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j a n ďż˝ f e b ďż˝ m a r 2017 I S S U E 06

mokulele.com

C O M P L I M E N TA R Y C O P Y


TABLE OF CONTENTS

b.

ON THE COVER

IN-FLIGHT INFORMATION 58 | Route Map 60 | Airport Maps

This large window opens onto a living exhibit at Maui Ocean Center, revealing cup corals, wire corals, mushroom corals, and other life found in the waters of Hawai‘i. Photo by John Hook.

DO! 10 | Unquenchable Dynamic waterman Kai Lenny always paddles out.

a.

12 | Plate Lunch Perfection Chef Sheldon Simeon takes a humble midday meal to the next level at his casual eatery. 14 | Transformation Artist Traditional cloth-making survives near extinction with the help of kapa artisans on Hawai‘i Island. 16 | Relocating the Reef Experts from Maui Ocean Center research and restore Hawai‘i coral in the face of natural disasters and global warming. 22 | The Making Mill What was once a hub of the sugar industry is now the sweet spot for makers of everything from surfboards to soap on O‘ahu’s North Shore. 30 | Lava Encounters A pilgrimage to Hawai‘i’s source of creation. 34 | Itinerary: Kailua Four places to see in this windward town of O‘ahu. GUIDE 38 | Do / Shop / Eat a. Spectators above a Kīlauea Volcano lava flow.

b. A quiet view at the Waialua Sugar Mill.


2 PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

MASTHEAD

jason cutinella

editor anna harmon

creative DIRECTOR ara feducia

DESIGNER michelle ganeku

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR john hook

PHOTO EDITOR samantha hook

COPY EDITOR andy beth miller

CONTRIBUTORS sonny ganaden k e l l i g r atz le‘a gleason

IMAGES b rya n b e rkowitz brian bielmann

evp & editorial director li sa yama da - s o n lisa@nellamediagroup.com CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER joe v. bock joe@nellamediagroup.com GROUP PUBLISHER mike wiley

mike@nellamediagroup.com marketing & advertising director k e e ly b r u n s

keely@nellamediagroup.com marketing & advertising executive chelsea tsuchida

chelsea@nellamediagroup.com marketing & advertising executive kera yong

kera@nellamediagroup.com OPERATIONS DIRECTOR j i ll m i yas h i ro

jill@nellamediagroup.com vp BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT g a ry pay n e

rya n m os s ijfke ridgley

junior designer mitchell fong

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES sales@nellamediagroup.com 808-688-8349

Published By

Nella Media Group 36 N. Hotel St., Suite A Honolulu, HI 96817 nellamediagroup.com ©2017 by Nella Media Group, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reprinted without the written consent of the publisher. Opinions are solely those of the contributors and are not necessarily endorsed by Mokulele Airlines.


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b.

ABOUT THE ISSUE

a.

Welcome to Hopper, the magazine of Mokulele Airlines.

c.

Hawai‘i is a place of constant creation. The islands were born of magma rising from volcanoes on the ocean floor, and on the Big Island, lava continues to flow into the sea. Over on O‘ahu, surfboard shapers, a jewelry maker, and a soap factory share a retired sugar mill as a workspace. And all around the islands, coral is growing, and hosting lifeforms unique to Hawai‘i. You don‘t have to look far to find something being made anew. So read on, and then go see it for yourselves.

a. Island Fin Design at Waialua Sugar Mill.

b. Tin Roof’s mochiko chicken kau kau tin.

c. Kai Lenny paddles the distance.


