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CHANEL.COM


CHANEL.COM


LES BEIGES NATURAL IS A STYLE

THE NEW HEALTHY GLOW GEL TOUCH FOUNDATION


CONTENTS

august

Our exclusive subscriber cover!

124

2017

42

p34. OH, ORLANDO The actor talks Pirates, Katy Perry and those paddleboarding pics.

NOW, NEXT, ALWAYS The future classics no self-respecting wardrobe should be without.

LARA AT 30

the best skin of your life

All the latest tools and treatments to give you complexion perfection.

In the shadow of Christian Dior’s beautiful Château de la Colle Noire, the model-turned-mogul reflects on her coming of age and why she stepped out of the spotlight.

108

STAY AND PLAY 162

When your hotel is this amazing, you can be forgiven for never wanting to venture outside.

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Darren McDonald at The Artist Group STYLING Rachel Wayman HAIR Travis Balcke at Company 1 for Wella MAKEUP Damian Garozzo for Dior MANICURE Nelly Ferreira LARA WORTHINGTON WEARS: (newsstand cover) dress, $26,000, underwear, $1,900, boots, $2,300, necklace, $500, rings, $390 each, all Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600; earrings, Lara’s own; (subscriber cover) bra, $1,250, coat, $6,300, both Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600; earrings, Lara’s own; on Lara’s left hand: rings, Lara’s own; on Lara’s right hand: rings, $500 each, all Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600 TO GET LARA’S BEAUTY LOOK, WE USED: Dior Prestige Satin Revitalizing Firming Mask, $220 for six, Dior Prestige La Lotion Essence De Rose, $162, DiorSkin Nude Luminizer, $95, DiorSkin Forever fluid foundation, $89, Diorblush Colour & Light in Peach Glow, $72, Rouge Dior in Hypnotic Matte, $53, 5 Couleurs in Fascinate, $107, DiorShow Bold Brow in Medium, $44, DiorShow Pump’N’Volume mascara, $56, Dior Vernis in Enigma, $41, Miss Dior EDP, $240 for 100ml, all Dior, (02) 9295 9059

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ELLE AUSTRALIA


FIRST LOOK

p24. making the cut

The latest in tailoring comes simple, chic and supermodel-approved.

p36. into the blue

Celia Pavey, aka Vera Blue, isn’t your average reality-TV alumnus. -----p36. ELLE book club

p72. the joy

of quitting

How giving up your job could be your best career move yet.

Attention Bachelor fans: this new novel is for you.

24

85

FASHION

-----p25. dream team

Aje’s new collection is bringing awareness to the beauty of Indigenous culture. -----p27. this is what we

call having it all

A sneaker, brogue and flatform in one: this is the shoe that keeps on giving. -----p28. home

improvement

Aerin Lauder can even make chips look chic. She reveals her entertaining secrets. ------

Embrace the best of both worlds in a bold mix of modern and oldworldly, or keep it fresh in crisp shapes and a white colour palette. Plus! We chat to the woman behind Fendi’s cult accessories.

-----p38. internet explorer

A tech expert answers all the security questions you’ve ever wanted to know. ------

p39. fast fashion

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p76. the denim story

Are the latest lifestyle trends doing you more harm than good?

After swearing off jeans as a kid, they’ve now become a staple for model/singer/ actress Lou Doillon.

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FEATURES

p50. now following

Meet the inspirational women using Instagram for more than just #cleaneating pics.

p140. my weekend

in products

Stylist Ilona Hamer swears by fresh, clean skin and luxe scents. -----p142. tête-à-tête

BEAUTY

Manicure magician Madeline Poole talks nail art for grown-ups.

beauty buys

-----p144. hit refresh

p130. the new cult

These are the products makeup artists can’t live without – add to kit now.

How to break through your fitness plateau. ------

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p56. experience

32

required

p32. on the rise

Actress Zoey Deutch proves she’s one to watch, both on and off the screen. ------

They say old friends are the best friends – but older ones may be even better. -----p58. an awaking

nightmare

This month’s must-see exhibitions will give an instant boost to your culture cred.

p32. face forward

Suffering insomnia, anxiety and irritable bowel, this writer discovered all three may be linked.

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p35. wich-craft

The humble sanga gets a gourmet reinvention. ------

p62. we need to talk

p146. breathe easy

130

Transform your life with one health hack. -----------

p134. temperature

control

Supercharge your regimen with products that cool or warm on contact. -----p138. the beauty edit

...and why it’s not such a dirty word.

Touche Éclat, Orgasm blush, dry shampoo... this month, our old favourites are getting an update.

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about ageing

156

LIFESTYLE

p156. heart land

Treasures collected from all over the world give this Byron home its soul. -----p167. privacy notice -----p168. horoscopes ------

and more...

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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ELLE.com.au

Justine Cullen Fashion Director Rachel Wayman Bookings and Style Editor Dannielle Cartisano Market Editor Claudia Jukic Fashion Office Coordinator Samantha Wong Contributing Fashion Editor Sara Smith

ADVERTISING Director of Brands and Categories Jane Serember (02) 9282 8904 Ad Production Manager Kate Orsborn (02) 9282 8364 Senior Events Manager Cate Gazal (02) 8116 9342 Brand Executive Emily Whelan (02) 8268 6293

VICTORIA

Sales Director Jaclyn Clements (03) 9823 6341 Head of Brand Sales Christine Lester (03) 9823 6382

QUEENSLAND

Head of Sales Judy Taylor (07) 3101 6636

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Sales Manager Jo Moroney (08) 8267 5032

OVERSEAS ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES

Europe Magazine International SRL +39 02 796 451

PRODUCTION

Production Controller Sally Jefferys (02) 8116 9385 Advertising Production Coordinator Dominic Roy (02) 9282 8691

@elleaus

@elleaustralia

Editor-in-Chief

@justine _cullen

justinecullen

EDITORIAL Associate Editor Genevra Leek Managing Editor Brooke Bickmore Chief Sub-Editor Laura Culbert Acting Deputy Chief Sub-Editor Ally McManus Features and Culture Editor Elle McClure Editorial Coordinator/PA to Justine Cullen Ana Eksouzian-Cavadas (02) 8114 9431

ART Acting Creative Directors Amanda McCourt, Lauren Dragosetti Deputy Art Director Melissa Drennan

BEAUTY Beauty and Lifestyle Director Amy Starr Acting Beauty and Fitness Director Sara McLean

BAUER MEDIA GROUP

Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul General Manager, Fashion, Health & Beauty Fiona Legdin Director of Sales Fiorella Di Santo Director of Media Solutions Warwick Taylor Marketing Director, Fashion, Beauty & Health Zenna Katsikaris Assistant Brand Manager Alicia Raiti Group Subscriptions Marketing Manager Kit Wilson Subscriptions Campaign Manager Lauren Flinn Research Director Justin Stone (02) 9282 8283

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HEARST MAGAZINES INTERNATIONAL

Senior Vice-President/CFO & General Manager Simon Horne Senior Vice-President/International Publishing Director Jeannette Chang Senior Vice-President/Editorial Director Kim St Clair Bodden Fashion & Entertainment Director Kristen Ingersoll

LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE

Chairman & CEO Lagardère Active Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE France & International Constance Benque CEO ELLE International Media Licenses François Coruzzi SVP/International Director of ELLE Valeria Bessolo Llopiz SVP/Director of International Media Licenses, Digital Development & Syndication Mickael Berret ELLE International Productions Charlotte Deffe, Virginie Dolata Deputy Syndication Team Manager Thérèse Genevois Syndication Coordinator Marion Magis Copyrights Manager & Digital Syndication Séverine Laporte

DIGITAL

Managing Director, Digital Christian Fricke Content Director Emily Kerr Managing Editor Alison Izzo General Manager Commercial Jane Waterhouse

www.ellearoundtheworld.com INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE: LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING

CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising 124 rue Danton, 92300 Levallois-Perret, France

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 T: (02) 8114 9431 E: elleaustralia@bauer-media.com.au WANT TO BE AN INTERN? Email your CV to the above address

ELLE is published by Bauer Media Pty Limited, 54 Park Street, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. © 2017; the contents of this publication are not for reproduction, redistribution or reuse, by any means whatsoever or in any form whatsoever without the express permission of Bauer Media. Printed by PMP Print Pty Limited, 31 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, New South Wales, Australia. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Limited, 26 Rodborough Road, Frenchs Forest, New South Wales, Australia. All prices quoted include GST, are approximate and are in AUD unless otherwise stated. Bauer Media accepts no responsibility for damage to or loss of material submitted for publication. Please keep duplicates of text and illustrative material. For all subscription and sales enquiries, visit magshop.com.au; email magshop@magshop.com.au; or phone 136 116 between 8am and 6pm (AEST) Monday to Friday. Correspondence should be addressed to: Magshop, GPO Box 4967, Sydney, NSW 2001. ISSN 2202-7254. Trademark notice The ELLE trademark and logo are owned in Canada by France-Canada Editions et Publications, Inc. and in the rest of the world by Hachette Filipacchi Presse (France), each LAGARDERE ACTIVE Group companies. ELLE is used under license from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse.


COMING OF AGE Justine with cover girl Lara at a (chilly) dinner celebrating the launch of the new Miss Dior fragrance at Christian Dior’s home Château de la Colle Noire in May

Do you become a different person every seven years? The argument goes

that every cell in our bodies is completely replaced over that time span, making us, essentially, a whole new us every seven years. Philosopher Rudolf Steiner believed in a theory of human development based on seven-year cycles. Astrologists subscribe to continual seven-month-growth phases relating to the 12 signs of the zodiac, with a complete cycle (or lesson) taking seven years. It’s a popular number when it comes to life theories. When I think of my own life at seven, 14, 21, 28, and 35, there are definite, super-significant life shifts I can recognise. Admittedly, I’m highly susceptible to finding the truth in this kind of thing (never have I been more unintentionally creative than after two years of seeing a kinesiologist who specialised in Neuro Emotional Technique – look it up – by which stage I had clearly run out of stressful memories to unblock but didn’t want to let him down). But even through my most sceptical filter, I don’t think I could say the same thing about the years of my life divisible by six, or eight. The sevens really were key ages for me – and I can sense that the one coming up next year (I’m not yet ready to say the number, because it can’t possibly be true) will be similarly life-shifting. I can’t speak to the early years of our cover girl Lara Worthington, but the fact that she became a mother just before her 28th birthday, the thing that she says – in our story on p108 – changed the person she was more than anything that came before, including the death of her father at 20 and meeting her husband Sam at 26, backs the theory. Having known Lara for a long time and watched her confidence and sense of self explode since having her sons Rocket and Racer, it does feel like there’s something more powerful at play than just the usual maturing of a woman moving into motherhood.

Of course, while the new cells theory is nice – I’d love to have an all-new bod next year, thanks! – it’s not quite as simple as that. No matter how we look at it, we are our birth age, not the age of our cells. But ageing is different for all of us, as we explore in-depth from p62. And it’s about so much more than wrinkles and greying hair (although they play a significant role) – it’s also how we dress, the music we listen to, whether or not we use voicemail, how much we appreciate our sleep, the thickness of our brows and – chiefly – if we think Facebook is addictive and thrilling, a necessary evil or the place where our mothers live. In a time when enough barre classes can make any 51-year-old look 15 (from the back, at least) and it’s all too easy to jab away our lines and balayage our hair to its sun-kissed childhood hues, there are new factors we use to give away our birth age. But our true age isn’t all bad. Debunking the complete-cell-regeneration theory is the fact that some cells in our bodies are with us from birth to death: the inner lens cells of the eye, the neurons in our cerebral cortex – which is the part of the brain that makes us human, determining personality and intelligence as well as thinking and perception – and the muscle cells of the heart. Our eyes, our brain and our hearts – three places I’m more than happy to carry the wisdom of age. And for everything else, there’s makeup.

Enjoy the issue,

TALK TO ME… @justine_cullen

justinecullen

elleaustralia@bauer-media.com.au

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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DAMIAN GAROZZO

BEHIND THE SCENES

THE CAIRNS-BORN, PARIS-BASED MAKEUP ARTIST HELPED GIVE WORTHINGTON HER FRESH GLOW

The creatives who put together our cover story talk chateaus

W

hen it comes to locations for a cover shoot, you can’t beat the south of France. Oh wait, you can – try a chateau in the south of France, and one that was previously home to none other than Christian Dior. That was the dream situation the ELLE team found themselves in for this issue – shooting Lara Worthington at Château de la Colle Noire in Montauroux, near Grasse. The chateau has recently been renovated to bring it back to its glory days, when it was the residence of the iconic designer (right down to the replanting of his favourite flowers). In fact, the picturesque Montauroux region is what inspired some of Dior’s most famous fragrances. With the spring sun creating an amazing light, it’s no surprise Worthington said it was her favourite shoot to date – it just might be ours, too.

RACHEL WAYMAN

and shoot essentials

ELLE ’S FASHION DIRECTOR PACKED SUITCASES FULL OF DIOR, AJE AND ZIMMERMANN TO CREATE THE SHOOT’S LAID-BACK, ROMANTIC FEEL

Most memorable part of the shoot? Getting once-in-a-lifetime access to Château de la Colle Noire. As soon as we captured the first image, we all knew it would be a special shoot. Everyone had this indescribable, magical energy. Any challenges? It was one of those pinchyourself moments: the weather was great, the location was out of this world, the light was beautiful… and it kept getting better. The challenge was trying to work out if we should keep waiting for even better light! What are your shoot essentials? Tea with lots of milk and a kit packed with a ridiculous amount of pins and clips. What did you do en route to the shoot? I  may be 10 years too late, but I started (and  am now obsessed with) Sons Of Anarchy on the plane. Also being sans children, I caught up on sleep. What’s your favourite French phrase? “Parlez-vous anglais?” When in France, I… always say yes to croissants. And load up on French pharmacy goodies.

TRAVIS BALCKE THE SYDNEY HAIRSTYLIST WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR GIVING WORTHINGTON HER MUCH-COPIED BOB FOR OUR FIRST COVER SHOOT WITH HER IN 2014. THIS TIME AROUND, HE FOCUSED ON SOFT, POLISHED HAIR Most memorable part of the shoot? The location – it’s not every day you get flown to the south of France to visit Christian Dior’s home! Any challenges? Having shot a cover with Lara before, I always challenge myself to do better or reinvent a style within the hair. What are your shoot essentials? The Dyson Supersonic hairdryer and Wella Glam Mist, plus lots of black coffee and pastries.

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

What did you do en route to the shoot? On the flight, I took advantage of the opportunity to sleep. And at the airport, it’s all about the Etihad first-class lounge and the Six Senses spa. What’s your favourite French phrase? “Avez-vous plus de beurre?” – that’s “Do you have more butter?” When in France, I… always eat as much cake as I can!

Dior Addict Lip Tattoo in (from left) Natural Cherry, Natural Pink and Natural Beige, $44 each, Dior, (02) 9295 9059

Words: Laura Culbert. Photography: Chris Jansen and Scott Hawkins (still-life); Instagram: @travisbalcke

DiorSkin Forever fluid foundation, $89, Dior, (02) 9295 9059

Most memorable part of the shoot? Being at Château de la Colle Noire. I arrived early and was given a tour through all the ornately decorated rooms and gardens – it was magical. We managed to take advantage of all the home’s picturesque exteriors – it was funny to see the look of horror on the caretaker’s face when the photographer set up one shot under the kitchen verandah, next to the bins. There was a gorgeous golden-hour light coming through on that side of the house and the photographer framed it in a way that all you could see was Lara’s face glowing in the sunlight. Any challenges? It was an unusually hot day, so I had to make sure Lara’s makeup stayed glowy without melting off. Lara has lovely skin so I didn’t want to mask it; instead I used Dior UV Shield BB Creme SPF 30 all over her face and neck, then DiorSkin Forever fluid foundation through her T-zone. And occasionally I would blot DiorSkin Forever Powder Loose to keep shine at bay. What are your shoot essentials? Micellar water, which is the most gentle makeup remover, and Boiron’s famous nongreasy everything-balm Homeoplasmine. Something new to my kit is the Dior Addict Lip Tattoo range – I’m obsessed. The texture is as thin as can be, making for comfortable wear but with a rich colour pay-off. What did you do en route to the shoot? I decided to skip the lines at the airport and go by train. It was glorious crossing through the French countryside, being able to spread out a bit and catch up on some reading. What’s your favourite French phrase? The French have the funniest, most nonsensical phrases, such as: “Aller se faire cuire un oeuf”, which literally translates to “Go cook yourself an egg”, but means, “Mind your own business!” What do you love about living in France? The fact I can walk down the street and have my own fishmonger or fruit and veg shop gives a real village feel to everyday life. Paris is a big city, but the absence of high-rises and massive billboards makes life feel less hectic than other capital cities. If we’re visiting Paris, where should we go? My two favourite restaurants are Au Passage and Spring – both do unfussy, market-fresh food in unexpected ways. I swear by Chambelland for coffee, delicious guilt-free desserts and the best homemade gluten-free bread. And I love wandering the  packed, Harry Potter-esque aisles of cookware superstore E Dehillerin. It has the best knives and copper cookware, and depending on the mood of the staff (how very French!), you can pick up some great advice on how to properly use them.


THIS MONTH

SHOP

Knit, $189, Skin And Threads X Zoë Foster Blake, skinandthreads.com

ZOË FOSTER BLAKE X SKIN AND THREADS

STREET

What to expect when ELLE cover star, author and Go-To creator Zoë Foster Blake collaborates with legendary Aussie cashmere label Skin And Threads? A bright, playful take on trans-seasonal separates. Think quirky prints, empowering slogans (“You look nice today”) and one very shiny skirt. The cashmere lobster knit is a particular Team ELLE favourite. In stores August 7.

COLOURFUL PAST Every designer worth their weight in gold thread is paying homage to our prosperous past with billowy robes, rich embroidery and jewel tones. Follow in the footsteps of It-girls around the world by pairing opulent,

Shirt, $169, Skin And Threads X Zoë Foster Blake, skinandthreads.com

voluminous pieces with of-the-moment layers and an oh-so 2017 statement bag.

Skirt, $198, Skin And Threads X Zoë Foster Blake, skinandthreads.com

STYLE

S

onia Ben Ammar is not your average Instaqueen (although her 375K followers may suggest otherwise). A singer/actress/model, the 18-year-old has worked with Chanel, Miu Miu and Dolce & Gabbana (she walked the AW17-18 show with her mother!), all while putting the finishing touches on her debut album. Splitting her time between her native Paris and adopted LA, Ben Ammar’s style is the perfect Cali-French hybrid – chic white shirts that aren’t too polished paired with denim and relaxed tees. Prepare to see and hear a lot more from her. q @itsnotsonia

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

Words: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Getty Images; Jason Lloyd-Evans; Instagram: @itsnotsonia

SONIA BEN AMMAR


AGENDA

PLEASE

BE SEATED

As the Australian Institute of Company Directors’ target for 30 per cent of board seats to be filled by women by the end of 2018 fast approaches, we speak to five female board members about the secrets to their success and the importance of gender equality

MELINDA PETRUNOFF

Head of Gaming Marketing Solutions at Facebook (Japan, Korea, Emerging Markets, Australia and New Zealand) and director for OzHarvest

MARINA GO

Non-executive director of Energy Australia and Autosports Group, chair of Office Brands and Wests Tigers, and advisory board member for The Walkley Foundation I made a decision to plan for a future second career as a company director shortly after completing an MBA in 2002, when I realised that female directors were in the minority. I was determined to be one of the women who increases the percentage of women on boards, both personally and through pulling other women up the ladder. Gender balance is one aspect of diversity and it’s been demonstrated time and again through hard data that diverse boards result in the best outcomes for shareholders. It’s been said that diversity is the insurance policy against groupthink and that’s a good business reason to ensure that, at the very least, boards achieve gender balance. One thing I’ve come to realise is that there are no stupid questions around the board table. In fact, the definition of stupid is not to ask about something that you don’t understand. I learned that quickly and early.

“Diverse boards result in the best outcomes for shareholders”

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

Gender balance at a board level is so important because broadening the composition of a board helps to expand perspectives. By having multiple women (at OzHarvest we have three female board members out of 11), it changes the dynamic. The Harvard Business Review reports that while most CEOs recognise how important it is to have directors of different ages and with different kinds of educational backgrounds and functional expertise, they still tend to underestimate the advantages of gender diversity. To get ahead, I believe in taking time to reflect on what’s most important to you, and to clarify what you want to achieve to ensure you get there. At Facebook we encourage everyone to write personal yearly visions focused on family/friends, health, career and community. My contribution to the OzHarvest board is a part of my vision of making a contribution to the community. We encourage people to share these with their colleagues and family/friends so their support network can keep them accountable and encourage them to achieve what they have set for themselves. I keep my vision on Notes on my iPhone so I can access this from anywhere, and I make sure I check in at least quarterly to see my progress. From my time on boards, I’ve realised that it’s okay to make mistakes if you learn from them. I’ve also learned the importance of communication – it’s better to over-communicate than under-communicate. You can’t just assume that people understand.


DR HELEN SZOKE

Chief executive of Oxfam Australia, vice-president of Australian Council for International Development, Executive Board member of Oxfam International, chair of the Public Engagement Committee to the Oxfam International Executive Board and chair of the Department of Health and Human Services’ advisory committee on bullying and harassment in Victoria I joined boards very early in my career because I felt that I wanted to contribute to other areas of public life, but also because I thought (rightly) that it would give me insight into governance and how to think strategically as well as operationally. I think it’s really useful as a development tool as well as what you contribute to civil society and the community. Being a board member teaches you how to manage time and content effectively. To be a good board member, it’s critical to be across the papers, to spend time with key staff and to talk to other board members both inside and outside of meetings. You learn how to actively listen and how to navigate the art of persuasion when you feel strongly about an issue and feel it needs to be addressed. Boards that have gender balance have better information, balanced perspectives and, let’s face it, they better reflect the community. Women are the decision-makers in so many other areas of life, so this experience, diversity and expertise needs to be brought into the boardroom as well.

“We’re learning how to be more assertive and understand we’re capable”

have a board that’s diverse in experiences – in terms of demographics, nationalities, etc. If we’re a global international company that sells to both men and women, we should have a board that reflects that type of business. Women are the ones who never feel ready [to take on leadership positions]. They kind of wait until someone suggests it. So I think we’re all learning how to be much more assertive and understand that we’re capable. I’ve been in the company for 20 years, and before that I worked summers when I was in college. I have a lot of knowledge, so I think it was a good time to say, “Okay, I can take that knowledge of what’s happening every day in the company and give the board a different viewpoint.”

RACHEL BOTSMAN

Author, university lecturer and non-executive director of the NRMA I think the conversation should be focused less around gender balance at a board level and more on diversity in general. You want diverse age, experiences and backgrounds, but there should be alignment around values, what you and the organisation stand for in the world. When you get the right kind of talent mix at a board level, there’s a good tension that can at times make you slightly uncomfortable, but ultimately leads to better decision-making. I’ve learned that working with the wrong people is not just unproductive, it can quickly become toxic. A friend of mine calls people “drains” or “radiators” in terms of their energy, and mismatches are generally not good news. I have become much better at saying “no” in an honest and authentic way as well. It’s a tricky skill that we’re not generally taught. I’m also learning to ask more probing questions in a way that’s productive versus a little disruptive. You need your executive team to trust you to tell you the hard truths. It has been eye-opening to experience how large, trusted organisations must manage a careful balance between serving immediate member needs and taking risks that will enable them to stay relevant in the long-term. It’s not always easy. q

“I’ve become better at saying ‘no’ – a tricky skill that we’re not generally taught”

As told to: Genevra Leek. Original interviews edited for space

JANE LAUDER

Global brand president of Clinique and director of the Estée Lauder Companies One of the things that’s important about a board of directors is that they don’t get into the day-to-day management of the company. They really think about how to create long-term value for the business and for shareholders. What’s great is being able to think about this incredible company that my family founded – how I make sure it survives and continues to thrive. You want a board to be representative of the larger consumer base, as well as the population. You want to

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

21


ELLE YOUR

FIRST LOOK

ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO EVERYTHING WORTH KNOWING IN STYLE,

CULTURE AND BEYOND

Words: Jackie Shaw. Photography: Sonny Vandevelde

REMAKING HISTORY

It was a marigold, button-front coat dress that sealed it. Designer Tomas Maier drew directly from the past for his forward-thinking AW17-18 collection for Bottega Veneta, which proved to be the ultimate celebration of womanhood. Sharp shoulders, nipped waists and clean lines felt just as modern on the runway as they would have back in the fabulous ’40s, when women were busting boundaries and breaking new ground. It’s tailoring made for the aspiring vintage enthusiast, or Netflix addict – think The Crown’s neat femininity over its urban-retro Girlboss counterpart. Victory rolls and polka-dot hosiery advised, though optional. q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

23


TREND

ISABEL MARANT

Pants, $1,075, Max Mara, maxmara.com

MAKING THE CUT

The New York Times: “It’s our past, but rethought for the future.” It’s a loosening of dress codes, for sure. Because who wants to be stuck with stiff power suits and fussy layering? Today’s tailoring has a distinct French It's one for the ages – all ages. feel with its simple elegance and Trans-seasonal tailoring chic understatement. Case in is getting a supermodelpoint: fresh-faced a day after the backed reboot Dries Van Noten show, Amber Valletta and Carolyn Murphy were again called upon to power down he rules of supermodeldom the runway for Isabel Marant. The haven’t changed much since designer’s take on cool-girl suiting the pre-noughties: long legs, saw Annie crossed with Jerry... Hall, sharp cheekbones, party-girl that is – aka tomboy geek meets sultry personality and a catchy first seductress. Then there was Clare name. These days it’s Kendall, Gigi Waight Keller’s final show for Chloé, and Bella, but back then it was Amber, where fitted knits topped draped Carolyn, Nadja and Liya ruling the trousers that hung oh-so low. And runway. For his AW17-18 collection – over at Christian Dior, a utilitarian his 100th show – Belgian designer approach saw patch pockets and Dries Van Noten celebrated by getting slouchy denim overalls rule. the band back together. This agePulling off the look IRL is a cinch, defying posse of iconic models, along literally. Moving bulky winter shapes with Malgosia Bela, Kirsten Owen and into spring requires a new-found Australian Emma Balfour, had been respect for the waist. Strap yourself mainstays of the designer’s collections into oversized trousers with metallic throughout the ’90s, and returned to studded belts, tuck an abstract-print stalk down the Paris runway for the knit into high-waisted jeans or add ultimate reunion show. shape to striped shirts with a knitted The collection was a retrospective of bodice for a defined middle. Then throw sorts, with the designer also bringing a rhinestone-encrusted tassel earring back some of his most iconic prints or metallic shoe into the mix – because via signature slouchy pants and boxy this supermodel-stamped look is all dresses. A master of androgyny, Van about making it your own. q Noten’s take on precision-cut tailoring has always read effortless, but this season it was another comeback, the oversized blazer, that had us itching to tweak a collar and push up a cuff. Worn Bag, $4,800, strap, with fluid slips over knitted rollnecks, $1,650, both cuffed jeans, starchy white shirts and Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600 heavy loafers, Van Noten constructed a sharp look that was all modern Brogues, glamour without the glitz. As he told

T

$1,390, Prada, (02) 9223 1688

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

Jacket, $78, H&M, hm.com/au

ISABEL MARANT

Shirt, $1,290, Ellery, ellery.com

Belt, $195, Paul Smith, (02) 9331 8222

CHRISTIAN DIOR

DRIES VAN NOTEN

Loafers, $900, Miu Miu, (02) 9223 1688


NEED TO KNOW DRAPED IN HISTORY From left: Edwina Robinson and Adrian Norris with a model and Jade Torres

DREAM TEAM

Words: Jackie Shaw; Genevra Leek. Photography: Andrew Finlayson (still-life); Imaxtree; Jason Lloyd-Evans. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano

What do you get when you combine two designers, one gallery owner and an art-world legend? An Australian fashion collaboration that’s contributing to the conversation around Indigenous culture

I

t’s universally known that art and fashion go together like Beyoncé and Jay Z. And when technology is thrown into the mix? “Social media does powerful things,” says Adrian Norris, one half of the duo behind Australian label Aje. He and design partner Edwina Robinson are standing backstage before their resort 2018 show at the Art Gallery of NSW with Jade Torres, founder of Pwerle Aboriginal Art Gallery, an online initiative specialising in works by Aboriginal artists hailing from the Utopia region of the Northern Territory. Norris, an art-school graduate, had been following the gallery’s Instagram account closely when Torres – daughter of respected art dealer Fred Torres, granddaughter to renowned artist Barbara Weir and great-granddaughter to the legendary Minnie Pwerle – reached out to suggest a collaboration.

It was the late Pwerle’s bold and free-flowing brushstrokes that inspired the Aje team. Pwerle was an Alyawarre woman born in the early 1920s, famous for her art despite only beginning to paint in her eighties. While her works draw on ancient culture and tradition, their linear nature and modern vibrancy made them ideal for transferring onto fabric, with three paintings translated into prints. “All three are from the same Dreaming, Awelye Atnwengerrp,” says Torres. “They tell a story of the traditional women’s ceremony where the women paint ochre on their bodies and sing their Dreamtime, which will travel from campsite to campsite – it’s their way of communicating their culture.” The designers were meticulous about staying true to the colour palette and scale of the works they adorned on sculptural dresses and shirts, but Pwerle’s influence is evident far beyond the print pieces, from voluminous shapes to leather binding. “We wanted a strong direction in terms of the silhouettes that had some bearing to the artwork and what she was trying to convey, her love for the land,” says Robinson. “My grandmother, Barbara, was in the stolen generation,” says Torres. “She got taken away from Minnie when she was only 10.” On the runway, Aje paid tribute to Pwerle’s life story with belted suiting and corsetry giving way to free-flowing dresses. “It’s almost a reflection of being bound and then freedom when they eventually reunited.” For Torres, the collaboration is a chance to bring an understanding of Indigenous culture to a new audience. “There’s a lot of negative imagery on the culture when actually it’s a beautiful message... For me, it’s about wanting to take back that culture and bring it out in a more positive way.” It’s also about assisting the next generation, which is why a percentage of the sale of each print piece will go to Pwerle’s family to help continue the artistic tradition and the communication of it. For Aje, a brand that’s dedicated itself to “raw beauty” and “tough femininity” since launching in 2008, the collection was an evolution of sorts, not to mention a chance to visit the landscape Pwerle was inspired by. Meeting Weir near Alice Springs while shooting a short film featuring the collection was a pinch-me moment for the designers. “We were a bit worried what she’d think of the collaboration but she was really excited,” says Robinson. “She wanted some of the shirts in the Minnie Pwerle prints, which is really, really cool!” q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

25


E L L e | A DV E R TO R I A L

WHAT GOES AROUND, COMES AROUND The worlds of art and fashion collide as Westfield Chermside unveils a beautiful collaboration with jewellery designer and artist Paula Walden that will appeal to your inner child


THE PIECE

THIS IS WHAT WE CALL

Shoes, $930 ,

McCar tn e stellamccar tn

.c ey

Meet the Sneakelyse, a sneaker-brogue-flatform hybrid that’s about to solve all

y,

HAVING IT ALL

ella St

om

your shoe woes

Words: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Pete Daly. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano

E

ver since athleisure transformed sneakers into acceptable footwear for absolutely anything (work, weekend, working on the weekend), we’ve had a hard time returning to shoes without laces and a rubber sole. Boots feel stuffy, brogues too classic and flatforms hard to walk in. This season, Stella McCartney has reinvented her cult-classic Elyse platforms to create the Sneakelyse: a sawedged, rubber-soled, lace-up shoe in fresh optic white. If that sounds like a lot, it is. But paired with a logo tee and denim or a sharp suit at night, you’ll find that the comfort of a sneaker and dressy height of a platform works for anything... just like your old faithful kicks. q ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

27


INSIDER

Trust Aerin Lauder (Estée Lauder heir and the mastermind behind lifestyle label Aerin) to make bowls of potato chips chic. We ask her the secrets to entertaining well

W H AT I S YO U R P H I L O S O P H Y W H E N E N T E R TA I N I N G ?

Entertaining should feel effortless so you, as host, can also enjoy the party. My grandmother Estée taught me the secret to entertaining is to make guests feel comfortable and welcome. She used to serve gourmet potato chips in beautiful bowls, which I still do today and guests love. She also loved sending her guests home with a small gift. I try to incorporate a little something for each guest into the place setting. I also like a great bar cart – it brings the party to whatever room you’re entertaining in. W H AT A R E S O M E O F YO U R E N T E R TA I N I N G E S S E N T I A L S ?

I find candles to be very uplifting, [especially] when entertaining. They can easily transform the feeling of a space. I would say when pairing a candle scent with a room, decide what kind of feeling or theme you’re trying to convey. We recently launched a line of destination-inspired candles that transport me to some of my most cherished vacations – my favourite from the line is Uzes Tuberose. W H AT AT M O S P H E R E D O YO U L I K E T O C R E AT E AT H O M E ?

I like to surround myself with memories from my past and childhood. My home is full of

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

frames with beautiful pictures that remind me of some of the most important moments in my life. One of my favourite gifts to give is a frame with a beautiful picture. It’s a personal and special touch.

Plate, $18, Williams Sonoma X Aerin, williams-sonoma. com.au

W H AT D O E S YO U R U N I FO R M C O N S I ST O F ?

I like classic, modern and feminine labels like Michael Kors, Oscar De La Renta and Stella McCartney. White silk blouses go with everything, and I love ballet flats or a lightweight cashmere scarf... I’ve recently discovered designer Johanna Ortiz, who’s amazing. And I have always loved denim – whether it’s my favourite Frame jeans or a chambray shirt.

Glass, $18, Williams Sonoma X Aerin, williams-sonoma. com.au

Scarf, $24.95, Princess Highway, dangerfield. com.au

W H AT ’ S T H E B E ST A D V I C E YO U ’ V E B E E N G I V E N ?

