including necklaces, bracelets, earrings and even a charm and glasses string, all made using simple buttons. Plus there’s basic methods of ‘displaying’ special treasured buttons that collectors acquire from time to time. Clearly written with simple illustrations, the styles vary from modern to vintage, using old and new buttons. Marrianne also gives good advice on sourcing buttons, as well as a comprehensive list of materials and tools that you’ll need.

tweNty to Make – JeLLy roLL scraPs By carolyn Forster (search Press, £4.99) This book from has been around for a couple of years, but we still thoroughly recommend it. It contains 20 excellent ideas for using up all your small scraps of fabric, as well as Jelly Roll scraps and Mini Charm packs. All the projects are designed to be easy to stitch and fun to work on, using basic sewing and patchwork and quilting techniques. A great little book for transforming those scraps you might otherwise have discarded into something beautiful for a gift, or for your home. Projects include bags, pincushions, placemats, hair accessories and fabric pots, plus much more.

To buy these books, visit searchpress.com. Free postage within the UK 38 Love To Make


FREE

PattERn OFFER You pay £2.75 postage

T

his flattering Learn-to-Sew A-line skirt pattern has special easyto-follow sewing instructions – great for absolute beginners Your pattern has two length choices and teaches you how to sew: l Darts l A fitted waistband l Insert a centre back zipper l Attach a hook and eye closure SIZES: XS-S-M-L-XL FABRICS: Cotton, twill, gabardine, silk and viscose suiting

wORth

£8.99

nExt mOnth’s PattERn

*Terms and Conditions:the offer is for sizes XS-S-M-L-XL and is subject to availability. The offer is valid until 10 May 2016 or until stocks run out. Please make cheques payable to Butterick Company Ltd for £2.75. Should you be unsuccessful and there are no more patterns, your cheque will be destroyed and not cashed. No correspondence can be entered into. If you are successful, your pattern will be despatched within a minimum of 7 working days and a maximum of 28 working days.

Please complete this coupon and send it to Butterick Company Ltd, Coupon Offers, New Lane, Havant PO9 2ND, UK You can pay by cheque or by credit card PATTERN CODE K3877 XS-S-M-L-XL

I enclose a cheque for £2.75 made payable to Butterick Company Ltd (Please write your name and address clearly on the back of your cheque) Or pay by credit card: Please debit £2.75 from my Visa  Visa Debit  MasterCard  LOVE TO MAKE, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you of news, new products, services and offers available from LOVE TO MAKE and from Time Inc. (UK) by email, phone and post. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email.

Card number                 Expiry date     Signature (I am over 18).................................................................................Today’s date...................................................... Mrs/Miss/Ms/Mr (delete as applicable) First Name............................................................................................................. Surname.........................................................Address..................................................................................................................... Postcode.........................................................Daytime telephone number (Inc. code)...................................................... Email address...................................................................................................................................................................................... Love to Make, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you via email of news, new products, services and offers available from Love to Make and from Time Inc. (UK) Ltd and its partners. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email. Please tick here if you prefer not to be contacted by phone or post.  Time Inc. (UK) Ltd may occasionally pass your details to carefully selected organisations so they can contact you by email with regards to promoting and researching their products and services. Please tick here if you prefer not to be contacted. 

Love To Make With WW 41


Pretty In Pink Make space in your wardrobe for our delicate lacy knit – the perfect summer cover up

A BIT MoRe TRIcKy

Measurements To fit bust sizes 81-86 (91-97) (102-107)cm/32-34 (36-38) (40-42)in. Actual measurements 89 (101) (112) cm Side seam All sizes 44.5cm Length to shoulder 62.5 (64.5) (66)cm Sleeve seam All sizes 44.5cm

Photography: Liz McAulay Stylist: Anne Hartnett Hair & make-up: Dottie Monagham * Yarn subject to availability

Materials 4 (4) (5) 100g (330m) balls of Patons 100% Cotton 4-ply in Candy (1734)*. Pair of 2¾mm (No. 12) and 3¼mm (No. 10) knitting needles; a 2¾mm (No. 12) circular knitting needle *Yarn subject to availability

Tension 24 stitches and 36 rows, to 10 x 10cm, over pattern, using 3¼mm needles

Abbreviations K, knit; p, purl; st, stitch; sl, slip; tog, together; inc, increase (by working twice into same st); dec, decrease (by taking 2 sts tog); skpo, sl1, k1, pass slipped st over; yon, yarn over needle to make a st; yf, yarn forward to make a st; skykpo, (sl1, k1, yf, k1, pass sl st over)

Note Yarn amounts are based on average requirements and are therefore approximate. Instructions are given for small size. Where they vary, work figures in round brackets for larger sizes. Instructions in square brackets are worked as stated after 2nd bracket.

Back With 2¾mm needles, cast on 121 (135) (149) sts. K7 rows. Change to 3¼mm needles. 1st and every alternate row (wrong side): P to end. 2nd row: K3, [skykpo, k4] to last 6 sts, skykpo, k3. 4th row: K2, [k2tog, yf, k1, yf, skpo, k2] to end. 6th row: K1, [k2tog, yf, k3, yf, skpo] to last st, k1. These 6 rows form pattern. Pattern another 13 rows. Keeping pattern correct, dec 1 st at each end of next row and 6 following 12th rows – 107 (121) (135) sts. Pattern 65 rows. Shape armholes: Cast off 7 (8) (9) sts at beginning of next 2 rows. Dec 1 st at each end of next row and 6 (9) (11) following alternate rows – 79 (85) (93) sts. Pattern 45 (45) (47) rows. Shape neck: Next row: Pattern 27 (30) (34), k2tog, turn and work on these 28 (31) (35) sts for right side neck. Right side neck: Dec 1 st at neck edge on next 5 rows – 23 (26) (30) sts. Cast off for shoulder. Left side neck: Sl centre 21 sts onto a st holder, rejoin yarn to remaining sts, k2tog and pattern to end – 28 (31) (35) sts. Dec 1 st at neck edge on next 5 rows – 23 (26) (30) sts. Cast off for shoulder.

Left front With 2¾mm needles, cast on 58 (65) (72) sts. K7 rows.

40 Love To Make

Change to 3¼mm needles. Work 19 rows in pattern as on back. Keeping pattern correct, dec 1 st at beginning – read end here for right front – on next row and 6 following 12th rows – 51 (58) (65) sts. Pattern 41 rows. ** Shape front: Dec 1 st at front edge on next row and 5 following 4th rows – 45 (52) (59) sts. Pattern 3 rows. Shape armhole: Next row: Cast off 7 (8) (9), pattern to last 2 sts, dec. Pattern 1 row. *** Dec 1 st at armhole edge on next row and 6 (9) (11) following alternate rows, at the same time, dec 1 st at front edge on 3rd row and the 3 (4) (5) following 4th rows – 26 (28) (31) sts. Dec 1 st at neck edge only on 3 (2) (1) following 4th row(s) – 23 (26) (30) sts. Pattern 37 (43) (49) rows. Cast off for shoulder.

Right front Work as left front to **, noting variation. Shape front: Dec 1 st at front edge on next row and 6 following 4th rows – 44 (51) (58) sts. Shape armhole: Cast off 7 (8) (9) sts at beginning of next row. Work as on left front from *** to end.