6 CEO LETTER

E komo mai! I arrived in Hawai‘i in 1961 as a young airman based at Hickam Air Force Base, and fell in love with the islands. I learned to fly at the Hickam Aero Club, advancing to flight instructor while attending night school at the University of Hawai‘i. After the Air Force, I was hired as a pilot for Braniff Airways, progressing from propeller aircraft to the Boeing 747 over the next 25 years. During my career as an airline captain, my favorite destination was always Hawai‘i, and I estimate that about 30,000 passengers have arrived here on my flights. As the owner of Mokulele, I continue to live my dream by providing about 100 daily flights between the islands and giving back to the communities that I love so much. I am especially pleased that Mokulele provides jobs for hundreds of young pilots on our operations in Hawai‘i and California. Our pilot training program has been the stepping stone to fulfill the dreams of hundreds of pilots starting as first officers on our Grand Caravan planes, and then progressing to captain. Our Grand Caravans are reliable workhorses that allow Mokulele to maintain a 95 percent dispatch reliability and be 98 percent on time while carrying about 25,000 passengers monthly. They are powered by 875-horsepower PT6 engines built by Pratt and Whitney Canada. Since 1960, PT6 engines have accumulated 335 million hours. The year of 2016 was especially exciting for Mokulele! We officially launched and now proudly offer scheduled service out of three airports in California: Imperial/El Centro, Los Angeles, and Santa Maria. We are honored to provide the same reliable service that made us successful in Hawai‘i in California. Those of you who are familiar with Mokulele know that it is our ongoing commitment to safety, reliability, and integrity that has helped Mokulele to create connections that continue to strengthen our communities one airport at a time. On behalf of myself, my family, and our extended family of nearly 250 employees that make up Mokulele Airlines, my deepest mahalo and aloha for continuing to make my dream a reality.

Mahalo,

ron ceo

hansen and

owner

mokulele

airlines


8 O ‘ a hu image by john

hook

Do! Walk the winding paths of Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden. Nestled at the foot of O‘ahu’s dramatic Ko‘olau Mountain Range, this botanical garden spreads over 400 lush acres. It was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1982 to prevent the flooding of Kāne‘ohe, and its Hawaiian name means “to protect” or “to give peace.” On the grounds are plants from major tropical regions around the world, open spaces perfect for picnicking, and a 32-acre reservoir lake where catch-andrelease fishing is offered every weekend morning.

Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden is located in Kāne‘ohe at 45-680 Luluku Rd. Entrance is free. For more information, visit honolulu.gov/parks/ hbg.html.


10 M aui text by lisa

yamada

Unquenchable Dynamic waterman Kai Lenny always paddles out.

images by brian

bielmann

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t was 30 seconds. Thirty seconds that Kai Lenny was held underwater, after he wiped out at the bottom of a 50-foot wave at Pe‘ahi, also known as Jaws, Maui’s infamous surf break. The biggest barrel he’s ever ridden crushed him with the weight of millions of tons of water. “I got absolutely destroyed,” Kai recalls. “But as I was underwater, I just couldn’t get out of my head the amazing view I had. Bar-none, it was the happiest I’ve ever been when I came up, and I just wish I could experience it again soon.” The 24-year-old excels at surf sports of all kinds, from windsurfing to foil-boarding. His parents are avid windsurfers from California who moved to Maui before he was born, and he attributes his love for ocean sports to them. “We would go to the beach every chance we could,” Kai’s father, Martin, says. “[Kai] was kinda doomed. … We had a little crib in the van that we’d put out on the beach. Then we’d go surfing, and then later in the afternoon, it’d get windy, so we’d go windsurfing.” Kai caught his first ankle-high wave when he was 4-years-old at Thousand Peaks in Maui, and realized it was what he wanted to do for the rest of his life. At 9 years old, he was sponsored by Maui-based surf company Naish, and at 11, by Red Bull. Now, he’s a seasoned professional who travels the globe. Kai has trained and competed in paddle boarding in San Francisco and New York, and surfed the famed big-

Above: Kai Lenny also kitesurfs and stand-up paddles.

wave break Mavericks in California. Last year, he broke the world record for the 32-mile stand-up paddle race from Moloka‘i to O‘ahu, and he has won three of the past four years of the Stand Up World Tour. While Kai is an accomplished athlete, he still considers himself a student. “The time you stop getting better at something is when you forget how to learn,” Kai says. “I’m just going to keep putting my paddle in front of me and get closer to that island. There’s no better feeling than when you’re coming into the home stretch and you’re like … I’m making it.” For more information on Kai and his foundation, which provides grants for improving ocean awareness and youth development to nonprofits, visit positivelykai.com.


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Kai Lenny caught his biggest barrel to date at Pe‘ahi, also known as Jaws, on Maui.