My family taught me the importance of passion and hard work. There’s nothing I love more than hearing my uncle and father talk about the business and all the incredible stories about Estée. I’ve been so lucky to have incredible family role models; I hope to do the same for my children. The best advice I’ve ever received was from Estée: “Whatever you do, do it well.” q

Jeans, $330, Frame, frame-store. com

Flats, $570, Mansur Gavriel, mychameleon. com.au

As told to: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Sevak Babakhani and Pablo Martin (still-life); Getty Images; Instagram: @aerin

Plates, $20 each, Williams Sonoma X Aerin, williamssonoma.com.au

HOME IMPROVEMENT


STREET STYLE

↑ “Even shoes are keeping cosy – these Miu Miu slingbacks sport a carpeted heel along with their signature big buckle. Raw-hem jeans give the ladylike shape an edge.”

→ “There’s no better time to wear headto-toe red than smack-bang in the midst of a feminist movement. Break up the colour with black and grey neutrals.”

COLD PLAY Revelling in the transition from

winter to spring, ELLE’s fashion office coordinator Samantha Wong has her eye on homebody hoodies, rainbow brights and playful parkas thrown over the top

→ “That jacket you pull out every snow trip now works on the street, too. A cute print ups the fun factor.”

← “By layering a white tee under her Jacquemus navy and check coat, Patricia Manfield is the best of both worlds: kooky and plain cool.”

→ “The ’90s wallet chain returns, but paperclip-thin and tassel-like. Wear with low-slung jeans and a jumper artfully tucked in.”

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ELLE AUSTRALIA


↑ “This little rainbow Ferragamo bag is a sartorial pick-me-up. Wearing it cross-body frees up the hands for more important things... like ordering your third coffee for the day.” → “Proof that Vans are a year-round, dress-code-crushing essential, even with balloon-sleeve dresses.”

Photography: Imaxtree; Jason Lloyd-Evans

→ “Amp up the rock’n’roll vibe of white shoes by pairing with fishnet stockings or ripped jeans.”

← “This is how you do trans-seasonal style: the suede boots and floor-grazing coat say winter, but the cute straw bag hints that warmer days are just around the corner.” q ↑ “No longer reserved for around the house, the hoodie brings a sense of effortlessness to a timeless trench and cinched-in belt.” ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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WATCH

Deutch has serious Hollywood lineage – her father is Pretty In Pink director Howard Deutch and her mother is actress Lea Thompson of Back To The Future fame.

was as personal as it gets – my sister wrote, starred in and scored it, and my mother directed it. It’s empowering to have some control in the process.

ON THE RISE

I DON’T HAVE ANY RULES ABOUT

THE

KINDS

OF

I have so much I want to do. I want to do a Western, a musical, to play villains...

PROJECTS I CHOOSE.

Cool, clever and capable, Zoey Deutch has Hollywood wrapped around her little finger

I’M

PASSIONATE

ABOUT

A LOT OF STUFF AND TRY TO

I take art classes; I have a political science tutor. I love school. It’s one of the many reasons I love acting. There are times when I play parts that require taking a crash course of sorts. When I played Oona O’Neill in Rebel In The Rye, I had a blast reading all of her father Eugene O’Neill’s work, plus JD Salinger shorts like The Young Folks and exploring the elite world of 1940s New York.

GROWING

IT FEELS LIKE A LOT OF PUBLIC FIGURES OR CELEBRITIES

UP,

MY

GRANDMA

PREACHED

PURPOSIVE

BEHAVIOUR AND MY MUM PREACHED WORKING HARD.

I always knew what I wanted to do and knew I had to work for it. My dad is the funniest man I know – he taught me to have a sense of humour about everything. I recently filmed The Year Of Spectacular Men, which

They don’t want to lose their audience or they don’t want to offend, perhaps. But I believe silence doesn’t keep anyone safe. Use your privilege to have a voice. Use that platform to have a voice. Be on the right side of history. q

HAVE A FEAR OF NOT SPEAKING THEIR MIND.

“STEP BACK TO STEP OUT” BY TOM POLO

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FACE FORWARD Familiar faces and fresh talent abound in the harbour city this month The annual Primavera exhibition is also guaranteed to see you leave with more culture cred (and Instagram fodder) than you walked in with. This year’s show features some of Australia’s most exciting artists aged 35 and under sharing their take on “Ancient

FINALISTS FOR THE 2016 ARCHIBALD PRIZE

S

ydney is the perfect place to future-proof your art knowledge this month, as a new crop of iconic portraits vie for the Archibald Prize at the Art Gallery Of NSW, while the nation’s nextbig-things appear in the Museum Of Contemporary Art’s Primavera. Last year’s Archibald – ultimately claimed by Louise Hearman’s depiction of Barry Humphries – saw the likes of fashion doyenne Linda Jackson, Dinosaur Designs’ Louise Olsen and gallerist Roslyn Oxley immortalised in some of 2016’s most-talked-about works, and this year’s finalists are shaping up to generate just as much buzz.

“ROSLYN” BY SALLY ROSS

SEE PICTURE PERFECT Artworks from 2016’s Archibald Prize and (far left) a piece from this year’s Primavera exhibition

Futures”, with traditional methods of photography, textiles and painting served up with a side of audio-visuals, coding and 3D simulation. The future is now. q The Archibald Prize exhibition starts July 29, artgallery.nsw.gov.au; Primavera starts August 23, mca.com.au

Words: Laura Collins; Elle McClure. Photography: Getty Images; Felicity Jenkins; Mim Stirling/Art Gallery Of NSW; © Tom Polo, courtesy of Station Melbourne

S

KEEP MY BRAIN WORKING.

tarring roles in last year’s Why Him? and Everybody Wants Some!! put the 22-year-old on our radar, but with a handful of impressive indies now under her belt and an Insta feed that’s fun and feminist, 2017 is shaping up to be actress Zoey Deutch’s most influential year yet.


AG ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED


MAN

OH, ORLANDO Just what is Mr Bloom thinking? Eve Barlow finds out

A

re we going to talk about my penis?” asks Orlando Bloom, letting out an almighty laugh. He’s referring to an episode in August 2016, when he was photographed paddleboarding naked in Sardinia with his then-girlfriend Katy Perry. The paparazzi images went viral. Did the hysteria surrounding his penis surprise him? “Yes, it was extremely surprising,” he says. “I wouldn’t have put myself in that position if I’d thought it would happen.” I wonder how the 40-year-old actor and tabloid regular (who has starred in two of Hollywood’s biggest franchises, The Lord Of The Rings and Pirates Of The Caribbean) would think he was safe from a long-distance lens. “I have a good radar,” he says. “We’d been completely alone for five days. Nothing around us. So I had a moment of feeling free.” Had it been a woman exposed by the press there would have been outrage. Is it a case of double standards? “I didn’t take it that deep. What can I tell you? Note to self: you’re never free!”

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

Today, Bloom is back at the seaside, fully dressed. Seated on a couch at an alfresco bar in Malibu, he looks out towards the ocean, talking slowly and carefully. As he reclines, a small tattoo of an orange sun on his stomach peeks out from under his shirt. Joking aside, the photos alarmed Bloom. He prefers to keep his life private; his former home in Hollywood was burgled in 2009 by the gang whose exploits were portrayed in Sofia Coppola’s 2013 film The Bling Ring. Inevitably, however, there was wider interest in the more recent news that he and Perry had split after a year together. She suggested in a tweet that their parting had been blameless: “U can still b friends & love ur former partners! No one’s a victim or a villain, get a life y’all!” As for evidence that he can handle a break-up in the public eye, Bloom points to his relationship with Miranda Kerr. The pair married in 2010, had their son Flynn, and divorced in 2013 (they now both live in LA and Kerr recently remarried). “With Miranda, there was a sense that I don’t want my son to go back through the internet where people have made up lies [about us],” he says. “Miranda and I have a remarkable relationship. We co-parent really well.” Of Perry, without mentioning her name, he says, “We’re friends. It’s good. We’re all grown up. She’s someone who’s very visible, but I don’t think anybody cares what I’m up to. Nor should they. It’s between us. It’s better to set an WE ANSWER THE example for kids and show [breakMOST-GOOGLED ups] don’t have to be about hate.” Bloom doesn’t shrink away from QUESTIONS shaping their post-split narrative – ABOUT ORLANDO around the time of the break-up, he posted a video to Instagram of “the dogs” (his dog Mighty and her pooch Nugget). The British star is new to social media, having avoided it for years. “I think the times are changing,” WHO DID ORLANDO BLOOM PLAY IN TROY? he says. “My mum kept an article Paris, the mythological from the mid-noughties that said this Greek prince who fatally kid had been googled more than shot Achilles in the heel. anyone on the planet for four years in WHO IS ORLANDO a row.” He pauses. “And it was me!” BLOOM’S FATHER? Colin Stone, who, He apologises, concerned he sounds until the age of 13, like a “knob”. “I’m not a millennial. Bloom knew only as They live their lives through their a family friend. phones. What happens to my son? DOES ORLANDO BLOOM SPEAK SPANISH? How is he going to have a real No, but he does relationship if it’s all happening on his speak French. phone? Disconnecting is important.” WHAT IS Now Bloom is older, he’s trying to ORLANDO BLOOM’S make sense of the passing of time. PHONE NUMBER? Nice try. He says he wants to have more


ORLANDO WITH SON FLYNN

“I HAD SO MUCH in some of the world’s poorest countries. In children, at the right time. As for his career, February he visited Niger, where he graduating from pin-up to an actor with SUCCESS IN MY worked with families who had escaped the longevity is no easy feat. But while some TWENTIES – MOST violence of the militant group Boko Haram. stars feel threatened by their advancing OF MY THIRTIES “We live in Disneyland,” he says, looking years, he feels liberated. “I’m excited about WAS SPENT out to the waves again. “In Niger, children the prospect of the next 10 years. Actors do FIGURING OUT are living in grass huts on the side of the their most interesting stuff between 40 and WHICH WAY road. They see their parents having their 50. Fuck – I hope that’s the case for me!” throats slit. It’s beyond our comprehension. This year, Bloom has returned for the WAS UP” There’s a Buddhist quote that has been in fifth instalment of Pirates Of The Caribbean, my life for years, and I’m going to butcher it: there will will play lead roles in Romans and SMART Chase, and be peace in the world when we have an understanding stars alongside Noomi Rapace in the thriller Unlocked. of what it means to make all mothers happy.” When asked what he looks for in a role, he struggles. Bloom has practised Buddhism for years. It helped “I had so much [success] in my twenties – most of my him cope with his sudden rise to stardom, a process thirties was [spent] figuring out which way was up. It he describes as like getting inside a burning car. came from that connection kids felt with [The Lord Of The Rings’] Legolas, or [Pirates Of The Caribbean’s] Will “You see these victims all around you: 15 minutes of Turner. I’m looking for that thing again.” fame, a YouTube sensation, whatever it may be. They Age has changed Bloom, and it’s his concerns for don’t realise what it takes. What you want to do is Flynn’s future that have led him to charity work. Since learn how to suit up and get out of that burning car 2007, he’s been involved with UNICEF, visiting children with grace, ease and integrity.” q

EAT DON’T MISS! Melbourne’s Bar Americano serves up Italian-style sandwiches gratis with your amaro. But you have to be quick: its tiny laneway location means capacity is just 10 people. baramericano.com

THE DIFFICULT DECISION

WICH-CRAFT Words: Elle McClure. Photography: Getty Images

The humble sandwich has been reinvented

A

n antidote to the higherthe-better burgers that have been dominating menus (and Instagram feeds) for as long as we can remember, the sandwich is being taken to new heights – but, in this case, only figuratively. Here are the best ones nationwide to get your hands around...

The Dolphin Hotel in Sydney’s Surry Hills takes sandwiches seriously. Its approach is based on owner Maurice Terzini’s memories of his youth in Italy, where a gourmet panino was de rigueur come afternoons. The result is “Proper Sandwiches”, a rotation of more than a dozen well-thought-out combinations you’ll have a very hard time choosing between. dolphinhotel.com.au

THE NATIONAL TREASURE

Sydney restaurant Ester’s take on the classic sauso sanga leaves Bunnings for dead, with a sausage of minced pork belly, rice, pine nuts and pig’s blood, sitting atop a sticky Chinesebun-style bread. Time to find new Saturday morning plans. ester-restaurant.com.au

THE NEXT-GEN JAFFLE

Every Tuesday, Brissie brunch haunt Morning After debuts a different gourmet jaffle, with their crowd-pleasing stuffings previously including truffle and cheese, classic spag bol and their take on the apple strudel, complete with stewed apple, cinnamon and ice-cream. morningafter.com.au

THE CROQUE MONSIEUR

Perth small bar Budburst does what could be the best croque monsieur this side of the Seine, with ham and gooey bechamel sauce aplenty. And despite what your mother may have preached to you, what’s on the outside – a gruyere cheese coating that turns crunchy once it’s grilled – most definitely counts. q budburstsmallbar.com.au

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

35


“HOLD” BY VERA BLUE

LISTEN

GET TO THE GIG Vera Blue is touring now – for details, visit verablue.com

There was something cool and mysterious about the sound. As Vera Blue, I can spread my wings more experimentally and when performing live. The electronics, blended with my folky background, extend who I am as an artist. THERE

HAVE

BEEN

SO

MANY

INCREDIBLE MOMENTS FROM THE

Performing “Never Be Like You” at Splendour In The Grass in front of thousands was really nerve-racking – I remember walking out and seeing an endless sea of people – but each time I turned around I saw Flume rocking out with me. The ARIAs was so much fun – performing “Papercuts” with Illy, in a flowing dress surrounded by fire. It was one of the most daunting experiences ever. PAST YEAR.

INTO THE BLUE What Celia Pavey did next...

S

he first hit the spotlight in 2013, singing Simon & Garfunkel’s “Scarborough Fair” on The Voice (and finding a spot on Team Delta), but two years later, Celia Pavey announced a new project – releasing music under the alias Vera Blue. Her first EP Fingertips featured the hit track “Hold”, and led to collabs with Aussie favourites Flume and Illy. Now, she’s set to wow all over again with her justreleased debut album, Perennial. I THOUGHT MY PROJECT DESERVED

The music I was making was so different to what I created under my real name.

ITS OWN NAME.

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

I’VE BEEN READING BIG MAGIC BY

It’s a good book for artists to read. Fear can be a good thing as well as bad. I’ve learned to love fear and let it do its thing because it notifies me when something is real and important and can often steer me in the right direction. ELIZABETH GILBERT.

I’LL CONSIDER MYSELF SUCCESSFUL WHEN MY MUSIC IS BEING SHARED AROUND

THE

WORLD

AND

IS

I just want to make people feel things – feel what I feel, relate and embrace my music as their own, whether it be to help them through something or just make them feel emotions. I like “Mended” from the new album because it hits quite hard emotionally and I think a lot of people will be able to relate to it. q

CONNECTING TO PEOPLE.

If you like The Bachelor, you’ll love Catherine Lacey’s new novel The Answers NA MED ONE OF GRANTA ’ S BEST YOUNG A MER ICA N

Catherine Lacey has just released her much-anticipated second novel, The Answers ($27.99, Granta). It follows the plight of the debt-ridden and chronically pained Mary, whose mystery disease is becoming increasingly unbearable – and she increasingly desperate for a cure. She becomes hooked on the New Age ways of an alternative health practitioner named Ed, but his promise of a fix doesn’t come cheap. To help foot the bill, Mary responds to an ambiguous job ad and before she knows it, has been recruited to The Girlfriend Experiment (GX), a Bachelor-style social experiment created by a rich actor who’s frustrated by his inability to find a lasting connection with a woman. Mary is assigned the role of the Emotional Girlfriend to Kurt, but there’s also the Intellectual Girlfriend, Mundanity Girlfriend and the Maternal Girlfriend, among others. With her generous salary, Mary’s also given a list of pre-approved Signs of Affection and a handbook of odd requests. As the GX progresses, Kurt and the Girlfriends’ search for answers about love leads them further down a complex rabbit hole – making for an irreverent take on common affairs of the heart and the way our identity can shapeshift as we navigate relationships. q

NOVELISTS,

This is the latest instalment of the ELLE Book Club, a place where each month we recommend one read we know you’ll love. To win a copy of this one, head to ELLE.com.au/win, and to read an extract, turn to p78.

Words: Elle McClure; Laura Collins. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

FINGERTIPS BY VERA BLUE

BOOK OF THE MONTH


As the Official Haircare Product of London Fashion Week, label.m adds to its list of ongoing collaborations the critically acclaimed fashion designer, Mary Katrantzou. This Winter, we are launching an exclusive scarf featuring Katrantzou’s signature colourful “Rodeo and Juliet” print - the perfect accessory to brighten up your Winter wardrobe. NEW T O LABEL.M - create catwalk-smooth hair with label.m’s 3-in-1 DETANGLING BRUSH. A long hair essential, the Detangling Brush glides seamlessly through hair, while creating natural movement and body. RECEIVE YOUR COMPLIMENTARY LABEL.M MARY KATRANTZOU SCARF WITH THE PURCHAS E OF THE NEW LABEL.M DETANGLING BRUSH ALONG WITH TWO OTHER LABEL.M ITEMS OF YOUR CHOICE *while stock lasts. Excludes label.m minis. Head to www.labelm.com/au to find your closest label.m stockist. /label.m.australia

@label.mau


TECH your commute or to recommend nearby places for lunch. If you don’t want this to happen, turn off Location Services in your phone’s privacy settings. SHOULD YOU PUT TAPE OVER YOUR

INTERNET EXPLORER

CAMERA? After seeing what some hackers get up to while we protect government networks at ASD, what’s a tiny bit of tape when it comes to peace of mind knowing that hackers can’t see you through the camera?

LAPTOP

All the weird – and possibly paranoid – things you’ve ever wanted to ask a tech security expert

IS IT SAFE TO SIGN UP TO ONLINE NEWSLETTERS USING YOUR MAIN

For the most part, yes. But sometimes even the most reputable organisations may ask permission to share your contact details with third parties, so if you don’t want to get too much spam, look out for that checkbox or notification.

EMAIL?

WHAT STEPS CAN YOU TAKE TO

Hackers don’t use black magic to break into your email. Most of the time they just use a computer to guess your password or call up your email provider and trick the staff into resetting your password. If you make your password and security questions hard to guess, that goes a long way to securing your email account. And don’t forget to change your password every few months. PREVENT EMAIL HACKING?

Matt is a tech security expert working for the federal government’s Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), a partner agency of the Australian Cyber Security Centre. His identity is so top-secret that we couldn’t even include his last name (but he didn’t rouse on us when we admitted to using the same password for everything, so we like him).

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

IF YOUR FINGERPRINT IS SAVED IN YOUR PHONE, WHO CAN ACCESS IT?

Smart-phone makers try to secure your fingerprints. While some hackers have figured out how to extract your fingerprint data from your phone, it’s still easier for them to steal your fingerprints from something you touch. WHAT

HAPPENS

WITH

ALL

THE

INFORMATION THAT YOUR PHONE COLLECTS WHEN YOU ALLOW PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

OR

LOCATION

For apps, all that information might get shared back to the app creator. Be careful of what sort of permissions each app is asking for – some hackers may upload apps to the store that ask for all the permissions, giving them full control over your phone. Most phones will also collect data about where you are and send it back to the manufacturer – they’ll use that information for all sorts of reasons including alerting you when there is a traffic jam on TRACKING?

DOES

USING

A

COMPLICATED

PASSWORD MAKE THAT MUCH OF

Absolutely! If your password is only eight letters long, it takes a computer a matter of minutes to guess all the possible combinations. For every letter you add, you’re adding trillions of extra possibilities to guess. We recommend 13 characters if you only use letters or 10 characters if you include special characters like punctuation marks. If you follow ASD’s advice, it would take a computer the rest of your life for it to guess all the combinations.

A DIFFERENCE?


IS

IT

A

PROBLEM

PASSWORDS

ARE

IF ALL THE

YOUR SAME?

Sometimes websites can get hacked. If you use the same password on multiple sites, a hacker could hack one site, then log in to your account on another service. Some hackers also have automated tools scanning the internet for these hacked password dumps and try to log in to other websites with the same password. If you’re using the same password everywhere, you

run a higher risk of losing all your accounts. SHOULD YOU USE FAKE ANSWERS FOR SECURITY

“FOR EVERY LETTER YOU ADD TO YOUR PASSWORD, YOU’RE ADDING TRILLIONS OF EXTRA POSSIBILITIES TO GUESS”

QUESTIONS? I’ve seen cases where a hacker has looked up the user’s Facebook or Instagram to figure out their mum’s maiden name or their pet’s name. Fake answers add another layer of defence, but only if you don’t forget them!

DOES VIRUS SOFTWARE REALLY DO ANYTHING?

It’s good at protecting you against viruses the anti-virus makers know about – and it’s better than nothing. But there are millions of hackers trying to hide from the software, so there’s a lot it will miss. What’s more important is not clicking on email attachments from people you don’t recognise. q

LIFE

FAST FASHION After the buzz around hygge, are we suffering

Words: Laura Collins; Cat Rodie. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Getty Images

lifestyle-trend fatigue?

W

hen the Danish hygge trend hit our shores, it felt like a breath of fresh air. Rather than committing to extreme change, the basic premise was to live a cosier life. Easy. But then more lifestyle trends began to emerge from far-flung parts of the world. The Swedish trend lagom, which is all about doing things in moderation, gave way to Finland’s kalsarikännit, which dubiously translates as “drinking at home, alone, in your underwear” (we’ve all been there), then from Japan there was wabi-sabi, the art of embracing imperfection. It’s easy to see why there’s been an appetite for new trends – they’re a remedy to the feeling we’re left with after a miserable 12 months of world news. But are they really doing us any good? Life coach Alex Kingsmill says while it’s important to live well, following one trend or another isn’t a sustainable approach. Worse, they can often make us feel like our lives are somehow lacking. “There’s a whole lot of noise out there about how you should be living, constantly striving for a better lifestyle, but it can keep you distanced from what you already have.” That doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with these trends – see them as lifestyle enhancers. “The key is to cherry-pick different elements,” Kingsmill adds. “Then you can weave them into a life that already suits you.” Buy a hygge-approved cashmere rug before your Netflix hibernation, but remember to book in a wine with your girlfriends – lagom preaches balance after all. Perhaps you can incorporate a bit of imperfection-accepting wabi-sabi by wearing ugg boots to said wine date? Just kidding (maybe). q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

39


GET THE WINGED-EYE LOOK

THE NEXT GENERATION OF WINGED EYES FLARED OUT LASHES Everyone loves a winged eye. It flatters the face and highlights your best features – but it’s not just about liner. With Maybelline’s NEW Falsies Push Up Angel Mascara you get flared out, winged lashes that accentuate your eye liner and give you a look that’s bolder, sexier and more alluring than ever. It’s so good, who needs false lashes?

THE NEW PUSH UP WING BRUSH Introducing the next big thing in mascara. ara. This es to lift and revolutionary brush uses short bristles ristles flick your flare out your lashes, while the long bristles lashes out to the side for an extreme winged effect.

MAYBELLINE NEW YORK PUSH UP ANGEL MASCARA RRP $19.95

SHORT BRISTLIES LIFT + FLARE

LONG BRISTLES SEPARATE + LENGTHENN

NEW


THE PERFECT ONE LINER To complement your full, flared out and fierce lashes, try Maybelline’s HyperSharp Wing Liner. The innovative tip goes from thick to thin, letting you create precise lines and thick dramatic ones for the perfect winged eye. Try chic lines for daytime or bold curves for the night.

MAYBELLINE NEW YORK HYPERSHARP WING LINER RRP $17.95

WINGED EYES IN A NEW YORK MINUTE STEP 1: LINE YOUR EYE Line your upper lash line using the thin side of Maybelline’s HyperSharp Wing Liner. Then turn the tip to the thick side to create a wing-like flick.

STEP 2: WING OUT YOUR LASHES Sweep your lashes in an upward and outward motion using Maybelline’s Push Up Angel Mascara. Start at the root and comb up and out towards the corners for your most lifted and flared lashes yet.


THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

ESSENTIALS

HOW TO WEAR CLASSICS WITHOUT LOOKING CLASSIC Full disclaimer: this Manual is not about to espouse the benefits  of building a wardrobe of conservative pieces. It’s no checklist of black trousers, white shirts and point-toe pumps (you already know all that!). No, these are the cool new fundamentals – the clever pieces that will elevate anything you have hanging in your wardrobe and buy in the future. How do we know? Because we’ve seen women reworking them on the street, in the ELLE office  and on the chicest feeds of Instagram. It’s time to reclaim the word basic.

FUTURE-CLASSIC PIECES TO KNOW ABOUT

S TA R T H E R E

THE REDONE TRENCH The trench is nothing new, but here’s why this one by Elin Kling’s label Totême is different OVERSIZED LAPEL A lapel that stretches as wide as your torso when unfastened has a flattering effect.

VOLUMINOUS SLEEVES Balloon sleeves will never not be elegant. Bonus points for having a statement cuff peeking out.

INVISIBLE FASTENINGS There are no buttons, zips or hooks that, in time, could lose their coolness.

AN INCONSPICUOUS BELT Secure it tightly to create a coat dress.

BELOW-THE-KNEE HEMLINE For drama and warmth, the longer the better.

Trench, $590, Totême, mychameleon.com.au

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ELLE AUSTRALIA


OUR FA V O U R I T E TEA DRESSERS

The unofficial uniform of an Insta-girl with a global outlook

Dress, $269, Hansen & Gretel, hansenandgretel.com Dress, $650, Scanlan Theodore, scanlantheodore.com

Bra, $99.95, Love Stories, lovestoriesintimates. com.au

JEANNE DAMAS

The pouty French designer and socialite is no stranger to a wrap dress. SIGNATURE TEA: One by her own label, Rouje.

CAMILLE CHARRIÈRE

A Parisian based in London, this podcaster knows how to serve the tea hot. SIGNATURE TEA: She’s a fan of the LA label Reformation.

AND ON THE WEEKEND... Undo a few more buttons or loosen the wrap to reveal a lace-trimmed triangle bra.

Dress, $105, Topshop, topshop.com

THE most flattering dress IN THE WORLD Based on the style of a ’40s day dress, the tea dress has converted even the most androgynously inclined ELLE staffers. Look for a hem that sits mid-calf, a nipped waist by way of a wrap detail

Bra, $36, Asos, asos.com/au

or seam, and finished in a micro print. Wear yours with kicks in spring, espadrilles in summer and boots in this tricky in-between period (we’ve got some suggestions on p48).

Bra, $115, Aimee Cherie Intimates, aimeecherieintimates.com

A CASE FOR TH E KITTEN

Heels so low, you can run to the ball. Arm yourself with this repertoire of baby stilettos and don’t look back THE MULE KITTEN

Replace your flat slides with this heeled variety and you have yourself a trans-seasonal hero. Team with denim, a tee and a sleek blazer.

TH E SLINGBACK KITTEN

Will your mum say, “I had shoes like that!” when you wear them? Likely. Try them with a mini and sheer stockings to make her proud.

THE COURT KITTEN

Consider this style the modern girl’s ballet flat: practical and polished when paired with everything, from officewear to athleisure. ]

PHOEBE TONKIN

Of course an Aussie understands the ease of a wrap dress. SIGNATURE TEA: A flirty style by Réalisation Par.

Heels, $200, Sol Sana, sol-sana.com.au

Heels, $130, Topshop, topshop.com

Heels, $119, Zara, (02) 9376 7600 ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

43


THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

2 4

ESSENTIALS 1

“I’ve newly discovered the power of the blazer and found that it seamlessly fits into my street-inclined style of hoodies and wide-leg pants. It’s actually the perfect polished element to counteract all my casualness.”

6

7

– Dannielle Cartisano, bookings and style editor 3 5

1. Bag, $4,430, Chanel, 1300 242 635 2. Blazer, $989, Georgia Alice, theundone.com 3. Heels, $120, Topshop, topshop.com 4. Hoodie, $59.95, Topshop, topshop.com 5. Pants, $569, Grey Jason Wu, (02) 8987 3400 6. Earrings, $139, Reliquia, reliquiajewellery.com 7. Top, $229, Georgia Alice, georgiaalice.com

3

4 1

THE BLAZER EXPERIMENT

2

hypothesis:

“I call this look ’90s Schoolteacher Goes To The Disco. To shake the structure and seriousness of a double-breasted blazer, I like to pair it with some playful accoutrements like a patterned crop top and dangly earrings.”

– Claudia Jukic, market editor

A blazer is serious business attire.

experiment:

6

Armed with three different blazers, the ELLE editors are to create an outfit centred around the piece to prove its versatility.

5

conclusion:

1. Top, $840, Prada, (02) 9223 1688 2. Pants, $295, Arnsdorf, arnsdorf.com.au 3. Earrings, $159, Kate Spade, (02) 9231 4353 4. Blazer, $600, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377 5. Shoes, $119, Zara, (02) 9376 7600 6. Bag, $540, Rachel Comey, theundone.com

44

ELLE AUSTRALIA

A blazer works for the office, weekend and play. See for yourself...


T-shirt, $570, Gucci, gucci.com/au

“Like a fresh hair colour or iPhone software update, a blazer makes me feel instantly put-together. I’m always on the go, so the mix of a blazer and denim is the perfect blend of classic and cool for my oftchanging schedule.”

or try it with a logo tee Gucci's cult T-shirt adds fashion-girl flair to a classic blazer (just ask Pandora Sykes).

– Rachel Wayman, fashion director 1

2

FURTHER EVIDENCE

FROM THE S T R E E T. . .

3

4

5

6

1. Blazer, $1,300, Emporio Armani, (02) 8233 5858 2. Heels, $517, Dolce & Gabbana, vestiairecollective.com 3. Earrings, $130, Reliquia, reliquiajewellery.com 4. Bag, $1,724, Chloé, vestiairecollective.com 5. Shirt, $240, Arnsdorf, arnsdorf.com.au 6. Jeans, $340, Bassike, bassike.com ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

45


THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

ESSENTIALS

Shirt, $129, RM Williams, rmwilliams. com.au

With a sharp pointed collar and slim fit, this style is practically begging for a model-offduty sleeve roll and half-tuck.

Nothing says relaxed like no collar at all. Try this style undone over a tee.

THE POWER OF

the tiered skirt

Let’s face it: tiered skirts rarely make it past the shop floor (or shopping cart) and into your wardrobe – the extra fabric makes them look big, and more volume off the body means more volume on the body, right? Wrong. It’s all part of a strategic Jenga-like balancing act: remove a few elements up top and you’re left with a strong base below and an altogether gamine look. These are the styles worth taking into the change room...

A TIER AT THE HIPS Good for adding shape and extra swish, pair this style with a white tee and sandals for Roman Holiday vibes in your own backyard.

Shirt, $79.97, Sportsgirl, sportsgirl. com.au Shirt, $260, Jac+ Jack, jacandjack.com

Skirt, $450, Lover, loverthelabel.com

Exaggerated cuffs can be left undone for a flared sleeve.

STRIPES over WHITE If street style has taught us anything, it’s that, season after season, the most effortless women have one item in common: a blue-and-white striped shirt. Sure, a white alternative can appear crisper and fresher, but it’s the striped iteration that has the power to mean business when worn with trousers, to channel French-girl ease with jeans and to whisper Mediterranean chic when paired with nothing at all. We break down the details to look out for...

46

ELLE AUSTRALIA

A TIER AT THE KNEES The ultimate curvedefining piece, this sexy skirt teams well with a ’50s bustier. Ensure it sits high on the waist for figure-eight definition. Skirt, $1,870, Prada, (02) 9223 1688


5 BAGS THAT FORCE YOU TO carry less Our love for hands-free, cross-body bags is forever, but there’s just

something so elegant about a top-handle. In impactful colour-blocked styles, let a dainty lady bag be your key to all-day streamlining 2

1

3

4

5

1. Bag, $2,100, Mulberry, mulberry.com 2. Bag, $3,495, Burberry, au.burberry.com 3. Bag, $395, Oroton, oroton.com.au 4. Bag, $2,695, Tod’s, (02) 8203 0901 5. Bag, $49.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600 ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

47


THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

ESSENTIALS

THE OTK BOOT

In pink leather with buckles? Yes and yes. Consider over-the-knee boots the party dress of the shoe world: a statement piece that requires minimal effort elsewhere.

Boots, $3,770, Prada, (02) 9223 1688

THE WITCHY KITTENHEEL BOOT

Riding on the back of the kittenheel revival, the pointy toe and lace-up details make this style leg-lengthening enough to wear with dresses and skirts.

Boots, $2,050, Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

THE only BOOTS YOU’LL ever NEED These are the only five styles to look out for when updating your

boot ’drobe

THE FA S H I O N BOOT

No one-hit wonder, the go-withanything white ankle boot has been swinging since the '60s.

THE ADVENTURE BOOT

Loves nature and the outdoors, but also works well navigating the concrete jungle. They should be black leather, rubber-soled and ready for stomping.

Boots, $295, Kurt Geiger, kurtgeiger.com.au

48

ELLE AUSTRALIA

Boots, $1,090, Jérôme Dreyfuss, jerome-dreyfuss.com

THE PERFECT NO-FUSS BOOT

This is the hard-to-explainbut-you’ll-knowit-when-youfind-it boot. It features minimal embellishment and a smooth transition from toe to heel.

Boots, $220, Tony Bianco, tonybianco.com.au


KNIT

WIT

S P I N N I N G A YA R N When it comes to enduring knitwear, look for a hero piece that will satisfy your trend craving as well as the desire to warm your body temperature. Stick to a dress code-conquering, face-brightening shade of oatmeal in one of these three styles and you’ll be armed for any cool occasion THE CRAFTY KNIT THE RIBBED KNIT

Choose a slim-fitting style that finishes at the hips. It should comfortably tuck into your jeans or trousers.

The frou-frou tassels and wide, cropped sleeves are just enough to tip this piece into "going out" territory.

THE CABLE KNIT

The classic piece gets a new twist courtesy of a slouchy shape. Continue the relaxed look with a flowy skirt or wide-leg pants.