Sleeves (both alike) With 2¾mm needles, cast on 58 (65) (72) sts. K7 rows. Change to 3¼mm needles. Work 9 rows in pattern as on back. Working extra sts into pattern as they occur, inc 1 st at each end of next row and 13 following 10th rows – 86 (93)


Knitting

(100) sts. Pattern 17 rows. Shape top: Cast off 7 (8) (9) sts at beginning of next 2 rows. Dec 1 st at each end of next row and 19 following alternate rows – 32 (37) (42) sts. Pattern 1 row. Dec 1 st at each end of next 6 rows – 20 (25) (30) sts. Cast off.

Front band Join shoulder seams. With right side facing and using 2¾mm circular needle, pick up and k90 sts up right front to beginning of front shaping, 70 (73) (76) sts along shaped edge to shoulder seam, 6 sts down right back neck, k21 across back neck sts, pick up and k6 sts up left back neck to shoulder seam, 70 (73) (76) sts down shaped edge of left front to beginning of front shaping and finally, 90 sts down left front to cast on edge – 353 (359) (365) sts. K2 rows. Picot cast-off row (wrong side): Cast off 2 sts, [sl st used in casting off back onto left-hand needle, cast on 2 sts, cast off 5 sts] to end, ending last repeat cast off 4 sts. Fasten off.

Ties (make 2) With 2¾mm needles, cast on 50 sts. K1 row. Cast off.

To make up Set in sleeves. Join side and sleeve seams. Sew a tie just below front shaping on wrong side of each front.

Love To Make 41


Take A Seat This on-trend cover gives a simple footstool a fashionable makeover – just pick colours to suit

A biT More TriCky

Measurements Fits a footstool approximately 38cm diameter and 13cm deep, excluding legs

Materials 2 x 100g (75m) balls of DMC Natura XL Just Cotton (100% cotton) in Bright Yellow (09); 1 ball in each of Grey (12), White (01), Pale Yellow (91) and Mustard (92)* Size 5.00 crochet hook 80cm of narrow elastic

Tension 11 stitches and 8.5 rounds, to 10 x 10cm over half treblem using 5.00 hook

Photos: Sussie Bell Stylist: Emma Wiltshire Designer: Freddie Patmore *Yarn subject to availability

Abbreviations Ch, chain; st, stitch; dc, double crochet; htr, half treble; htr2tog, work 2 half treble together thus: [yarn round hook, insert hook in next st, yarn round hook and pull through] twice, yarn round hook and pull through all 5 loops on hook; slst, slip stitch

Note Yarn amounts are based on average requirements and are therefore approximate. Instructions in square brackets are worked as stated after second bracket.

To make

1st round (right side): Using 5.00 hook and Grey, wind yarn round index finger of left hand to form slip ring, insert hook into ring, yarn round hook and pull through, 2ch (does not count as a st), work 8htr into ring, slst in 2nd of 2ch, pull end tightly to close ring, turn – 8 sts.

42 Love To Make

2nd round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 16 sts. 3rd round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in next st] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 24 sts. Fasten off. Join in White. 4th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 2 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 32 sts. 5th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 3 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 40 sts. 6th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 4 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 48 sts. Fasten off. Join in Pale Yellow. 7th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 5 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 56 sts. 8th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 6 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 64 sts. 9th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 7 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 72 sts. Fasten off. Join in Bright Yellow. 10th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 8 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 80 sts. 11th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 9 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 88 sts. 12th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 10 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 96 sts. Fasten off. Join in Mustard. 13th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 11 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 104 sts. 14th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 12 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 112 sts. 15th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 13 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 120 sts.

16th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [2htr in next st, 1htr in each of next 14 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 128 sts. 17th round (right side): 1ch (does not count as a st), [1dc in next st] 128 times, slst in 1ch, do not turn. 18th ridge round (right side): 2ch (does not count as a st), [yarn round hook, insert hook from back to front of next st, then take hook around st to back again, yarn round hook and pull through, yarn round hook and pull through all 3 loops on hook] 128 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch. Fasten off and turn. Join in Bright Yellow. 19th round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [1htr in next st] 128 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn. 20th round: As 19th round. 21st to 27th rounds: Joining in and breaking off colours as required, repeat last round, working in a striped sequence of 1 round Pale Yellow, turn; 1 round White, do not turn; 1 round Grey, turn; 1 round White, turn; 1 round Pale Yellow, turn; 2 rows Bright Yellow, turning at end of both rounds. Continue in Bright Yellow only. 28th round (wrong side): 1ch (does not count as a st), [1dc in next st] 128 times, slst in 1ch, do not turn. 29th ridge round (wrong side): 2ch (does not count as a st), [yarn round hook, insert hook from front to back of next st, then take hook around st to front again, yarn round hook and pull through, yarn round hook and pull through all 3 loops on hook] 128 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn. 30th decrease round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [work htr2tog, 1htr in each of next 14 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch, turn – 120 sts. 31st decrease round: 2ch (does not count as a st), [htr2tog, 1htr in each of next 13 sts] 8 times, slst in 2nd of 2ch – 112 sts. Fasten off. Thread elastic along last round and fasten off securely.


Crochet

Love To Make 43


rk✤shops o W ✤ t hat ! k wor ✤

£69

per person

Would you like to be able to alter a knitting pattern to your own specifications? Now’s your chance. We’ll teach you how to work out a pattern for a simple stocking-stitch cardigan in double-knitting yarn. It’s also aimed at budding designers with some knowledge of knitting. 10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.30am Draw line diagram with detailed measurements as required 11am Work out the tension from your own swatch to be used to translate all the measurements into stitches and rows 11.15am Calculating back and front instructions and working out all shapings 1pm Lunch 2pm Calculating sleeve instruction and working out all shapings

£69

per person

3.30pm Tea break 3.45pm How to incorporate a simple stitch pattern into your own instructions 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes You will need to bring with you:

✤ An old sweater or item that fits you perfectly ✤ a calculator ✤ a tension sample knitted in the doubleknitting yarn that you intend to knit the entire sweater. The sample should be knitted on 4mm (No. 8) over 34 stitches thus: K3 rows. 1st row: K to end. 2nd row: K2, p30, k2. Repeat last 2 rows, 19 times more. Next 2 rows: K2, p30, k2. Cast off pwise.