12 M aui text by kelli

gratz

images by ijfke

T

ridgley

in Roof is easy to miss, flanked by an art gallery and a payday loan office in a strip mall near the airport in Kahului. But after its debut in April 2016, the bustling takeout spot became an immediate favorite, offering perfected local fare like its kau kau tins (bowls with rice and meat) with the choice of mochiko chicken, pork belly, chop steak, garlic shrimp, or poke. The mochiko chicken is marinated overnight in ginger sake shoyu, topped with sumiso and gochujang mayonnaise, and pairs excellently with a side of ‘ulu (breadfruit) macaroni salad and a six-minute egg. Also instant hits are the daily specials such as the miso saimin bowl, made with fresh noodles, pickled dashi kombu, pork belly, and kalua pig.

Plate Lunch Perfection Chef Sheldon Simeon takes a humble midday meal to the next level at his casual new eatery.

Behind Tin Roof’s success are husband and wife owners Sheldon and Janice Simeon. Sheldon garnered acclaim while at Maui’s Star Noodle restaurant, and debuted his first restaurant, Migrant, in 2013 (closed temporarily, but reopening in Wailuku this year). Having dreamt of having a takeout lunch spot since he was a finalist on Top Chef: Seattle in 2012, Sheldon decided it was time to do so with Tin Roof when the space’s previous tenant, Koko Ichiban Ya, shut its doors after nearly 25 years. “I couldnʼt afford to see another local spot close down,” Sheldon says. “This was an opportunity to service the community, to serve local food, to go back to our roots, to go back to the food that I like to eat, and present it in a much more casual way.”

The inspiration for Tin Roof came from the mom and pop lunch spots that Sheldon frequented as a child in the rainy town of Hilo, and particularly from his fond memories of the sound of downpours hitting his family garage’s tin roof during gatherings and lū‘au. Janice, who has a background in accounting but can also be found working Tin Roof’s counter alongside Sheldon, is equally as excited to have begun this new adventure. “Sheldon is very ambitious,” she says. “He sets goals and goes after them, always thinking up ways to be better, do better, always hungry for more.” Tin Roof is located in Kahului at 360 Papa Pl., Ste. Y. For more information, visit tinroofmaui.com.


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Chef Sheldon Simeon creates flavors of home, like garlic shrimp, at his plate lunch shop.


14 Big isl a nd text by le‘a gleason images by john

hook

Transformation Artist Traditional cloth-making survives near extinction with the help of kapa artisans on Hawai‘i Island.

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n Big Island’s Kamuela town, Roen Hufford walks the organic vegetable farm she and her husband operate. Along a path that winds through the lawn are lush ‘ōhi‘a, shady fern groves, flowering protea, and two large patches of wauke, used in making traditional Hawaiian kapa cloth. There’s the poa‘aha variety, with heart-shaped leaves and thick, felt-like bark, and mana lima, a taller variety. In a single, swift motion, Hufford deftly harvests a stalk of poa‘aha using a tool gifted to her by a fellow kapa maker. Handmade from wood and shell, its barely audible scrape removes the outer bark of the plant with stunning precision and efficiency. In ancient times, women beat wauke every day to make kapa for loincloths, blankets, and other adornments. The pieces that came out rougher were worn by commoners, while more embellished pieces were given to ali‘i, the royalty or nobility. But when missionaries brought fabric to the islands, kapa making diminished almost instantly. Everything Hufford knows about kapa making was passed down to her by her teacher and mother, Marie MacDonald, a self-taught living master who began making kapa in 1948. At 90, MacDonald no longer actively pounds kapa, yet she remains among a select few responsible for a cultural renaissance in the transforming of wauke to cloth. The finished product, resulting from several stages of pounding, is a thin sheet of cloth-like fiber that

Above: Kapa cloth is made by harvesting wauke (top), beatiing it with wooden tools (middle), and printing it with natural dyes using ‘ohe kapala (bottom).

can be gently crinkled or rubbed with coral, stone, or shells to soften it further. In a small studio near her laundry room (“It’s very appropriate,” says Hufford, who sometimes dons the traditional cloth for special occasions), she prints her kapa cloth using natural dyes made from fruits, leaves, roots, and earth—a process also passed down from her mother. Hufford’s pieces have shown at Bishop Museum, Merriman’s, and the Wailoa Arts and Cultural Center. “What I like about [beating kapa] is this is transformed from that piece of bark I cut out there,” Hufford says. “Then it gets transformed by beating on it, letting it get hot, and then adding color to it. And pretty soon it doesn’t look like anything it started out as.”


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Roen Hufford, above, learned kapa making from her mother, Marie MacDonald, a self-taught master of the art.