2 1

3

Should we really not wash our knits? Yes really, according to Maike Dietrich, the Berlinbased designer of super-knit brand Maiami. She shares her other tips... WAS H

The best way to care for knitwear is to avoid washing it. Clean by airing instead. If necessary, you should wash it by hand using a shampoo or special wool detergent. My favourite brand is Lenor. DRY

1. Jumper, $360, Bassike, bassike.com 2. Jumper, $489, Kate Spade, (02) 9231 4353 3. Jumper, $299, Iro, (02) 9362 1165

Words and styling: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Imaxtree; Jason Lloyd-Evans; Instagram: @camillecharriere; @jeannedamas; @phoebejtonkin

THE JEANS THAT ARE MORE LIKE TROUSERS You can wear the infamous “Jeans And A Nice Top” outfit to just about any occasion. And while tops may come and go, we’ve got the investment jeans sorted – a straight-leg, deep-indigo style is fail-safe.

Ensure the jeans sit high on your waist and don't hug your calves.

My secret tip is to use a towel and wrap your knit piece carefully, or just lay it flat so it doesn’t lose its shape. Loose knits should always be dried flat. STORE

Keep knits in a plastic storage container with a lid. Always ensure it isn’t packed too tightly or the garments will lose their shape. CARE

Hems should hit the ankle bone – fraying optional.

Every knit lover should own a wool comb. This is the optimal way to get rid of any pilling. For loose knit pieces, it’s best to use a lint roller or carefully pull the fibres with your fingers. q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

49


1

1

NOW FOLLOWING using their public platforms to bring about powerful change. We speak to seven of

1

50

ELLE AUSTRALIA

them to find out exactly how they’re making a difference

Gabrielle wears: jacket, $49.95, Cotton On Body, cottonon.com

With more than 700 million users and growing, Instagram is inarguably a global force to be reckoned with. And while many of us might still be using the app to document our daily granola and downward dogs, there’s an inspiring bunch of women


W HAT W ISD O M WO UL D YO U L IKE TO PASS O N ? Sometimes it doesn’t really matter what the end goal is, just the journey.

@fridacashflow

G A B RIELLE RIC HA RDS O N

New York-based model, artist, graphic-design student, face of Cotton On Body and co-founder of @arthoecollective, which is giving more visibility to artists of colour MY MUM TAUGHT ME HOW TO LOVE MYSELF, EVEN

As a black woman, I didn’t always feel beautiful because of white beauty standards, but my mum pushed me to love myself to the fullest. I also look up to Solange [Knowles]. She is amazing – so vocal and so smart. She has a vision and she’s able to execute it. EVERY DAY I’M STILL OVERCOMING ADVERSITY. A lot of my power comes from the people around me. I think about all the people who are working against adversity to  create  a  better,  brighter  world  and  they  help me overcome. I TRY TO SPEAK OUT ABOUT MY EXPERIENCES – from people  shitting  on  my  appearance  because  my  teeth  are messed up, or because I’m not a size zero, or because I’m black and dealing with structural racism. I think about what I’ve gone through on the journey to loving myself and use social media to talk about it. Because one thing that really helps people is [the feeling] they’re not alone. THOUGH A LOT OF THINGS WERE PUSHING ME BACK.

I HAVE A LOT OF HATERS AND HAVE HAD DEATH THREATS ON SOCIAL MEDIA. You have to learn to utilise that block

button – take the negative energy out of your life.

THROUGH TECHNOLOGY, YOU CAN NOW FIND SO MANY DIFFERENT WOMEN WHO HAVE THE SAME GOAL TO

People can mobilise quick and meet up quicker. There are online communities, new tight-knit groups of women who just want to support women. CREATE CHANGE AND A BETTER WORLD.

I KEEP BALANCED, HAPPY AND HEALTHY BY CENTRING

I get overstimulated easily because I always have a million things going on and then I can’t do anything. I say to myself, “Collect all your thoughts and meditate on them.” You need to just breathe. MYSELF.

I’M PROUD OF BEING PART OF THE ART HOE COLLECTIVE.

I love being able to bring light to other artists. I also have a project where we teach art classes to children in Brooklyn, because in a lot of metropolitan areas, grants for the arts are being taken away. Just being able to help other people makes me really happy. ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

51


1 @heapsgay

KAT D O P P E R

@frances_cannon

Sydney-based event producer, Mardi Gras director and founder of Heaps Gay, which is creating safe spaces for LGBTIQ people and their friends I

TAKE

INSPIRATION

FROM

MANY

POWERFUL,

who are helping change cultural landscapes of Sydney and are investing their time for a greater good: Clare Holland, managing director of FBi Radio; Terese Casu, CEO of Mardi Gras; and Lisa Havilah, director of Carriageworks. INDEPENDENT AND CREATIVE WOMEN

SINCE

THE

HEAPS GAY

BEGINNING, TO

HELP

I’VE

LEVERAGED

RAISE

AWARENESS

AND MONEY FOR MANY LGBTIQ CHARITIES AND

and it’s always at the forefront of what we do. Heaps Gay is also a platform for artists and musicians to showcase their works in a safe HOW D O YOU space and we’re always COMB AT T H E encouraging new talent. D OWNS I D E OF THE INTERNET IS SO GREAT. You S O C I A L M EDI A? You can’t please can create your own passion everyone out there. – whether it’s design, blogging, As long as you stay e-commerce or activism. You can true to who you are connect with people and use social then you have done media to promote your brand. the best you can. ORGANISATIONS

THE ACHIEVEMENT I’M MOST PROUD OF IS WHEN HEAPS GAY WON BEST MUSIC EVENT AT THE FBI

and when I was also awarded “Queen Of The Party” in the Time Out Bar Awards. Receiving praise from industry professionals is really special. And I had a “wow” moment when I realised the work we’re doing in the LGBTIQ community was having a real impact on the mental health of young Aussies.

SYDNEY MUSIC, ARTS & CULTURE AWARDS

TO KEEP HAPPY AND HEALTHY, I TRY TO CLOSE DOWN

I also get my butt to boot camp most mornings, try to make sure I see/do at least one thing creative/cultural each week and enjoy lots of delicious wine. MY COMPUTER BY 6.30 EVERY NIGHT.

THE

WISDOM

I

WOULD

LIKE

TO

PASS

ON

IS

TO

RESPECT THE DIVERSITY AROUND YOU, LISTEN AND

Back yourself, run with it, find your niche and go for gold. Always know what else is out there and stay true to who you are. MY FAVOURITE HASHTAG IS #HEAPSGAY. It’s such a good way to track down images and find people engaging with us every day. LEARN FROM EVERYONE YOU MEET.

52

ELLE AUSTRALIA

F RA N C ES CA N N O N

Melbourne artist, feminist and Self Love Club creator who looks at ideas of body love and body loathing, anxiety, relationships, sex and sexuality I ADMIRE STRONG, INFLUENTIAL

Artists like Frida Kahlo, Louise Bourgeois and Nancy Spero for fighting their way into a very male-driven art world and flourishing; women who are activists and speak truth like Alicia Garza, Opal Tometi and Patrisse Cullors, founders of the Black Lives Matter movement; and Maya Angelou, Laverne Cox, Clementine Ford, Roxane Gay – all women who use their artform and their platform to educate. WOMEN.

I FACE BULLYING FOR MY WEIGHT, ESPECIALLY ONLINE, AND MY ANXIETY CAN MAKE THIS

If I’m struggling, I have to learn to ask for help, whether that’s from a friend, a family member or a therapist. This is something we all need to learn: it’s okay to struggle and it’s okay to ask for help. EVEN MORE DIFFICULT TO DEAL WITH.

I USE MY ART TO DISCUSS DIFFICULT TOPICS

WHAT WISD OM WOULD YOU LIK E TO PASS ON? You’re pretty damn amazing just the way you are.

THAT ARE PERSONAL TO ME (AND MANY

Through drawing and painting, I discuss mental health, sex and sexuality, body positivity, menstruation, family and religion. I discuss these issues through a personal lens and I try to approach everything with honesty and tenderness. OTHER PEOPLE).

I’M PASSIONATE ABOUT BEING OPEN ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND SHARING BOTH THE GOOD AND THE BAD. I try to be as truthful and realistic as I can. My life isn’t perfect, so why should I pretend it is? I GET MY FAIR SHARE OF TROLLING, especially as a “fat feminist” (the two most terrifying F-words in this patriarchal society). I don’t have time to deal with haters and trolls, so I block and delete. AS I  WORK FROM HOME, I HAVE TO REMEMBER THE IMPORTANCE OF REST AND GETTING OUTSIDE. Some days I forget to take a break, which isn’t good for my mental health, so I’m learning to remind myself of the importance of this.


@hannahfaith__

@op_shop_to_runway

HA NNAH FA I T H

London-based DJ, art director and founder of @delikadesigns MY ROLE MODELS ARE MY FATHER,

Solange Knowles, Maya Angelou and Tracee Ellis Ross. I’VE

OVERCOME

UNDERSTANDING

ADVERSITY MORE

OF

BY

MYSELF

I trust the abilities that I’m capable of. Eliminating my sense of doubt is important for me in moments of adversity. Doubt can do so much damage to yourself if you don’t acknowledge and take care of it. AND KNOWING MY WORTH.

I TRY TO HELP OTHERS THROUGH THE

Music is my healer and I feel that’s the best way for me to use my art to make myself and others feel good. There’s so much negativity in the world, but we must not forget the beauty this world has to offer and I want to add to that. MIXES I CREATE.

SOMETIMES THE NEWS OR BEHAVIOURS I COME ACROSS

but everyone has their own opinions and not every opinion you will agree on. It’s important to have the right community on my social handles and to filter what I want to feed into. ON SOCIAL MEDIA MAKE ME FEEL CLOUDY-HEADED,

A LEX VA N O S

Sydney eco-stylist, Australian Red Cross ambassador and founder of Op Shop To Runway who’s demonstrating that second-hand doesn’t mean second best MY PARENTS ARE MY BIGGEST ROLE MODELS – THEY’VE ALWAYS SUPPORTED ME. Beyond my family, I draw inspiration from humanitarians and everyday people who volunteer their time to make a difference. And I will eternally be inspired by Sir David Attenborough and Dr Jane Goodall. INSTAGRAM HAS PROVIDED ME WITH AN INCREDIBLE

to instantly and personally connect with an online community and share my eco ideology, op-shop finds and creative collaborations. I PRIDE MYSELF ON BEING CONFIDENT AND POSITIVE but sometimes, with the constant exposure to the apparent “perfect, beautiful, high achiever” on social media, I start to compare myself. In those moments, I simply switch off. I put my phone down, remember there’s no such thing as perfection and continue on with my beautifully imperfect life. PLATFORM

TECHNOLOGY HAS ALLOWED WOMEN TO BECOME MORE

TECHNOLOGY PROVIDES WOMEN WITH INSTANT ACCESS

It’s also invited a lot more exposure on various parts of the world and allowed us to connect with more amazing people and absorb more knowledge.

TO PLATFORMS

FLEXIBLE WITH OUR CAREERS.

I LOVE TO TAKE TIME OUT OF MY DAY TO JUST KICK BACK

Music and art-directing my passion projects are other outlets for me. My creativity keeps me balanced and healthy – it feels rewarding to be able to create whatever I put my mind to. Also, healthy food and sunshine are essential! AND READ.

MY PROUDEST ACHIEVEMENT IS MOVING TO BERLIN

It’s one of the most rewarding feelings knowing I’ve made such a huge step to live what once seemed so far-fetched.

EARLIER THIS YEAR.

MY ADVICE IS TO LIVE IN YOUR

enjoy the little things, appreciate life for what it is and never give up on the dreams you think are too far to reach. Have faith. TRUEST FORM,

H OW D O YO U USE SO C I AL MED IA TO SH A R E YO UR M ESSAGE? Through words of positivity, images that exert beauty and music that flows through the soul with ease.

THAT

AMPLIFY

OUR

VOICES

AND

ALLOW FOR DISCUSSION OF THE ISSUES WE FACE.

These platforms empower the individual to define their own topics for discussion, seek refuge, provide support and invoke change. WHENEVER I’VE BEEN WORKING CRAZY HOURS – LIKE 60 TO 70 HOURS A WEEK – I MAKE

I feel most balanced when I exercise every day, eat nutritious food, get outdoors in the sun and spend quality time with my partner, family and friends. SURE I TAKE TIME OUT TO RECUPERATE.

I FEEL SO PROUD WHEN SOMEONE TELLS ME

WHAT ’ S YOUR FAVOURIT E HASHTAG ? #ecostylist. This simple term encapsulates my sustainable philosophy and passionate activism.

THAT I’VE INSPIRED THEM TO LIVE A MORE SUSTAINABLE LIFE. Shopping

second-hand, supporting ethical brands, purchasing locally produced goods, consciously reducing waste and being mindful of our everyday impacts... these simple changes can make a huge difference. MY ADVICE IS: LIFE’S SHORT. Stand up for what you believe in, question and challenge the status quo, be a voice for those who don’t have one, encourage positive change and channel your passion to make a difference – no matter how big or small. ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

53


@theimpossiblemuse

L AUR E N WASS E R

Model, face of Cotton On Body, activist and amputee toxic shock syndrome survivor who’s raising awareness about TSS prevention INSPIRATIONS

ARE

THE

PEOPLE

WHO

ARE

M IRA N DA TA PS ELL

IN

I was in a wheelchair for eight months, and it takes such a strong human being to be able to get up  every  single  day  –  doing  the  littlest  thing  is  such a task. Honestly, I think they’re superheroes. WHEELCHAIRS.

Indigenous Australian actress bringing awareness to the lack of diversity in TV and film

WE ALL GO THROUGH THINGS, BUT AT THE END OF THE

I love being silly and enjoying this life. I’m always in pain. My left foot is severely damaged from TSS and I’m probably going to have to amputate my left leg – I could be super-depressed and upset and devastated about it, but I have a second chance. I’m here... Your body is just your body. If I lose my legs, I mean, it’s horrible and it sucks but thank God I’m in a world where technology is so advanced that I can run again. I can be the best mum eventually. I can [climb] mountains, I can go swimming. I can do anything and everything. DAY IT’S HOW YOU DEAL WITH IT.

WHEN I INITIALLY SHARED MY STORY, SOME PEOPLE

ON

SOCIAL

MEDIA

WERE

NOT

EDUCATED ON WHAT TSS ACTUALLY WAS.

I couldn’t blame those people because it wasn’t really talked about. The H OW D O YO U misconception is if you leave your K E E P BA L A N C ED , tampon in too long, you will H AP PY A N D develop TSS, but it’s not necessarily H E ALTHY? the case. It can be the toxins With laughter. I grew up on Jim in  the  tampon  getting  into  your  Carrey and Living bloodstream and starting to shut Colour. I’m just down your system. Now, thank a huge dork God for social media because this at heart. is a serious issue and people are slowly getting it. MY FAVOURITE HASHTAG IS #AMPUTEE. There are just so many of us. TECHNOLOGY HAS HELPED WOMEN TO ADVANCE. With social media, we have YouTube, we have Instagram, we have Snapchat; they’re all ways to connect with one another and it has given women a platform that we’ve never had before. MY PROUDEST ACHIEVEMENT IS JUST BEING ALIVE. I’m grateful I’m even here, so I’m living a dream. YOU  ONLY GET ONE SHOT AT THIS LIFE, SO MAKE THE

I think that’s the best advice I can give anyone, because this is my second chance and [I’m] just freaking lucky to be here.

MOST OF  IT.

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MY ROLE MODEL IS MY MUM, BECAUSE

SHE

HAS

THE

My mentor is actress Leah Purcell, because she is unapologetic in the stories she wants to tell and the way in which she wants to tell them. And my inspiration is Viola Davis, because she’s so articulate about her experience as an actress and as an AfricanAmerican woman. I hope I can speak my truth in the way that she does hers.

BIGGEST HEART BUT SHE IS AN ABSOLUTE WARRIOR.

I’M A VERY PRIVILEGED ABORIGINAL WOMAN, SO

I

HAVEN’T

ADVERSITY

AS

EXPERIENCED OTHER

THE

FIRST

SAME

NATIONS

WHAT ’ S YOUR FAVOURIT E HASHTAG ?

But I’ve experienced casual #slay. All dat. racism, derogatory terms disguised as jokes... And when it happens, I pull people up on it. Even when it means they won’t like what I have to say. AUSTRALIANS.

I USE SOCIAL MEDIA TO AMPLIFY VOICES THAT AREN’T

It’s something I’m still learning. I’m also not keen to dive into semantics with trolls. I stay on message. For my own self-care, I have to choose which battles to fight. HEARD.

TO KEEP HAPPY AND HEALTHY, I GO TO YOGA AND

I’ve often  fallen  off  that  wagon  but  I’m  back on and I feel good. When I eat junk, I eat healthier the next day. Acknowledging when I’m not okay emotionally is healthy, too. MEDITATE.

THE ACHIEVEMENT I’M MOST PROUD OF IS GETTING MY

PARENTS INTO THE CANNES FILM FESTIVAL when The Sapphires was screening there in 2012. I thought they wouldn’t be allowed and the producers got permission. It was so special to have them there. IN AN INSTANTANEOUS CULTURE, I’VE REALISED THAT ANY FORM OF LEARNING DOESN’T HAPPEN OVERNIGHT.

Patience and persistence get you there. q

As told to: Genevra Leek. Photography: Johnny Diaz Nicolaidis; Ming Nomchong; Tatanja Ross; Instagram: @frances_cannon; @fridacashflow; @hannahfaith__; @heapsgay; @misstap; @op_shop_to_runway; @theimpossiblemuse. Lauren wears: top, $24.95, tights, $39.95, both Cotton On Body, cottonon.com

MY

@misstap


@elleaustralia

@elleaus

EL LE

EVERYWHERE get fashion as it happens

E LLE .C O M . AU


EXPERIENCE Female friendships

are essential to our mental health, our decision-making capabilities and our basic need for connection. But when Meg Mason met

a woman 25 years her senior, she found a different kind of dynamic that offered even more

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REQUIRED

S

he had a way of clasping her hands below her chin when she spoke that made you lean in, as though she was sharing a confidence and not speaking to an audience of 200. She had a rich AM-radio sort of voice that could have been introducing the Polish Philharmonic something-or-other on your mother’s kitchen radio. Her face was the kind that smiled in repose, and within minutes of seeing her for the first time, I decided we would probably have to be friends. It was that flicker of recognition that says, “Here she is. Here’s one of yours. Sidle up to her after this lecture, be sweet and don’t leave without her number.” And it seems I’m not the only one to have experienced what researchers have dubbed “friendship chemistry”. In fact, this instant connection between two people is most common among females, according to a study in The Social Science Journal. It’s about instinct, and because us women are programmed to trust our emotions, that “friendship at first sight” feeling motivates us to pursue the relationship. With any luck, it marks the start of a conversation that will continue in instalments for the next 30 years, fuelled by mutual interests, shared loathings, life events that become increasingly interwoven, and quantities of gin.


It certainly didn’t steer me wrong. Ten years later, here we are. I was right. She’s a journalist, too, radio to my print. A reader and writer; short stories her, novels me. No matter how many lunches, walks or Saturday afternoons of not much that we fit in, we can never get through our list of talking points (there’s an iPhone note of open threads), and the sensation of seeing her is the same as sinking into a sofa that still bears an impression of the last time I was there. So it doesn’t really matter that she’s 25 years older – maybe more, I’ve never asked. But much closer in age to my own mother than to me. “The odd thing about these deep and personal connections of women,” wrote Gloria Steinem, “is that they often ignore barriers of age, economics, worldly experience, race, culture – all the barriers that, in male or mixed society, had seemed so difficult to cross.” That was in the ’70s, and thank goodness nothing much has changed because there are so many benefits to these friendships that I suggest we all scout a woman from the generation above. women friends that keep It’s not that I don’t adore friends my own age but, starch in my spine, and collectively, I think it’s fair to say that none of us know without them, I don’t the literal fuck what we’re doing. We’re tired, we have know where I would be.” no time, the kids are relentless. But an older woman has I often wonder how done it all and survived. She remembers the madness of being a working mum, trying to fit a full working I help my friend, since day into school hours, as though it were yesterday. For I’ve got no advice to give me, it was yesterday, so I can’t hear enough about how in return, I do sometimes she made it work. All the times she didn’t, I find stealthily check my immensely comforting. If it turned out for her, it will phone and I’m two decades behind in the accumulation for me, too, she says. That sort of reassurance, the kind of anecdotes. But when she talks about her peers and with experience behind it, is something most of us their interests – primarily bung knees and arthritis – could do with on a daily basis, which makes me wonder I can see mine are more diverse or, at least, less why intergenerational friendships aren’t more common. medically focused. I definitely know better restaurants. More than once I’ve arrived at her house and burst At one recent dinner, as the waitress led me to our into floods as she ushered me in, sat in the opposite chair table she said, “Your mother is just over there.” and opened with an “alright then, let’s have it”. Wine I blushed, as though I’d been caught in a lie. I hadn’t appears at some point, and if there’s material benefit in said as much but also, I didn’t correct her. Do I wish a friendship like this, it’s that over-sixties can afford the she was my mother? She has daughters close to my age type of pinot that doesn’t burn on the way down and and I wonder if they’ve ever felt baffled by the leave you with that twitchy left eye my under-40 friends relationship, or jealous of the time their mum spends know as the Cleanskins Palsy. But even more valuable: with me. I’ve given it a lot of thought, fearing the she has time. It’s not that her days are in need of filling. invisible line and overstepping it. I don’t think I view It’s just that, for however long we’ve got, her attention her as a proxy – I’m happy with the mother I have. She is all mine. No stealthy phone checking, no sprinting lives overseas and I’m used to not having her around, but back in the era of screaming newborns and no-one off to the next thing. If I have a decision to make, she’ll to hold them but me, I couldn’t look at a woman with workshop the 400 pros and cons I’ve come up with, her baby and her mother, because my longing to have showing what one writer called “high tolerance”, what she had was so overwhelming. I hadn’t met my another marker of authentic friendship that now has older friend yet, but I wonder now about how much me loath to make certain decisions without her input. easier those years would have been with her in them. For some time we’ve known friendships improve Friendships between women are everything – the mental wellbeing – the feel-good hormone oxytocin is moments of connection, the sacrificial things women do released when friends connect with each other for each other, the gap they fill that romantic partners emotionally – but a link has now been established can’t, no matter how much we love them. “Women know between the sort of tribal feeling we get from time how to be friends,” the novelist Alice Adams said. “That’s spent with women and increased resilience. How funny what saves our lives.” But I like Keira Knightley’s that the sage Jane Fonda knew as much: “It’s my version better. “Female friendships are fucking extraordinary.” To have another woman on your side, older or younger, experienced or on the same everyday hustle as you, is to be extraordinarily lucky. q You Be Mother ($32.99, HarperCollins) by Meg Mason is out August 21

Photography: Sevak Babakhani. Styling: Melissa Drennan

“OVER-SIXTIES CAN AFFORD THE TYPE OF PINOT THAT DOESN’T BURN ON THE WAY DOWN”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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AN AWAKING

nightmare

Rachael Combe was coming apart under the burden of

unrelenting insomnia. Nothing helped – until one day her dentist, of all people, told her she had the so-called “young, thin, beautiful woman’s sleep disorder”. Flattered, she investigated

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I

’d wake in the middle of the night, gasping for breath as though surfacing from a near drowning. My heart would be racing, my skin clammy, my organs suffused with fear, like I’d been pickled in some bitter brine while I slept, and now, at 2 or 3am, I was fighting my way out of the jar. I’d then lie awake for hours, my life flashing before my eyes – And then I crunched through the night but only the sad, bad, mad parts. Even the happy mouthguard I wore to stop me from grinding my scenes curdled in this film – I was screwing up my teeth. And it was my dentist, Dr Michael Gelb, who children, ruining my marriage, wasting my life. And ended up diagnosing my problem when I went to my life! Was I dying? This gasping and sweating in get a new one. He peered down my throat and then the night – something was wrong with me. motioned for his assistant to come over. “Look at The episodes started in my early thirties and that big tongue! No wonder!” he exclaimed. “This is went on for years, gradually progressing in severity easy. I know what you have. You’re waking up and frequency until, according to my Fitbit, I was in a panic? In a cold sweat? Like someone just threw averaging only four hours of sleep a night. I’d a rock through your window?” he asked. Yes, yes, always been an insomniac, but this was a new level yes, I told him. “You have low blood pressure? Cold of hell. In the past, I’d prided myself on being a hard feet?” Uh, yeah. “You have anxiety?” Yes. “Were worker. Now I could barely keep my mind on a task you ever told you needed a palatal expander as for 15 minutes. My body began to break down: my a kid?” Umm... yes? “You have UARS – the young, ankle gave out mysteriously, and I had to wear an thin, beautiful woman’s sleep disorder.” In the 15 years I’ve known Gelb, orthopaedic boot for months. I ached he’s never steered me wrong – an everywhere. I developed rosacea. It “HE PEERED expert in head and neck pain, he’s was hard to eat out because everything cured my TMJ (temporomandibular but the plainest food made me sick. DOWN MY I’m fortunate to have good THROAT THEN joint) problems and my husband’s loud snoring. And yet, he’s so quick health insurance, and I put it to use. MOTIONED FOR to diagnose problems that can only I went to my gynaecologist: was it HIS ASSISTANT. be resolved with $4,000 retainers that perimenopause? No, she said, just ‘LOOK AT THAT I’m sometimes inclined to disbelieve stress and postpartum hormones. him. I couldn’t hold my freakishly (I gave birth to my fourth child BIG TONGUE! huge tongue in check: “Please. The during this period – another red NO WONDER!’” ‘beautiful woman’s sleep disorder’?” herring that threw everyone off: “Of I laughed. “That’s not a thing.” course you’re tired!”) I went to my Gelb snap-snapped at his assistant, who printed general practitioner: was it cancer, Lyme disease, a stack of articles from reputable journals. Turns hyperthyroidism, early-onset Alzheimer’s? He tested me for all of them. Nope. I went to out UARS is a thing. Upper airway resistance a gastroenterologist and a nutritionist, who failed syndrome was first identified in adults nearly to find anything wrong with my stomach or diet. 25 years ago by researchers at Stanford University I went to a psychiatrist, who diagnosed anxiety in the US. It’s a form of sleep-disordered breathing in and prescribed sleeping pills, which didn’t help me which people get slightly less air than they should because some part of their airway is too narrow and get more sleep but did make me feel more cotton– though they’re not actually in danger – their body headed the day after I took them. perceives they’re suffocating and wakes them up. I followed all the “sleep hygiene” advice: no naps, UARS is often put in the same category as getting up at the same time every day, no caffeine, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), but its effects are no screens an hour before bed. I exercised. I took subtler and its diagnosis trickier. Because the lavender baths, hung blackout curtains, wore a sleep research on it is broad but rather shallow, experts mask and earplugs. I took a class on stress reduction. disagree about almost every aspect of the disorder, I meditated. I tried sleeping in a different room from from whether it’s distinct from OSA to the best my husband. I tried giving up wheat, dairy, sugar therapies to ameliorate it. The exact prevalence of and – finally, painfully – wine. Nothing worked. UARS isn’t known – in part because it’s thought to be so under-diagnosed – but it’s estimated that about five per cent of Australians suffer from sleep apnoea in general, or 1.2 million people. ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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That said, there are some established facts about UARS: while OSA is associated with being older, heavier and male, UARS sufferers are typically younger, leaner and predominantly female. A petite build may be a risk factor, because smaller bodies have smaller airways, which can be more easily crowded by adenoids, the tongue and the uvula, as well as relaxation of the throat during sleep. (And while the literature is silent on the topic of beauty and UARS, one physician told me anecdotally that the facial structure that can put a woman at risk for UARS is sometimes linked with beauty in our culture: a small jaw and nose.) High blood pressure commonly occurs in tandem with OSA; the opposite is true for UARS, which can cause blood pressure to be so low that it leads to fainting and chronically cold extremities. UARS patients don’t always snore or stop breathing, but they do experience the same fatigue and daytime sleepiness as OSA sufferers. Due to this constant tiredness, some scientists have focused their research on the fact that UARS often co-exists with a host of psychiatric and somatic disorders, including anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia. They’ve suggested the exhaustion – and somatic disorders – aren’t caused by a shortage of sleep, but by the increased levels of stress to the body caused by the disordered breathing. If that’s true, treating the breathing could mean the anxiety or fibromyalgia recedes without doing anything else. It frankly all sounded too good to be true: not only did I have Gelb’s “pretty girl’s sleep disorder”, but curing it would eliminate every ailment I’ve ever had. I felt like one of those parents who can’t face that their child has a behaviour problem and so, instead, blame gluten or vaccines or the kid being “too creative” for school. But I had nothing to lose except debilitating insomnia, so I headed to the Stony Brook University Sleep Disorders Center in the US, where much of the research on UARS and somatic disorders has been done. I walked in fully expecting to be told that my dentist was a quack and I was a head case. Instead,

Dr Susan Manganaro took one look at my history, peered into my mouth and agreed with Gelb (although Stony Brook is abandoning the term UARS – they see it as a manifestation of OSA and think it’s misleading to cordon off sufferers just because they’re mostly thin women). Again, my tongue was of great interest. “See how it has ridges on the side?” Manganaro said. “It means your tongue is pressing against your teeth because there isn’t enough room for it.” (I swear, my tongue doesn’t loll out of my mouth like on a Rolling Stones album cover.) She said I likely needed to use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine, which would blow air up my nose and keep my breathing even. To confirm the diagnosis and then titrate the machine to the right air pressure, I needed to do two overnight sleep studies. Those studies – sensors all over my head and body, a tube up my nose, a camera watching me while I slept in a hospital room with pastel ocean scenes on the wall – showed 70 arousals in the 6.5 hours I spent in bed. I spent two of those hours lying awake, giving me a “sleep efficiency” rating of 69 per cent (normal is anything over 85 per cent). The diagnosis? Moderate sleep apnoea with mild sleep fragmentation. After some tussling with my health insurer, my CPAP machine finally arrived. It looked like a clock radio, connected by a long tube to a mask for your face. I had to try five masks before I found one that didn’t make me claustrophobic or rub my nostrils so raw and pink that I looked like a coke-addicted rabbit when I woke up. Ultimately, I settled on a snazzy ResMed AirFit P10 For Her, size extrasmall, that goes just into the tips of my nostrils and gives me the appearance of having a dainty lilacand-white elephant trunk dangling off my schnoz. It’s the least sexy thing I’ve ever worn to bed, outside of the disposable panties filled with ice packs and haemorrhoid pads the hospital gives you after you have a baby. “UARS OFTEN CO-EXISTS WITH A HOST I was told it would take a couple of weeks to get used to the machine, OF DISORDERS, INCLUDING ANXIETY, but it took me nearly two months. At DEPRESSION AND IRRITABLE BOWEL” first, I had to use sleeping pills to fall asleep with the mask, and I’d often rip it off in the wee hours. But then the turning point came: I woke up one morning and realised I’d slept straight through the night – CPAP success! Then my heart sank. Where was my mask? I didn’t feel it on my face; I must have clawed it off without

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Photography: Getty Images

realising it. I scanned my bedside table, looking for my little lilac elephant... before realising it was, in fact, still on my face. I’d acclimatised! Once I was able to wear my “MY FATIGUE JUST... STOPPED. ANOTHER CPAP through the night without sleeping meds, my fatigue and PART OF MY BRAIN – THE PART THAT anxiety just... stopped. Another HAD ENTHUSIASM FOR WORK AND part of my brain – the part that had PLAYING WITH MY KIDS – TURNED ON” enthusiasm for work and playing with my kids – turned on. It was like I’d been listening to a fire alarm for decades and Of course, not everyone is convinced by Gold then, finally, found the button to turn it off. At my and his colleagues. Scientists from the Penn State follow-up visit with Manganaro, my resting heart Sleep Research And Treatment Center wrote rate had dropped from 79 to 60 beats per minute. a journal essay a few years ago, complaining that his My sleep still isn’t perfect, but now all the stressconjectures are based on small studies without reduction and sleep-hygiene tactics I’d tried in the control groups and that if physicians act on them past make a difference. Caffeine, wine and PMS without more proof, Gold “will have a negative pretty reliably give me insomnia; exercising and impact on the health of our patients, on our economy setting my alarm for the same time every day and, not least, on the credibility of our field”. improve my sleep. Now I’m no longer a black box, It’s possible that all the benefits I’ve noticed are where nothing I do has the outcomes I expect. I’m the result of a placebo effect. Placebos are considered more of a clockwork gumball machine: you put particularly robust in sleep medicine, accounting for perhaps 50 per cent of the response to sleeping 25 cents in and the happy rainbow gumballs roll out. pills. Gold agrees that better studies are needed. Four months into my treatment, I’m still stunned “Sleep medicine is bullshit. We’ve built a branch of by the change. Who is this calm, elephant-masked medicine on a very weak foundation,” he says, woman? I call up Dr Avram Gold, director of the referring to the lack of investment in research. The Stony Brook sleep centre, who’s among those who result of the failure to fund double-blind, controlled believe it may not be the extra sleep that makes studies, he contends, is that people whose sleep people feel better-rested – and just all-around better could be improved are instead dying of causes that – but the reduction in activation of stress hormones. range from substance abuse to cardiovascular disease. He blames the olfactory nerve for UARS. “The nasal Dr Christian Guilleminault, the Stanford researcher passage is one of the fundamental ways we learn about opportunities and dangers,” he says. “Think who identified the UARS population a quarter of of the rabbit on the lawn, sniffing to find something a century ago, also lamented the dearth of research to eat but also sniffing to smell a coming dog.” into milder forms of apnoea. He says women’s The olfactory nerve is directly connected to the sleep-disordered breathing has been especially limbic system – the emotional centre of the brain – overlooked, calling us “the forgotten gender”. and senses not only smells but air pressure. Gold I’m almost embarrassed to admit how much suspects that UARS patients’ limbic systems have I believe in Gold’s theories. For the first time in my come to associate a drop in air pressure during sleep life, my symptoms make sense, and I’ve found with danger. For this connection to form, he a treatment that works. My husband used to tease postulates, there must be a stressful sensitising me for being “highly calibrated”, as I tried in vain to event, whether it be the trauma of war or the strain come up with something that would relieve my of getting a divorce. And perhaps you need to be anxiety, insomnia and irritable bowel. My husband someone who’s more reactive to stress to begin with. was right: I was sensitive and remain so. But in Manganaro points out that someone else, with the past, it was like I was trying to fine-tune an a different nervous system, could have sleep-study intricate machine that was on fire. You need to put out the blaze before you can experiment with results similar to mine yet feel completely fine. She’s less interested in the number of arousals patients the monkey wrench. I’ve come to think of the have at night than in the severity of their symptoms cool breeze from my CPAP machine as a little during the day. “If your brain is responding to the air-conditioner for my brain. It turns down the sleep-disordered breathing as a danger, and your temperature; it cools off my hot reactions. It gives fight-or-flight system turns on and the anxiety me the time and peace to regard the beautiful syndromes start up, it doesn’t matter how many machine of my body and mind with gratitude and times an hour you’re waking up,” she says. kindness instead of fear and disgust. q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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let’s

TALK about

AGEING ELLE ’S NO-BS GUIDE TO GETTING OLDER If, like 40 million people globally, you’ve downloaded FaceApp, uploaded your selfie and hit the “old” button, your artificially enhanced glimpse into the future probably involved sagging eyelids, grey hairs and wrinkling skin. Chances are you laughed heartedly at your aged self, shared the image, then discarded it before vaguely reminding yourself to moisturise before bed. If only ageing, the IRL kind, was so easily switched on and off, right? Well, the experts say it can be. We spoke to the best of them and found the issue of ageing is anything but skin-deep

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Words: Meg Mason

W

hen we were 16, we all and accelerated ageing comes from looked 16, give or take our the Nobel prize-winning Australian orthodontic situation and researcher Dr Elizabeth Blackburn and level of access to Rimmel her study of “telomeres” – protective eyeliner. Once we’re older, matter at the ends of chromosomes that let’s say 38, our age gets to be anyone’s serve a similar purpose, she explains, to guess. The range in appearance of those little plastic bits on the ends of women homing in on 40 is vast and shoelaces. When the telomeres wear out, sometimes astonishing. There are our DNA starts to wear out, too. Cell scientific studies to prove it, or you renewal slows down and soon after, we can just spend five minutes scrolling wake up looking and feeling like Big through a “Class of ’97” Facebook Edie from Grey Gardens. reunion page. Look there and it seems Here’s an abbreviated list of things, like some women are ageing at halfabstract and concrete, that have been speed, and others at hyper-lapse. shown to fray our telomeres: chronic Because they are. A landmark study stress, too much sitting down and measured the “biological age” of nearly smoking (of course), divorce, poor 1,000 New Zealanders who were all, nutrition, habitual negative thinking and technically speaking, aged 38 and born self-criticism, too much exposure to within a year of each domestic chemicals, other. By using 18 inadequate exposure specific physiological to nature, social “SO MANY WOMEN markers – including isolation and sleep TURN TO BOTOX, metabolism, problemdeprivation. The list is solving and how well overwhelming, until BUT IT WOULD BE they could take a flight you consider how many of those factors of stairs – some of BETTER TO LOOK are entirely within our those ’70s babies INTO WHY AGEING IS control, and therefore turned out to have how possible it is to, a biological age of just ACCELERATED IN 28, while others were as they say, flip it and already 40, effectively reverse it. Within just THE FIRST PLACE” ageing 1.2 years for a few months, the every actual year that impact of lifestyle passed. When strangers were then asked changes targeted at restoring inner health will start to register. to estimate the candidates’ ages based “We age from the inside out,” says only on a photograph, their best guesses aligned more closely with biological age Dr Michael Elstein, an anti-ageing than actual DOB. specialist based in Sydney. “But external Why though? While it’s tempting to signs of ageing are the ones that tend blame simple genetics (or in lay terms, to concern us most. So women may, our mothers), an individual’s pace of for example, turn to Botox to improve ageing is determined far more by lifestyle the appearance of their skin, but they and environmental factors. Yes, that would be better to optimise nutrition, tissue-thin skin under your eyes, the kind have their hormone levels and super-prone to darkening and making adrenal function tested, get zinc levels you look prematurely sad and tired, is checked and really look into all partly thanks to your mother. But the fact those invisible markers that are the you’re 20-a-day on the Marlboro Lights is reason why ageing may be accelerated a far greater part of it. in the first place.” Some of the most significant research And call their mothers. Turns out it’s into the relationship between lifestyle not entirely her fault after all. ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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TURN B A

TAKE A SAUNA

is your lifestyle speeding up

THE CLOCK?