Knit & Crochet Tea Party with Freddie and Monika on Friday 24 June

If you know how to knit and crochet, we’ve the perfect day out for you. We have a choice of fabulous yarn projects for you to make. You’ll need to be confident in basic knitting or crochet to join in, but there will be technical demonstrations on knitting in the round, embroidery, beading and a crochet slip (or ‘magic’) ring. WW’s Editor, Diane, will join you for afternoon tea before you go home. 10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.30am Start work on your chosen cake project 11am Introduction to pattern reading and basic shaping 11.30 Tea break 11.45am Double-pointed needles knitting demonstration

1pm Lunch 2pm Sewing-up instructions 2.45pm Adding beading and decorative embroidery 3.30pm Tea break 4pm Stuffing cakes and finishing off 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

To book easily, call 0800 024 1212*

How To Design A Child’s Knitted Sweater

£69

with Tina on Friday 7 October

How To Design Your Own Knitted Cardigan with Tina on Friday 15 April

Come along to WW’s HQ for our exclusive knitting & crochet workshops and meet the editorial team

per person

We’ll teach you how to create a sweater pattern for your child or grandchild. The pattern will be for a simple stocking-stitch sweater in double-knitting yarn that you make at home. 10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.30am Draw line diagram with detailed measurements 11am Work out the tension from a swatch to be used to translate all the measurements into stitches and rows 11.15am Calculating back and front instructions and working out all shapings 1pm Lunch 2pm Calculating sleeve instruction and working out all shapings 3.30pm Tea break

£69 per person

3.45pm How to incorporate motif into front instructions 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes You will need to bring with you:

✤ An old sweater that fits intended child ✤ a calculator ✤ a tension sample knitted in the double-knitting yarn that you intend to knit the entire sweater. The sample should be knitted on 4mm (No. 8) over 34 stitches thus: K3 rows. 1st row: K to end. 2nd row: K2, p30, k2. Repeat last 2 rows, 19 times more. Next 2 rows: K2, p30, k2. Cast off pwise.

Circular Knitting Masterclass with Freddie and Monika on Friday 17 June

For experienced knitters, this introduces you to two circular knitting tools: double-pointed needles and circular needle. You’ll learn how to hold and work on a set of four double-pointed needles, creating narrow knitted tubes, such as socks or a polo neck. In the afternoon, you’ll work on a circular needle for straight and tubular knitting. This workshop is the next step to build up your skills. 10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.45am How to cast on and divide stitches on to doublepointed needles and join to form a round 11.05am Working with doublepointed needles 11.30am Tea break 12.30pm Rearranging stitches

and troubleshooting doublepointed needle techniques 1pm Lunch 2pm How to work on circular knitting needles 3.15pm Tea break 3.45pm Working on a circular knitting project 4.15 Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

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Woman’s Weekly Workshops OUr 2016 KNITTING & CrOCHET WOrKSHOPS IN LONDON TINa EglEToN WW’s Technical Knitting Editor has over 40 years’ experience. She’s designed many of Woman’s Weekly’s knitting patterns and is an expert tutor.

Make The Woman’s Weekly Knitted Bear with Freddie and Monika on Monday 16 May You’ll need to be a confident knitter to make our adorable toy as he needs some complex shaping techniques to create the perfect shape. We’ll take you through the tricky shapings, including turning rows and invisible seaming and facial embroidery. 10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.30am Start work on your bear 11am Basic shaping techniques 11.30am Tea break 11.45am Complex sole shaping and attaching legs to body 1pm Lunch 2pm Sewing-up instructions 2.45pm Indenting eye positions and adding embroidery 3.30pm Afternoon tea with WW’s Editor Diane per person 4pm How to stuff your bear 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

£69

Learn To Crochet With Your Child NEW! £60 Or Grandchild per pair on Friday 12 August

This half-day workshop will be fun for you and your child or grandchild to learn together. our tutors will teach you how to do basic crochet stitches, starting from how to hold your hook and yarn to how to do basic stitches. Ticket price includes one child and one adult. 10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.30am How to hold your hook and yarn and make a slip knot 11am Working basic stitches, chain, double crochet and trebles 11.30am Using basic stitches, try an easy project idea 1pm Workshop finishes

FrEDDIE PaTmorE our Knitting assistant has been crocheting since she was a child. She’s gone on to become a published author and designer and loves teaching our workshops.

Learn To Crochet with Freddie and Monika on Friday 16 September The workshop for beginners. Join our friendly team of tutors, who’ll teach you all you need to know, starting per person with how to hold your hook and yarn, how to do the basic stitches and how to work from your chosen pattern.

£69

10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.30am How to hold your hook and yarn and make a slip knot 11am Learn how to work the basic stitches, chain, double crochet and double trebles 11.30am Continue working on the basic stitches 1pm Lunch 2pm How to read a pattern and work in the round 3.30pm How to change a colour and work a basic project 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

Learn To Knit With Your Child Or Grandchild on Friday 19 August our tutors will teach you and your little one to knit from scratch on this half-day workshop. They’ll show you how to cast on, knit, purl and cast off and get started on a scarf or a bookmark project, which you can carry on with together ready for the winter. Ticket price includes one child and one adult.

Speedy/Ultimate Christmas Knitting

£69

per person

with Freddie and Monika on Monday 3 October Packed with handy, time-saving hints and gorgeous gift ideas, this workshop is for the confident beginner. 10am Welcome, with tea and coffee 10.45am Start work on some super-speedy Christmas decs 11.30am Tea break 12.30pm Finish off your decs, darn in ends and learn to stiffen for a professional finish 1pm Lunch 2pm Quick scarf project using glitzy yarn 3.15pm Tea break 3.45pm Finish off your scarf and learn other time-saving tips and tricks 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

It’s easy to book , just call us on

0800 024 1212* Quote code LTM05 *Lines open Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm but closed bank holidays. Call charges from mobiles and non-BT landlines may vary. booking notes for the Knit & Crochet Tea Party: Please state at the time of booking which craft (or maybe both) you are confident with. This will allow the tutor to tailor the day to suit the group.

Where are the workshops held? ✤ At our HQ, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU

NEW!

£60

per pair

10am Welcome, with coffee and tea 10.30am How to hold your yarn and needles 10.45am Casting on 11am Learning how to knit and purl stitches 11.30am How to cast off 11.45am Start work on a beginner’s project 1pm Workshop finishes

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moNIKa CobEl our newest member of the team has a calm and patient nature, making her an excellent tutor. She’s now begun designing for Woman’s Weekly.

The workshops do not include lunch, but at our HQ, there is a canteen or you can bring your own. There are also food outlets close to the office. Should your chosen date already be sold out, you will if possible be offered an alternative date. Terms and condiTions Tickets will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Woman’s Weekly has the right to change the itinerary of the day. Please note, tickets to this event are non-refundable, unless it is cancelled or postponed. A guest-list policy will be in operation at the event. Shortly after purchasing tickets, you will receive confirmation: this is your ticket to the event, so please retain it for future reference.

, ops h s ork m/ w r ou kly.co n o e info answets e r mo om en For visit w ev


Comfort And Joy If you’ve never tried machine appliqué, give this quilt a try following our simple instructions

A bit More triCky

you will need l Scalloped template on page 72 l A long strip of paper, 17cm deep x 99cm long, for making the appliqué pattern l Pencil l Paper and fabric scissors l 30cm each of two different blue Liberty tana Lawn prints for appliqués l 50cm of 135-150cm-wide red and white cotton spot fabric for appliqués l 50cm of 135-150cm-wide grey and white cotton spot fabric for appliqués l 180cm of 135-150cm-wide white print fabric for the background l 180cm of 135-150cm-wide backing fabric l 50cm of 135-150cm-wide binding fabric l 210cm of 90cm-wide lightweight iron-on interfacing l 110cm x 160cm (43in x 64in) cotton wadding l Silicone release paper or appliqué pressing sheet l Fabric marker pen l Matching threads

Completing the Making up scalloped pattern piece Note: Unless otherwise indicated, use a

1

Trace off the scalloped template on page 72. Measure 11cm from one short end of the long strip of paper and fold it in half across the width; crease firmly and keeping the straight top and bottom edges level. Continue folding and creasing concertina style down the whole length of the strip, to form nine sections, each 11cm wide.