16 M aui text by sonny

ganaden

images by ijfke

ridgley

Relocating the Reef Experts from Maui Ocean Center research and restore Hawai‘i coral in the face of natural disasters and global warming.

Finger coral and honeycomb coral in Maui Ocean Center’s shallow-reef exhibit.


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Marine biologist and Maui Ocean Center’s head curator John Gorman tends to coral in the wet lab.


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e get all sorts of responses when we ask visiting school kids what they think coral is; if it’s an animal, a plant, or a mineral,” says Jim Luecke, assistant curator at the Maui Ocean Center. The center—which is home to several aquariums featuring the same endemic ocean life that is found within its surrounding 10-mile radius, as well as a café, a restaurant, a wet lab, and a learning center—fronts the harbor at the south end of the perennially windy Ma‘alaea Road. “Really, it’s all of those things,” Luecke tells the students. He can’t blame the kids for not knowing what coral is, as even brilliant scientists across the tropics are still attempting to determine the complexity of coral reef ecosystems. Global tropical waters are the equivalent of barren deserts on land, low in nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus—in them, reefs are oases, teeming with life. Corals are, in fact, tiny animals, with even tinier plants living inside them. The reef consists of countless generations of dead coral topped by a layer of alive coral, creating a form of geologic mineral and habitat that protects the shore from the ravages of the sea. “Hawai‘i may be one of the last, best places to do continuing coral research,” Luecke says, “because ocean warming and acidification isn’t as bad here as it is in other parts of the world.” As coral experts operating under the direction of head curator and marine biologist John Gorman, the staff at Maui Ocean Center have been

growing their own coral since the center’s opening in 1998. Over the last six years, the team has put that expertise to use in collaboration with the Hawai‘i Department of Natural Resources, performing coral research, recovery, and relocation projects. As a result of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that originated in Tōhoku, Japan, piers across the Hawaiian Islands, including those at Lāhainā Small Boat Harbor, Moloka‘i Harbor, and Ma‘alaea Harbor, required repair and rebuilding. Decades of reef, which had grown around the pilings, needed to be chiseled off prior to the reconstruction. The center was tasked with the removal and relocation of live coral within these harbors. Harvesting coral is difficult and dangerous work, a mix of construction demolition and something akin to underwater basket weaving. From 2013 to the present, while the three Hawai‘i harbors were under full use, Maui Ocean Center experts used hammers and chisels to break off decades of coral growth from the pilings, and then transported them to other parts of the reef or to the facility in haste. The work at Lāhainā Harbor was particularly difficult, as boats motored overhead, and surfers on both sides of the harbor mouth caught waves. The center maintained a curatorial and scientific instinct when documenting the process, tagging each piece retrieved. After years of tracked growth in the lab, the center’s team “planted” some of the coral on the reef near the piers. They used a Above: Hawai‘i corals are rehabilitated under LED light.


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process that resembles underwater tiling, employing marine epoxy and a wire brush to remove any algae, sediment, or debris before an hour-long “babysitting” period in which the lab-grown coral sets. This prolonged effort has ramifications for the peoples of the Pacific. Coral science is still developing in labs around the world, where experts are attempting to determine the mechanisms for the survival of reefs as the world’s oceans continue to warm and acidify. Reefs around the world are estimated to be home to anywhere from one million to nine million species. In Hawai‘i, 20 to 25 percent of coral types are unique to the islands, and the reefs are a major component of the economy via fishing, tourism, and ocean sports. Without these thriving reefs, the islands’ ecology—and the lifestyles that go along with them—will change forever. The important scientific work taking place at Maui Ocean Center is contrasted by the joy found at its location. At the Living Reef exhibit, adults and children walk through a glass tunnel that reveals the underwater moments of Pacific sea life. Nearby are tanks where toddlers can see starfish at close proximity. In total, the center has more than 60 indoor-outdoor exhibits. While we speak, Luecke is monitoring a tourist and a staff diver in the large tank as a variety of toddler-sized sharks encircle them. The wet lab, which visitors can see by participating in a tour, is the heart of Maui Ocean Center. Within it, fluorescent lights create a neon nightclub scene, and buckets of brine shrimp being grown to feed the coral bubble with aerating tubes. Also here, an estimated 640 pieces of coral from pilings grow on gridded trays in tanks. Lights and brine shrimp promote the rapid growth of coral species, like rice, sandpaper rice, corrugated, and lace coral, and even a species of mushroom coral the curators may have discovered during the project. As a result of the success of Maui Ocean Center’s work on Maui, both Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island counties are looking to fund similar projects. “Before this project, the harbormasters just considered all this coral attached to the pier as a form of bio-fouling,” Luecke says. “We’re not just educating kids here. We’re trying to show boaters, fishermen, surfers, and everybody else about the ecosystem right underneath them.” Maui Ocean Center is located on Highway 30 at Ma‘alaea Harbor. For more information, visit mauioceancenter.com.