The short answer: yes. But you can do something about it

H

ow much is ageing to do with nature versus nurture? Dr Sara Gottfried, the New York Times bestselling author of Younger (published by Vermilion), says nature (genetics) loads the gun, but nurture (environment) pulls the trigger. “Only 10 per cent of disease is caused by your genes, while 90 per cent is caused by environmental factors, including the environment you create with your lifestyle choices. This gives you an incredible opportunity to change the course of disease and ageing in your body.” The goal, she says, is to upgrade that 90 per cent to affect the genetic 10 per cent. Fast ageing is the biggest health problem Gottfried sees in her San Francisco practice and with the people she works with online. “No-one talks about it, yet most of it is modifiable with small lifestyle tweaks.” She says there are five factors that can make ageing more visible after 40, leading to “inflammaging” – the unfortunate hybrid of increasing inflammation, stiffness and rapid ageing. THE MUSCLE FACTOR

Ageing begins in your muscles, starting with the loss of the fast-twitch fibres that allow you to perform burpees and jump squats. On average, adults lose 2.27kg of muscle every decade, which

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may show up as a thicker waist in your jeans or a body-fat test showing higher fat mass and lower lean-body mass. If unaddressed, your muscles usually get more doughy as they’re replaced with fat, and you’re not as strong as you used to be. Exercise is the solution, particularly high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with plyometrics, which has been shown to turn on 274 genes and tricks your brain and muscles into thinking you’re younger. THE HORMONE FACTOR

Your hormone system is not like a fine shiraz that gets better with time. Unfortunately, your thyroid gland slows down and, with it, your metabolism, so the bathroom scale climbs a few kilos per year (or even per month). You get cold easier. You poop less often. With age, both men and women make less testosterone, leading to more fat deposits at the breasts, hips and buttocks. Women produce less oestrogen, which normally protects the hair follicles and skin. Lower levels of oestrogen and testosterone may weaken your bones and sex drive, while lower oestrogen-to-testosterone ratios may trigger hair loss and heart disease. Your cells become more sensitive to the hormone insulin, which leads to rising blood sugar in the morning. As a result, you may feel foggier and experience

Either dry or infra-red – steam rooms also work, says Gottfried. Of all these forms of heat, dry saunas have the most evidence that they help you age well, but infra-red saunas aren’t far behind. If you want to live long and healthy, you need molecular chaperones to tend to your DNA, and that’s what sitting in a sauna provides. It’s also relaxing; it eases stress while adding to your health span (the period of time you’re in your prime and free of disease). FLOSS

Flossing fosters longevity, independent of brushing your teeth, as does seeing the dentist at least twice per year. If you don’t floss, your risk of mortality is 30 per cent higher and if you see the dentist only once a year, you raise mortality risk by 30 to 50 per cent. Flossing can prevent gum disease after as little as one month of regular use. Gottfried advises flossing at least twice a day. No-one does it right, so get a reminder on good form. SLEEP ON YOUR SIDE

Your brain’s glymphatic system, which cleanses toxic molecules associated with neurodegeneration, works best when you’re sleeping on your side. Gottfried uses a pillow between her bent legs to pin herself in a side-lying position to get a better “brain shampoo” and decompress her lower back. Sleeping on your right side activates your vagus nerve, which is key to stress resilience.

TIME

(AND GAIN SOME SUPERB HEALTH BENEFITS)

CK

HOW TO EASE YOUR BODY’S AGEING PROCESS


stronger cravings for carbs, then notice more skin wrinkling along with an olderlooking facial appearance. The point is: the right food, sleep, exercise and support for detoxification can reverse many hormone problems linked with ageing. THE BRAIN FACTOR

Your nerve cells lose speed and flexibility as you get older. Connections between neurons aren’t what they used to be, so finding words may become an issue. The balance shifts towards more forgetting and less remembering. Your hippocampus – the part of your brain involved in memory creation and emotional control – can shrink, especially if you have a high degree of stress. As if that wasn’t bad enough, excess stress kills brain cells by increasing production of beta-amyloid, which then forms disruptive plaques that harm synapses further, putting the brain at risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The key is to focus on keeping your brain malleable as you get older. THE GUT FACTOR

Compiled by: Genevra Leek; Amy Starr; Sara McLean. Photography: Getty Images

Nothing ages you faster than autoimmune disease. About 70 per cent of your immune system lies under your gut lining, so it’s where it can get overstimulated, leading to inflammation and autoimmune conditions. Your gastrointestinal tract also contains around two kilos of microbes. Imbalanced microbes may cause you to make more enzymes such as beta-glucuronidase, which can raise bad oestrogens and lower protective oestrogens. Stress raises the corticotropinreleasing hormone, which pokes holes in

EAT

YOURSELF HEALTHY

Only one diet can fight gut and sleep problems, acne and even heart disease

THE MASTER

DOUBLE SHOT

MINERAL

Few foodstuffs inspire as much passion as the humble latte. Caffeine is arguably the world’s most common drug. It gets your blood pressure going, fires up adrenaline, inspires focus and triggers the release of dopamine, which can stop your bad mood on a chemical level – and all this within an hour or two of consumption. But can you get all that for nothing? If your obsession has you feeling a little guilty, don’t sweat it. Last year, a UK study found that enjoying coffee on the regular may also reduce the risk of damage to the liver – the organ responsible for processing all manner of toxins in the body, so one you need functioning at its best for the long haul as you age. It’s not yet known exactly what part of coffee consumption is responsible for this surprising side effect, but who are we to question science?

IF YOU ONLY TAKE ONE SUPPLEMENT TO HELP YOU SLEEP BETTER, STRESS LESS AND STAY ENERGISED, MAKE IT MAGNESIUM. “MAGNESIUM HELPS WITH MUSCLE RELAXATION, SO IT CAN HAVE AN OVERALL RELAXATION EFFECT ON THE BODY TO ENCOURAGE A CALM AND RESTFUL SLEEP. IT’S ALSO INVOLVED IN YOUR CELLULAR ENERGY PRODUCTION CYCLE,” SAYS SWISSE NATUROPATH CHERYL GOODMAN. RESEARCH HAS ALSO SHOWN MAGNESIUM INTAKE CAN PLAY A ROLE IN OFFSETTING YOUR RISK OF DEVELOPING DIABETES. “AS IT’S INVOLVED WITH REGULATING INSULIN, IT CAN HAVE A BENEFICIAL ACTION WITH CONTROLLING BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS.”

your gut, leading to food intolerances, more stress and lower vagal tone, an indicator your nervous system is out of whack. Finally, stress can make you absorb nutrients poorly. But don’t get lost in the details; just know that your gut can accelerate or wind back your clock. THE TOXIC FAT FACTOR

Toxins from the environment accumulate in your fat. Scientists call them gerontogens. They are similar to how carcinogens increase your risk of cancer, and they can work against you and cause premature ageing. Pollution, cigarette smoke, heavy metals, UV rays, chemo, contaminated drinking water, pesticides and preservatives can all conspire against you. While exposure to certain poisons is inevitable, we can attack the genetic flaws that cause you to accumulate them. ]

A diet built around fighting inflammation is like giving your insides a nice, warm hug. It’s gentle and nurturing, plus if your organs aren’t fighting inflammation, they can get busy boosting your body’s natural defence mechanisms, so you’re ready to actually fight potential diseases. Meat, milk, eggs, cheese and butter are off-limits, but you can have salmon, trout and, on occasion, even chicken. Then, you basically need to make your diet as colourful as you can – greens, purples, reds, yellows… you get the idea. Taste the rainbow.

I N F L A M M AT I O N - F I G H T I N G F O O D S LEAFY GREENS

CELERY

BEETROOT

SALMON

WALNUTS

BLUEBERRIES

PINEAPPLE

KIMCHI

GARLIC

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unwavering social media obsession. As Estée Lauder CEO Fabrizio Freda explained in an interview: “The 30-year-old today gets more photographs of themselves [taken] in a day than their mother did in a year, so they care what their skin looks like now, not when they are 40.” So while sales of facial anti-ageing products are down, the makeup market is up, as is sales of face masks, which give a gratifyingly speedy result. There’s a demographic shift at work here, too. According to research, in 2015, millennials – generally those aged 20 to 36 – surpassed baby boomers (ages 53 to 71) as the largest living generation in the US. So while they might be ages away from a deep-set wrinkle, they’re now the most important demographic for the retail You demanded a more positive take on getting industry – the ones spending the money and older, and the beauty industry is taking note paving the way for the future of the entire beauty business. The problem is, because millennials ere’s the problem: the term “anti-ageing” have to constantly adapt in a rapidly changing first took off in the ’80s, presenting the world, they’re tricky to figure out. “Everything passing of time as a bad thing and assuming is more temporary for millennials; they’re showing we’d agree – that we are, and should be, less interest in future-proofing their skin than against it. But there’s a seismic shift going their mothers did,” says Alexia Inge, co-founder of on, rebelling against this outdated way of thinking. shopping website Cult Beauty. “‘Anti-ageing’ is Last year, according to less of a trigger term.” Google, none of the UK’s “The anti-ageing message “THERE HAS BEEN most-searched beauty questions that’s been peddled by the featured the perennial tag-line beauty industry for years is A MOVE AWAY FROM term “anti-ageing”. And marketlosing relevance,” says Victoria research company Mintel Buchanan, a strategic researcher YOUTHFUL reported that the US market for at consumer-insight company PERFECTION TO facial anti-ageing products has The Future Laboratory. “Women been declining for five years. So are growing more self-assured A SPIRIT OF POSITIVITY” and are becoming less anxious what did those Google searches reveal? That people are instead about the signs of ageing.” Inge looking for answers to skin issues that impact our agrees: “Traditional ways of marketing – specifically here and now. “How to get rid of acne” topped the around age, gender and ethnicity – are becoming list of queries, followed by “How to get clear skin” less relevant. There has been a move in focus away and “How to get rid of bags under your eyes”. from eternal, youthful perfection to a spirit We’re going to hazard a guess this is to do with our of positivity, confidence and psychological

future

FACING

H

PUTTING YOUR MONEY

WHERE YOUR MOUTH (AND FACE) IS

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WE CALCULATE THE ANNUAL COST TO TURN BACK THE YEARS, BEFORE YOU EVEN TOUCH YOUR MAKEUP BAG

$1,320

$2,400

$1,200

$1,200

for anti-ageing LED light treatments

for facials

for Botox in the frown lines

for regular skin peels

$2,250

$800

for skin tonefor lip evening IPL enhancement treatments


EXION

P

R

FE

CO

PL

E

M

CTOR

S

Words: Joely Walker. Photography: Getty Images; Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

Skinlongevity Vital Power Infusion, $70, BareMinerals, mecca.com.au

and emotional health. The skincare regimens of millennials are seeing shifts from correction to preparation.” Blue Serum, $155, Chanel, Unlike erasing wrinkles, davidjones.com.au prepping our skin is something we can all take control of. Skincare innovation is responding, and the offerings of Ultimate Eye Cream, vitamin-rich, hyaluronic $48.99, Olay, priceline.com.au acid-heavy, antioxidantpacked formulations, which make for softer, smoother complexions, are booming, NightWear Plus alongside the most Anti-Oxidant important preventative Night Detox Creme, measure of all – UVA/UVB $80, Estée Lauder, 1800 061 326 sun protection. We’re also becoming savvier shoppers. “Customers are now educated in beauty language; they understand Capture Totale DreamSkin 1-Minute Mask, $110, what retinol is and they Dior, myer.com.au know what antioxidants can do for them,” says beauty buyer Emily Saunders. “That’s why Pure Vitality Skin brands such as Peter Renewing Cream, $87, Thomas Roth are popular – Kiehl’s, kiehls.com.au they apply no-nonsense attitudes to packaging and messaging.” Knowledge is power, and brands are The Revitalizing Hydrating having to work harder and Serum, $340, La Mer, more transparently to gain davidjones.com.au our loyalty and trust. So what does this mean for you? It’s good news: the changing desires of millennials are redefining the term “anti-ageing”, which means we’re creating

a demand for more positive messaging from beauty brands. Now, if there’s one thing we resolutely are “anti”, it’s being told how to think, especially about the future of our faces. In fact, we’re pro-ageing. We know it’s inevitable, and we’re embracing it. But while we are more content than ever with owning our age, we also want our skin to look as healthy as possible for as long as possible. Hence the shift to preparation – something many of the big brands are already hot on. Enter one of the most exciting skin innovations this year: Chanel’s Blue Serum. Its aim is to deliver healthier, happier skin for the long run by boosting the skin’s defence system with hardworking ingredients from areas of the world where people live the longest. Rather than working as a “corrective”, it equips your skin for the daily fight against damaging aggressors (such as free radicals) by keeping skin active. This approach is shared by BareMinerals with its Skinlongevity Vital Power Infusion, which is all about endurance. Its ethos? For a healthy body, you aim for prevention rather than cure – the same should go for your skin. Think of this as the mindfulness age of skincare, and (pat on the back) you’re probably already doing all the right things. In 2016, the Google search for facial SPF – the most important skincare step for prevention – was the highest on record. It was also the year we clued up on the damaging effects of pollution and, according to Mintel, 38 per cent of us noticed how stress took a toll on our skin. It seems language is what it comes down to. It’s not the contents of the “anti-ageing” products that are the problem (because, for the most part, they do work in the short term to nourish and refresh your skin), but rather those two little words strung together that are causing the issue. If you need more convincing of the pro-ageing movement, look at (and admire) Charlotte Rampling’s campaign for Nars (she’s 71), or Lauren Hutton, 73, for Bottega Veneta SS17. With age comes confidence, and that’s the type of positive messaging we can get behind. ]

$3,000

$1,500

$600

$2,000

$800

$330

$1,700

$2,390

for skinfirming Thermage

for skin rejuvenation with Fraxel

for haircuts

for hair colour

for teeth whitening

for brow tinting and shaping

for lash extensions

on luxury skincare products

TOTAL:

$21,490 A YEAR

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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What is it, if anything, that really sets different age groups apart?

I

financial downtimes, unlikely ever to buy property and ruing the day they ever thought to put avocado on toast. They’re derided for being so sensitive they can’t get through a job interview without a parent by their side. But when they attempt to step up, they’re accused of “adulting”. A whole generation is being treated like the baby of a family, and it’s humiliating. Is it a surprise that 60 per cent of adults in this age group resist being tagged as millennials? Gen X is hardly better off. No sooner did we wrest leadership off the baby boomers did millennials spring up. They’re more vocal, more adept at social media, more innovative and unafraid to flout convention, and it makes us feel old. For those of us “lucky” enough to have million-dollar mortgages, the implications of ageing out of relevance are scary. Two generations, unhappily boxed. So why do we still use the stereotypes against each other? In doing so, we all miss out. The flow of ideas, the “THE FACT THAT NOBODY interchange of culture. Gen X sharing what we’ve learned so far, millennials CAN DECIDE WHERE ONE keeping us on our toes. Instead of GENERATION ENDS AND THE resenting millennials for picking over Xers’ cultural contribution, feel OTHER BEGINS SHOWS WHAT flattered they’ve appropriated our grunge. Millennials, please teach us A FALSE DEMARCATION IT IS” what a subtweet is. And don’t we all love Friends? Our identities are already dependent There’s more that unites us than on our age. We’re in our twenties, we divides us. And the fact that nobody still ought to be having fun. We’re in our can decide where one generation ends thirties, we should have kids. We’re 40, and the other begins shows what a false does that make us invisible? Each decade demarcation it always was; there only makes us re-evaluate who we are and to satisfy human nature’s innate need to where we fit into work, society and culture. divide and sort. Maybe it’s my gen X But being lumbered with a label makes propensity for nostalgia talking, but it’s that already difficult process much harder. hard not to think how liberating it would Think about it: millennials have been be to go back to when there were only called the “unluckiest generation”, born in adults and children and Winona Ryder.

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REALITY BITES

t was a seminal experience for two reasons. One: that first VHS viewing of Reality Bites would cause me to imitate Winona Ryder in all things for the rest of my teens. Two: it was from that movie that I learned what generation X was, and that I was part of it. Did generations have names before the ’90s or had I just not heard of them? Either way, in the 23 years since Reality Bites, two more generations have been born, and as many more identified and parsed. After X came Y, the millennials, then gen Z. Because the boundaries between them keep shifting, defining characteristics must be ascribed instead. Millennials, we’re told, are entitled, flaky, easily triggered. Gen X, ironic, mildly depressive, hardworking but squeezed from above and below. But for millennials trying to grow up and gen X working out how to be old, are these sorting systems helpful or a hindrance?

MILLENNIALS VS GEN X M: WHEN YOU GO OUT TO LUNCH WITH YOUR MOTHER, YOU’VE STARTED TO BRING YOUR WALLET. X: When you go out to lunch with your mother, she no longer brings her wallet. M: YOU WONDER IF YOU SHOULD GET YOUR HAIR CUT INTO MORE OF AN OFFICIAL STYLE, BECAUSE MAYBE A TOP KNOT ISN’T OFFICE-APPROPRIATE. X: You’re trying to grow your hair past shoulder length, fearing it’s your last chance before it’s inappropriate. M: FINDING OUT MILLIONAIRE MODEL BELLA HADID IS ONLY 20 BRINGS ON AN EXISTENTIAL CRISIS. YOU THOUGHT YOU HAD YEARS TO MAKE YOUR FORTUNE. X: That Gwyneth Paltrow will always be three years older than you, and will turn 50 first, is a continuing source of reassurance. M: YOU’VE RELAUNCHED YOUR RUNNING PROGRAM, AND ARE ACTUALLY SUCCEEDING THIS TIME. X: You’ve had to stop running because of this weird pain in your knee. M: YOU HAVEN’T BEEN ON A PREPAID PHONE PLAN FOR 18 MONTHS. X: You’re now on a first-name basis with the guys at the Apple Genius Bar. M: YOU WONDER IF YOU’LL EVER LIVE ALONE, INSTEAD OF WITH THREE MESSY ROOMMATES. X: You wonder if you’ll ever live alone, instead of with three messy kids.

Words: Meg Mason. Photography: Getty Images

GIRLS

the generation gap

HOW TO KNOW IF YOU’RE AGEING


TRAIN YOUR BRAIN It’s not technically a muscle, but it behaves like one. And just like that Kayla Itsines-toned tummy, it’s a case of use it or lose it FOR MOST OF US, THE MOTIVATION

THINK

to run intervals or to switch a morning croissant for a plate of sardines doesn’t come from a desire to stave off dementia. It’s a disease so much “for old people”, we don’t see it as a real risk to our health requiring a proactive response while we’re still under 50. And yet by 2021, dementia is expected to surpass heart disease as the leading cause of death.

TARGETED

TO GET OUT OF BED

WHETHER

WE’RE

GENETICALLY

brain volume begins to shrink in all of us at just 40. When you consider how integral mental function is to quality of life – think memory, work performance, emotional wellbeing, decisionmaking – building a fit mind for the future becomes more important than working for toned glutes now. PREDISPOSED OR NOT,

A WEALTH OF RESEARCH HAS SHOWN

how quickly it forms new physical pathways to manage challenges, keeping its function sharp. It’s not the solid, unshifting lump of matter we used to imagine, and a cursory go at the cryptic crossword and the occasional Zumba class is no longer considered an adequate hedge against its degeneration.

HOW MALLEABLE THE BRAIN IS,

STEP UP

Your legs say no but your head is saying take the stairs instead

OF

BRAIN APPS

TRAINING COME

TO

AND MIND

But the jury is still out on the efficacy of the many screen-based brain fitness products that are part of a billion-dollar market. In one case, highly targeted computer games have been found to cut older users’ risk of dementia by nearly half, but the more broadly available products, when reviewed by researchers at the University of Illinois, were found to have little impact, beyond how well users could play the game itself. FIRST.

THERE ARE MANY PROVEN WAYS TO BOOST YOUR BRAIN and most don’t require a subscription. Hard work, for example. Specifically, focusing on difficult mental tasks for a sustained period so the brain is forced to work out like muscles do in a CrossFit session. Reading qualifies, but it has to be demanding – think War And Peace, not Buzzfeed’s “Which War And Peace Character Are You?” – and the concentration level has to be “exam prep”. AS WE APPROACH MIDDLE AGE, THE BRAIN’S NATURAL INCLINATION IS TO AVOID DIFFICULT TASKS, but the best way to age-proof the part of the brain connected with abstraction

function (such as decision making) is to challenge it. In a study published in the Journal Of Neuroscience, older participants whose brains appeared physically younger in scans were those who took part in activities more challenging than an occasional Sudoku, making their brains “shrink-resistant” in the process. WHEN

IT

WORKING

COMES OUT,

TO

ANY

ACTUALLY

EXERCISE

IS

but some forms are more so for the brain, such as HIIT. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that not only do workouts involving short bursts of extreme activity stop cells from ageing, they reverse existing damage in a way that no medical intervention can. BENEFICIAL,

TO SUPERCHARGE THE BENEFITS OF

Yoga and chanting, like the Kirtan Kriya form of meditation, have been shown to improve memory, mood balance, navigation, focus and multi-tasking ability by boosting communication between different parts of the brain. AND TAKE A NAP. An hour-long snooze, especially after lunch, can prevent your brain ageing by five years and boosts cognitive function – which will make chapter 47 of War And Peace a little less of a grind. ] EXERCISE, MIX IN MEDITATION.

Bypassing the elevator and climbing the stairs will not only help tone your glutes but can also slow down brain ageing, according to a study in Neurobiology Of Aging. Researchers examined the grey matter of 331 brains aged 19-79 and showed that for every flight of stairs (defined as the stairs between two floors) people climbed daily, their brains appeared 0.58 years younger than their chronological age.

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the art of

GROWING UP The one-way road to 40 isn’t always a smooth ride. Meg Mason isn’t apologising

N “WE SWEAR WE’D NEVER ‘INJECT SHIT’ IN OUR FACES, THEN SEE A PHOTO AND THINK, MAYBE JUST SOME TOPSHELF SHIT”

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othing makes a woman look so old as trying desperately hard to look young,” said Coco Chanel. Which was perfectly fine for her. She never had to video conference in fluorescent lighting. She never woke up and reached for her phone, missing Instagram and opening the camera flipped to facing instead, only to discover that Gargamel was in her bed and wearing her PJs. And she had a wardrobe full of Chanel, which would go a long way to mitigating the experience of getting older and trying to be fine with it. Ageing is strange. It’s confusing. For a long time, our twenties and into our thirties, we get not to think about it. When we hear all the chatter about wrinkles and retinol, about celebs who are “ageless” and Elle Macpherson’s “wrinkling” knees, we don’t listen, believing ourselves to be immune. When we go out, we dab on a little tinted SPF, in deference to the vague idea of our future selves, but otherwise we feel impervious to the things other women worry about. Then one day, we don’t want to go out without Morning Showgrade concealer, and that’s only to move the car. This is ageing. When we arrive here, at whatever arbitrary age we do, every one of us has to decide how we’re going to play it. “Ageing is out of your control,”

Diane von Furstenberg has said. “How you handle it, though, is in your hands.” So, will we Helen Mirren our way through this next bit, or Real Housewives the shit out of it, acid-peeling ourselves into oblivion? Perhaps we’ll flick-flack between the two extremes, feeling sexy and confident one day, practically sorry for poor twenty-somethings still working things out, and the next day, achingly, viscerally jealous of their plentiful collagen production. Why are they not more grateful, actually? Why are they not happier in themselves? Then again, why weren’t we? “Oh, how I regret not having worn a bikini for the entire year I was 26.” We know the Nora Ephron quote. We have it written down. “If anyone young is reading this, go, right this minute, put on a bikini, and don’t take it off until you’re 34.” We thought she was being funny. Now we see she was deadly serious. Regret is part of the process: that we didn’t take that job, that we should have worn a hat, that we didn’t marry that man or that we did. Ephron wrote about turtlenecks and changing her mind on cosmetic surgery and we start to understand that, too. The bold positions we took on those things – when we didn’t need them – are back on the table. If like Jennifer Aniston we swore we’d never “inject shit” into our


Additional words: Amy Starr; Genevra Leek. Photography: Getty Images

faces, after seeing a photo of ourselves on a friend’s feed and feeling confused as to why our own mother was in a bar, we think, maybe just a bit of top-shelf shit? We look to culture to help us but culture, it turns out, doesn’t know what it thinks about ageing either. On one hand, it tells us getting older is to be embraced. It’s empowering, we’ll finally step into ourselves. Joan Didion for Céline, Charlotte Rampling for Nars, Catherine Deneuve for Louis Vuitton and Joni Mitchell for Saint Laurent – they are good signs. But they are exceptions, too. Still in the main part, culture glorifies youth to such an extent, we feel like we’ve done something wrong – that we should have tried harder to be born in 1995. “It’s almost as if we’ve failed if we don’t remain 25 for the rest of our lives,” Cameron Diaz said once. “It’s my fault that, at 40 years old, I don’t look like I’m 25. Oh, I’m sorry. I apologise. I wasn’t able to defy nature.” And then, magically one day, we get tired of apologising. What, exactly, are we apologising for, come to think? That we’ve worked and had children and travelled the world, that we burnt ourselves to a crisp that time in Capri and have a tiny, heartshaped pigment spot to prove it? That we’ve made and lost friends, had husbands and lovers, read and cooked, danced all night and cried all day? That we find ourselves now at the height of careers we worked so very hard for, that we are good at things and say much less that is stupid? We’ve found somewhere to put our regrets and the heartbreaks that still hurt. We have stopped calling ourselves crazy and a mess. We have learned to take a compliment. And buy good product, eat excellent food and we know what to wear. “Youth and beauty are not accomplishments,” Carrie Fisher once tweeted. “They are temporary, happy by-products of time and/or DNA.” We have real and actual accomplishments, so should we be sorry that when we really think about it, we wouldn’t go back? No. Only forward, stronger.

MANE FRAME PONYTAIL NOT AS SWINGY AS IT USED TO BE? IT’S NOT JUST YOUR IMAGINATION “Just like any other body tissue, hair does ‘age’ and decline as we do – less hair coming from the scalp, thinner density and less nutrition and hormonal support all contribute,” says trichologist Anthony Pearce. “It’s estimated that the average 80-year-old has about 50 per cent less hair in the growing phase than when she was 15.” Ouch – so why does it happen? Basically, hair has three phases in its growth cycle: the anagen, when it’s growing; the catagen, a transitional phase; and the telogen or resting (which Pearce says is usually around three months long), when it stays dormant then sheds, so a new strand can take over. Over time, the anagen phase progressively gets shorter and the hair growing back is gradually a bit different than what was there before. “Most of that is genetically set, but improving lifestyle choices like diet and fitness can help prevent the process being sped up,” says Pearce. “Iron, vitamin D, iodine, zinc and selenium, in that order, are the most important nutrients for optimal metabolic functioning.” He also suggests a diet high in protein and cruciferous vegies like broccoli and bok choy to stabilise the hormone levels that can affect hair loss.