Scallop appliqué blocks

2

Lay the template on top of the folded paper, with the top straight edge level with the top edge of the folded paper, and trace around the lower curved edge, using a pencil. Now add a 6mm seam allowance to the lower curved edge and cut out the curved shape through all layers of paper, making sure that you keep the shapes an equal size on each fold. Open out your full-sized pattern piece, with nine equal-sized scallops.

Cutting out Using the scallop pattern, and each time adding a 6mm seam allowance to the long straight top edge and side edges, cut out one piece from each of the Tana Lawn fabrics, two pieces from each of the different spot fabrics and six pieces from interfacing. Note: The interfacing is too narrow to fit the pattern piece across the width, so place the pattern piece lengthwise.

1

Sew the scallop edges of a cotton print piece and a fusible interfacing piece together with the right side of the fabric facing the fusible side of the interfacing. To help you do this, mark the point of the stitching line, between each scallop, onto your fabric using a fabric marker. As you sew, when you reach each marked point, stop, lower the needle down into the point of the seam, raise the presser foot, pivot, lower the presser foot, and continue sewing. This will ensure that you get nice crisp points between the scallops.

From white print background fabric cut: six strips 26.5cm x the width of fabric. From the binding fabric cut: six strips 6cm wide x the width of the fabric.

46 Love To Make

6mm seam allowance throughout and all seams are sewn with the right sides of the fabric facing each other.

2

Clip in to the seam allowances along the scalloped edge and clip into


AppliquĂŠ

Love To Make 47


each small corner of the seam allowance where the scallops meet.

Assembling and finishing the quilt

short end of the binding, sew it in place, stopping approximately the distance of one seam allowance from the corner.

3

Turn the appliqué right side out. The fusible side of the interfacing should now be facing you when you are looking at the back of the appliqué.

4

Press the piece of stitched appliqué on the fabric side, using the silicone release paper or an appliqué pressing sheet between the fusible interfacing and the ironing board. Now repeat steps 1 to 4 to complete all of the scallop appliqués.

5

Using an iron, fuse an appliqué piece to a background fabric strip, aligning the straight upper raw edges and with the interfacing toward the background fabric. From this point forward, handle the blocks gently. If the appliqué comes away from the backing fabric, just give it another press to fuse it in place.

6

Topstitch the scallop edge of the appliqué to the background fabric, working close to the edge. Repeat steps 5 and 6 with each remaining appliqué and background fabric strips.

3

Fold the binding neatly at the corner to turn it 90 degrees before continuing to sew along the next side. Continue in the same manner until you meet the starting end of the binding. Fold over the binding at the finishing end and tuck it under the starting end. Trim away excess binding and stitch the ends in place.

1

Follow the photo of the quilt above, for colour placement. Working from top to bottom, sew the rows together. Press. Trim the sides of the quilt top even with the sides of the scallop appliqués.

2

Cut a piece of wadding and backing fabric to the same size as the completed appliqué top. Carefully lay out the backing fabric on a flat surface, wrong side up. Place the wadding on top and finally the appliqué top, right side up, and smooth out until there are no wrinkles. There are many techniques for holding the fabric layers together whilst you are quilting: safety pins, a quilt basting gun or large tacking stitches. One of the simplest methods is using a basting spray.

4

Finally, turn the folded edge of the binding over the wrong side, enclosing the raw edges of the quilt and whipstitch the folded edge to the back of the quilt.

3

Work vertical rows of straight-line machine quilting down the whole length of the quilt, with rows spaced 25mm apart.

Binding

1 Tip... To prevent puckering and slipping when working straight line quilting through multiple fabric layers, use a special dual-feed or walking foot on your sewing machine. 48 Love To Make

Join the binding strips together until you have a strip long enough to bind all around the edges of your quilt. Iron the binding strip in half, wrong sides together, so it measures 3cm wide.

2

Working from the right side, place the folded strip, half way down one side edge of your quilt, with raw edges level. Starting 12mm from the

Taken from Liberty Love, by Alexia Marcelle Abegg (Stash Books, £17.99). www.searchpress.com


Easy Make

Pretty Little Things Update your cupboards and drawers, bringing some style to your home with these decorative knobs You will need l Six plain wooden knobs l Pale blue acrylic paint l Paintbrushes l Decorative paper napkins l Découpage glue l Gold gilt wax polish l Scissors l Soft cloth

To make

1 2

Paint the wooden knobs with the blue paint and allow them to dry.

Peel the napkin layers so you have a single-ply sheet and discard any pieces without images on them. Cut out the required images, and using découpage glue and a paintbrush, carefully attach each napkin image on to the centre of a knob.

3

Allow your work to dry before applying more coats of découpage glue to seal and varnish them.

4

When the knobs are dry apply some gold gilt wax polish around the edges; you can also gently apply a small amount over the surface, too. Let the wax polish dry and harden before buffing up with a soft cloth. They are now ready to attach to your furniture.

Taken from Twenty to Make – Modern Decoupage (Search Press, £4.99). See page 38.

Love To Make 49


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Blossom Bag

This Japanese-inspired embroidered pouch, made from satin-back shantung with sequin blossoms, makes an exquisite mini evening clutch or make-up bag a bit More triCky

you will need l embroidery motif on page 72 l Charcoal satin-back shantung, one piece measuring 27 x 18cm* and one piece measuring 23 x 14cm l Light beige satin-back shantung, two pieces measuring 23 x 14cm l iron-on lightweight interfacing, four pieces measuring 23 x 14cm l DMC stranded cotton embroidery thread, one skein of each: 3023 (beige) and 819 (pale pink) l No 8 crewel needle l Pack of 4mm-diameter pale pink opaque iridescent sequins l 20cm matching zip fastener l Matching sewing thread l Dressmaker’s carbon paper l embroidery hoop * add more fabric to this piece as necessary to fit in your embroidery hoop or frame.

Finished dimensions: Approximately 21 x 12cm

Cutting out and preparation

1

On the larger piece of charcoal fabric, tack a rectangle measuring 23 x 14cm. Following the manufacturer’s instructions, attach one piece of interfacing in the marked rectangle on the non-satin side, as shown. Then, attach one piece to the non-satin side of the smaller piece of charcoal fabric and one each to the satin side of the two beige pieces of fabric.

2

Using dressmaker’s carbon paper, transfer the embroidery motif onto the right side of the larger fabric piece, making sure it is centred in the tacked area, and mark the sequin flowers with just a single dot. Mount the fabric in the embroidery frame with your marked design uppermost.

of how to work these stitches). Once the design is fully stitched, remove from the frame and cut out the front of the pouch along the outer tacking stitches.

Making up the pouch

1

Prepare the zip by folding over the tapes at both ends of the zip towards the wrong side, as shown, and sew down.