22 o‘ a hu text by anna

harmon

images by john

hook

The Making Mill What was once a hub of the sugar industry is now the sweet spot for makers of everything from surfboards to soap on O‘ahu’s North Shore.

Though long retired, the iconic smoke stack remains a landmark at Waialua Sugar Mill.


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Behind his Waialua surf shop, owner Stephen Matthews glasses surfboards for his Third Stone brand and others.


O

n the road to Waialua, past the turnoff to Hale‘iwa, cars wind through towering grass. Minutes pass before the town comes into view, and with it, the iconic smoke stack left behind from what served as Dole’s sugar mill through 1996. When the mill was running, spent cane was dried in the cone-shaped structure called a bagasse spin, then burned beneath the smoke stack to power the production; warehouses were filled with coffee and sugar. Looking at the remaining structures, the year doesn’t matter—it could be 1975 or 2017. Only now, it houses local mechanics, surfboard makers, and other craftsmen who rushed in to claim the space shortly after the sugar operation shut down. As one tenant explains, it is the only legitimate industrial space on the North Shore. Today, a smattering of vehicles is parked in the mill’s main dirt lot. On the left, as Saturday’s mid-afternoon sun beats down, vendors pack up their farmers market stands; a lady selling huli-huli chicken is left with only two on the rotating spit. On the right, marked by two hula girl cutouts, is The Waialua Surf Shop, the commercial front for Third Stone,


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a surfboard glassing company that joined the mill’s surfboard makers there 14 years ago (there are more shapers and glassers at the mill than can be counted on your fingers and toes). Past the shop’s art and locally made clothing, behind a window that looks onto a room coated with dried resin, owner Stephen Matthews pulls fiberglass cloth over a board. Also at work in the building are other shaping and glassing ventures, a screen printer, and a handful of artists. Legendary longboard shaper Owl Chapman wanders out on his way to lunch. “I compare [the mill] to how the North Shore is called the Seven Mile Miracle,” says Matthews. “As far as surfboards for the island, I would have to say this is probably a third of the business.” The earliest shapers to stake their claims here are also some of the industry’s best. There is Eric Arakawa, whose client list has included Andy Irons, Reef McIntosh, and brothers Seth and Josh Moniz. A few hundred yards behind Third Stone, longtime shaper John Carper works beneath a weathered “JC” sign. Beyond this is Pyzel Surfboards, whose riders include North-Shore born John John Florence, the youngest-ever Triple Crown of Surfing champion. Across a dirt alley, in another warehouse, Steve Mock of Island Fin Designs crafts handmade fins, which he has been doing since the 1970s. Nearby, Greg Griffin shapes high-performance boards, borrowing Above: North Shore Soap Factory makes and sells its products in the mill’s old bagasse spin, where sugarcane once dried.

a grinder from Mock to create custom fins for each board. Along the road leading to the mill is Schaper Surfboards, a factory and surf shop where boards are made from blank to finish. While they don’t schedule tours, if you ask nicely, you can get a view of the entire process. To the left of their structure is a flourishing nursery. At the mill, the common thread is the creation. “Everyone in the mill is making something. The soap factory is making soap, Island X is making the coffee,” Matthews says. The Island X Hawaii warehouse shop, North Shore Soap Factory, and V Boutique are three such spots that circle the parking lot and are open to foot traffic. At Island X Hawaii, visitors snatch up trinkets alongside powdered kava, imuroasted wild boar, and shave ice made with homemade liliko‘i syrup. In the Third Stone building, Vanessa Pack of V Boutique handcrafts her jewelry, soldering pieces together and pounding shapes into forms to create wave bracelets, metal coral charms, and framed sea-glass necklaces. She also curates a small shop that sells her jewelry alongside beachy clothing and home accessories. “I lived in New York City for five or six years before I moved here, and I feel like there is something raw, artist loft-esque about the sugar mill area,” she says. “It’s a whole conglomeration of aspiring artists, creators, woodworkers.”