STOP DRESSING

YOUR AGE

Ageism is (happily) out of style “STYLE IS AN ATTITUDE – NOT A NUMBER.” IF ANYONE SHOULD KNOW, IT’S BRIGITTE WARNE, CO-FOUNDER OF SILVERFOX, A MATURE-AGE MODELLING AGENCY THAT BELIEVES STYLE AND BEAUTY ARE AGELESS. “WE’RE SEEING LOTS OF CHANGES IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY WHEN IT COMES TO AGE. BRANDS ARE REALISING THE IMPACT IT CAN HAVE AT A COMMERCIAL LEVEL BY CORRECTLY ADVERTISING TO THEIR TARGET AUDIENCE.” WARNE’S PASSION FOR FOSTERING A MORE AGE-POSITIVE CULTURE IS PART OF AN ADMITTEDLY SLOW-MOVING GLOBAL MOVEMENT TOWARDS AGE DIVERSITY ON THE RUNWAY. BUT WITH DESIGNERS INCLUDING DRIES VAN NOTEN AND SIMONE ROCHA HIGHLIGHTING THE VERSATILITY OF THEIR DESIGNS BY CASTING MODELS WHO WEAR THEIR LAUGHTER LINES AS WELL AS THEIR NEW-SEASON COATS, THE SHIFT IS GAINING MOMENTUM. “I THINK PEOPLE CAN USE OLDER MODELS AS A GIMMICK OR THEY CAN GENUINELY WANT TO SEE DIVERSITY IN FASHION,” SAYS DESIGNER THOMAS PUTTICK, WHO LAUNCHED HIS FASHION LABEL AT AUSTRALIAN FASHION WEEK THIS YEAR BY ENLISTING 15 “MUSES” AGED 23 TO 63, INCLUDING SILVER-HAIRED SRI LANKAN CREATIVE DIRECTOR NADINE BUSH, WHO IS REPRESENTED BY WARNE. IT’S THE WAY FORWARD FOR PUTTICK, WHO WORKED FOR DESIGN STUDIOS IN LONDON AND NEW YORK FROM AGE 18 BEFORE RETURNING HOME TO RECALIBRATE. “I HAD TO STEP AWAY [FROM FASHION]. I DIDN’T REALLY LIKE WHAT THE INDUSTRY WAS SAYING, SO I COULD EITHER CHANGE INDUSTRIES… OR CHANGE IT FROM THE INSIDE. THERE ARE OTHER PEOPLE WHO WANT TO SEE GROWTH, SO I WANT TO BE A PART OF THAT.” WHILE PUTTICK’S DESIGNS ARE DEFINED BY RESTRAINT, VAN NOTEN’S CELEBRATED VIVID COLOUR AND PRINT AND ROCHA INDULGED IN DARK ROMANCE, PROVING FASHION TRULY HAS NO BOUNDARIES. WE’RE TOSSING AWAY THOSE PRECONCEIVED NOTIONS OF WHAT IS DEEMED APPROPRIATE FOR WOMEN OF A “CERTAIN AGE” AND EMBRACING FASHION FOR WHAT IT’S MEANT TO BE: EMPOWERING, EXPRESSIVE AND, ABOVE ALL, FUN. BECAUSE, AS WARNE SAYS, “STYLE IS A REFLECTION OF YOUR MOOD AND PERSONALITY. IT’S SOMETHING THAT SHOULD MAKE YOU FEEL HAPPY, CONFIDENT AND BE APPEALING TO YOUR OWN EYES.” q

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THE JOY OF

QUITTING Having been told her whole life that leaving is for losers, Alex Holder

gave up her high-flying job

and realised that, actually, it was the most

empowering

thing she had ever done

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I

took inspiration from Zayn Malik on the day he said goodbye to One Direction. I sat with my business partner in the park opposite our office, said the words “I’m leaving” and cried. I was quitting my dream job – or at least, what had once been my dream job. The one I’d gone through eight rounds of interviews to get. I was partner in an amazing advertising agency; one I’d admired for so long. Loads of people wanted that job, I’d got it, and now I was giving it up. And there you have it, my proudest career moment to date: the day I quit. When I’d left the house that morning, I hadn’t known that, by the end of the day, I wouldn’t have a salary or, gulp, an answer to the question, “So, what do you do?” I had to ring my boyfriend and confess, “Er, I quit my job today.” Did I mention our 11-month-old son, our mortgage, my ego? Oh, and by no means were we prepared financially; there was enough money to last six weeks, maybe eight. But when I got into bed that night, I felt an elation that only comes from an act of bravery. I was always taught that quitting was for losers, so throughout my life I’d made sure

I wasn’t one of them. I stayed with the boy I lost my virginity to for seven years. I ran marathons, once with cystitis. If I started a book, I finished it, even when I misguidedly picked up Ulysses. I spent a relentless decade working my way to the top of my career. I was not a quitter. Then, with two words, suddenly I was. What I had mistaken for ambition and conviction was actually fear. I told myself I was happy enough. I had the house, the partner, the baby, the job. This is what adults do, isn’t it? They forsake fun for security. I regarded freelancers, part-timers and anyone who didn’t go into an office every day with jealousy and confusion. I stayed put, not because I loved my job, but because I was too scared to leave.


“I TOLD MYSELF I WAS HAPPY ENOUGH. I HAD I describe how I felt to behavioural psychologist Michael Guttridge, who immediately diagnoses impostor syndrome. “It’s the persistent fear you’ll be exposed as a fraud,” he explains. “Our society’s bias – that women aren’t as competent as men – means more women suffer from it.” His words ring true: I felt I was just getting away with keeping the job I had. I worked ridiculous hours to prove I was good enough; I was that person, the one sending 3am emails. I was scared that quitting would confirm what everyone already knew – that I was useless. In her book The Secret Thoughts Of Successful Women, Dr Valerie Young articulates my thoughts perfectly: “You feel as if you’ve flown under the radar, been lucky or they just like you.” Before quitting my job, I’d hit a real confidence low at work and had sought the help of life coach Tania Keeling. In our first session she said, “Imagine someone is giving a speech about you in 20 years’ time: what do you want them to say?” The speech I conjured talked of my brilliance as a mother and friend, and praised me for my creativity and spirit of adventure – not once was my job in an ad agency mentioned. And that was my first breakthrough: I was putting all my energy into a job that, in the wider context of my life, wasn’t important. Looking back, I ask Guttridge what it was about projecting into the future that gave me such clarity: “By seeing yourself from a distance, it removes the emotion from the situation; it can also help if you imagine a friend in the same position and the advice you would give them.” And actually, my friends and family had tried to tell me my job wasn’t what defined me, and it certainly wasn’t worth the stress it brought to my life. Gradually, I began to realise that quitting wasn’t failing. It would mean I believed in myself. “It’s about making choices and not sleepwalking through life,” says Guttridge. “It’s checking in with yourself and asking, ‘Do I really enjoy this?’ and ‘Is this what I want?’ Life is too short to plod through years in a job or a relationship that’s so-so.” At one point he shouts, “Wake up! Live!

Don’t spend your life on THE HOUSE, THE autopilot!” I get it; I too want PARTNER, THE everyone to understand the power of quitting. BABY, THE JOB. Remember when Miranda THIS IS WHAT in Sex And The City struck upon the wisdom of “He’s ADULTS DO – just not that into you” and couldn’t help telling FORSAKE FUN strangers in the street? I’m FOR SECURITY. Miranda on a mission and can’t stop talking about how I STAYED PUT, good it felt to quit. It’s not that I want everyone to NOT BECAUSE quit; I just want them to know they can. Even I LOVED MY JOB, Guttridge advises against BUT BECAUSE quitting too many things at once. “Change is hard, so I WAS SCARED don’t quit your job, your TO LEAVE” relationship and move house all at once,” he says. “Pick your battle – ask yourself what would make the biggest difference to your life right now.” Feminist icon Gloria Steinem got it right when she said, “I got rid of the myth that we’re supposed to grow up and settle down – [that] those two things go together.” Ever the pioneer, her realisation follows an experience in the ’50s, when she found herself engaged to a man she didn’t want to spend the rest of her life with, then pregnant with his child. She ended the engagement, had an abortion, went travelling to India and became the heralded political activist we know now. That was some serious quitting! But if anyone can break Guttridge’s rule of not ending everything at once, it’s Steinem. At a time when many women were giving up autonomy over their lives, she took control of hers and inspired a generation. I still regret not quitting my childhood sweetheart earlier. I stayed with him from my 16th birthday until the age of 22 because I hadn’t worked out that, sometimes, for all the right reasons, relationships end. We met in our local club, where he bought me a shot, paid for in 20-cent pieces. I was completely charmed. Fast-forward four years: we had opposing political views, our sex life had ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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Photography: Getty Images

plateaued, but still we plodded along. I stayed with him throughout university, when I was meant to be open-minded and free, and I still think about the boys (and girls) I didn’t sleep with. When I finally found a way to end it, after years of knowing I should get out but not having the guts to, I resolved to act more quickly the next time my life felt stale. Accepting I’m not trapped has made my relationships since then stronger. I’m not afraid of committing, as I know I can always leave, whether it’s a joint mortgage or a boring film at the cinema – in fact, I’ve waltzed out of both in recent years. Admitting we’ve made a bad decision can be tough. My friend Amelia found this out the hard way after meeting an Icelandic girl on Tinder, falling in love and, after a seven-month longdistance relationship, moving to Reykjavik. “I put it on Facebook: ‘I’m moving to Iceland to pursue my dream of being cold – let me know if you know anyone there!’ But only two weeks later, I realised I couldn’t stay in Iceland; the relationship wasn’t strong enough for me to build a life in a new country. I quit everything again and was back. Quitting the dream after only two weeks was harder than when I left “ACCEPTING I’M my whole life to go.” NOT TRAPPED Emigrating is socially acceptable quitting, HAS MADE MY but coming back? That feels shameful. The RELATIONSHIPS conversation is always STRONGER. I’M about what must have gone wrong, not the new NOT AFRAID OF thing you tried. Amelia continues, “There was my COMMITTING, panic at coming back to AS I KNOW no job and no house, but the real panic, the one I CAN LEAVE” I was most consumed by, was the Facebook status – I’d told everyone!” I asked Amelia if she regretted going, whether the upheaval and (short-lived) embarrassment of quitting twice had been worth it? “Of course I’m glad I went, or I’d always wonder what could have been.” Bronnie Ware, a palliative care nurse, revealed in her book The Top Five Regrets Of The Dying that

HOW TO the most common was: SUCCEED “I wish I’d had the courage AT to live a life true to myself, QUITTING not the life others expected of me.” Ware urges, “Life BE REALISTIC, PLAN is a choice... Choose AND PRIORITISE consciously, choose wisely, Don’t quit everything at once. Start small and choose honestly.” I put this think, “Do I want to be to Keeling, my life coach, doing this next year?” who agrees. “Work out If the answer is no, work out what you need to what’s important to you do between now and and make sure you honour then to get out. that in your life. So many of BE SELFISH. IT’S my clients are women in YOUR LIFE their thirties who are doing Project yourself into the what they think they should future and think about the person you want to be in 10 be doing – working hard, years. Is what you’re doing keeping the partner, having now going to get you the baby – rather than there? If not, quit! living the life they want.” DO WHAT MAKES It’s true; I think about YOU HAPPY Not what others expect you Guttridge shouting: “Wake to do. Don’t spend years in up, live!” So many of my limbo. Be decisive. friends plod through life until a wake-up call like the death of a parent, being made redundant or having a baby shakes them to question what they really want out of life. It’s ironic we often need to experience this kind of loss of control to realise the control we actually have. It’s been seven months since I quit my job, and I genuinely haven’t looked back. My current role is a maternity cover, which is just the right mix of commitment and freedom. I’m planning on moving to Bali... India... doing a Masters... wherever my daydreaming that afternoon takes me. I like not knowing what I’ll be doing in six months’ time, although, admittedly, I do occasionally find myself wide-eyed at 3.30am with chest palpitations thinking about the mortgage. Oh, also, it wasn’t that difficult to find a job I truly love. Take that, impostor syndrome! I’m a different person now. As with all good break-ups, I had a drastic haircut afterwards. I know I’ll never suffer boring again. Because, hey, you can always quit. I’m now the queen of ghosting at parties and refuse to feel guilty about it – no-one wants a bored guest. If a book doesn’t have me in the first 50 pages, I no longer suffer through the next 200. My advice to any wannabe quitter would be this: listen to your gut, not your head. It doesn’t matter what you “should” be doing in life – if it doesn’t feel right, lean out. Don’t plod. Live! q


Does your workspace make you feel good inside?

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A. Kirby Bookshelf $129 JBKIRBYBKS B. J.Burrows A4 2 D-Ring 25mm Gloss Binders $3.57ea. JBGLSRBWE C. Collapsible Cardboard Magazine Files $6ea. CLPMAGKR D. HP DeskJet Wireless Inkjet MFC 3632 $35.78 HPDJ3632 E. J.Burrows A4 2-Ring Gloss Lever Arch Files $3.98ea. JBGLSLAWE F. Otto A4 Criss Cross Boxes $13.95ea. OTA4BOXST G. Otto Criss Cross 4-High Storage Drawers $24.95 OT4DRAWAQ H. Radar Plus Mesh-Back Chair $249 PARADPHBBK I. HP 25" IPS Monitor $299 HPT3M84AA J. Seagate 5TB Expansion Desktop Hard Drive $199 SGEX5ØØØDE K. Otto Criss Cross Pen Cup $7.95 OTPENCUPAQ L. Venturo 3 Drawer Pedestal $149 OTVEN3DWE M. Matrix Gas Lift Desk $379 JBMAGL15OA N. Otto Criss Cross Document Tray $11.95 OTDOCTAQ O. Professional Sit Stand Stool $199 JBPROFSSBK Printed for 24/07/2017. Furniture on this page comes flat-packed, ready to assemble. Display accessories not included. Colours may vary by store. Ø Where you see this symbol, it represents a zero.

OWO2549_ELLE


THE DENIM STORY

Model, singer and actress Lou Doillon on her lifelong love-hate relationship with denim

I

remember swearing to myself as a little girl that I would never wear jeans. Growing up in the ’80s, everyone was in Levi’s 501s. It was the same cut for men and women, worn with Converse, and I used to think it was the worst combination possible. I feel differently about denim now, of course. I was born in September 1982, and at that time my mother [actress Jane Birkin], my father [director Jacques Doillon] and three of my sisters – Kate Barry, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lola Doillon – were all wearing jeans. It was all they ever wore, with a white T-shirt or a denim jacket. I must have believed that jeans were a uniform. When my mum gave birth to me, she’d run away to a very bourgeois part of Paris, the 16th arrondissement, which is extremely boring. She’d left Serge [Gainsbourg] for my dad so, to hide from the press and madness of it, they bought a house in this horrible area where everyone wore two-piece Chanel suits with dreadful heeled ballet pumps and tights. My mum stood out because she was absolutely androgynous, which today is the norm but, back in the ’80s, it certainly wasn’t. I hated her for it. Jeans were a family trademark, and I wanted to rebel against them. When I was a teenager, I had dreadlocks and piercings. I used to walk around Paris barefoot, with my flared jeans dragging along the ground, reading William Blake aloud. People were horrified. It was great; at least they weren’t saying,

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Photography: Getty Images; Instagram: @loudoillon

“Look, it’s Jane Birkin’s daughter.” Most “kids of” are just “kids of”, so I created a kind of look that was the best way of getting out of the “chic” character impressed upon me, which I wasn’t. I was weird and tall and crooked and loud, so I had to own it one way or another. HIGH NOTE I can’t say I’ve learned any lessons from my mum when it comes to denim, or Doillon rocks double denim even style in general. She has no fashion sense whatsoever – that’s why she can be a fashion icon. I remember having a conversation with Kate Moss about it. What most people don’t get today is that everybody is so bloody self-conscious and they’re all trying so hard – 99 per cent of Instagram photos are of people trying to resemble women like my mother, but she had no clue about either her beauty or her sense of fun. She literally wore whatever was around. At the time, my mother had three kids, she was performing nearly every night, drove her own car, barely had a nanny, and needed to wear something practical. I’ve never seen her in heels because she’s always late and needs to run. There’s a wonderful photo of me, my mother, Kate and Charlotte, in which we’re all wearing jeans, taken by the famous French photographer Jeanloup Sieff shortly before he died in 2000. I was about 14 and had started liking jeans again. I used to buy them from thrift stores and tear them up the side to add a flare, an old technique my mum taught me. Last time I was going through her old things, I found this horrendous pair with a huge heart patch on the ass that she’d made It’s funny, despite being French, until a few years ago, I’d never made the connection that “denim” derives from in the ’70s. I’ve got another pair of my mum’s Nîmes – “de Nîmes”, as in the French city where it originally from the ’80s, which I seldom wear but love came from. There’s something beautiful about the story of having around. They’re very “of the decade”: this crazy fabric you can really, really have fun with – and high-waisted and short on the leg. People wore now you have Vetements, a brand that does crazy pieces of them so high, it made the most insane bum. denim. And then on the other hand, you have J Brand, I don’t customise my jeans anymore, which is a company I now work with as a collaborator and model, a shame. I used to do it a lot. It’s the real sadness of whose jeans are so classy and chic. comfort and wealth: now that I have a dressing For me, denim is a form of protection. When I’m on tour room, I’ve lost a lot of my sense of style. I always with my band, I take one pair of black jeans and one blue tell kids: you’ve got it all when you haven’t got pair. They’re like a second skin; it’s why a lot of musicians much because you have to get your brain going. wear them with a T-shirt. It’s a kind of code: you want The more books you have, the fewer you read. The people to forget the look and just listen to the music. more clothes you own, the fewer you wear. As a kid, I hated wearing denim dungarees, but now, when I remember my father wearing the same jeans I see pictures, I think they’re so lovely. I even forced my son for months. We would tell him to wash them but Marlowe [now 15] to wear them when he was small. They’re he’d say no. That’s the whole point of jeans; they like Marmite: people love them or hate them. The drummer in were made with a double grid of thread and were my band has a pair and I love when he wears them, but the extremely resistant. I also recall him telling me rest of our group takes the piss out of him. I guess it makes me that, when he was younger, he’d worked for two think of children, and I love the practicality of them. years to be able to afford a pair of jeans. I own around 10 pairs of jeans, but I wear the same three until they crack, or that terrible moment when the zip doesn’t work anymore. Whether we feel good in a pair of jeans is extremely personal; it’s hard to find a lovely pair that fits you perfectly. In fashion, we’re always going back to something, and right now we’re going back to the ’80s, which was the era of denim. It was a uniform that went through every age, every country, every social strata. It was the first democratic style: men, women, kids, even my grandmother had a pair of jeans. There’s a beautiful message behind that, and I think that’s what we’re craving right now. q

“DENIM WENT THROUGH EVERY AGE, EVERY COUNTRY, EVERY SOCIAL STRATA. IT WAS THE FIRST DEMOCRATIC STYLE”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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PERSONAL DAY by Catherine Lacey

I

woke on my personal day feeling impersonal. I’d slept long and late, so much I barely recognised the time of day in my bedroom, dust made obvious in the hard light, no job or appointment or interview to rush toward. I needed nothing and was needed nowhere. I almost doubted I was alive. In fists I fingernailed my palms, to make sure I was still in there. Hands

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above eyes, I watched the skin flush and release the dimples. I walked to that restaurant in my neighbourhood where a bare piece of toast cost $7 and came with a marble of hand-churned butter and salt from a far-off sea. It had been years since I’d been there, a place I went with Paul, back when I spent money as if we had everything I’d ever need, as if


I were debtless and immortal. The walls were painted this frosty, pale green and the silverware and china felt like art in the mouth. They served omelettes stingy with filling and magnificently complicated fruits – soaked mulberries, candied lemon, papaya crescents, cubes of heirloom melon, a black grape sliced into a bloom. A little dish of it cost $16 to account for carbon offsets and living wages, which made it more than organic, they said – this fruit salad was ethical. People swore it was the only place in New York where the produce tasted as good as it did in California. Tourists would approach the windows, look in at this diorama of people in expensive clothes, then move on. Before I lived here the only place I’d ever heard of in New York was the Metropolitan Museum because it was in so many captions in one of my history books. I went there every free day or afternoon I had my freshman year, until I’d been in each room, looked at every piece. I was methodical, reading all the cards, taking notes. Once a security guard asked me if I was a student and I said I was and he said to study hard and I said I would and I turned a corner, sat down and wept quietly for five minutes. I wasn’t entirely sure why. I became accustomed to these unexplainable moments, emotional things. It was just a part of living in the world, I told myself, of not having an obvious god. Maybe spending so much time at the Met had something to do with why the city also seemed like an exhibit, or maybe that’s just what Manhattan is – a bunch of shrines and re-enactments. I’d overhear conversations about what this building used to be or who used to live in that place or what it was before it was whatever it was. (It always used to be something better.) Restaurants listed the origin and history of every ingredient they served, archaeology of a salad, a stew. And the people, the characters in the streets, they were always so arranged, layered with clues about who they were and where they were in their history. Leather purses carried

hieroglyphic messages about the carrier’s taste and socioeconomic status. The young wore their tribes overtly, with messages on T-shirts, brands or bands. The rich looked out their cab windows the way painted eyes looked out of a frame. I ordered $47 of breakfast with a whole pot of tea because I was going to spend as much of my personal day right here, trying to re-enact my history, pretend Paul was here, pretend I was younger and in less debt and in less trouble. Maybe I somehow knew it would be one of the last calm days before the GX began – that I needed to spend a little time looking back before I could go forward. I thought of Ed hearing the word June and Ephesians 6:4 and seeing the man with the red hat standing so strangely in my future. I took a heavy sip of tea, tried to scald these thoughts out of my head. I watched the people eating or barely eating, eavesdropping on them as Paul and I used to – that her spring collection was horrendous, embarrassing, and someone else was just going to outsource the whole thing or that he didn’t fucking believe this guy wasn’t checking his phone – but my attention kept drifting back to Ed’s predictions, premonitions. How had he heard these things? Where had they come from? I had once been sure there was almost no difference between hearing a voice and hearing your own desire to hear a voice, that we make what we want, but this didn’t explain Ed, the window he seemed to have on me. “June, June, I keep hearing June like someone is calling that name.” Ed was always looking at me with this expression of curiosity mixed with concern, an expression similar to the way that Paul had looked at me, as if I were a puzzle he was waiting to comprehend. And how sad it is that the last face someone makes at you is always the face you remember the most. Some days I felt haunted by Paul’s last face. I’d seen it after we had taken a couple of weeks off – his term – which meant that during the time we would have been together, we stayed alone in our respective ]

“I ordered $47 of breakfast with a whole pot of tea because I was going to spend as much of my day here, trying to re-enact my history, pretend I was in less trouble”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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apartments, doing nothing in particular, because being alone had somehow become more compelling to us than being together. How sad our respective nothings had seemed at first, the cool absence in a bed, the dinners with a book. Then, even sadder, those nothings became preferable. The simplicity of being alone won out over the complexity of being together. And that last day – a July afternoon, immovable heat – we sat on a park bench and watched a pack of kids shooting each other with water guns, fighting with cool relief. They screamed at and with each other, dizzied themselves with pleasurable aggression, but I felt no aggression and no pleasure. Paul asked me why I wouldn’t open up to him, why I was always so cagey, said he couldn’t help me if I wouldn’t let him, and I said, “Why do I need the help?” And he said that wasn’t what he meant but I said, “It’s what you said, that I need help, and who are you to tell me what I need, to think you’re so necessary?” I was spitting these words at him, but I did not recognise my own ferocity, so I stamped it out like embers. It seems to me that we can be the angriest with those we love most – what a curse, what a trick. We sat there in silence for a while until he said, so softly, “That’s not what I meant.” It seemed we were always saying things we didn’t quite mean. I said, “I used to miss you when you were out of town, but now I have that feeling when I look at you, when you’re right here.” This was true. I did mean this. He said something about how hard that was to hear or how it hurt or maybe he didn’t say anything and I saw that hard hurt in his eyes, that it came out wordlessly. What had started all this time off was the morning I’d woken in his apartment, got dressed, splashed cold water on my face, brushed my teeth and hesitated before putting the toothbrush back in the cup beside his. I held still for a moment, then slipped the toothbrush into my pocket, then the cheap moisturiser I’d left in the medicine cabinet, the bobby pins that were collecting rust on a metal shelf, the

black hair elastics circling nothing. I went to the living room, found the few books that I’d finished and abandoned months ago, put them in a paper grocery bag, put the bathroom things in there, too. I took the scarf that had lingered since the snowy spring and wrapped it around the good knife I’d brought over to make dinner with because all his were dull and cheap. I went back to his bedroom and noticed he’d rolled over but his eyes were still closed. I removed the few clothes I had in his closet, the underwear, the extra bra, the dress, the other dress. I was shaking. I was afraid I might cry or vomit, that I would wake him. Why did this feel so large? All I was doing was taking what was mine and getting away from him, but I felt somehow as if I were killing someone, myself or him or us. I didn’t know. I looked at his face in the pale dawn, sleeping or just still, and I let myself completely feel the pain of missing a person who no longer exists. Not missing a person who has died, not mourning (I had yet to feel actual grief), but the strain of trying to see the person I’d fallen in love with inside the person he had become. Now I know this just comes with love, that there’s no way to avoid seeing a person gradually erased or warped by time, but the first time I realised this with Paul – it felt apocryphal. But what had really happened? It was still unclear. Was it possible nothing of any significance had ever happened between us and our ending was just the sad process of realising this? It was too sad to believe that we had just been two people staving off loneliness together. Perhaps I had just ruined it by reading Barthes at the wrong time. (A Lover’s Discourse, Chandra said, was relationship poison.) But no – I had to trust my memory of those easy early days, when words passed between us like water, when we were always quick to laugh, when we had held each other as if we were part of the same body, built to be like this. It seemed, on nights like those, that a whole lifetime of such feelings could be right there, ready to be taken. Hadn’t I woken up

“I said, ‘I used to miss you when you were out of town, but now I have that feeling when I look at you, when you’re right here’”

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some mornings so sure that all my life must have been leading up to this for a reason? And what had happened to those easy days and what had happened to our laughter and what had happened to us? Suddenly, it seemed, they’d been replaced with copies of those people, then copies of those copies, blurry and blurrier still. Losing Paul to time was far from the worst thing to happen to me, but the feeling doesn’t always match the loss. Sometimes the bigger ones are easier to take, like ocean waves. Smaller, human losses, the ones that carry a sense of fault, a choice, a wrong turn – they haunt, fuse in you, become impossible to remove. The night before I left Paul’s apartment with all my things we’d gone to a party at his friend’s house, and when he talked to other people, I noticed how his face seemed to go backward in time, how his eyes lit up when we spoke to anyone new and how he smiled in a way that he never smiled at me anymore. And how sad and stupid it was that I believed it would always be that way, that our love wouldn’t dissolve into the ordinary. Believing in exemptions, maybe everyone has to make this mistake once. I wished that seeing Paul talk to new people at the party that night hadn’t hurt as much as it had. I barely managed to do the small talk – the what-do-you-do, the where-are-youfrom, the what-neighbourhood, the what-college, the despair of trying to explain oneself. I deflected questions about where I’d been raised. I answered the terrible, terrible question about how Paul and I had met – at a party, at a party like this one – but internally I was obstinate and childish and furious, so furious over not being back there at that time when I met Paul, the original Paul, when all my life had a happy, drugged feeling in it. I had nothing to say to these strangers, whoever or whatever they were. You know, it was so stupid. Of course people become accustomed to each other. Of course you don’t put on your first-impression face when

impressing yourself on someone for the 900th time. What a child I am. “I miss you to your face,” I said to Paul, too quietly, as we were walking back to his apartment after that party, not looking at each other, just hand in hand, walking. “You missed what?” And I said, “No.” And he said, “What?” And I said, “Nothing, never mind.” In the months and years since Paul, I began seeing his features in other people. Someone would walk by with a shoulder span like his or his eyes or his jaw. There’s Paul’s jaw, I’d think. Here it comes. There it is. There it went. That was Paul’s jaw. Several months after I had last seen him it seemed that every third man in the city had Paul’s haircut or glasses, and on a crowded subway car one morning I was surrounded by memory and suddenly incensed. This is mine, I thought senselessly, helplessly. This is my men’s haircut and my glasses on all these strangers’ heads, all those people going places I didn’t know. When my stop came, I faked lateness and ran. So I killed an hour of my personal day in that cafe, with all this nostalgia, which I suppose is what I wanted, was the reason I’d gone there, to borrow the past. Leafy tea dregs were cool in the pot. I paid my check, tipped extravagantly, not because I felt generous or wealthy, but because I wanted to pretend to be. Spending money was a luxury in itself. Having it. Giving it away. As I was leaving, I saw a woman who, in profile, looked so much like my mother everything in my body told me to sprint, every organ jolting. She was long limbed and underfed, 60 or so, holding a spoon to smack the shell of a boiled egg cradled in a red cup. As I pulled open the glass door, we caught eyes through the frame, though she likely felt nothing, oblivious of ]

“When he talked to other people, I noticed how his eyes lit up and how he smiled in a way that he never smiled at me anymore”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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how we, two women who were strangers to each other, echoed two women who were estranged from each other. She struck her $11 egg, scooped the white, and dipped toast points in the molten yellow, thinking nothing of it as I drifted into the city’s ever-moving bodies. But the image of her face turned my stomach in on itself – or perhaps it was all the caffeine and cream, or perhaps I hadn’t been healthy enough to stomach real food. I turned a corner and let out my expensive breakfast churned with acid against a building and sidewalk. I leaned into the wall, held back my own hair, stared at the errant beads of vomit on my shoes. I tried to contain myself, to ignore and be ignored in the street. It was what we did here, one of the urban agreements I’d observed, learned, upheld. A hand offered me a tissue and disappeared before I could see where it had come from. How utterly isolated we were and still never alone. As a child I felt lonely but knew He was always up or out there. Then, as a woman in this city, I spent all my public time in a sacred privacy, though sometimes when my eyes briefly darted over a stranger’s eyes I felt a silent flash, a visit from the god in other people. I spat up the last bit of acrid vomit and felt a fresh push of sweat cool my head. Three decades had turned me into a woman, but girlhood memories still sat in me, steering – I could almost hear the pot rattling on the stove, so many years ago, steam illuminated in a diagonal of afternoon sun.

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Mother asked, “How long do you let it boil?” I must have been 10, if that, eight or nine or 10. I didn’t know what she was talking about, only that it wasn’t right for her to not know something like that, for her to ask me how to do something in the kitchen. “Do you let it sit for... How long is it?” I was silent for a moment, the most uncomfortable nothing I’d ever known, though it may have only been two seconds. The way children stretch time and the way adults forget that stretch could be one of the saddest differences in the world. “To boil an egg?” I asked her. “I’m forgetting everything these days.” Her eyes went red and glassy. “You’re such a good help around the house. God blessed me with you as my daughter.” She pulled me into her body so I couldn’t see her face. “Thank God. Praise God,” she said, soft and low. She clenched me and it hurt but I was silent. Affection didn’t come with this sort of intensity in the cabin, so I gave her the privacy of her feeling. A couple of days before this I had woken in the middle of the night to the sound of the kitchen table skidding across the floor. Then the silence kept me awake – so still – not even crickets or the night wind or the grandfather clock ticking outside my bedroom. Where did the crickets go, that wind, that clock? I heard my parents’ voices and mother weeping. In the morning it was clear that something had happened that should not have happened. Too many things were wrong.


The stove was cold. She wasn’t there. Wet chicory grounds were spilled in the sink. Even the light seemed strange, as if part of the sky had gone missing. Merle was sitting at the kitchen table but he was elsewhere, praying or otherwise lost. He didn’t open his eyes when I came into the room. An unconscious frown. Hair askew, shirt cuffs undone, flayed open like animal skin, and when he opened his eyes, I could see the dark fear in them. No child understands how well she knows her parents’ faces, how much they tell her without speaking; that language is writ so deep she could never back away from herself far enough to see it, but she always feels it. It registers in there. I didn’t ask where Mother was and reacted not at all when she came back as if she’d just been in the garden. I can’t remember if she was gone for a whole day or overnight – all I remember clearly was that afternoon she couldn’t remember how to boil an egg and how hard she held me, as if I were about to float away. (I suppose I was. I suppose she knew.) When I saw those dark bruises on her arms, they explained it, though the bruises weren’t the worst of it. It was that she’d been moved by an instinct deeper than deference that made her leaving and coming back terrible. She’d been moved by something embarrassingly deeper than the sanctity of marriage or her husband’s authority or her fear of God. Now years have gone and that old idea of God has gone and I’ve also left, left my family, my name, the whole simple way I could have let my life pass. I keep wondering what, in me, might be constant. I catch myself looking for that remainder, retracing my steps as if in search of lost keys. I am always wondering if there’s something holy between people, a formless thing, something that can’t be bruised. “Your mother is forgetting everything,” she said, watching the water roil and ripple. “I can’t seem to keep my head straight.” She was shaking. It wasn’t cold. She held the side of my face to her chest and I watched the dust move in the sunlight the way tadpoles move in a creek and years later, in a biology

class, a professor told us about a recent study on foetal cells, how some cells from a child in utero seep into the mother’s body and remain decades after a birth – even from aborted children or stillborns or children who grow up and go away. But the study was inconclusive. The researchers weren’t sure if those children cells helped or hurt the mother or if they had some effect that wasn’t particularly helpful or hurtful. Some scientists discovered that these children cells collected around illnesses and tumours, but they couldn’t quite tell what they were doing there, if they served any real function. It just wasn’t clear. Still, I wondered whether any of my cells were in that bruise and what they might have done in there. Was there anything left of me in my mother? What order, what rules, were there in the world, a body? And why did I still hope for answers that I knew weren’t coming? It could have just been a craving for the kind of certainty I’d been born into – having a user’s manual for life and an unmovable, divine love. But maybe I really did sense something vague and holy in others’ eyes, something sacred in crowds, in a bus of people staring out their windows, watching life. There should be a middle ground between believing in a certain god and believing that some mysterious third substance was between people. Like churches, I thought, there should be a place for people who just weren’t sure. There should be a place for people who see something but won’t dare say what it is. Maybe there’s something, something between people that is more than air and empty space, something holy in that nothing between one face and another. Sometimes it seems all I have are questions, that I will ask the same ones all my life. I’m not sure if I even want any answers, don’t think I’d have a use for them, but I do know I’d give anything to be another person – anyone else – for even just a day, an hour. There’s something about that distance I’d do anything to cross. q This is an edited extract from The Answers by Catherine Lacey ($27.99, Granta), on sale now

Photography: Getty Images

“A hand offered me a tissue and disappeared before I could see where it had come from. How utterly isolated we were and still never alone”

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Photography: Rob Shaw (still-life)

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STAND

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Coat, $1,500, Joseph, joseph-fashion.com; cardigan, $2,749, skirt, $2,199, both Ralph Lauren Collection, (03) 9654 0374; bodysuit, $205, Falke, falke.com; cap, $1,200, Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

LOOK SHARP MAKE IT

Photography: Aitken Jolly at Serlin Associates. Styling: Anne-Marie Curtis. Hair: Philippe Tholimet at Saint Luke. Makeup: Andrew Gallimore at CLM. Manicure: Adam Slee at Streeters. Model: Pauline Hoarau at Elite Paris. Fashion editor: Charlotte Deffe

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FASHION

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TOWN & COUNTRY From bold and modern to intricate and old-worldly, pre-fall’s hero pieces prove

opposites attract /

Photographs by Aitken Jolly Styling by Anne-Marie Curtis

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Cape, $5,050, top, $1,070, boots (worn throughout), $2,300, all Louis Vuitton, au.louisvuitton.com; skirt, $POA, Saint Laurent, ysl.com; sunglasses, $630, Fakbyfak, shopbyfak.com; earrings, model’s own (worn throughout) Opposite page: coat, $2,970, shirt, $1,110, skirt, $1,280, all Bottega Veneta, (02) 9239 0188; bodysuit, $205, Falke, falke.com; hat, $35, silk hat cover, $38, both Treehouse Sporting Colours, treehouseonline.co.uk (both worn throughout)

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Cape, $5,000, dress, $6,800, boots, $2,050, cap (worn throughout), $1,200, all Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600; tights, $79, Wolford, wolfordmelbourne.com Opposite page: leather top, $2,350, skirt, $3,800, bag, $4,050, all CĂŠline, (03) 9530 4300; long-sleeve top, $365, Wolford, wolfordmelbourne.com

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Coat, $7,800, Giorgio Armani, (02) 8233 5888; pants, $716, AWAKE, net-a-porter.com; shoes, $1,168, Laurence Dacade, laurence-dacade.com; sunglasses, $320, Kaleos Eyehunters, George Skoufis Optometrists, (02) 9360 7487 Opposite page: coat, $4,940, Prada, (02) 9223 1688; bodysuit, $205, Falke, falke.com; boots, $2,300, Louis Vuitton, au.louisvuitton.com; cap, $POA, Fendi, fendi.com/au

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Jumper, $1,260, skirt, $1,720, both Miu Miu, (02) 9223 1688 Opposite page: jacket, $POA, dress, $POA, both Gucci, gucci.com/au; drop earrings, $370 each, Delfina Delettrez, delfinadelettrez.com

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Coat, $6,500, bag, $2,850, both Fendi, fendi.com/au; bodysuit, $395, Wolford, wolfordmelbourne.com (worn throughout); sunglasses, $300, Illesteva, illesteva.com Opposite page: coat, $16,660, Chanel, 1300 242 635 Photography: Aitken Jolly at Serlin Associates. Hair: Philippe Tholimet at Saint Luke. Makeup: Andrew Gallimore at CLM. Manicure: Adam Slee at Streeters. Model: Pauline Hoarau at Elite Paris. Fashion editor: Charlotte Deffe

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CLEAN SLATE

Layers of white make

a statement thanks to crisp fabrications and deconstructed shapes. This is the fresh start your wardrobe needs / Photographs by Georges Antoni Styling by Rachel Wayman

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Jacket, $349, pants, $349, both Natalija, natalijathelabel.com.au; loafers, $1,015, Tod’s, (02) 8203 0901 (worn throughout); earrings, all model’s own (worn throughout); necklace, $8,600, Tiffany & Co, tiffany.com.au Opposite page: coat, $3,695, Burberry, au.burberry.com; shirt, $800, Tome, tomenyc.com; pants, $320, Bassike, bassike.com; earrings, $69, COS, cosstores.com (worn throughout)

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Dress, $870, Ellery, ellery.com; ring, $375, Lucy Folk, lucyfolk.com Opposite page: top, $880, Ellery, ellery.com; dress, $260, Bec & Bridge, becandbridge. com.au; pants, $490, Sass & Bide, sassandbide.com; hoop earrings, $139, Reliquia, reliquiajewellery.com (worn throughout); bag, $295, Oroton, oroton.com.au

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Dress, $239, Kowtow, kowtowclothing.com; belt (tied around waist), $1,465 (part of dress), Tome, tomenyc.com; pants, $349, Polo Ralph Lauren, (02) 9410 2038; bangle, $485, Dinosaur Designs, dinosaurdesigns.com.au Opposite page: coat, $799, top, $229, both Lacoste Runway, lacoste.com.au; pants, $115, COS, cosstores.com; earrings, $450, Holly Ryan, hollyryan.com.au

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Knotted top, $119, Hansen & Gretel, hansenandgretel.com; shirt, $220, Life With Bird, lifewithbird.com; pants, $140, Nice Martin, nicemartin.com; earrings, $130, Reliquia, reliquiajewellery.com; bangle, $336, Dinosaur Designs, dinosaurdesigns.com.au Opposite page: top, $249, dress, $299, both Morrison, morrisonshop.com; bag, $6,265, Hermès, (02) 9287 3200

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Jacket, $599, Polo Ralph Lauren, (02) 9410 2038; shirt, $425, White Story, whitestory.com.au; culottes, $520, Max Mara, maxmara.com; earrings, $130, Elvis Et Moi, elvisetmoi.com Opposite page: shirt, $695, Zimmermann, zimmermannwear. com; shirt (tied around waist), $495, Christopher Esber, christopheresber.com.au Photography: Georges Antoni at The Artist Group. Hair: Daren Borthwick at The Artist Group. Makeup: Noni Smith at The Artist Group. Model: Rosie Tupper at IMG

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Shirt, $220, Life With Bird, lifewithbird.com

Top, $390, Ba&sh, (03) 9420 1500

Earrings, $280, Louise Olsen For Dinosaur Designs, dinosaurdesigns.com.au

Sunglasses, $200, Epøkhe, epokhe.co

WHITE NIGHT When paired with architectural gold earrings, all-white waltzes into eveningwear.