2

Place the embroidered fabric right side up on a flat surface. Align the zip face down along the top edge of the fabric. The zip should be centred along this edge. For a right-handed version, the zip pull should be to the left side; for a left-handed version, it should be to the right.

Working the embroidery

3

Place one piece of the interior fabric right side down on top of the zip. Tack the layers together along the top edge, sandwiching the zip in between.

1 This project is taken from The Handstitched Flower Garden by Yuki Sugashima (Search Press, £12.99). See page 38.

52 Love To Make

Using two strands of thread in your needle start to work the design. Stitch the flowers first, by sewing five sequins in a circle. The sequins should be evenly spaced and slightly overlapped, with each stitch going from the centre of the sequin to the centre of the flower. Next, work the buds in satin stitch, using pale pink; outline the thick branches in beige, with split stitch, and fill with satin stitch. Finally, work the thin branches in stem stitch using beige (see page 67 for details

4

Using the zipper foot on your sewing machine, sew the zip in place, moving the zip pull as necessary so that it doesn’t get in the way.


Stitchcraft

of the zip with the remaining pieces of the exterior and interior fabrics.

the edges, leaving an opening of 12cm along the bottom of the beige fabric for turning through right side out.

7 5

Flip the fabrics over so that the zip is exposed and the wrong sides of the fabrics are together. Tack and then machine topstitch through all layers of fabric, along the top edge close to the zip. Repeat steps 2 to 5 on the other side

6

With the zip pulled halfway open, flip the fabrics so that the right sides of the charcoal fabrics are facing and pin the outer edges together. Now pin the beige fabric pieces right sides facing, as before, and machine stitch around

Clip the bottom corners and turn right side out and close the opening edges together with slipstitch (turn to page 68 for details of how to work this stitch). Push beige lining inside the pouch and close the zipper. It is now ready to use. Love To Make 53


Top Drawer Up-cycle old drawers to create the perfect modern storage solution

Child’s Room 1 Turn knobless drawers into a brilliant cube-like shelving unit, perfect for tidying clutter easy peasy

you will need l Old drawers without knobs or handles l Brightly patterned lining papers l White undercoat and satin wood paint l paint brush l Fine grade sandpaper l Drill and screws l Double-sided sticky tape

54 Love To Make

Sand down your drawers to remove any previous finish and paint them with undercoat; leave to dry then give them one or two coats of white paint. Leave to dry thoroughly.

2

Drill a couple of fixing holes in the base of each drawer. Measure the inside base of each drawer and cut a sheet of lining paper to fit each one.

3

Screw the drawers to the wall arranging them in an interesting pattern, and then stick the lining papers to the back of the new shelfunits/base of the drawers, using double-sided sticky tape.


Be inspired

Craft Room Get organised and keep everything close to hand. With this simple unit, you can chose how many, and the depth of shelves easy peasy

you will need l a long slim white melamine drawer, or a drawer painted white l pieces of 12mm-thick timber, cut to depth and width of drawer for your shelves l shelf supports l acrylic paint in bright colours l paint brush

1

Decide on the number of shelves you want in your unit and cut your timber to size yourself, or ask your hardware store to cut them for you.

2 3

Give the shelves a coat of acrylic paint and leave to dry.

Nail or screw in your shelf-supports, ensuring that they are level on each side of the drawer, and then insert your shelves and fill with crafting materials.

Bedroom A single drawer suspended from the wall makes an ideal bedside cabinet easy peasy

l single pine drawer l White emulsion paint l paint brush l Masking tape l Drill and screws l Washi tape

1

Paint the inside base of the drawer with white emulsion, using the masking tape to protect the sides of the drawer. Leave to dry and then remove the masking tape.

2

Drill two holes in the base of the drawer close to the drawer front. Fix the drawer to the wall, by screwing through the drilled holes.

3

Decorate the front of the shelf unit/top edge of drawer by sticking on contrasting Washi tape to highlight the edges. Love To Make 49


Kitchen For retro-kitchen style, use wooden drawers turned sideways to create simple open shelf units, with hanging knobs at each end. Perfect for herbs and spices and other small kitchen items eAsY peAsY

You will need l Wooden drawers with knobs l pieces of 12mm-thick timber cut to depth and length of drawers for shelves l A length of 12mm square pine wooden moulding for shelf supports l Waterproof acrylic paint l Drill and screws l Wood glue l Fine grade sandpaper l Masking tape l Decorative Washi tape, optional

1

Cut the shelves to size yourself, or ask at your hardware store to cut them for you. Then cut two shelf-supports for each shelf to the same depth as your shelves.

2

Give the drawers, shelves and shelfsupports a couple of coats of acrylic paint, leaving them to dry between coats.

3

Glue your self-supports to the inside front and back of the drawer, ensuring that they are level and hold them in place with masking tape until completely dry.

4

Drill two holes in the base of the drawer close to one side edge, and then fix the drawers to the wall, by screwing through the drilled holes. Remove the masking tape and insert your shelf. Decorate the front edge of the shelf with pretty Washi tape, if desired. 56 Love To Make


Other simple ideas Bathroom: Old drawers painted entirely with a waterproof acrylic paint and stacked as desired.

Gardener’s corner: Create a distressed look, by choosing an old wooden drawer and painting just some of the sections. Lightly sand over paintwork and glue on the shelf brackets before fixing the shelves.

Hallway Keep the family keys sorted with this brilliant rack and shelf unit eAsY peAsY

You will need l Old small wooden drawer l Acrylic paint l Brightly coloured metal hooks l Drill and screws l Fine grade sandpaper

1

Sand your drawer to remove any previous finish then give it one or two coats of paint. Leave to dry thoroughly.

2 3

Drill two holes in the base of the drawer close to one side of the drawer front, and fix the unit to the wall by screwing through the drilled holes.

Photography: EWA/Flora Press

Arrange the hooks in the base of the drawer, leaving enough space for the keys to hang below them, and then fix in place using screws. Display cabinet: A collection of drawers in various sizes have been painted grey and lined with striped paper to display a collection of blue and white crockery. Love To Make 57


Each pattern will be printed on A4 card and delivered to your door

Great Summer Knitting an

Ladies Bolero Crochet Pattern, £3.99

Lace Cardigan Vintage Knitting Pattern, £3.99

Lace Cardigan Ladies Knitting Pattern, £3.99

Womens Gilet Knitting Pattern, £2.99

Ladies Jacket Vintage Knitting Pattern, £3.99

Metallic Tee Shirt Top Knitting Pattern, £2.99

Ladies Cardigan Crochet Pattern, £3.99

Lace Tee Shirt Ladies Crochet Pattern, £3.99


nd Crochet Patterns for You

Wrap Bolero Ladies Knitting Pattern, £2.99

Lace Tunic Ladies Crochet Pattern £3.99

Lace Cardigan Ladies Vintage Knitting Pattern £3.99

To order, call 0800 024 1212* or complete the coupon below mastercard or Visa cardholders can order direct on the above number quoting L2m5 Lines open Monday to Friday 10am to 4pm, but closed bank holidays. *Call charges from mobiles and non-BT landlines may vary. Offer closes 31 may 2016

Fill in the coupon Payment must be made by cheque, sent with the coupon to the address provided

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TO: Woman’s Weekly Patterns L2M05, Customer Care, Room 06-C06, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU Knitting Pattern Lace Cardigan Ladies Knitting Pattern Ladies Jacket Vintage Knitting Pattern Lace Cardigan Vintage Knitting Pattern Lace Cardigan Ladies Vintage Knitting Pattern Metallic Tee Shirt Top Knitting Pattern Textured Cardigan Vintage Knitting Pattern Womens Gilet Knitting Pattern Wrap Bolero Ladies Knitting Pattern Ladies Cardigan Crochet Pattern Lace Tee Shirt Ladies Crochet Pattern Ladies Bolero Crochet Pattern Lace Tunic Ladies Crochet Pattern

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The Fabulous Baker Bears

Older children as well as adults will love making these cute needlefelted bears, ready for a picnic with their delicious bakes a bit More trickY

n

eedle-felting techniques are surprisingly easy. All the body parts are needled separately and then jointed so that the limbs move. You must take care though, as the needles are sharp and barbed. The aim is to create firm shapes using a felting needle and a bundle of wool fibres.