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At V Boutique, owner Vanessa Pack creates jewelry and sells beach-friendly attire.


In front of her boutique, within the cone-shaped structure that has become the mill’s visual cornerstone, is North Shore Soap Factory. Owners Debora and Jerry Driscoll started making their products here 10 years ago and have worked hard to keep the structure’s integrity and history. “People from the neighborhood bring us things they find at tutu or uncle or dad’s place,” says Debora of the bits of mill history displayed around the space. Out front are large gears left behind from the production infrastructure, and inside, visitors can watch employees make soaps, balms, and washes through framed windows. After buying a bar of soap, you can take it to a wooden counter and pound a design into it with a mallet and rubber stamp, making your own mark amid the mill’s history. The Waialua Sugar Mill is located in Waialua at 67-106 Kealohanui St. For more information, visit waialuasugarmill.com.


30 Big Isl a nd text by anna

harmon

Lava Encounters A pilgrimage to Hawai‘i’s source of creation.

images by john

hook

W

hen I was growing up, I used to play “lava” with my siblings, imagining that the floor was molten rock. We would jump from chair to chair, the only way to avoid certain death. Today, as I stand on a mound of week-old rock in the darkness of night with Kahi, a guide for Kalapana Cultural Tours, with glowing lava slowly rolling toward us, we talk about how he used to play that game as well. Only after playing it at home, he might pack up a cooler and head out onto volcanic slopes with his cousins “just to watch things burn” as slow-rolling lava approached them, or trek to warm waters near oceanentry flows to fish. He remembers his aunties and uncles hanging out and drinking beer while observing lava create paths of destruction and rebirth. For Kahi and his tour guide cousins, who grew up in Kalapana, lava was a childhood norm. And they still give it its due respect. Earlier that day, at 3:30 p.m., I had begun my journey on the tour led by Kahi and his cousin Mikey, setting out on a walk over miles of hardened lava. Destination: Wherever Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of lava, was making her presence known. Along the way, black rock from episodes dating back to 1990 set an appropriately dramatic path— mounds, twists, sheets, braids, cracks, depressions, whirls of black as far as we could see. The fields are solid to walk on, but flakes and rocks at the surface crunch and tinkle with nearly every step. Tour-goers were slowly crushing what Mikey explains is basically glass—the cooled lava

is roughly 50 percent silica and 50 percent mineral—into finer pieces of what will one day be black sand. On semi-regular occasions, the lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea overflows, creating spectacular fiery displays of molten rock surfacing on land, or oozing into the sea. To witness this in action is to see new land being formed, creation at its most raw. All treks to view lava flows in any form are impressive, but not many tours get the opportunity to see red-hot flows both at the surface and entering into the sea; some don’t see new flows at all. We reach our destination as the sun begins to set, the cooled black lava reflecting a warm yellow hue. Molten rock glows only yards away. Mikey sings a pule (prayer) to mark our arrival. Occasionally, there is a hum of helicopter choppers as tourists get an overhead view. At sea, a lone tour boat dances near the ocean entries. On the field, our shoes heat up from lava just a week old. We could–if we wanted to lose a finger and horrify our guides–literally touch the 1,800 to 2,200-degree Fahrenheit flow, but the shimmering heat is good enough. We stand on a ledge overlooking sea cliffs, watching the orange glow of lava entering the Pacific Ocean, releasing plumes of steam. Once night falls, Kahi and Mikey hand out flashlights, which the new rock reflects in a glittering dark silver. On the hike back, the stars make themselves known. Along the way, Kahi and Mikey share stories of exploring the fields as children. Mikey’s father’s house was destroyed


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When Kīlauea Volcano is erupting, lava may flow into the ocean or on land—only a lucky few get to witness both.