CHECKLIST

High-street buys inspired by this issue’s fashion shoots Earrings, $69, COS, cosstores.com

Dress, $82, Asos, asos.com/au

JUST LIKE HEAVEN

Skirt, $249, Morrison, morrisonshop.com

THIS SEASON’S VOLUMINOUS RUFFLES, TROUSERS AND SLEEVES ARE ALL THE M O R E A N G E L I C I N H E A D -T O -T O E S H A D E S O F   F R E S H W H I T E A N D C R E A M Y VA N I L L A .

TOP OF THE CROPS The Going Out Top is updated in a crisp palette. Pair with wide-leg trousers and reveal a sliver of midriff. Top, $45, H&M, hm.com/au

Dress, $198, Paddo To Palmy, paddotopalmy. com.au Jeans, $99.95, Seed, seedheritage.com

Top, $279, Morrison, morrisonshop. com

Top, $199, Fame And Partners, fameandpartners. com.au Shirt, $79.95, The Fifth Label, thefifthlabel.com

Pants, $120, Seed, seedheritage.com

Top, $55, H&M, hm.com/au

Bag, $39.95, Missguided, missguidedau.com

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Dress, $220, Oskar, oskarthelabel.com

Brogues, $225, Zomp, zomp. com.au

Words: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Georges Antoni at The Artist Group; Aitken Jolly at Serlin Associates; Pablo Martin (still-life). Styling: Samantha Wong

Skirt, $179, Hansen & Gretel, hansenandgretel.com


Jacket, $129, Asos, asos.com/au

NEXT BIG THING E M B R AC E TH E N E W

Skirt, $189, Hansen & Gretel, hansenandgretel.com

S E A S O N I N WA R M , SUNNY TONES AND ’70S -ST YLE STRUCTURE. HOW

WINE AND DINE Tones of sauv blanc and pinot noir make for the perfect blend (get it?). Keep it fresh by layering over a white rollneck.

TO BRING THE LOOK INTO 2017? WITH POPS OF WHITE AND PLENTY OF O N -T R E N D P L A I D .

Top, $280, Life With Bird, lifewithbird.com

Boots, $215, 2 Baia Vista, zomp.com.au

Pants, $170, C/meo Collective, cmeocollective.com

Pants, $260, Cue, cue.cc Skirt, $341, Eugénie, eugeniestore.com

Pants, $45, H&M, hm.com/au

Jacket, $500, By Johnny, byjohnny.com.au

Coat, $499, RM Williams, rmwilliams.com.au

Skirt, $225, Karen Millen, karenmillen.com.au

Jacket, $109, Asos, asos.com/au Pants, $219, Veronika Maine, veronikamaine.com.au

Boots, $70, Boohoo, au.boohoo.com Coat, $140, H&M, hm.com/au

Top, $45, H&M, hm.com/au

Skirt, $49.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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from

Lara

WITH LOVE

Model, mogul, mother and wife: Lara Worthington has crammed a lot into her 30 years. As she lies in the languid shadows of Christian Dior’s Château de la Colle Noire, she reflects on her milestone birthday, in her own words / Photographs by Darren McDonald Styling by Rachel Wayman

Dress, $495, Aje, a-j-e.com.au (worn throughout); boots, $1,300, Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600 (worn throughout); rings, Lara’s own (worn throughout)

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A spritz befitting a French villa and rolling green hills will keep you feeling fresh all spring. Try Miss Dior EDP, $240 for 100ml, Dior, (02) 9295 9059

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For bigger, better brows, swipe on a formula that gives colour and control. Try DiorShow Bold Brow, $44, Dior, (02) 9295 9059

I spent my recent 30th birthday at the Blue Lagoon in Iceland. It was a surprise trip – Sam [Worthington, Lara’s husband] had arranged for my mum to look after the kids. I’ve wanted to do the spa experience there for a long time so it was super sweet of him. From there we did four cities in four days, going to four concerts. We flew to Ireland and saw Radiohead, to Brussels the next morning for Coldplay, and then to London where he took me to Royal Ascot – because he knows I like getting dressed up – and Ed Sheeran that night. The last concert was U2 in Toronto. At the end of each day I would get a T-shirt revealing the band I was seeing the next night. It was crazy but so much fun. It took him six months to organise. No-one’s ever done anything that extreme for me. Big, milestone birthdays like that make you look back and think about where you are and what you’ve done. I’m so proud to have had two sons [Rocket and Racer] before I turned 30 – that’s definitely the highlight so far. I always knew I wanted children, but I’m not really big on planning. I tend to just go with the flow and I think that comes back to my roots, growing up by the beach. My dad was a surfer and a landscaper; he worked outdoors for a living and I was always surrounded by that kind of carefree lifestyle. He and my mum really drummed into me that you need to just live how you want to live and do what you want to do and don’t worry about anything. If you’re not happy, just change it. I was super-close to my dad. When he passed away, I was at a place in my life that I didn’t know how to get out of. But it brought me and my mum closer together. As much as he was my dad, he was her husband; ]

“YOU NEED TO live how

you want to live AND DO

WHAT YOU WANT TO DO. IF YOU’RE NOT HAPPY, just change it”

Dress, $2,995, turtleneck, $450, both Zimmermann, zimmermannwear.com; boots, $2,300, necklace, $500, both Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

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Create a pretty lip shade that’s all your own by layering different formulas together. Try Rouge Dior in Sensual Matte, $53, and  Dior Addict Lip Glow in  Coral, $49, both Dior,  (02) 9295 9059


Dress, $795, Aje, a-j-e.com.au; circular rings, $500 each, Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600 (both worn throughout); band ring, Lara’s own Opposite page: bra, $1,250, coat, $6,300, pearl ring, $500, all Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600 (all worn throughout); earrings, Lara’s own (worn throughout)

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I can’t imagine being in her shoes. But she’s so strong and that strength is something I feel she’s passed on to me. It has helped me through life. I was thrust into the public eye so young and it was a different world back then – social media was only just beginning so it was print, TV and radio. Now if something happens, it usually passes pretty quickly and people forget. Over the past few years I’ve realised that I find more comfort in keeping quiet, and as much as sometimes I would love to respond to things, in the end my theory is that it’s never really worth it. The only people who matter are around me and they see me every day, they know the truth. My family doesn’t read any of this stuff, so who would I even be saying it for? Being portrayed in a different way to what I knew the truth to be was always a challenge for me. I’d read something and it was like I was reading about someone else; it was a creation of a person, not the real me. I think for a long time I’d overcompensate by trying to control it but mostly it made things appear worse. I don’t blame anyone else, but I was young and naive in the sense that I was always taking on other people’s opinions. Back then I didn’t know how to push forward and follow my own path – I sought guidance and hoped that I was being led in the right direction. I had my mum, but when your mum gives you advice, you’re not necessarily going to take it all the time. Meeting Sam is when things really changed for me. Until then, I never really trusted anyone entirely. When I was younger, I think maybe I’d try to impress a person by adapting to their ways, but with Sam, from the get-go, I was just myself. I wasn’t trying to be anyone else and I think that’s the basis for a strong relationship. Sam is present. I always feel like I’m the priority, our family comes first and our marriage is the most important thing to him – he always says that our work is secondary. These days it’s hard to be there sometimes – between phones and work and everyone wanting things immediately. It’s nice to just slow things down. Sam’s different in that he doesn’t use social media, it’s just not where he spends his time. If he’s on the internet, he’s not looking at other people’s lives. It’s refreshing.

“MOTHERHOOD

shifts your way of thinking... HAVING

CHILDREN IS THE ANTIDOTE TO SELFISHNESS”

When I first met him, I was nervous and I’d be like, “Don’t read anything, you might get pulled away,” because there was a lot of crap. And he was like, “I don’t even know what you’re talking about.” As much as I flourished after meeting Sam, it was having Rocket and being a firsttime mum that made me realise there’s a bigger world out there than just Lara. It wasn’t just about me anymore, there are three other people with me now. When I’m making decisions and choices, it’s always about what’s best for them. Motherhood shifts your way of thinking – there’s this big, universal understanding, like you are part of something bigger. Having children is the antidote to selfishness. I have help from the grandmas – my mum flies over quite a bit – but I very much wanted to figure it out on my own. There are definitely days, though, when Sam’s working and I’m there by myself with the two of them and it’s challenging. I’ve always wanted to have a big family and I’m only 30 but, I don’t know, to do that all over again, those sleepless nights... I have a handful of really close girlfriends, people who have been around for a long while. ]

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Build a flawless base without covering your natural complexion by starting foundation in the centre of your face, making it more sheer as you move outwards. Try DiorSkin Forever fluid foundation, $89, Dior, (02) 9295 9059

Roll neck, $450, dress, $2995, both Zimmermann, zimmermannwear.com Dress, $16,000, briefs, $1,900, choker, $530, all Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

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Jacket, $POA, pants, $POA, both AWAKE, net-a-porter.com

My friend [Sydney artist] Vicki Lee has had two children so she went through the same things, the same changes, but on the other side of the world. We were kind of doing it together in spirit. In New York I have a few American girlfriends, and in LA there are a lot of my crew – Teresa Palmer is one, she’s there with her kids – so I’m trying to trying to better myself and learn more so that I can build some people around me who are in the same kind of life stage. It’s nice to ensure I give them the best guidance. I definitely consider myself a feminist. I love Lena Dunham’s be able to talk to other mothers and Lenny Letter. It’s so brilliant and supportive of my friends who have children and feel women – just reading other women’s stories brings that you’re not alone. I’m more tuned in to the goings on in solace and inspiration. the world since living in America and I started my own business without knowing much. I’d been modelling for so long but always wanted to having children. I was pregnant through create something that was mine and that no-one the recent Presidential election so I got could take away. I quickly realised if you don’t very into it. Remembering that our children are a collection of who we are understand all aspects – the back end, production, the merchandising and digital – there’s no point in doing it and what we’re teaching them, I’m always at all. These days you have to be sound in all areas. I’m passionate about all things beauty and fragrance. I love being around people who know different things to me so I ask questions and learn. ]

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For natural, but better, nails, opt for a nude polish shade with extra sheen. Try Dior Vernis in Enigma, $41, Dior, (02) 9295 9059

“OUR CHILDREN ARE A COLLECTION OF WHO WE ARE, SO I’m always trying to better myself ”

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To create an all-over glow, mix some liquid illuminator into your foundation before you apply. Try DiorSkin Nude Luminizer, $95, Dior, (02) 9295 9059


Bustier, $721, shirt, $2,354, pants, $1,174, all CF Goldman, modaoperandi.com Photography: Darren McDonald at The Artist Group. Hair: Travis Balcke at Company 1 for Wella. Makeup: Damian Garozzo for Dior. Manicure: Nelly Ferreira. Shot at Château de la Colle Noire, Montauroux, France

“I’M VERY FOCUSED ON BEING A MUM, BUT I ALSO STILL HAVE THAT fire in my belly – I WANT TO MAINTAIN BALANCE” I like to go into my modelling work knowing what’s ahead – styling, wardrobe, hair and makeup, etc. I’m interested, and I know what I don’t like. People have their own perception of you and it’s easy to get pulled into that. I’m definitely strong-minded and I know what works for me. When I was first introduced to fashion, I became a little obsessed. These days it’s a rarity to be able to indulge in it. I just throw it together quickly and rush out the door – sticking to things from brands I know and love... Bassike, Céline, Albus Lumen, The Row and for those special occasions, Dior. Being a friend of Dior and representing the new Miss Dior fragrance – perfumer François Demachy’s latest – with a shoot at Château de la Colle Noire (Monsieur Dior’s home) and the chance to see one of the world’s biggest and best-known luxury brands celebrating its 70th anniversary has been a pinch-me experience. From meeting Natalie Portman and legendary makeup artist Peter Philips to attending the Cannes Film Festival and the beautiful dinner to honour 70 years of the house and the fragrance – start to end, it’s one of those memorable times I’ll be telling my grandchildren about one day. I feel so lucky as a mum to be able to switch hats like that. It’s just nice to do something for you. I’m very focused on being a mum, but I also still have that fire in my belly – I want to maintain balance. My husband reminds me: you can have both and don’t feel guilty about it. He’s very supportive like that. I definitely know how far I’ve come and there is plenty more to do. Even at the time of Being Lara Bingle I knew it wasn’t going to be my proudest chapter in life. I can reminisce with Sam and laugh about it. I might think, “Gosh, I could have done that differently,” but I’m not a regretful person. With all things in life, one day you’ll look back and realise they were somehow meant to be. Live and learn. I’m a big believer in that. q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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VITAE

The enviable career of Silvia Venturini Fendi all started with a call to individualism – a philosophy the Roman designer and her covetable bags still champion today

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Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans

G

ive me your bag!” “What?” “Your bag.” “It’s a Baguette.” The day Carrie Bradshaw got mugged in a New York alley on Sex And The City was defining for two reasons. One: from that day forth it was officially acceptable to take your OTT purple sequinned bag out for a quick spot of casual shopping. Two: the original It-bag had cemented its place in popular culture as a fashion icon. It was the turn of the new millennium and the introduction of the highly coveted accessory conceived by Silvia Venturini Fendi (above right) was changing the way we viewed luxury bags and would continue to do so over the next two decades. “When I started designing the bags, I wanted to make my own little revolution,” says Venturini Fendi, on her first trip to Australia for the official launch of the new Sydney Fendi boutique. “It was the moment of minimalism, so I was like, ‘I have to do something totally different and change the fact that everybody is dressed the same.’ The Baguette was the response to that. It came out at the right moment because there was a need for change.” The long, thin, soft bag designed to be tucked under the arm was both functional and fabulous, celebrating the individual via countless embellishments and inspiring feverish waiting lists. The relief of success that Venturini Fendi felt in her role as creative director for accessories of the Roman luxury house must have been great considering she had a lot to live up to. If being raised under the matriarchy of founder Adele Fendi and her daughters – her mother Anna and


four aunts, Paola, Carla, Franca and Alda – wasn’t pressure enough, Karl Lagerfeld was at the helm of ready-to-wear, long before he began splitting his time with Chanel. But it was the role she’d been training for all her life. “I was always there, even when I was very little. Instead of being at home with my sisters playing with dolls, I always found an excuse to see my mother at the atelier and especially when I heard Karl was coming from Paris.” Wearing a minimal shirt and slacks with a cardigan draped across her shoulders, today the ageless designer (and mother of three grown children, including jeweller Delfina Delettrez Fendi) is the picture of classic Italian style. But the Fendi woman would not be complete without a cheeky twist, in this case a colourfully patterned velvet Kan I bag, a style introduced for resort 17 and starring again on the recent AW17-18 runway. With a top handle and long shoulder strap, and tiny metal rings perfectly positioned for personalising with charms (the famous Fendi bugs were another of Venturini Fendi’s creations), it’s the ideal blend of practical and playful and has been popping up on street-style stars and supermodels alike (hey, Kendall). Whether the Kan I will match the success of brand heroes like the Baguette and the iconic Peekaboo remains to be seen. But as Venturini Fendi says, the magic of a hit bag is a mix of skill and alchemy. “When you do a bag you just do it without thinking, ‘Oh my God, this is going to be a success.’ So we will see,

because it’s quite recent. It’s already doing well, but you know... At Fendi we follow our DNA. Our way to do the bags is to do them in different versions,” she says of the myriad colours and embellishments on offer. “We think it’s important to give options. To be democratic.” She adds, “There’s a Fendi way of doing things. I push my team to do research and to make it differently, not to look at what others are doing. Fendi has always been [about] taking risks and sometimes using old techniques – twisting them, mixing old and new.” And after 23 years as creative director of accessories, does she sometimes look to the archives? “I don’t need to; I know them. Karl always says, ‘We because in my family, are the archives!’” being a woman is a plus, Like with any it’s not a minus. Even if collaboration of in the world sometimes creative minds, it’s not like that. I was Venturini Fendi and [a] feminist from the very Lagerfeld’s working first day of my life GREAT MINDS Silvia Venturini Fendi with relationship is one of because I’ve seen in fellow creative force Karl give and take. “He front of me, women who Lagerfeld (above); the cult has his idea, I bring were acting like men. Kan I bag (above right) some references, That’s why I’ve always maybe I find a material and I show been ready to support and fight for him – it’s like that. Karl is very... he women’s rights. I’m happy that knows what he wants,” she says. today fashion is embracing this. “He sends a lot of interesting books But it doesn’t have to become just and ideas and we talk, Skype, a trend – it should be something sometimes we send messages. that has to continue, not just as Technology helps. Before, things a runway statement but in real life.” were lost at the post office!” For now, Venturini Fendi will For AW17-18, their brainstorming do what she’s always done: create resulted in an army of wax red must-have investment pieces for thigh-high boots – worn with sheer clever, open-minded women who dresses, herringbone suiting, knifeare interested in understanding pleated midi-skirts, cuffed tweed the quality and process of things. pants, those covetable bags and For her, it’s the woman who carries hoop earrings bearing Fendi’s the bag, not the other way around. “I think it’s a personal choice,” she reworked F logo. It was a gimmicksays. “Function is more important free, grown-up collection that put today than ever before because a focus on craftsmanship, and an empowering moment in a season we have a different kind of life... of fashion intended for strong But also playfulness, because at women. It’s a message the designer the end of the day it’s only can cautiously get behind. “For fashion. This light-hearted spirit me, to be a woman has been easy has to stay.” q ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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Anti-tricky, non money-wastey and irritant-free skin care that actually, yknow, works .


WITH A

TWIST A change (of perfume) is as good as a holiday

I

Words: Amy Starr. Photography: Pete Daly. Styling: Amanda McCourt

f there’s a better way to cure a chronic case of winteritis than with a spritz of a lemonsoaked scent, we’d like to see it. “Lemon notes make a fragrance softer and more diffusive,” says Erica Moore, a pro perfume evaluator from Fragrances Of The World. “Citrus notes can be traced back to the very first fine fragrances created, when their purpose was to cleanse and refresh.” Boost your mood and wash away your weatherinduced funk with one of these fresh lemon scents.

ELLE

Vivaciously Bold, $366 for 100ml, Diana Vreeland, mecca.com.au, out August 1; Sole Di Positano, $340 for 50ml, Tom Ford, 1800 061 326; Star Magnolia Cologne, $198 for 100ml, Jo Malone, jomalone.com.au

BEAUTY

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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THE

BEST SKIN OF YOUR LIFE Gone are the days of looking “done”. Now,

light-touch treatments, innovative techniques and customisable formulas are

rewriting the ageing rule book to

keep you looking like yourself, only better

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BEAUTY

F I R S T, A W O R D O N WHY WE DON’T ALL A G E T H E S A M E WAY

When that melee went down last year over Margot Robbie’s age, the world wasn’t out for blood and her birth  certificate  based  on  her  wrinkle count. No, people thought there was something else making her look older than her 27 years, though the internet couldn’t quite put  its  scrolling,  trolling  finger  on  it. Meanwhile, her Suicide Squad co-star Jared Leto had countless articles devoted to his foreveryouthful appearance. So was it a man/woman thing? Or had Robbie’s sunny Aussie upbringing simply caught up with her, while Leto had somehow kept his face frozen in Jordan Catalano time? Why is it that some of us can do all the right skin things (sunscreen, expensive creams, et al), yet still manage to age faster than that friend who rarely washes her face? “We can all look at our parents and see the sort of trajectory of where we’re going, whether we like it or not,” says Adam Geyer, consulting dermatologist for Kiehl’s. “But while genetics is a component in terms of our intrinsic ageing, the extrinsic factors are enormous. Whether it’s sun exposure, smoking, alcohol... all that stuff is a factor in  ageing, regardless of genetics.” Wrinkles have long been skin’s arch nemesis, but today’s consumers are catching up on what dermatologists have known for years – the changes in elasticity, volume, texture, pigment and pores all contribute to how old we look. “Rather than striving to erase all these signs and look younger, people are accepting that they just

want to look good for their age,” explains Geyer. “That has shifted the dialogue  away  from  filling  people’s faces excessively and ironing out every wrinkle to really improving quality of skin, texture and tone as a way to make the skin look healthy.” Kiehl’s has tapped into the onecream-can’t-fit-all  concept  with  its  Apothecary Preparations, a range of  serums  specifically  tailored  to  your skin’s needs. Following an evaluation, consultants prescribe two active complexes for you to drop into a hydrating and plumping serum base. Whether you want to address redness with vitamin E while you smooth texture with lipo hydroxy acid, or simultaneously shrink pore size with  salicylic  acid  and  fight  wrinkles with retinol or brighten with vitamin C, the choice is yours. It brings a sense of freedom (and fun) for the consumer while allowing the results-driven brand an opportunity to use the globe as one giant skincare focus group. “Things that tend to vary in terms of geography have a huge impact on how your skin will age,” says Geyer. The sun is an obvious common culprit, but temperature and city-versus-rural pollutants can all change the rate of ageing. “If the climate is humid, your skin is going to be less desiccated and more hydrated, and if it’s dry, you’ll likely have a compromised skin-barrier function.” That’s not to say that those born in a complexion-threatening climate are doomed to look ready for a seniors’ discount before their time. “It’s about what you do and don’t put in your system,” says Geyer. Think: less stress and more sleep, less sugar and more brightly coloured fruits and vegetables to help  stave  off  the  destruction  of  collagen. “Investing in goodquality products is also worth the time and expense, because they really do make a difference.” ]

INGREDIENTS 101 IN YOUR TWENTIES

“I love vitamin C as a photo protector, a wrinkle preventer as well as an ingredient that’s not too heavy-handed in reversing and reinventing the skin,” says Geyer.

V I TA M I N C

IN YOUR THIRTIES

“In addition to prevention, skincare becomes about correcting signs of ageing, so I put a focus on renewing ingredients, such as retinol [a derivative of vitamin A],” says Geyer.

V I TA M I N A

IN YOUR FORTIES AND BEYOND

“Skin can become prone to irritation as it gets more sensitive over time, so work with ingredients that renew but aren’t as harsh,” says Geyer. “Peptides can be a gentle way to accelerate renewal without causing irritation.” Sunflower oil  can also help reduce redness.

SUNFLOWER

Apothecary Preparations, $140 for set, Kiehl’s, 1300 651 991

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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LOOKING “DONE” IS SO DONE

The era of obvious work is over. Now, cosmetic surgeons and dermatologists have become the superstars of skin, using stealth placement, new technologies and innovative techniques to make tiny and untraceable tweaks to the face. Here’s what’s trending now in treatments. NEW WAYS TO NEEDLE

“In the old days, we didn’t really understand what was going on behind the canvas, we just treated the canvas with fillers. But the face is not just a static document that sits there – it’s dynamic and it moves,” says dermatologist Natasha Cook. In her Sydney clinic, she’s found success using fillers through the lateral and outer points of the face, treating deflation in the temples and lifting the outer brow. “If we correct volumetric loss in this zone first, we can often get away without filling in the central part of the face,” which, she warns, can lead to the dreaded pillowy, chipmunk look. TAKE IT ON THE CHIN

Belkyra, the latest flab jab to minimise double chins, is finally available on our shores (find a clinic at nomoredoublechin.com.au). The injection features a naturally occurring molecule that dissolves fat without damaging cells. Two treatments can be all that’s needed to diminish fullness and tighten under the chin, with rumours mounting it’ll be further developed to treat other areas in the future. A CLOSE SHAVE

Dermaplaning is the latest buzzy treatment popping up in skincare clinics across the country. Each session involves having a fine blade run across your face, essentially

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shaving your face to remove the top layer of dead skin (available at allsaintsskinclinic.com.au). It’s said to increase penetration and ORDER, ORDER the efficacy of products, with It’s not just your skincare products that are important – the order in light therapy used later in the which you apply them can affect session. Makeup also goes on how well they work. “A good rule super-smooth in the days after is to apply the products with the the treatment, making it perfect lightest consistency first, for a special occasion. finishing with the heavier “It’s a great way to consistency,” says skincare exfoliate on a deeper expert Melanie Grant, who level and remove suggests starting with peach fuzz, which all serums, followed by an eye women have,” says gel, then a face oil and Kate Somerville, one of finishing with heavier the first to implement creams and sunscreens. dermaplaning at her Somerville is a fan of the LA clinic. Her top patchwork approach and tip? DIY at home to suggests only applying stay smooth in products where needed. between your pro “Your face has different treatments. “I’ve been ecosystems – for example, shaving my face since you may have breakouts my twenties as my From top: Eyebrow eczema prevented me on your chin but your And Face Razors, from waxing,” she eyes and cheeks need $7 for three, Tinkle, says. “Shaving was crushcosmetics.com.au; moisture,” she says. “Get Lady S Home Spa also a part of Marilyn to know your skin and Device, $299, Racinne, Monroe and Liz Taylor’s apply the products where racinne.com.au beauty regimens.” you need to.”

H O W T O D O M E L A N I E G R A N T ’ S FA C I A L AT H O M E When Phoebe Tonkin, Jessica Gomes and cover star Lara Worthington are in town, they all head straight to Melanie Grant’s Sydney clinic to get back their glow. But the celebrity skin expert says regular maintenance is just as important as treatments. “I love giving myself a facial at home before an event or on a rainy Sunday,” she says. “It doesn’t need to be overly complicated.”

STEP 1: DOUBLE CLEANSE

STEP 2: EXFOLIATE

“Massage in an oil cleanser to remove makeup, dirt and pollution. Then massage in an alpha hydroxy acid cleanser to really deep-clean, exfoliate and brighten.”

“Use a fine granular scrub, enzyme treatment or a peel pad to exfoliate your face, neck and décolletage.”

From left: Modern Friction Cleansing Oil With RadianceBoosting White & Purple Rice, $42, Origins, mecca.com.au; Diamond Anti Gravity Gentle Foaming Milk, $300, Kristals Cosmetics, verdem.com.au


BEAUTY JOIN THE R E T I N O L R E V I VA L

“Retinol is my favourite antiageing ingredient. It helps reduce fine lines and wrinkles, boosts collagen in the skin, alleviates pigmentation and improves skin texture,” says celebrity facialist Shani Darden, who is responsible for the glowing complexions of A-list beauties such Overnight Retinol as Rosie HuntingtonRepair 1%, $148, Whiteley, Chrissy Dermalogica, Teigen and Jessica dermalogica.com.au Alba. “You need to build it up gradually as retinol can be drying, so start by using it one night a week, then add a night each week if your skin can tolerate it.”

Advanced Retinoid 2%, $17.90, The Ordinary, adorebeauty.com.au

“I OFTEN WAKE UP PUFFY, SO I PLUNGE MY FACE IN ICE WATER” FREEZE FRAME

Ingredients come and go, but sometimes all your skin needs is a good chill. “I’ve been in practice for more than 40 years and one cure I always recommend is a cold compress,” reveals dermatologist Dr Gary Goldfaden, who uses it to relieve sunburn, itchiness, redness and inflammation. Makeup artist Lisa Eldridge presses cucumber-infused iceblocks into jetlagged models’ faces to tighten contours, while Crystal Patel, owner of Melbourne’s Clinica-Lase, tells her clients to keep cooling products in the fridge to calm skin after IPL. And Grant swears by Kate Moss’ ice-cube facial. “I can often wake up a little puffy, so I like to plunge my face in ice water,” she says. “It works a treat and is so refreshing.” ]

Time Retreat Face Treatment, $136, Eve Lom, mecca.com.au

STEP 3: SERUM

STEP 4: MASK

STEP 5: REMOVE

STEP 6: MOISTURISE

“Apply two to three serums. I love to use a vitamin C serum for brightening, combined with a hyaluronic acid serum for plumping and hydration before an event.”

“Layer a cream or sheet mask over the top of your serums and leave for 20 minutes. If your skin is more oily or congested, swap these steps and apply a clay mask first and then your serum afterwards.”

“Wipe off with a warm towel. Then spritz your skin with a hydrating mist and apply your serum again as well as a face oil if your skin needs it.”

“Massage moisturiser in using small, circular, upwards movements, and your middle and ring fingers only. Then finish with an eye treatment gel and lip balm.”

From left: O-Biotics B3 Plus, $119, O Cosmedics, ocosmedics.com; Hyaluronic Serum, $129, Aspect Dr, 1800 648 851

Hydrating Coconut Gel Masks, $34 for three, Farmacy, sephora.com.au

Luminous Dewy Skin Mist, $70, Tatcha, mecca.com.au

From left: La Solution 10 De Chanel, $132, Chanel, 1300 242 635; Advanced Night Repair Eye Concentrate Matrix, $115, Estée Lauder, esteelauder.com.au

WANT TO DEFY G R AV I T Y? DON’T YOYO DIET

If you want to retain that snap-back of your youth, keep your weight consistent. “Rapid and large weight fluctuations can result in loss of skin tautness and lead to saggy skin,” warns New York dermatologist Dr David Colbert. From top: Revitalift Laser X3 Dual Action, $49.95, L’Oréal Paris, 1300 659 359; Retensify Firming Cream, $300, Colbert MD, mecca.com.au

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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“IF NOT PROPERLY CARED FOR, SENSITIVE SKIN CAN AGE MORE QUICKLY” WHY SO SENSITIVE?

A bit of redness here and there is nothing to worry about, but chronic irritation? “When the majority of people refer to the term sensitive skin, they’re generally referring to skin that’s become sensitised to outside influences,” says dermatologist Dr Nicholas Perricone, who names weather conditions, extreme heat and cool air, pollution, harsh chemicals and irritating topical products as common irritants. “If not properly protected and cared for, sensitive skin can age more quickly as it will experience more damage from the sun and the environment.”