Safety note: Please note, although safety eyes are used for these little bears, they are not toys and they are unsuitable for babies and small children. Because of the sharp needle used in this craft, children under the age of 10 should be supervised by an adult when needle felting.

Making the basic bear Making your bear the right size The basic bear measures approximately 12cm in height and weighs approximately 20g. We say ‘approximately’ because the amounts of wool used for each bear body part may vary slightly. Enjoy the fact that no two bears will be the same! The wool will shrink in size as you needle felt, so to help you assess how much you will need to create each body part we have provided a simple wool measuring method and finished same-size templates. We find that this is the easiest way to work out the quantities needed. 60 Love To Make

You will need For the bear: l templates on page 73 l coarse wool fibres – brown for the bear and white for the chef’s hat l Merino tops in black and red for the nose, cheeks and mouth l two 2mm black glass eyes with a single loop, or small glass beads l 20cm of pink narrow satin ribbon l small foam block for forming chef’s hat l Waxed dental tape l 7cm long needle l Fabric glue l Wooden barbecue stick For the gateaux, you will need: l coarse wool fibres in beige for the cake base l Merino tops in pink, white and red for the decoration

Using the bear templates

1

Take a handful of wool for the head and form into a ball with loose ends trailing from one side.

For the cookies, you will need: l course wool fibres in beige l Merino tops in red For the cupcakes, you will need: l coarse wool fibres in blue l Merino tops in pink, cream and red For the breads, you will need: l course wool fibres in beige l Merino tops in light brown For all the projects, you will need: l triangular felting needle, gauge 40 l star felting needle, gauge 38 l Foam pad l embroidery scissors l scissors l Wooden barbecue stick l scalpel

2

Pull the fibres tight and hold the ball next to the head template (see page 73). It should be slightly bigger than the template. If the ball is a little small just add a layer of wool and reform it into a tight ball. If it is too big remove some wool. Continue in this way following the making instructions on page 62 and referring to the templates whenever you are making a new body part. This will be your technique for sizing all the body parts for the basic bear.


Love to Make for kids

Love To Make 61


Forming the bear parts

6

Roll a tight oval for the body between your fingers and needle it, turning it as you work to achieve an even finish.

1

Using the triangular felting needle, hold the needle firmly and poke it into the fibres. Don’t angle it – use a straight downwards motion or it may break.

12

Slip the wool off the stick and needle it in the middle to secure the sausage shape. Needle the end of the sausage shape to make it round.

7

Complete one rounded end, then work down the oval and needle all the loose fibres to create a smooth shape. Match the size of the finished body with the template.

2

Roll the wool for the bear’s head into a tight ball leaving the fibres loose on one side. Lay the ball on the foam pad and, holding the loose fibres, start to needle, turning the head round as you felt to create an even surface.

8

Place the bear’s head onto the top of the oval body, spreading the loose fibres over the shoulders. Needle them firmly to secure the head.

13

Work down the shape, needling it to make it firm. When the arm is the same length as the template, round off the other end. Repeat for the second arm.

14

Create a slightly thicker sausage shape for the leg using the same technique. Press one end of the shape onto your foam pad so that the foot bends slightly and then needle the inner fold firmly. Repeat for the second leg.

3

Keep needling until the ball shrinks to fit the template. Finish the ball and place the head to one side.

9

Lay the base of the nose cone onto the front of the head so that the loose fibres splay out. Needle the loose fibres into the head.

15 4

Take a small piece of wool for the bear’s nose and needle it into a cone shape, leaving loose fibres trailing from the base of the cone. Put to one side.

5

Felt two small semi-circles for the ears, leaving the flat edges un-felted. Again, put to one side. 62 Love To Make

10

Attach an ear to either side of the head by needling the loose fibres into the head.

11

To create the first arm, wrap wool tightly round the end of a barbecue stick to make a sausage shape.

Place the arms and legs on the template to make sure they are the same size. If necessary, add wool to the shapes, or trim away excess fibres with embroidery scissors. Work over cut areas with the needle and some fibres to smooth the surfaces.

16

When you have completed the body parts use a star needle to work over each of the shapes. Needle in any stray fibres if you want a smooth finish.


Making faces

Adding the features

Adding the features is like waving a magic wand to bring your little baker bear to life

Attaching the eyes

5

7

6

8

Using a thin strand of black Merino wool, needle a triangular outline onto your bear’s nose.

Divide this strand in two, pull the two strands apart and needle one to each side of the face to create the mouth. Trim the ends to neaten.

1

Create the eye sockets by repeatedly stabbing the needle into the head to create two indented circles above the nose and use the tip of a scalpel to make a small slit in the centre of each socket.

Needle the centre of the nose with more wool. Needle another thin length of wool to the base of the nose. Take it a little way down below the nose and then needle it into the face to secure it.

2

Thread a 20cm length of dental tape through the loop of the first eye. Put the two tape ends together and thread them onto a long needle.

Jointing the bear You can pin the limbs to the body to get the positioning right before jointing. Remove the pins when you are happy with the look of your bear, before you start the jointing process. The jointing technique is the same for the arms as it is for the legs, which are shown below. left leg at C. Make sure the legs are symmetrical.

B

3

Push the needle through the slit and out through the base of the back of the head. Pull the eye tight into the socket and leave the ends trailing. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the second eye with a separate length of dental tape, making sure that the thread emerges from the back of the head adjacent to the first threads.

Needle a few strands of pink Merino wool into the cheek area to create a gentle rosy glow. Trim off the excess fibres close to the bear’s face. Needle any loose fibres on the head with the star needle to neaten.

A

1

Thread the needle with approximately 40cm of dental tape. Push it in at point A, through the body and out the other side. Pass the needle through the top of the bear’s right leg. Pull the thread through at point B, leaving approximately 10cm hanging from point A.

B

C

3

Pull the thread through, then pass the needle back through the leg adjacent to the thread at point D.

C D

4

Pull the thread tightly so that the bear’s limbs are firmly jointed. Tie the ends of tape together in a knot. Thread the ends one by one back into the bear’s body and trim away the excess tape.

5 4

Tie the ends of the tape together in a secure knot and thread them one at a time through the body. Trim the ends of the tape close to the body.