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in one of the ongoing eruption’s episodes. He explains that the hardest part wasn’t the loss; it was how slowly the lava moved, teasing the family with the hope that it might, at the last minute, change its course. The tour company is entirely comprised of family from the area and has a strong Hawaiian heritage. Each guide has his own path through the lava field, learned from years of exploration, which avoids obscure cracks and dangerous pits. They lead us back through the dark like mother ducks with ducklings following in single-file lines. As we approach home base, we begin to again see ‘ae and ‘ama‘u ferns growing among the cracks, which, along with ‘ōh‘ia trees, are the first plants able to thrive among aged lava. At the beginning of our trek, Mikey had shared that, in traditional hula, there is always one of these ferns in the dancers’ haku lei. “The fern is a representation of new life,” Kahi explained. Back at our starting point, we pack in a van, and head to a bustling farmers market with live music and a busy outdoor bar. You can only think about the glory of destruction and grace of genesis for so long, before you must return to living yourself. But on the Big Island, the cycle continues steadily along.


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34 O ‘ A HU promotional

image by ryan

moss

Itinerary: Kailua A mountain range away from the hustle and bustle of Honolulu, Kailua’s laid-back beach atmosphere and extensive shopping and dining scene make for the perfect combination of town and country.

A trail leads along Mount Olomana, near Kailua, which has a series of three soaring peaks.


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Dine Any Time of Day at Kalapawai Café & Market

T KALAPAWAI CAFÉ & DELI Kailua: 750 Kailua Rd. Kapolei: 711 Kamokila Blvd. KALAPAWAI MARKET Kailua: 306 S. Kalaheo Ave. » kalapawaimarket.com

he landmark Kalapawai Market has been serving the residents of Kailua and Lanikai for more than 80 years. Delicious deli sandwiches, a full-service coffee bar, and ice cold beer make this the perfect stop on the way to Lanikai beach, or just on the way home. Watch for the grill outside on summer weekends, where its classic Beach Burgers are made! The sister location in Kailua Town, Kalapawai Café & Deli, offers great coffee and healthy deli options every day until 5 p.m. In the evening, Kalapawai Café changes into one of O‘ahu’s favorite little full-service dinner houses featuring

local, day-boat seafood; handmade, gluten-free gnocchi; and delicious salads and steak specials! Chef Trevor Shibuya stresses using locally grown, organic, and sustainable produce, pork, and beef whenever feasible for his seasonal menus.


36 Om‘ Aaui HU promotional

Local Flavors Meet Latin American Cuisine at Cactus

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n Hawai‘i’s dining scene, fusion restaurants are nothing new. However, no one is doing fusion like Cactus in Kailua. Melding the flavors and culinary traditions of Central and South America with locally sourced produce, Big Island beef, Ni‘ihau lamb, Puna greens, and day-boatfresh fish, the menu at Cactus features Latin American cuisine with a local twist. There’s a fun mix of authentic South American and Mexican products that help set Cactus apart: Sinaloa Hawaiian tortillas, Jarritos sodas, Spanish and South American wines, Latin beers, more than 60 tequilas, and traditional cocktails. “Everything we serve is as fresh and authentic as possible,” explains manager Kristen Allspaw. “If it’s not made or grown locally, then we source the genuine products.” Chef Thomas Borges illustrates Cactus’s signature flavors with dishes like Big Bellied Empanadas, a daily Ceviche Inspiration, and the seasonal Farmers Market Salad. “Thomas loves to have fun with food and experiment with the smoker,” Allspaw says. “He’s great at creating unique, unexpected flavor combinations that really work."

CACTUS 767 Kailua Rd. 808-261-1000 » cactusbistro.com

Windward Jewelers Celebrates 51 Years of Serving Kailua

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indward Jewelers has served Kailua since 1966 with on-site expert repairs of jewelry and watches, while also offering unique collections from local Hawaiian designers and others from around the world. The friendly, family-owned personality of the store is the foundation of its success. One of the most exciting services offered by Windward Jewelers is custom digital jewelry designing. With one-of-a-kind custom jewelry, clients are involved with the design and hand-crafting of their jewelry every step of the way. With today’s technology, the prices of custom-made jewelry is comparable to selecting something out of the showcase, and the results are absolutely stunning. Windward Jewelers continues to be committed to providing the highest quality service to the town of Kailua and all of O‘ahu.

WINDWARD JEWELERS 600 Kailua Rd., Ste #122 808-261-6661 » windwardjewelers.com


38 M aui image courtesy of bryan

berkowitz

Events Get to know Hawai‘i’s humpback whales with the 11th Annual Whale Tales. Whale Tales is an annual four-day event that brings marine experts, photographers, and conservationists to Maui from around the world to share their knowledge about whales. Residents and visitors are invited to engage in a weekend of talks, receptions, and whale watches to learn more about the majestic animals.