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Take your routine down a notch. “In my practice, the majority of women who reported sensitive skin had a history of using too many topical products resulting in a host of problems,” says Patel. An easy hack? Try using surgical gauze. “It’s great to help remove makeup properly while gently exfoliating the skin, and being cotton it’s great on sensitive skin, too.”

Words: Sara McLean. Photography: Betina du Toit; Sevak Babakhani, Pablo Martin and Rob Shaw (still-life); Getty Images

From left: PhysioLift Eyes, $64.95, Avène, avene.com.au; Advanced Génifique Sensitive, $109, Lancôme, 1300 651 991, available August 6

HOW TO RECTIFY REDNESS


BEAUTY

AVOID SCRUBS THAT CONTAIN NUTS AND SEEDS AS THEY CAN SCRATCH AND DAMAGE THE SKIN. INSTEAD, STICK WITH THESE GLOWGETTERS: THE MVP Ruby crystals remove dead skin cells and target uneven texture, while hyaluronic acid and jojoba oil plump. Doctor’s Scrub, $110, Goldfaden MD, mecca.com.au

THE CULT CLASSIC Blends beads with papaya, pineapple and pumpkin enzymes to deep-clean pores, reduce fine lines and give a youthful glow. ExfoliKate Intensive Exfoliating Treatment, $124, Kate Somerville, mecca.com.au

THE BRIGHT STAR Bromelain enzyme particles slough surface cells and deliver brightening vitamin C deep into the epidermis. Ultra Dual Microfoliant, $79, Ultraceuticals, ultraceuticals.com

THE DYNAMIC DUO The first step uses charcoal to detoxify, while the second oxygenates and brightens. The Microdelivery Detoxifying Oxygen Peel, $85 for set, Philosophy, 1800 812 663

E X F O L I AT I O N U P D AT E

If you’re not exfoliating, you’re selling your skin short. “The removal of dead skin cells will make skin look younger, tighter and absorb products better,” explains Goldfaden, who likens un-exfoliated skin to an unpeeled onion. “It can look rough, uneven and has dark spots, as there is a build-up of dead skin cells, dirt and bacteria.” Skip the harsh scrubs (especially if you suffer from rosacea) and instead pick a formula that uses fruit enzymes to dissolve dead skin cells, decongest and deal with textural issues. “I always exfoliate in the shower with steam,” reveals Somerville. “Steaming not only warms the skin, it also adds moisture and hydration to soften.”

“THE REMOVAL OF DEAD SKIN CELLS MAKES SKIN LOOK YOUNGER AND TIGHTER” WAT C H T H E WAY YOU WORK OUT

Going beyond the “when you feel good you look good” factor, now science is saying working out makes you younger at a cellular level, too. A recent study out of the US found that participants who ran between 30 and 40 minutes a day, five days a week, showed a “biological ageing advantage” of nine years over those who were sedentary. Still, there are certain ways to sweat that are better for your skin. “We all know that exercise can make us

feel good and release endorphins, so there’s a glow that can come from within when our bodies and minds are firing on all cylinders,” says Geyer. “But in terms of physiological effects, there are many things that can happen, both good and bad.” DON’T SWEAT IN THE SUN

“Athletes have to be really careful to remember sunscreen application and sun-smart behaviours,” says Geyer. He recommends not exercising outdoors in peak UV hours but instead at the beginning or end of the day. IF THE REDNESS NEVER ENDS

“For some athletes, you can see an increase in the vascularity in their skin and a greater dilation of veins, so that’s one risk for people who are rosacea-prone.” If this is the case for you, fight the flush by breaking up exercises into shorter 15-minute blocks to avoid overheating, and switch out strenuous workouts like HIIT for low-intensity swimming or Pilates. PLUMPING IRON

“One thing people look at in my field is people who exercise extensively over time,” says Geyer, revealing that when it comes to age and exercise, you have to pick what to preserve. “We all look better with a bit of volume in our cheeks, but for older athletes like long-distance runners, it’s hard to maintain that look of youth when you’re really thin. So there’s a balance to exercise – [working out] but not so excessively that your volumes change significantly.” q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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NuLipsRX Lip System, $22.79, Nurse Jamie, net-a-porter.com

SECRET WEAPON OF

JASMIN LO

“Even if your lips don’t need exfoliating, this compact little tool stimulates blood flow, which helps to plump them up. It’s perfect for prepping lips for a big, bold colour.”

UNDERCOVER LOVERS Lean in close. We’ve picked the brains of our favourite makeup artists to find out their deep, dark beauty-kit secret – the

unsexy product that may not come with pretty packaging or trumpet-and-confetti fanfare, but that they can’t live without. Learn them, use them and never look back

SECRET WEAPON OF

DOTTI

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SECRET WEAPON OF

MICHAEL ASHTON

Jade Roller Facial Skin Massager, $35, White Lotus, whitelotus.com.au

Thin Cotton Buds, $4.99 for 200, Muji, (02) 8036 4556

“I first discovered jade rollers in Hong Kong about 15 years ago. I was having acupuncture and after the treatment, they massaged my face with a cold roller. I nearly jumped out of my skin, then I saw the benefits. It gets the blood going, brings out the glow and firms the skin. I use it on clients and on my own face twice a day, every day.”

“The Muji cotton buds are great for making winged eyeliner even and exactly the same. I extend the eyeliner up a bit, then dip the cotton bud in micellar water. I then drag it at a 45-degree angle up and out underneath the wing to get that perfect feline flick.”


BEAUTY SECRET WEAPON OF

JACLYN HNITKO

Goe¯ Oil, $79.95, Jao Brand, beautydepartment.com.au

SECRET WEAPON OF

LINDA JEFFERYES

“Put simply, this oil is the best thing for your skin and hair. I believe beauty starts from the inside, and after a week of this, skin looks plump and lines are reduced – it means makeup is more even, too.”

Pink Clay Facial Sponge, $21, The Konjac Sponge Company, beautydepartment.com.au

“This stuff is great for dehydrated skin or even just to give the body an all-over glow. If you want the dewy makeup look, massage it in before you apply your foundation. It will also make you smell like you just stepped off a tropical island.”

SECRET WEAPON OF

NADINE MONLEY

“I use this sponge on everyone’s skin before I apply makeup. It smooths out the complexion, is naturally alkaline so leaves you balanced, doesn’t irritate even sensitive types and brings a glow – like you’ve had a facial.” ]

Udo’s 3-6-9 Oil Blend, $26.25, Udo’s Choice, udoshealthproducts.com.au ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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Black Cherry Tinted Lip Balm, $6.45, Hurraw!, nourishedlife.com.au

SECRET WEAPON OF

PHOEBE FEVER

“Every woman should have a mist like this. It’s the first product I use when I’m prepping the skin and the last step once makeup application is complete. It creates beautiful, fresh, taut skin, boosts vitamins and minerals and, because it’s oil-free, won’t affect the makeup you apply with it.”

SECRET WEAPON OF

CLAIRE THOMSON

“Not only is it natural, organic and a great oval shape to smooth over lips, but the shade gives the perfect hint of colour to cheeks for a rosy glow. It makes for a slightly wet, ’90s-style blush that applies well over fading makeup to freshen everything up. I’m obsessed.”

SECRET WEAPON OF

ELSA MORGAN

Lash Fan Brush, $21, Sigma Beauty, redefiningbeauty.com.au

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Copper Peptide Toner Mist, $97.75, LaGaia, lagaia.com.au

Compiled by: Amy Starr. Photography: Pete Daly. Styling: Amanda McCourt

“Mascara wands are great but if you want any versatility with how you apply it, then you need this brush. It’s brilliant for perfectly applying mascara to lower lashes without overloading them with product, and it washes and stays in shape easily, so it lasts for ages.”


BEAUTY

Makeup Remover Set, $59 for seven discs, Santé By Enjo, sante.enjo.com.au

SECRET WEAPON OF

MAX MAY

“I use these wipes with coconut oil to remove waterproof makeup like mascara without drying out the skin or lashes. They work using just water, too, but coconut oil makes it more nourishing. When I’m applying four or five looks a day to a face, skin can easily get irritated. This way, the complexion stays fresh.”

SECRET WEAPON OF

NONI SMITH

“This pair of masks makes skin feel amazing – tightened and smooth. One heats, which opens up the pores and detoxes the skin as it exfoliates, while the other cools skin down and minimises pores. They’re also all-natural – a big bonus in my book.” q

Red Ointment, $7.99, Tiger Balm, priceline.com.au

SECRET WEAPON OF

MOLLY WARKENTIN

“I always keep Tiger Balm in my kit. It’s great on mosquito bites to stop the itching in minutes – very handy when I’m on location. And on a cold day, I mix it with body moisturiser to keep the model warm and to stave off goosebumps.”

Hot & Cool Pore Pack Duo, $46, Caolion, sephora.com.au

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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TEMPERATURE

CONTROL

1

Meet the new skincare heroes that are making waves by tweaking the thermostat

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Prefer to just keep the temperature up? Farmacy’s Honey Potion Renewing Antioxidant Hydration Mask uses gentle heat and a tonne of super-moisturisers to power up the glow of skin, morphing from a gooey honey to a rich cream as you massage it in. And for instantly smoother (and warmer) tootsies on a winter’s night, slather on Susanne Kaufmann’s Foot Cream Warming, which uses marigold extract to boost circulation and counteract cold feet (it also comes in a cool formula – perfect for summer). For those purely about the cool factor, Aveda’s new Cooling Balancing Oil Concentrate can be used as a massage blend for weary muscles, a refreshing scent on the wrists or to cool a foot bath after a long day in heels. If that’s not potent enough, Endota Spa’s Clove & Mint Recovery Balm is a more sophisticated – and natural – version of a medicated muscle rub, and it gives instant relief to tired shoulders, whether they’ve been playing the field, or hunched over a laptop. Think of them as perfect for a little chill (Netflix optional). q

2

1. Pore-Balance Facial Sauna Scrub, $38, Ole Henriksen, sephora.com.au 2. Cooling Balancing Oil Concentrate, $49, Aveda, aveda.com.au 3. Honey Potion Renewing Antioxidant Hydration Mask, $85, Farmacy, sephora.com.au 4. Clove & Mint Recovery Balm, $45, Endota Spa Organics, endotaspa.com.au 5. Foot Cream Warming, $39, Susanne Kaufmann, net-a-porter.com

5

3

4

Words: Amy Starr. Photography: Wayne Maser; Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

K

een to dial up the efficacy of your skincare regimen? Try giving room-temperature lotions and potions a miss. Danish celebrity facialist Ole Henriksen has been inspired by his roots for his latest creation, the self-warming and cooling Pore-Balance Facial Sauna Scrub. “In Scandinavia, saunas are used in the cold, when you’re less likely to get fresh food and leafy greens in that part of the world,” he says. “The heat works well when the immune system is confronted with stress. It’s perfect for sore muscles, to detox the whole system and just to relax.” The clever scrub, which warms on contact then cools and calms, gives your face a deep clean, with fine particles of Icelandic volcanic sand buffing you back to baby skin. “The heat opens the pores, which is detoxing and allows for better passage of the active ingredients into the skin. Then, the cooling constricts the skin as well as firms,” says Henriksen, who follows up his personal regimen by popping an ice cube inside a handkerchief and massaging it all over his face for an even firmer finish.


COLOUR NOW AVAIL ABLE AT

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E L L e | A DV E R TO R I A L

BLOWN AWAY

Prepare to be amazed by the new Dyson Supersonic – a hair dryer, but not as you know it...

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nce in a while, a product comes along that not only updates your beauty routine but completely revolutionises it. Case in point: the Dyson Supersonic hair dryer, an innovative combination of form and function that’s guaranteed to supercharge your regimen and deliver the ultimate salon-like finish. With the aim of completely rethinking the hair dryer, Dyson invested millions in development, spending four years in a specially designed hair lab and creating some 600 prototypes to make sure they got it just right. The result? A hair dryer that’s as powerful as it is precise, as quick as it is compact, and as smart as it is sleek. Think of it as a breath of fresh air – and the perfect gift for that special someone who takes their haircare as seriously as their tech game. For more details, visit dyson.com.au/supersonic

SLEEK AND CHIC A powerful, perfectly angled jet of air creates smooth strands in minutes

NATURAL INSTINCT Innovative Air Multiplier technology means faster drying time for naturally beautiful body


WHY WE LOVE IT SUPER SHINY: Monitoring air temperature 20 times per second, intelligent heat control helps prevent extreme-heat damage to protect your hair’s natural shine. SUPER SMART: The Supersonic is as high-tech as its name suggests. With the small but powerful Dyson digital motor V9 moved from the head to the handle, the dryer is engineered for better balance, making it easy to manoeuvre. Plus, it has been designed to reduce sound, and each nozzle attaches magnetically so you can practically do it with your eyes closed. SUPER SWIFT: Never have time to style your hair before work? You do now. Air Multiplier technology amplifies airflow by three times, creating a high-pressure, high-velocity jet of air that’s perfectly angled for controlled styling so you can quickly dry and style at the same time. Think fast, focused airflow – and another excuse to hit snooze. SUPER SLEEK: It’s time to say goodbye to your bulky hair dryer. The Supersonic features a cutting-edge design that’s clean and minimalistic and chic. Beauty and brains – it’s an unbeatable combination.

RISE AND SHINE Intelligent heat control prevents damage to your hair, creating the healthy, glossy strands of your dreams


BEAUTY YOUR FRIDAY NIGHT PICK-ME-UP THE SECRET TO GOING FROM DESK TO DRINKS IN A H U R R Y ? T H I S M A G I C B U L L E T. B A L A N C I N G A   M AT T E FINISH IN A CREAMY FORMULA, THE PUNCHY COLOUR M A K E S YO U L O O K I N S TA N T LY P U T T O G E T H E R . P L U S I T ’ S

THE BEAUTY EDIT

B U D G E - P R O O F, S O W O N ’ T C O M E O F F O N YO U R N E G R O N I . Color Riche Matte Addiction in Erotique, $21.95, L’Oréal Paris, 1300 659 359

SKIN FEELING A BIT BLAH?

Ours too. But the contents of this pretty pot will get you back to your pre-winter best. Loaded with the same plumping and hydrating black rose as the OG face mask, it starts out like a cream but turns watery once it hits your skin, making it feel super fresh and clean.

Black Rose Skin Infusion Cream, $230, Sisley, sisley-paris.com.au

New buys tried, tested and approved by the

ELLE beauty team

DRY SHAMPOOS WITH A DIFFERENCE TO VALIDATE SEVERAL HITS OF THE SNOOZE BUTTON, TRY OUAI’S DRY SHAMPOO FOAM, WHICH RUBS IN LIKE A MOUSSE BUT DRIES QUICKLY, SOAKING UP ANY SECOND-DAY OIL INSTANTLY; WHILE ELEVEN’S DRY POWDER VOLUME PASTE DEGREASES, BOOSTS VOLUME AND REVIVES YESTERDAY’S HAIR FLIP IN A FEW SECONDS.

TIME TO START SAVING DESIGNER ALBER ELBAZ’S COLLAB WITH SCENT KING FRÉDÉRIC MALLE IS NOTHING SHORT OF A M A S T E R P I E C E . F E AT U R I N G JA S M I N E , A M B E R A N D PAT C H O U L I , T H E F R AG R A N C E I S A L L C O M E - H I T H E R S E X I N E S S . Y E S , I T ’ S E X P E N S I V E , B U T S O A R E YO U . Superstitious, $570 for 100ml, Editions De Parfums By Frédéric Malle, mecca.com.au

Clockwise from left: Liquid Blush in Orgasm, $44, Nars, mecca.com.au; GALifornia, $51, Benefit, benefitcosmetics.com/au; Sunchaser Palette, $58, Becca, Sephora, (02) 9221 5703

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TO...

GET ROSY

Dry Powder Volume Paste, $24.95, Eleven, elevenaustralia.com

1. BINGE on Netflix’s GLOW starring Alison Brie, who displays some impressive blush-draping skills as an actress-turned-wrestler in the ’80s. 2. JOIN the other 80,000 people in Sydney sweating through 14km for the annual City2Surf on August 13. Touche Éclat Le Cushion, $89, Yves Saint Laurent, 1300 651 991

IT’S A GOOD NEWS DAY

3. LAYER on one of the latest shimmer-spiked blushes. Becca’s palette offers three foolproof shades, Nars has given its cult Orgasm hue the liquid treatment and Benefit’s GALifornia has the perfect pink-pigment-to-gold-fleck ratio.

AS FAR AS ICONIC BEAUTY PRODUCTS GO, YOU’D BE HARD-PRESSED TO FIND ONE MORE LOVED THAN TOUCHE ÉCLAT. AND NOW THE GENIUS CONCEALER IS AVAILABLE IN A CUSHION-COMPACT FOUNDATION. THE BEST BIT: THE SPONGE HAS TWO DIFFERENT TEXTURES, WHICH MEANS YOU DON’T NEED A MASTERS IN MAKEUP TO CUSTOMISE YOUR COVERAGE.

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Words: Amy Starr; Sara McLean. Photography: Sevak Babakhani; Rob Shaw

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Dry Shampoo Foam, $43, Ouai, Sephora, (02) 9221 5703


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1. La Collection Privée in Bois d’Argent, $680 for 450ml, Christian Dior, (02) 9295 9059 – “Fragrance is important to me. When I feel like something a bit different, I steal this from my husband.” 2. Epsom Salts, $3.69, chemistwarehouse.com.au – “I make my own sea-salt spray with this and water. Then when my hair is almost dry, I twist it up and pin it like Princess Leia for 15 minutes and I get a nice, natural wave.” 3. Alpha Beta Universal Daily Peel Jar, $216, Dr Dennis Gross, mecca.com.au – “I use this two-step system every few days for extra-clean skin.” 4. Facial Treatment Essence, $210, SK-II, 1800 012 169 – “I’m only a new convert but it has changed the texture and tone of my skin.”

3

@ilona_hamer

MY WEEKEND IN PRODUCTS

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super-stylist behind swimwear brand Matteau, has a clever edit of essentials and pros across the globe

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ILONA’S TIPS FOR… ageing gracefully

1. Someone once told me your skin is not ageing, it’s just dehydrated, so I keep mine plump with a facial mist and lots of alkaline water.

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2. I’m not against

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natural-looking, non-invasive procedures for a little lift – but total face transformations are ridiculous.

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3. Take care of yourself and

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10. Primrose Facial Hydrating Cream, $53, Aesop, aesop.com/au – “It’s gentle and works so well – I use it on a daily basis.” 11. Les Exclusifs De Chanel in Sycomore, $470 for 200ml, Chanel, 1300 242 635 – “This is heavier than my favourite Diptyque fragrance, but such a special smell. I just have to pick the days to wear it. Most days, I combine a few sprays of the two.” 12. C + Collagen Perfect Skin Set & Refresh Mist, $44, Dr Dennis Gross, mecca.com.au – “I keep it in my bag for spritzes throughout the day.” 13. Living Luminizer, $55, “Un” Cover-Up in 11, $52, both RMS, mecca.com.au – “I like fresh skin that you can actually see. Nothing too covered or thick. And I couldn’t live without this brand.”

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work with what you have. A crooked nose or beauty marks are far more beautiful than anything too perfect.

5. L’Ombre Dans L’Eau, $146 for 100ml, Diptyque, mecca.com.au – “I’ve been wearing this for so long, people think it’s how I naturally smell!” 6. Eyelash Curler, $32, Shu Uemura, davidjones.com.au – “I rarely wear mascara, but I always curl my lashes.” 7. Cleansing Purifying Scrub With Sea Salt, $61, Christophe Robin, sephora.com.au – “I mix up my shampoo and conditioner, but always stick with this scrub.” 8. Parsley Seed Facial Cleanser, $41, Aesop, aesop.com/au – “There’s lactic acid in it, so it helps to exfoliate, too.” 9. Lip Pencil in Spice, $30, M.A.C, maccosmetics.com.au – “The perfect shade for my complexion. It’s orange/ brown but smudges nicely with lip balm to create a neutral lip colour.”

HAIRCUT I go to Paloma Rose Garcia at Oscar Oscar Salon, Sydney. I hate haircuts. I have them as rarely as possible.

HAIR COLOUR I see Courtney Bates at Oscar Oscar or Mauricio Bermudez at Suite Caroline in NYC. Colour makes my texture manageable.

NAILS I like Paddington Nails in Sydney or my local NYC salon. I opt for simple, short nails in a clear polish or a dark red.

FITNESS Pilates at Body Evolutions in NYC is an hour to myself. The reformer is fun and doesn’t feel like working out.

SPA In Sydney, a facial with Melanie Grant is life-changing. And when I’m in LA shooting, I head to Natura Spa for a full-body scrub.

oscaroscar.com.au

suitecaroline.com

(02) 9361 6470

bodyevolutions.com

melaniegrant.com; natura-spa.com

ELLE AUSTRALIA

Compiled by: Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

Ilona Hamer, the


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Shade: Erotique 640


BEAUTY 8

I T ’ S G R E AT T H AT N A I L A R T H A S

madeline poole

YO U ’ R E

NEW

T O N A I L A R T, T R Y S TA R T I N G

WITH

A

LOOK

CLASSIC

O R A S T Y L E T H AT CAN MIX INTO ANY

I really love moon manicures as well as colourful French tips – they’re easy to wear. I think Instagram-ready hands the best source of inspiration for anything you do creatively is outside your field. I try not to look at other nail artists’ work, but art, architecture and KIT ESSENTIALS 1. Vitamin E Nail nature instead. Nature has the best & Cuticle Oil, colour combinations. Flowers, fish, $17.45, Sally Hansen, frogs, birds – they have such 1800 812 663 2. Hand And Nail beautiful combinations of neons Cream in Suede, $69, and pops of colour.

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Byredo, mecca.com.au 3. Le Vernis Longwear Nail Colour in Rouge Puissant, $41, Chanel, 1300 242 635 4. Expert Touch Lint-Free Nail Wipes, $11.95 for 200, OPI, 1800 812 663 5. Color Therapy nail polish in Chai On Life, $16.95, Sally Hansen, 1800 812 663 6. Insta-Dri Top Coat, $15.45, Sally Hansen, 1800 812 663 7. UV Gel Soak Off Clips, $7.95 for five, Secret Star Girl, sahairsupplies.com.au 8. Nail Lacquer in Ube, $26, JINsoon, mecca.com.au

L I K E H A I R , YO U S H O U L D T R I M YO U R

IF

The New York-based nail artist and Sally Hansen global colour ambassador reveals her tips for getting

1

gravitate towards, and try to pull a polish colour from there. Chances are it will work with your wardrobe.

WARDROBE.

I L O V E M AT C H I N G M Y M A N I C U R E T O M Y M A K E U P. Coordinating it with my lips or eye makeup is a nice look, or I like to pick up on colours in my outfit that aren’t so obvious, like the lining of a jacket. A lot of people have a specific colour palette they wear or have around them, whether they realise it or not. So think about what you normally

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IF

YO U

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GELS,

IT’S

I M P O R TA N T T O TA K E B R E A K S .

After every two or three gel applications, I wear a restorative nail polish. I like Sally Hansen Color Therapy as it delivers oil and treatment to the nail plate without sacrificing colour. And I swear by Byredo Hand And Nail Cream as well as cuticle oil for keeping hands in top condition – they’re two products that are always in my kit. Diet also plays a big role in the health of your nails. Biotin and keratin supplements can be beneficial. THERE’S

NO

PERFECT

NAIL

It’s a case of taste as well as what suits your hands best. Super-short nails don’t work in an oval shape. It’s better to do them in a square or “squoval”. As they get longer, you can pull off a variety of shapes like almond or oval, or “squareletto” if they get really long. q

SHAPE.

5

7

TO

I file and clip my nails frequently if they get very long and I notice them getting weaker. Leaving a file in your bag is also a good move as you can avoid tearing your nails. Having long nails is fun, but if you’re aggressive with the way you use your hands it can cause trauma to the tips. You need to be careful. STRENGTH.

@mpnails

Compiled by: Sara McLean. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Instagram: @mpnails

tête-à-tête with

M AT U R E D . When I first started, there was so little out there that anything I did felt cutting edge and new. Now there’s so much experimenting that’s being done. Trends come in and out very quickly and I think that’s due to how rapidly videos and images are shared on social media.


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Shade: Blush in a Rush 103


HIT REFRESH Stuck in a fitness rut? This troupe of trainers will help you re-energise your routine and

push past your workout plateau

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tarting a new type of workout is much like any fresh relationship. It’s exciting, you can’t stop talking about it, you invest time and buy gifts (a top-of-the-line yoga mat, boxing gloves that would make Ronda Rousey nervous). Then the honeymoon period ends. Maybe you’re bored, not feeling challenged or your butt just isn’t getting any higher. Whatever the reason, you soon ditch it for a different workout before you ever reap the full benefits. Standard. But with the help of this team of experts, you can break through your plateau and stay on track.

COMPLACENCY IS THE KILLER

Don’t blame the game, blame the player. “Plateaus happen when you stop challenging yourself: you don’t get the endorphin kick you used to and, most importantly, you don’t get the results you once saw,” explains Connor McManus, head trainer at F45 Sydney CBD. “The moment you stop chasing that point of ‘Oh my God this hurts’, that’s when it all goes out the window. The same actions lead to the same results.” Janet Yockers of One Hot Yoga & Pilates blames Western culture for the fact that we don’t continue to raise the bar for ourselves on the mat. “It’s all very safe, very ‘do what feels good’, but traditional yoga is meant to be challenging. Try getting into the depth of a posture straight away and believe you have greater potential – it keeps it interesting.”

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BE A TEACHER’S PET

Starting to struggle to go to that class you used to be obsessed with? Emma Seibold, founder of Barre Body, suggests hitting up the instructor to rediscover the spark. “Asking the teacher to correct your technique will help you get better results,” she says. Yockers also admits she can’t help but give her punctual students a touch of special treatment. “It shows discipline, plus it lets you develop a relationship with your instructor, allowing time to ask them specific questions and give them a reason to keep an extra eye on you during class.”

BEWARE OF THE BURNOUT

Lack of variation is a rut waiting to happen. “Often runners will hit plateaus because they’re training too hard all the time, or run the same way week in, week


FIT CLUB Air Zoom Pegasus 34 trainers, $180, Nike, nike.com

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This lightweight, wireless wonder will support you throughout even the most intense HIIT class.

out,” says Nike+ Run Club head coach Matty Abel. “You need to have a blend of easy, moderate and hard.” If she clocks a one-time vinyasa devotee dropping off, Yockers suggests they slot in a yin class. “Taking it down a notch with a more meditative style that focuses on deep stretching is the best reset button for your practice.”

SLEEP NIXES A SLUMP

FEAR OF FITNESS COMMITMENT? Whatever you choose to do, here’s how

to stop stalling and elevate your workout

Studies show a link between sleep deprivation and cravings for unhealthy food, but not getting enough I F YO U L I K E B A R R E . . . rest can also sabotage your workouts. “It’s like putting Doing the exercises on relevé (on your toes) when the instructor offers it will ramp up your glutes cheap fuel in a Formula 1 car and expecting it to thighs, or try balancing through some “Make your and perform at its best,” says Abel, who tells his sluggish moves without using the barre for support movements to engage more muscles. “Also make your runners to ditch the social media at night. “Aim to movements smaller,” suggests Seibold. smaller to get 30 minutes’ extra sleep a night – this is like “Really narrowing your movements focus on compound interest totalling three-and-a-half extra and focusing on the muscle at work will a muscle” hours a week. Also, drink more water during the increase the effectiveness of your workout.” day and try to limit your sugar and caffeine intake.”

MOMENTUM IS EVERYTHING

As clichéd as it is, you never regret a workout, so don’t let yourself off the hook if you can’t get to a class. “The clients who are most likely to fall off the wagon seem to forget that they have the tools to do a lot of the work at home,” says Joanne Bezzina, director of Sydney Centred Pilates Studio. “If work is crazy, take 10 to 20 minutes in the evening to get your spine moving on a mat with the exercises you know from class.”

Words: Sara McLean. Photography: Sune Czajkowski

SET YOURSELF A PB

I F YO U ’ R E A YO G I . . .

Rather than just waiting for class to start, do five reclining bound angle poses (on your back, feet together, knees apart) in five minutes. “Or spend one minute in a squat, then a minute in downward dog, then forwardfold legs together, forward fold legs apart, then lie back on a block to open up your chest,” suggests Yockers. “You’ll find your mindset and flexibility will improve and your practice will grow quickly.”

I F YO U ’ R E A RU N N ER . . . Injecting intervals into your jog, switching from track to trail or changing up locations will keep your mind and body guessing. “It’s important to track your runs to see how you‘re progressing and keep you accountable,” adds Abel, who recommends the Nike+ Run Club app.

“Track your runs to see how you’re progressing”

Don’t just work out for the sake of it – make like a pro athlete and set micro goals to keep you on your toes. “At the barre, you could focus on flexibility and I F YO U ’ R E A P I L AT E S LOV ER . . . mobility, where you increase your range of motion From foam rollers and weights to resistance bands and stretch deeper, or on strength by using heavier and magic circles, props will supercharge your session. weights,” suggests Seibold. “In our cardio classes, do “If they aren’t available, change the rhythm or the pace you’re working to, or try slowing down a movement, the higher- or harder-impact options and take less especially during ab work,” says Bezzina. breaks. There’s always an opportunity to push yourself a little further.” Bezzina agrees that it’s the subtle shifts I F YO U ’ R E I N TO H I I T. . . that have the biggest impact on pushing you past Every second of work and rest counts in high-intensity a plateau. “In Pilates, you can change the way you interval training, so prep for the next breathe to be deeper and more stimulating,” she “Giving yourself exercise during each break. At F45, a new target McManus recommends setting specific says. “It can take an exercise from being very goals, with each burpee having a purpose. will make passive to quite invigorating as the biomechanics “Giving yourself a new target to reach you more change to accommodate the way your trunk in the set timeframe will also make you accountable” moves during deeper breathing.” more accountable on every exercise.” q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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BREATHE EASY We take 20,000 breaths a day, yet most of us are doing it wrong. Rebecca Newman discovers that learning to breathe properly

may just transform your life

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Dennis radiates calm, all big grins and glowing skin. It’s hard to see her as the person she describes in her book And Breathe, so beaten down by depression that she attempted suicide. She says breathing is what brought her back. “As babies, we breathe deeply from our belly,” she tells me. “But most adults breathe with just their chest. Often this is down to stress – we feel too busy to breathe, and get by on half-breaths.” These breaths send messages to our brain that we’re in a fightor-flight survival mode, spiking levels of the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline, and leading to health complaints such as poor digestion and anxiety. TB is designed to take you back to breathing deep, diaphragmatic breaths, to improve physical and mental health. By strengthening your diaphragm, it can also give you a flatter stomach, though these days I’d settle for a more even blood pressure. When Dennis asks what I’d like to achieve in the session, I answer, “Serenity.” Lying on the floor, I follow her instructions to open my mouth wide and breathe in for two counts then immediately out in a “rolling” breath. It requires full focus, and soon I feel a peculiar tingling in my hands. As I breathe, Dennis massages acupressure points on my body to release tension and whispers encouragement. When we finish, I feel oddly, deeply renewed. I hadn’t expected this just from breathing.

challenge of motherhood I hadn’t expected was postnatal depression. Around the birth of my baby, Luke, last year, things were hard. On a bad day I felt sucked underwater, struggling for air. It’s getting better, but it’s evolved into a less stifling but still persistent anxiety. I’ve noticed an ongoing sense of breathlessness. I feel the air getting stuck at the top of my chest, as though I don’t deserve to take in more of the oxygen around me. So it was with some excitement that I started to read about the restorative power of better breathing. It sounds so simple. While resting, adults breathe about 12-20 times per minute, yet many of us might be doing it ineffectively. Advocates, including Lena Dunham, Karlie Kloss and a host of medical experts, believe regular, mindful breath work can bring a sense of calm, lower blood pressure, help mental acuity and improve health and fitness. “If I had to limit advice on healthier living to one tip, it would be [learning] how to breathe correctly,” says integrative medicine expert Dr Andrew Weil. So I book in to see Transformational Breath (TB) facilitator Rebecca Dennis (yes, that job actually exists). I arrive at her studio with moderate expectations. I’ve tried meditation where the focus is breathing, but my mind wanders. And anyway, who wants to be the creepy tantric-yoga person with the ostentatiously groaning exhale?