2

Pass the needle back through the leg and into the body, as close as possible to where it came out. Push the needle through the body and the bear’s

Cover any holes you’ve made when jointing by needling over them using a tiny piece of matching wool.

Love To Make 63


Making the chef’s hat and baked goodies

1

Using coarse white wool, create a flat felt band and circle. Using the templates provided on page 73, cut the band and the circle to the correct size.

Cookies

6

Make gateaux, as shown below, and glue it between the bear’s paws. Secure further with needling if necessary.

Gateaux

1

Take a small clump of beige wool. Shape it into a ball and then needle it all over until it becomes a flat disc shape measuring approximately 2cm in diameter.

2

Needle a small ball of red wool to the top for the cherry.

Cup cakes

2

Cut a cylinder out of the small foam block and trim it to measure 5cm long, with a diameter of 3cm.

1

Take a 20cm strip of beige wool, approximately 3cm wide. Roll this into a loose sausage. Lay it down on your foam pad and needle the centre a few times to secure the sausage shape.

3

Lay the felt circle on top of the cylinder and bring the edges down. Gather and gently needle them into the foam base. Wrap the hatband round the bottom of the gathered hat and needle it to secure.

2

Now hold the sausage upright on your pad and needle one end of it flat. The sausage shape will become fatter as you needle. Turn it over and repeat on the other end until you have created a rough cylinder shape.

4

Position the hat on the bear’s head and needle it securely all round. Tie a ribbon round the bear’s neck and trim the ends. 64 Love To Make

2

Create the typical cupcake case shape by needling one end of the cylinder while turning it, until it tapers slightly.

3

5

4

6

5

7

6

Lay it on its side and needle round the shape to neaten the cylinder.

Needle a little band of pink wool round the middle of the cake for the filling and then needle a thin layer of pink wool over the top of the cake for the icing.

Needle a small ball of white wool to the middle of the top of the cake and add a small ball of red on top.

5

Take a 10cm strip of blue wool approximately 2cm wide, roll it into a sausage and needle it into a small cylinder shape. Use steps 2 to 4 of the gateaux to help you.

3 4

Repeat, working on the ends and round the middle until you have a cake base shape with a 3cm diameter by 2cm deep.

Gently pull the finished hat away from the foam.

1

Needle small balls of red wool round the edge of the top of the cake to represent cherries.

To create a base for the swirly icing, first needle a pea-sized ball of cream wool onto the top of the blue cake case. Take two 10cm lengths of wool – one pink and one beige. Lay them side-by-side at the edge of the blue cake case and needle the ends to secure. Now wrap the length of wool round and round, needling it as you wrap to create the swirl of icing.

When you reach the top, trim back any excess wool fibres and needle the ends to neaten. Needle a small ball of red wool to the top for the cherry.


Breads

Bread roll

1

Use a small clump of beige wool to create a slightly flattened ball shape approximately 2cm in diameter.

2

Needle a few fibres of light brown wool over the top of the ball.

Cottage loaf

1

Needle a slightly flattened ball of beige wool so that it measures approximately 3cm in diameter.

2

Needle a smaller flattened ball. Place the smaller ball on top of the large one and needle through the two balls to bind them together.

3

Needle a few strands of light brown wool over the smaller ball to add interest.

4

Needle repeatedly into the middle of the top of the loaf to create an indentation.

French loaf

1 2

Needle a 6cm long firm sausage using beige wool.

Lay some light brown fibres across the top of the sausage and needle until smooth.

3

Using a scalpel, cut four V-shaped slots along the top of the loaf. Remove the small V-sections.

How to Make Little Needle-Felted Teddy Bears, by Judy Balchin & Roz Dace (Search Press, ÂŁ8.99.) See page 38.

Love To Make 65


Only

ÂŁ4.95

On Sale Every Month From all good newsagents and supermarkets


Stitch Guide All the stitches and techniques you will need to complete the projects in this issue Counted thRead StitCheS Cross-stitch

backstitch

3

2 1 A

3

B

Cross-stitches can be worked either individually or in rows. It doesn’t matter which direction you work, but make sure the bottom halves of the stitches slope in the same direction, so the top halves will do the same. To work either individual stitches or rows, bring the needle up at 1 and insert one block up (or two or three threads up) and one block (or two or three threads) to the right at 2, forming a diagonal

stitch. Bring the needle out at 3. Either complete an individual stitch as in diagram A, or continue in this way to form a row of half crosses, then work back, finishing the upper half crosses, as in diagram B.

1 2

Bring the needle through at the corner of a stitch (1), then take a backward stitch over one block (2). Bring the needle through one block in front of the first stitch (3). Then take another stitch, reinserting the needle where it first came through the fabric (1). Continue to make a row. Always work the backstitches one block in length, noting that the stitching doesn’t have to be in a straight line – it can be worked in different directions, down the side of blocks or even diagonally across a block.

FReeStyle embRoideRy StitCheS Stem stitch

Work from left to right (reverse if you are left-handed). Bring the needle up at the end of the line and make a short stitch, bringing the needle up again immediately adjacent to the first stitch and about half way down its length, make another stitch the same length as the first and repeat to make a line of stepped stitches in this way.

Couching

Lay a thread along a line of the design and, with another thread, tie it down at even intervals with a small stitch into the fabric. The tying stitch can be of a contrast colour to the laid thread if desired.

Satin stitch

short distance away and bring it back up, leaving a similar gap. Repeat to make a line of stitches, as long or short as you like, but make them all of equal length.

Split stitch 1 Following the outline of the shape, work straight stitches close together as illustrated. Keep the tension even and stitches close for a smooth, flawless finish with no background fabric visible.

2 3

Running stitch Work from left to right: Bring the needle up at 1 and down at 2, pull thread firmly through. Bring the needle up again at 3, through the centre of the thread from the first stitch. Repeat as required 4. Bring the needle up through the back of the fabric where you want to start stitching. Insert the needle down into the fabric a

Love To Make 67


basic hand stitches slipstitch

This stitch is used to join two folded edges together. Worked from right to left (reverse this if you are lefthanded), bring the needle out through the folded edge. Slip the needle through the fold of the opposite edge for about 6mm and draw the needle and thread through. Continue in this manner.

whipstitch A Whipstitch is generally used to sew two finished edges together. B It can also be used to hold a raw edge neatly against a flat surface. Insert needle at right angles and close to the edge, picking up just a few threads. Slanted floats will be produced between the tiny stitches. Space between the stitches can be short or long, depending on your project.

sewing a french seaM

hOw tO wOrk a buttOn shank If the button is being used for a closure you will need to add a shank, this is done with the help of one, or two matchsticks, depending on the length of the shank required, placed across the top of the button and stitched over. The same method is used for a two or four-holed button.

The French seam is a self-enclosed seam, meaning that the raw edges are enclosed with-in the seam. They are only suitable for lightweight fabrics and joining straight edges. This type of seam is stitched twice, once from the right side and then from the wrong side, and it is often used on sheer or semi-sheer curtains.

1

1

2

2

Mark the position of your button with a chalk and secure your thread on the right side of the fabric at the button mark, with a small stitch. Bring the needle and thread through one hole in the button and then lay a matchstick across the top of the button. Take the needle over the matchstick(s) and down through the second hole, pass it up through the third hole, over the matchstick(s) and down through the fourth hole. Take about six stitches through each pair of holes then, carefully slide out the matchstick(s).

3

Lift the button away from the fabric so the stitches are taut, and pass the needle back down through the button only. Wind the thread tightly around the stitches to form a thread shank. Secure the thread on the underside with a couple of stitches.

With the wrong sides of the fabric facing, pin and tack the two edges together. Machine stitch the seam, working 6mm in from the raw edges, reverse stitching at each end to secure. Press the seam open, then refold the fabric, with the right sides together and the stitchline placed exactly on the folded edge. Press the folded edge flat, then pin and tack the pressed edge in place. Machine stitch once again, working 1cm in from the seamed edge, enclosing the raw edges, and reverse stitching at each end to secure. Press the seam to one side.

luX linen

tiMe fOr tea

Page 6

Page 21

shown actual size

shown actual size

flOwer teMPlates

uP te c a a te Pl M te

68 Love To Make


5cm

Plates with shaPes Page 24

5cm

5cm

5cm

Pencil POts

flight Of fancY

Page 27

Page 28

Photocopy to required size tabs to fold and glue

5cm

a Perfect setting Page 29

burn bright Page 31

PYrOgrahY teMPlates Photocopy to size

5cm 5cm Love To Make 69


HOT POTS

Chart B

Page 34

Cross Stitch charts

Chart A

Key to Cross-stitch charts Chart A each coloured square and symbol represents one cross-stitch worked with two strands of DMC MoulinĂŠ special stranded cotton. the solid lines represent backstitch, using one strand of DMC MoulinĂŠ special stranded cotton. 70 Love To Make

Chart B

3348 (lime)

3802 (wine)

502 (blue green)

3607 (bright pink)

645 (dark grey)

351 (coral) 318 (light grey)


HOT POTS TEMPLATE Shown actual size

Plac

e to fold

CUT 1 on the fold of stiff interfacing

F C

G B

E B A B A

A D

F

A

A

B

B A

ANEMONE TEMPLATE

F C

Pages 36 to 37

Enlarge template by 200%

F

G

F F G

G

G

G

F Love To Make 71


cOMFORT AND JOY Page 46 to 48

Top Edge

ScALLOPED TEMPLATES

Shown actual size

BLOSSOMiNG OUT Shown actual size Pages 52 to 53

EMBROiDERY MOTiF

72 Love To Make


THE FABULOUS BAKER BEARS Page 60 to 65

Shown actual size Ear

Ear

Head

BASic BEAR TEMPLATE

Nose

HAT TEMPLATES Band Arm

Arm Body

circle

Leg

Leg

LOVE TO MAKE, Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU. Call: 020 3148 5000. Email: WomansWeeklyPostbag@timeinc.com. Advertising: 020 3148 3680. Offers: 0800 138 2826. Back issues: 01733 688964; mags-uk/ipc. Unless otherwise stated, all competitions, free samplings, discounts and offers are only available to readers in the UK, Channel Islands, Isle of Man and the Republic of Ireland. All details correct at time of going to press. Pre-press by Rhapsody Media. Covers by Polestar Chantry. Printed by Polestar Chantry. ISSN 2056-5739. WOMAN’S WEEKLY® is a registered trademark of Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, and is sold subject to the following conditions, namely that it shall not, without the written consent of the publishers first given, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise disposed of by way of trade at more than the recommended selling price shown on the cover, and that it shall not be lent, resold or hired or otherwise disposed of in a mutilated condition or in any unauthorised cover by way of trade or affixed to or as part of any publication or advertising, literary or pictorial matter whatsoever. All designs used in this magazine are subject to copyright laws. Patterns are for personal use only and cannot be sold. Multiple copies of any part of this publication may not be made, and no part of this publication whether in its original form or a reproduction thereof may be sold. All patterns featured within Love to Make are reproduced in good faith that they do not infringe any copyright. © Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, 2016. l We work hard to achieve the highest standards of editorial content, and we are committed to complying with the Editors’ Code of Practice (https://www.ipso.co.uk/ IPSO/cop.html) as enforced by IPSO. If you have a complaint about our editorial content, you can email us at complaints@timeinc.com or write to Complaints Manager, Time Inc. (UK) Ltd Legal Department, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London, SE1 0SU. Please provide details of the material you are complaining about and explain your complaint by reference to the Editors’ Code. We will endeavour to acknowledge your complaint within 5 working days and we aim to correct substantial errors as soon as possible. Love To Make 73


Over To You...

body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy body copy

What you are doing, sharing and making this month

Facebook Feedback

body copy body copy copy body copy Arebody you a body tidy copy crafter, or body copy body copy body copy body messy? copy body copy body copy creatively body copy Lillian Kerr: Very tidy, I like everything in its place, it’s much easier to work.

Linda Cannon: Tidy crafter? Are you crazy? I don’t think that is possible! It may look a mess, but people just don’t understand my system! Barb Webb: Haven’t met a tidy crafter yet... and that includes me!

Dawn Wyllie Harmer: I think I’m tidy, but my husband disagrees.

Pam Ashton: Very tidy… tidy mind, tidy work!

What have you been crafting lately?

Jane Barrett: I call it organised chaos.

Susie Harris: New comfy seating for my boat’s cockpit – sewn at anchor whilst in Panama!

Justine Ashton: I’m knitting socks in different sizes for refugees here in Germany.

Sarah Ryan loved the mice in of Love To Make. featured in the January issue und and so She had a suitable tin lying aro ghter, dau decided to make them for her each bed who she says, tucks them into ll We p. slee night, before she goes to as k loo do done Sarah, they really tin bed! ‘snug-as-a-bug’ in their little

Lynn Holland: Lavender bags from vintage curtain material, left over from turning a curtain into a dress.

Erika Lodey: Had a new cutting machine, so been designing pictures and cards.

Marjorie Gale: A hooded jacket for my expected first great grandchild. Yay!

Marylyn Sheldon: Sat crocheting a small jacket and hat for 6-inch bear.

! It’s a hoot, prov ed

Last month’s cute felt owl to be very popular with lots of our lovely readers and you’ve sent us some great photos of your own versions. We particularly love this one made by 12 year-old Alice e Sutcliffe from Devon. Well done Alic dren chil that w kno to t grea it’s and e enjoy sewing once again! Plus we’v by in had another cute fellow sent se Fiona Richardson of Leicester. Plea it’s as ures pict r keep sending in you always great to see what you have enjoyed making.

WRITE TO US

ht Night night, sleep atig tin that we

Love to Make with Woman’s Weekly, 110 Southwark St, London SE1 0SU.

The cuddly g

iant We were thrille d to receive th is photo from Barbara Christie of this cuddly giant dog, which we feat ured in last July ’s issue of Love To Make. Barbar a says she mad e it for her friend Victoria ’s little girl, Sum m er, who is 4. I think that w e can tell from the photo that Summer w as thrilled with her dog, he’s gorgeous, we all want one he re in the office !

We’d love to hear from you, so please get in touch.

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