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Photography: Getty Images

FIT CLUB Yogic breathing can also make a big difference when working out; once you’ve practised “learning to breathe” through your nose, apply the technique to exercise, as oxygen and carbon dioxide are thought to be best exchanged nasally. On the in-breath, the diaphragm contracts, expanding the lungs and drawing air through the nose. It’s then pulled through the wind I ask Dennis who will benefit from it. She reels off pipe into the lungs’ tiny air chambers. The oxygenated satisfied clients: a CEO with panic attacks, a lady with blood flows to the heart and is pumped around the fertility issues (who, on learning TB, became pregnant), body enabling cellular respiration (needed for most a boxer who improved his fighting skills. “Anyone,” cellular activity). More oxygen in and more CO₂ out she says. “This is why there is a surging interest in equals more energy generated. breath work, because so many people are stressed.” But it’s not all science. During sex, conscious Belief that breathing is good for you has been around breathing can heighten intimacy if you for centuries. Buddha, for example, stated synchronise your breath with your lover’s. that mindful breathing, developed and HOW TO In resistance training, breathing can be repeatedly practised, “is of great fruit, of BREATHE used as a way to hold the torso correctly. great benefit”. He left instruction on breath BY REBECCA DENNIS, “Exhalation engages the core, which supports meditation in a text, Anapanasati Sutta. TRANSFORMATIONAL the spine, reducing chance of injury,” Following on from Buddhism, some BREATH GURU explains personal trainer Neil Dimmock. branches of yoga are more focused on Prop yourself up on Breath work can also give us better control breathing. In kundalini yoga, energetic a bed with pillows behind you, so your chest is of our life, according to Michael Townsend breath work, or pranayama, is the bridge higher than your legs. Williams’ book Do Breathe: Calm Your Mind. between the mind and body. “Breathing Find Focus. Get Stuff Done. Townsend makes you immediately calmer and Make sure you’re warm Williams was an advertising producer who connected,” says Maya Fiennes, the yoga and comfortable, and was managing an alcohol addiction. He teacher whom Elle Macpherson dubs that your head and neck are supported. reached a nadir when his brother died inspirational. In kundalini yoga, breath falling from a balcony, but his salvation was techniques are used to arouse kundalini Place your hands on breath work. The book explains how using energy, said to rest at the base of the spine. your lower abdomen. the breath as an anchor can improve our “Your breath brings your kundalini energy Relax your jaw and focus, flow and productivity. “Awareness of from the lower chakras and bursting up widely open your mouth. our breath enables us to get in the zone to through the crown of your head.” Take a deep inhalation do our best work,” he tells me. The response I’m still not convinced about chakras, so – your belly should rise to the book was so strong, he launched an I look up psychologist Dr Emma Seppälä. like a balloon – and app, BreatheSync. He notes, “So many Her TEDx Talk, Breathing Happiness, refers exhale with a quick sigh. to a study that found not only do emotions people enjoyed Do Breathe, from Stay present: inhalation have their own breathing patterns, but also entrepreneurs to someone who bought should be twice as long that if you breathe according to the pattern a copy for a friend who was breathless as the exhalation, which associated with anger, calm or happiness, because of lung cancer, who told me the should be quiet like you will trigger that emotion. “It’s book kept her going until the very end.” a soft sigh. revolutionary. We can change how we feel Breathing is free, and you can practise it Keep the breath using our breath,” she says. And she’s properly just about anywhere. I do it at connected with no right: should your friend’s dog pee on your work, in the stationery cupboard. I swear it pauses. Repeat for one makes a difference to how much I achieve suede boots, deep breaths can transmute to two minutes. Rest for in a day. You can even do it on the train the most murderous intent (trust me). one minute as you or in the checkout line. It might just Seppälä set up a yogic breathing return to a normal breathing pattern. workshop for war veterans suffering change your life. q post-traumatic stress disorder. Exercises included ujjayi (victorious) breathing, a slow breath where you consciously experience the air touching the throat, and bhastrika (bellows) breathing, where air is rapidly inhaled and forcefully exhaled. “After six days, veterans who said they had felt ‘dead’ since returning from Iraq said they felt alive again,” says Seppälä. “Several studies suggest yogic breathing has positive effects on psychological wellbeing, blood pressure and heart rate. By activating the parasympathetic nervous system, in charge of ‘resting and digesting’, breathing can train the body to be calmer.” If it can work on ex-soldiers, then surely it could work for me. ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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This next-level, all-in-one desktop has got it all: extraordinary speeds, a pop-up camera and a s e x y u l t r a - w i d e c u r v e d d i s p l a y t h a t ’s s o h o t y o u ’ l l w a n t t o s h o w i t o f f .

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In keeping with the sleek design the HD camera and mic onl y pop up when in use, so you can maintain your pri vacy – and your aesthetic.

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LIVING

heart land

The Vista’s Julia Ashwood travels for a living, so her home base has to be pretty special if it’s going to lure her back

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OLD MEETS NEW Modern shapes and plenty of greenery breathe new life into an old home

I

n the picturesque rolling hills surrounding Byron Bay, you’ll find the charming timber Queenslander that’s home to Julia Ashwood, founder of popular travel website The Vista (followthevista.com), along with her husband Matterson Rabbidge and daughter Delilah Bee. The family have lived among the banana and lemon trees – and their sweet little vegie patch – for less than a year, packing up their lives in Sydney when Delilah was only eight weeks old. For Ashwood, it was a return to roots of sorts; she grew up in nearby Lennox Head. Since moving, their challenges have had less to do with geography and more to do with architecture. “Like most Queenslanders, there’s absolutely no storage, so you have to come up with your own solutions, like cupboards, racks and loads of baskets,” she explains. Ashwood gets to travel on the regular, penning her much-loved destination guides for The Vista. Her husband goes with her as photographer, while little Delilah is in charge of packing the cute. But how do they tear themselves away from such an idyllic spot so often? “We love to bring home an object or a souvenir from all our trips, whether it’s a cowbell or a blanket from India, a basket or woven rug from the Rose Bowl Flea Market in LA or a novelty tea towel from Hawaii. I dare say we’ll have a very exotic collection of things in 30 years’ time. We already do!” she laughs. ]

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BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE “My mum passed these gorgeous antique chairs to us,” Ashwood says of the vibrant, reupholstered chairs that dot the house. “They’re so fun”

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As with a lot of old houses, the magic of this one is in the unusual features, packed with personality and a long history. A serving hatch between the kitchen and living room allows for the flow of chat and tunes, more than it’s used for handing over dinner dishes. And panelled glass of mismatched shapes and colours gives softness to the inside light. “The master bedroom has beautiful light,” Ashwood says. “I love the long glass doors which open onto the verandah and the banana trees. It’s very peaceful waking up to the kookaburras.” To bring a little of the hinterland inside the walls, the family have plenty of house plants, with the flashes of green adding a living energy to their eclectic treasures. They also have an ever-rotating roster of art destined for the panelled walls. “My style is random, colourful and definitely artdriven. We love to support artists when we purchase items for the house, from the linen to the breakfast bowls. Matt also runs the gallery Mild Manners [mild-manners.com] so our collection is constantly multiplying,” she says. They might need some extra walls soon. ]


“I’M A SUCKER FOR COLOUR. AN ECLECTIC MIX OF EARTHY TONES AND ITEMS MAKES A SPACE WARMER AND MORE COMFORTABLE”

CHARM SCHOOL Stacks of books and keepsakes from the family’s travels give the space a charming, lived-in feel

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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LIVING Lamp shades, $295 each, Tigmi Trading, tigmitrading.com

Mobile, $269, Flensted Mobiles, designstuff.com.au

Dining table, $729, Castlery, castlery.com.au

Basket, $175, Olli Ella, olliella.com.au

Cushion, $180, Pampa, pampa.com.au

Cup, $35, PĂŁn Pottery, panpottery.com

Duvet set, $340, In Bed, inbedstore.com

Chair, $1,600, JD Lee Furniture, jdleefurniture.com

Unique, artisanal pieces layer together to make a space more individual, no matter what the bones of your place are like. q

Vase, $130, Samantha Robinson, samantharobinson.com.au

Floor cushion, $137, Nancybird, nancybird.com

Serving board, $49.95, Hope & May, hopeandmay.com

Sideboard, $799, Castlery, castlery.com.au Coaster, $65, Stoned Crystals, stonedcrystals.com

Sofa, $5,280, JD Lee Furniture, jdleefurniture.com

Basket, $149, West Elm, westelm.com.au

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Words and styling: Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani. Hair and makeup: Phoebe Fever

Rug, $3,790, Pampa, pampa.com.au


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Photography: Chris Jansen. Styling: Eden Abagi. Sunglasses, $210, Ray-Ban, ray-ban.com; bag, $4,050, Céline, (03) 9530 4300; Rouge Pur Couture lipstick, $55, Yves Saint Laurent, 1300 651 991; Gypsy Water, $158 for 50ml, Byredo, mecca.com.au; diary, $99.95, The Daily Edited, thedailyedited.com

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AND

STAY PLAY Get acquainted with the hotels where there’s so much fun to be had inside, you’ll never want to leave

BEST FOR HIPSTER CRED:

T

Mama Shelter, Los Angeles

he first American outpost from the French-owned Mama Shelter crew is designed by Thierry Gaugain (Philippe Starck’s protégé), so you’ll be stepping into a world that’s been expertly designed to encourage playfulness. The 70-room hotel in the heart of Hollywood likes to be unassuming; housed in a white ’30s-era building, it’s only once you enter that you realise just what you’re in for (and even then, the team pride themselves on the surprises you’ll discover over the course of your stay). The lobby houses a foosball table, bar, restaurant and fireplace with plenty of seating. During its renovation, the ceilings were lowered to create an intimate feel and are now painted black to act like an art installation – artists have turned it into a hipster Sistine Chapel with drawings and cheeky turns of phrase

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(it makes waiting for your coffee an entertaining exercise). Postcards and polaroid snaps scattered around amp up the homely feeling, and there’s a wall of gumball machines stocked with sweets in case you’re hungry – after all, this is not a regular mum, but a cool one. Proof of this fact is evident around 6pm, when the downstairs area becomes a magnet for the city’s coolest crowds who choose to wind down with cocktails at the lobby bar (each with names like Mama Mia or Mr Mom) or a bite to eat in the communal-style kitchen. If you want to snap a panoramic shot of LA, the rooftop bar is the place to go. You’ll find couches to curl up on with friends, and tables and chairs if a romantic dinner is more your speed. The rooms vary in size, but even the smallest is comfortable enough to empty the contents of your suitcase on the floor (go on, make yourself at home). Each has an iMac – it doubles as a TV and a computer, but its coolest function is the Photo Booth. Snap some shots on yours (opt for one of the provided masks if you want to go incognito), and if you elect to make them public, you may spot them on the computer in the lobby. It’ll keep the party vibe alive until the last moments of your day. mamashelter.com


TRAVEL B E S T F O R A SA I N THONORÉ PILGRIMAGE:

Hôtel La Tamise, Paris

T

here are plenty of wonderful places to stay in the French capital, but for those seeking a quintessentially Parisian getaway, it’s hard to turn down this boutique hotel. A short walk from the Metro and surrounded by the city’s most magnificent attractions – the Louvre, Musée d’Orsay, Jardin des Tuileries, Avenue des Champs-Élysées and, naturally, fashion boutique Colette – La Tamise is itself steeped in the kind of enviable history other hotels can only aspire to. Originally a familyowned manor built in the mid-19th century, it was converted into a 19-room hotel in 1878, attracting British and American travellers on a post-university adventure. Later, it became a hotspot for the models of local couturier Madame Grès (her studio was just around the corner) as well as fashion legends like model Twiggy and photographer Patrick Demarchelier. The hotel prides itself on having stayed true to its stylish and artistic roots – it’s equal parts traditional and modern, with velvet and tweed upholstery in the bedrooms and chic parquet floors and stained-glass window details throughout the lobby. Most rooms offer money-can’tbuy views of Rue d’Alger and the Tuileries garden, some from a balcony, and the decor is exactly what you’d expect in this part of the world – luxurious, understated and the tiniest bit opulent (think brass finishings and a bathroom mosaic courtesy of artist Mathilde Jonquière). The in-house restaurant serves up fresh, seasonal dishes, while the expertly curated wine list and pastries from nearby favourite

Fauchon will ensure you’re so wrapped up in what’s in front of you that you’ll completely forget to check your phone for hours at a time. A place to kick up your heels and turn in at sunrise, this is not (but you needn’t wander far to find a vibrant bar or club worth visiting). It’s a drawcard for a different reason; it’s the place to live out your French fantasies, upon plush velvet chairs, drinking rosé from Provence and practising your langue française over duck foie gras and truffle ravioli. We all know those kinds of evenings are priceless. ] paris-hotel-la-tamise.com

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B E S T F O R S TAY I N G U P ALL NIGHT:

A

The Hoxton, London

relatively new addition to the hotel scene, the ethos of the fast-growing Hoxton chain (one is just about to open in Paris’ 2nd arrondissement, with Williamsburg up next) is perhaps best exemplified at its Holborn outpost, in the centre of London. Despite the fact that it lies just beyond the foot trafficheavy areas of Soho and Covent Garden, you’ll never find a hotel lobby that’s as populated at any time – day or night – as this one. That’s not a bad thing. On the contrary, you’ll find it quite nice to saunter down for breakfast at in-house restaurant Hubbard & Bell and see morning meetings taking place or freelancers nabbing a table by the window and ordering their first of many flat whites for the day. If you plan to catch up on your emails, a sleep-in will most definitely inhibit your chances of getting a table to yourself but the lo-fi, communal atmosphere means sharing tables – and wine, later on – with new friends is just part of the fun. What The Hoxton lacks in typical hotel features – a pool or gym – it makes up for in atypical ones: a beauty parlour, chicken shop and lobby DJ spinning tunes well into the night. Yet while the music doesn’t stop until about 1am, the noise, thankfully, doesn’t carry up into the 174 rooms upstairs. The rooms are admittedly small (the smallest is the “Shoebox” at 14 square metres and the biggest is the “Roomy” with 23 square metres), but each is practical and cool, with

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vintage chairs, an appropriate amount of throw pillows and wallpaper illustrated with cute little drawings, the kind where you’ll always spot a detail you didn’t notice before. If you haven’t quite mastered the art of packing light, you may struggle to find a place for all your shoes. But The Hoxton doesn’t want you to stay holed up in your room all night – they’ll provide the essentials, like a comfortable bed, a decent shower and coffee and tea supplies, but they know that their customer is prone to a little FOMO and doesn’t at all mind being the last to leave the party. thehoxton.com


TRAVEL

B E S T F O R C I N E M AT I C NAME-DROPPING:

Words: Laura Collins. Photography: Francis Amiand; Rita Platts; Mauro Sostini; Gilles Trillard

Hotel Locarno, Rome

S

et in Rome’s vibrant art precinct – nearby galleries include the Gagosian, the Russo gallery and Magazzino – this 66-room Art Nouveau hotel was boutique before “boutique” was even a thing. In the ’70s, when hotel chains began populating the Eternal City, owner Maria Teresa Celli commenced a renovation that saw each room given a unique makeover – no two were the same, right down to the bathroom fixtures. Celli later purchased a palazzo adjacent to the hotel and filled it with larger, more deluxe suites, 18 in total. To this day, it feels more like a guesthouse of yesteryear – the rooms are filled with antique furniture, oil paintings, stuccoed ceilings and Lynchian red drapes, though mod cons like wi-fi, airconditioning and satellite TV aren’t forgotten. As beautiful as the quarters are, it’s the hotel bar that’s the main attraction – it’s been that way since the ’60s, when director Federico Fellini was a regular, and, in truth, it almost feels as though you’re stepping back in time when you swing by for aperitivo (actually, history is so important

here that the original poster promoting the hotel’s opening, designed by Anselmo Ballester, still hangs in the lobby). The lighting is low, the music just right and the tchotchkes so on-point that you’ll desperately want to shove something in your purse as a souvenir of your visit (but your conscience will get the better of you, of course). There’s no shortage of places to grab a drink once you’re here. On the roof, the bar provides sweeping views of the city and across the Tiber River, and is a favourite of both locals and expats in the height of summer. In cold weather, the lounge offers plush seating in front of the open fire and the bar staff, under the tutelage of mixologist Nicholas Pinna, will happily whip up one of their original cocktails for you (if your taste extends into the more VVIP zone, there’s a decent collection of rare bottles behind the counter, too). The courtyard, which connects the two buildings, is open year-round and is the perfect place to escape the sun beneath the shade – and scent – of the blooming wisteria. It’s absurdly pretty, so ensure your phone is fully charged and its storage isn’t full. q hotellocarno.com

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ASK

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ADVICE

E QU STI

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A

EMAIL ejean@bauer-media.com.au OR TWEET @ejeancarroll

right decisions. I looked you up. You’re about as unfeeble as a gorgeous, cultivated, brainy woman can be. So you know your affair is romantic, painful, sexy and marvellous because it’s so uncertain, right? Enjoy him!

THE BREAK-UP ARTIST DEAR E JEAN, If I were Adele,

all my songs would be about this guy. He’s a complex character; a neurosurgeon who’s wickedly funny and intelligent. After eight months of us being crazy for – Ravishing Regards, E Jean each other, he broke up with me. I resolved to find DEAR E JEAN, I like this idea someone better, online-dated, a lot. But I still haven’t called. met okay men who all If he doesn’t answer, I’ll seemed to be fighting with spend the night being killed their exes, rejected them all by jealousy, thinking he’s and fell back in with the man with someone else. Getting who broke up with me. It back together has its advantages. Seriously, it’s was a wonderful couple of what dreams are made of! months, then he broke up But is the anguish worth it? with me again for someone Tormented? Driven witless? else. I missed him desperately. – Back-And-Forth Fear not, help is just a short letter away Two weeks later, he came FORTH, DARLING! You’re having back to me. It was romantic more anguish anticipating and fun and lasted another six months until he broke anguish than feeling actual anguish. It’s hard to up with me yet again. That was 10 days ago. know anything for sure, so let’s spell this out: if you He says he would marry me if a second marriage decide the pain of revelling and laughing and were in the cards for him. I’ve already accumulated one quarrelling and flying back to each other and possibly ex-husband, but if this fellow were game, I’d try it breaking up (again) is greater than the pain of missing again. I adore him. He admires me and agrees we have him “desperately” – don’t call him. But if you believe great fun together, but he’s not certain he can commit. the ecstasy of getting back together and giving yourself I have a wonderful life – children, career, many friends at least a shot at making a life together is greater than – but I miss him! I’m writing to you because he sent the regret of not giving it another shot, call him. a text yesterday saying to call him and signalling he wants to get back together. Should I? I’m looking for MORNING GLORY: MINUTE BY MINUTE nothing less than magic. I just don’t know why I’m DEAR E JEAN, This is my morning routine: wake up holding on to this man so tight. at 6am. Fall back asleep. Wake up again at 7am. Look at – Back-And-Forth my phone. Start shouting at myself. Enter bathroom. Exit feeling calm and fresh. Look at my phone. Discover BRACE YOURSELF, FORTH A hideous choice is before you. I’ve spent 40 minutes in there! At this point, I’m no From this moment on, you’ll be detested by one longer calm. I start getting dressed and looking segment of society – spiritual leaders, self-help book desperately for the top I could swear was on the drying floggers and members of the Advice Columnists’ Yacht rack. Now it’s 7.55. This leaves me five minutes to do And Garden Club will never speak to you again if you my hair – and I never go a day without a compliment do call Dr Neurosurgeon, and I will never speak to on my hair. It’s 8.26am when I’m done. Feeling like you again if you don’t. If the man were a cad, a drunk, a bore, a fool, if he hit you, disrespected you, tried to I’m forgetting something keeps me in the house until control you, I’d say, “Get him gone!” But he seems 8.40. I get to work at 9.25 – late. This happens every a good egg or, as you say, “complex, wickedly funny, day! I can’t get myself out of this rut. Can you help? and intelligent”. So call him. – The Girl Who Runs Late Now, I know this goes against every syllable of MY GIRL Begin your routine 15 minutes earlier, and you’ve advice from the Miss Lonelyhearts Advisory And got yourself the kind of gorgeously ambitious day that Corset Committee. They’re forever telling women after F Scott Fitzgerald writes of in The Great Gatsby. To wit: a couple of break-ups with a chap to “Never go back!” 6.45: Open eyes. (as I myself have advised many times in this column)… 6.45-6.46: Rise to sitting position. Raise glass from as if women are too feeble and oversexed to make the bedside table. Toast to “falling in love”. Drink 300ml of

ask e jean

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water. All sorts of sweet, exciting health benefits are ascribed to drinking water first thing in the morning on an empty stomach (jolts metabolism, revs the digestive tract, thrills the brain and so on), but these claims never mention the main thing: it wakes a betch up! 6.47: Enter bathroom. 7.30: Exit bathroom. 7.31: Get dressed. Now, Gatsby had a lot of shirts, yes. But if you pry open your closet the night before and use your imagination, you can style four or five interesting outfits straight from the cast-offs in the back (I can only imagine what you may find in the front). Hang your outfit on the closet door the night before. 7.45: Hair. (And may Auntie E say, yours looks stunning!) 8.15: Exit house. There’ll be no frenzied loping through the premises, muttering, “Where are my damn sunglasses?” Everything you need for the day will be neatly arranged and waiting by the front door. Why? Because you put it there the night before. 8.58: Arrive at work. You can’t change the world unless you get out of bed.

HOW A LADY TREATS A STRIPPER DEAR E JEAN, For my birthday party at her house, my

14 MINUTES COVER NAKEDNESS

best friend surprised me with a stripper. Unfortunately, her husband came home early and asked (with a smile) how his wife behaved. We laughed and I said she only “took a glimpse of his boxers”. Which was true, but somehow this hit a nerve, and her husband became furious. So I guess it’s a question of etiquette: how should a woman behave when eye-to-eye with a stripper? It was my birthday and the stripper focused on me, and I didn’t know what to do!

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HOW TO BEAT THE CLOCK 43 MINUTES MORNING TOILETTE

1 MINUTE GUZZLE H�O ELIXIR

A CURE FOR TEXTING LOGORRHEA DEAR E JEAN, I need a new dating strategy. If I get hurt badly by a guy, I stay single for a while. Then a new guy comes along and sweeps me off my feet. But once intimacy happens, communication dissipates, and the guy starts disappearing. So I start over-texting him and completely scare him off. How do I calm down?

– The Over-Texter

Photography: Gregg Delman. Styling: Christian Stroble. Hair: Eduardo Carrasco at Ford Artists NYC. Makeup: Sylwia Rakowska at Ford Artists NYC

I’m not sure why it works. Maybe because I don’t ask my girlfriends for their opinion, or I stand up and hold the phone at arm’s length, or all the mental shouting lathers my brain into such a heightened state that it pops the champagne corks of adrenaline – and when the adrenaline fizzes, my mind becomes sharper, and when my mind is sharper, my text is put into perspective, and when my text is put into perspective, it’s easier to recognise that only a crazed imbecile would text the chap at that moment. Or perhaps because it just makes me laugh. Either way, I rarely hit Send. PS: Texting too much/too little/too much/too little is the endless double helix of hell we all fall into. But if you hold off on shagging a chap until you’re more certain it’s true lust, you might be happier.

OVER, MY ORCHID Alas, I don’t have the answer. That is to say... I don’t have the answer. I have an answer, of course. It’s a little trick that works for me. Instead of telling myself to “calm down” as I punch out a text, I do the opposite. I fire up. I say to myself: “Look at this text! This is big, E Jean! This is colossal! This text is better than Shakespeare! It’s cooler than Beyoncé! This is the most sublime text ever sent by womankind!”

– Eye Of The Stripper Storm

professional rank, or how many companies you run, when a woman is confronted with a gentleman who bursts into the room shaking his butt and winking his navel, there’s one rule: you must courteously scream and faint. You are then free to proceed with as much yelling and whooping as possible, with these caveats: 1. Never sit facing him, unless you can defend yourself by throwing hors d’oeuvres at him. 2. Never pull the stripper’s tank top off over his head if he has a lit cigarette in his mouth. 3. Never spank a stripper, even when he asks, as it’s best to ignore a child who’s behaving improperly. 4. Never post incriminating photos if your boss checks Instagram. 5. Never bend over to get something from your purse while the chap is performing. Trust Auntie E on this. 6. When the husband of the hostess arrives home early and asks about the male stripper, the hostess has only one reply: “Ha! Ha! Ha! He looked half as large as you!” q

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HOROSCOPES ON

@temple_healing_arts

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What does August have in store for your career, love life and friendships? Astrologer Ashley Otero reveals all

LEO

JUL 24 – AUG 23

August will be an eventful month for you, Leo, with a lunar eclipse and solar eclipse occurring in your sign and your opposing sign (Aquarius). The lunar eclipse on August 8 hints at big changes in relationships over the next six months. While Mercury will be in retrograde for most of August, expressing yourself and showing your romantic side will come much easier. You’ll even get a boost in confidence between August 26 and 31. But the most noteworthy event is the solar eclipse in your sign on August 22. Expect some major shifts to the way you present yourself, and you should also consider cultivating rejuvenating health practices.

SCORPIO

AQUARIUS

TAURUS

Important events involving home and family stand out during the start of the month, particularly around the lunar eclipse on August 8. Finishing up a project or buying something practical could be something to look forward to. The majority of August, however, revolves around the changes that come with a thriving career. A step in a new direction will become a focus around the solar eclipse on August 22. As Mercury’s retrograde moves back into Leo on August 31, new enthusiasm over a goal could help motivate you for the next few weeks.

The August 8 lunar eclipse will put a spotlight on you, encouraging you to forge a path to your community’s shared aspirations. A strong support system stands behind you, offering reinforcement against obstacles. Whether you share a direct goal with a group or represent something others have confidence in, people resonate with your hopes for the future. But the highlight of the month will be your one-to-one relationships, with the solar eclipse on August 22 serving as a gateway for new partnerships, either business or personal, to blossom.

The lunar eclipse on August 8 will bring considerable change to your professional status, which could continue to take shape over the next six months. Whether you get a promotion or take on a new job altogether, expect transition in your work life. This month also marks a pivotal change in the very foundation of your life around the solar eclipse on August 22. This could mean welcoming a new family member, moving houses or new developments in domestic matters. Whatever is the case, you’ll receive plenty of support from your loved ones.

VIRGO

SAGITTARIUS

PISCES

GEMINI

Mercury’s retrograde in your sign this month asks you to reorganise your thoughts and become more mindful of your needs. If anyone can attest to the mind/body connection and the effects of overthinking, it’s you. This month’s eclipses, especially the solar eclipse on August 22, emphasise a need to take a break. Eclipse season is exhausting on its own, but you have plenty going on that makes rest essential. The sun enters your sign on August 23, marking your birthday month – which means it’s all about you. Be kind to yourself and only do what makes you feel good.

Issues regarding your financial situation resurface around the beginning of the month. To get your dreams off the ground, you’ll need to seek help from the right people. You may not feel like you have a big support system, but there are some willing to lend a hand if you’re ready to offer something in return. Although Mercury’s station retrograde, on August 12, will require you to redesign your vision and perhaps revise some of your professional goals, you’ll find yourself gradually making progress throughout the month. Be alert and ready to seize opportunities that await you.

It could feel like your aspirations are at the mercy of those with more power. While it’s true that further evolution of your labour of love depends on access to other people’s resources, your creativity will help you attract what you need. Continue to share your unique selling points with enthusiasm and pay attention to potential opportunities. Although most of your focus is on work now, that will shift when the sun enters Virgo on August 23. Keep in mind that interaction with a partner will nudge you to be more thoughtful about the way you communicate with them.

Paying closer attention to what family members are saying and tending to technological hiccups (like internet issues) will be a major focus as Mercury turns retrograde this month, starting on August 12. Keeping your home organised may prevent you from misplacing things, but make sure you note where you move something to because it’ll be easy to forget later. Consider freshening up your living space once the sun enters Virgo on August 23. Around this time, communication with a loved one or business partner will also feel smoother and commitment issues will begin to move forward.

LIBRA

CAPRICORN

ARIES

CANCER

This month brings opportunities for career advancement, but they won’t come without some tough choices. Over the past year, you’ve grown tremendously. Now, you’ll be catapulted through one more round of changes as the very foundations of your life shift. You might be showered with attention and affection, or face pressure that threatens to disturb the peace at home. Now’s the time to decide what you’ve outgrown and what it’s time to move towards. While it’s important not to let frustration steer your decisions, you should ask yourself which direction feels right.

The first few days of August bring a climax to an issue between your growing professional influence and the profound metamorphosis you’ve been undergoing, and it will demand a big adjustment. Navigating a partner’s needs is the other major theme. Don’t be surprised if a partner complains they feel like they come second to your work or if their need for attention causes you stress in other areas of life. Although it’s not easy, you’ll have to decide: could you be more compassionate to your significant other’s insecurities, or is it in your best interests to go separate ways?

There’s a lot going on in your personal relationships this month. Sorting out a conflict of interest between a partnership and your work is a must. Major shifts in your professional life will also require more sensitivity and compassion with family affairs. It could feel overwhelming as family, partnerships and work all compete for your attention, but the people in your inner circle need to know they matter. A solar eclipse on August 22 serves up a cocktail of passion and drama. Whether you fall in love or give birth to a creative project, you’ll enjoy a boost in confidence.

Getting in touch with what makes you feel good is a major theme this month. Working on making your home more comfortable will be a priority, but don’t be surprised if some intense confrontation begs for your attention as well. Residual issues concerning a changing partnership are culminating now. Patching them up will require you to dig deeper into dark places that are difficult to talk about, but it needs to be done. Keep an eye out for financial opportunities around the solar eclipse on August 22. You could be making unexpected changes within your career before you know it. q

AUG 24 – SEP 23

SEP 24 – OCT 23

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

OCT 24 – NOV 22

NOV 23 – DEC 22

DEC 23 – JAN 20

JAN 21 – FEB 19

FEB 20 – MAR 20

MAR 21 – APR 20

APR 21 – MAY 21

MAY 22 – JUN 21

JUN 22 – JUL 23

Illustration: Joanna Sotiriou

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EXTRA

Sneakers, skincare and seriously chic hair – we’ve got

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A’KIN

Photography: Georges Antoni at The Artist Group. Styling: Rachel Wayman. Hair: Daren Borthwick at The Artist Group. Makeup: Noni Smith at The Artist Group. Model: Rosie Tupper at IMG. Model wears: dress, $870, Ellery, ellery.com; earrings, $69, COS, cosstores.com; ring, $375, Lucy Folk, lucyfolk.com

Love rosehip oil? Well, A’kin has made it even better. The new Rosehip Oil With Vitamin C offers the same intense hydrating benefits, but with added collagen-boosting and skin-brightening vitamin C plus softening macadamia oil. The result: healthy skin that glows. $29.95; akin.com.au

TRESEMMÉ

Forget everything you know about mousse. TRESemmé Beauty-Full Volume Touchable Bounce Mousse gives you the lift and hold you love, without crunch. It’s thanks to Fleximax Volumisers, which amp up the bounce while keeping hair soft. You really can have it all. $7.99; 1800 061 027

L’ORÉAL PARIS

For a false-lash look minus the hassle, try L’Oréal Paris False Lash X Fiber mascara. One end has a thickening primer, and the other a lengthening, ultra-black formula. Expect the lashes you’ve always dreamt of (and a reason to cancel your extensions appointment). $28.95; lorealparis.com.au

OFFICEWORKS

Fact: a clean, uncluttered workspace has the same effect on your thinking, so this minimalist Linear desk from Officeworks is a must. It has a sleek finish yet is strong and sturdy. Think of it as a career investment (and a chic addition to your home office). $199; officeworks.com.au

NOVO

Sneakers are still big news this season, but if you’re bored of your regular old kicks, get a lift with Novo’s Charlee flatforms. Paired with jeans, dresses or even slouchy suiting, they’re guaranteed to take any outfit to new heights. $79.95; novoshoes.com.au

BLOOMSBURY

It’s the book everyone’s talking about. Argentinian writer Samanta Schweblin’s haunting novel Fever Dream focuses on the eerie dialogue between a dying woman and a young boy. Seriously addictive, it’s like a ghost story for the real world. $19.99; bloomsbury.com/au

IRO

Feminine. Effortless. Cool. Iro’s new collection speaks our language. Inspired by the It-girls of the young Hollywood of the ’90s, you can expect relaxed denim and slinky slips. Our pick? This floaty blouse – the perfect way to celebrate the arrival of spring. Blouse, $329; (02) 9362 1165

DYSON

The Dyson Supersonic is set to end bad hair days. With its innovative engineering – the motor has moved to the handle for easy manoeuvring and temperature is measured 20 times per second to prevent heat damage – expert hairstyling is literally at your fingertips. $499; dyson.com.au

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last PAGE As answered by

Charlotte Tilbury

– makeup maestro, backstage mainstay, founder of her eponymous beauty line and the steady hand behind BFF Kate Moss’ signature feline flick WHAT WAS THE LAST... …THING YOU BOUGHT WITH CASH? A youth-boosting Bodyism smoothie to detox, energise and kickstart my metabolism.

…INVESTMENT PIECE YOU BOUGHT? A genius piece by the British sculptor Antony Gormley and a work of art by my great friend Louie Simpson.

…PARTY YOU WENT TO? I had the most amazing time at a party Madonna threw in LA.

…BEAUTY PRODUCT YOU APPLY BEFORE BED? A smudge of my brand’s Rock ’N’ Kohl eyeliner and some Full Fat Lashes mascara to elongate and define my eyes. I call it my “bedroom eye”!

…PIECE OF CLOTHING YOU B OUGHT? AN AMAZING BL ACK CHLOÉ DRESS.

…SONG YOU PL AYED ON ROTATION?

“YOU GOT THE LOVE” BY CANDI STATON – IT’S KATE’S AND MY FAVOURITE SONG.

…THING YOU DO TO A MODEL BEFORE SENDING HER OUT ONTO THE RUNWAY? I lightly dust the skin with my incredible Airbrush Flawless Finish powder to set makeup, and spray my Scent Of A Dream fragrance.

…BOOK YOU READ? Return To The Little Kingdom: How Apple & Steve Jobs Changed The World by Michael Moritz.

…PHOTO YOU TOOK ON YOUR PHONE? A photo of my husband George jumping into a lake with my gorgeous two boys Flynn and Valentine.

…VACATION YOU TOOK? I went to the Maldives with all my friends and family.

...TIME YOU WERE RELAXED? On the weekend. Any spare time I have I always spend with my husband and sons.

…CO CKTAIL YOU DRANK? A SKINNY BITCH WITH VODKA, LIME AND SODA – MY FAVOURITE COCKTAIL.

…TIME YOU CRIED? I cried tears of joy with my incredible Team Tilbury – we were discussing just how much we’ve achieved since launching the brand almost four years ago.

…TEXT MESSAGE YOU SENT? TO MY HUSBAND, TELLING HIM HOW MUCH I LOVE HIM!

…TEXT MESSAGE YOU RECEIVED? From my CEO, to confirm meeting times.

…TIME YOU FELT REALLY HAPPY? ALWAYS, DARLING!

Compiled by: Elle McClure; Sara McLean. Photography: Getty Images; Instagram: @ctilburymakeup. Beauty Food, $69.95, Bodyism, bodyism.com; Rock ’N’ Kohl in Barbarella Brown, $43, Full Fat Lashes in Glossy Black, $48, Airbrush Flawless Finish, $70, all Charlotte Tilbury, charlottetilbury.com/au; dress, $2,400, Chloé, net-a-porter.com

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