Whale Tales takes place February 24–27 at The Ritz-Carlton in Kapalua on Maui. For more information, visit whaletrust.org.


D O ! E V E N T PICKS

GEORGE KAHUMOKU JR.’S SLACK KEY SHOW: MASTERS OF HAWAIIAN MUSIC (MAUI) Every Wednesday, 7:30–9:45 p.m. Napili Kai Beach Resort’s Aloha Pavilion, Lāhainā Enjoy the beautiful sounds of Hawai‘i’s slack key guitars and ‘ukulele played by the biggest names in Hawaiian music. This concert series features a guest artist each week and is hosted by slack key guitar master George Kahumoku Jr. » slackkeyshow.com ALOHA FRIDAY ON THE PORCH (BIG ISLAND) Every Friday, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. Volcano Art Center Gallery, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Join Hawaiian practioners on the porch of the Volcano Art Center for stories or workshops on making lei or gourd instruments, or demonstrate lauhala weaving, kapa beating, or ‘ukulele playing. » volcanoartcenter.org ART NIGHT IN LĀHAINĀ TOWN (MAUI) Every second Friday night, 7–10 p.m. Throughout Lāhainā Lāhainā is called the “Art Capital of the Pacific” because it is home to more art galleries per capita than any other town in the United States. Each second Friday, galleries stay open late to hold special shows and feature artists in action. Guests may also enjoy live music and outdoor vendor booths. » mauifridays.com/lahaina

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NOTE: EVENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH ORGANIZER FOR THE MOST UPDATED DETAILS.

WAIMEA OCEAN FILM FESTIVAL (BIG ISLAND) January 2–10 Waimea and South Kohala Coast This festival offers a breathtaking lineup of more than 60 films focused on the ocean environment and island culture, accompanied with special guests, intimate talks, exhibits, and receptions. The festival is held at various Waimea and Kohala Coast venues. » waimeaoceanfilm.org NEW SHANGHAI CIRCUS (MAUI) January 16 & 17, 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Maui Arts and Cultural Center, Kahului Building on traditional Chinese acts, the acrobats of New Shanghai Circus bend and twist with graceful movements to form living sculptures and perform spectacular stunts accentuated by dazzling lighting and effects at this yearly event for all ages. » mauiarts.org MAUI POPS ORCHESTRA “BROADWAY DIVA POPS” (MAUI) Jan 22, 3–5 p.m. Maui Arts and Cultural Center, Kahului This annual Broadway spectacular features soloists such as Doug LaBrecque and guest artist Christiane Noll accompanied by the Maui Pops Orchestra. The program will include favorites from The Great American Songbook. » mauiarts.org

KA MOLOKA‘I MAKAHIKI FESTIVAL (MOLOKA‘I) January 28 Kaunakakai Ball Park This celebration of Hawaiian culture is held right after the harvest season. Historically, battles were paused, taxes were paid, and the celebration commenced. This custom is kept alive through this annual festival where guests participate in traditional Hawaiian sports, and enjoy art workshops, lectures, and other activities. 13TH ANNUAL KONA SURF FILM FESTIVAL (BIG ISLAND) January 28, 4:30–10 p.m. Courtyard King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel, Kailua-Kona The Kona Surf Film Festival presents surf films from around the world and local live music, all benefiting the Big Island and the surfing community. » konasurffilmfestival.org VOLCOM PIPE PRO (O‘AHU) January 29–February 10 ‘Ehukai Beach Park, Hale‘iwa One of numerous surfing contests that light up O‘ahu’s North Shore in the winter season, the Volcom Pipe Pro at world-famous break Banzai Pipeline features some of the top professional surfers. Be sure to check the website to see if the contest is on before you make the trek. » volcompipepro.com


ANNUAL WAIMEA CHERRY BLOSSOM HERITAGE FESTIVAL (BIG ISLAND) February 4, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Venues throughout Waimea This festival showcases the decadesold cherry trees planted at Church Row Park, as well as the Japanese tradition of viewing them, hanami. Enjoy an all-day lineup including demonstrations of bonsai and origami making, a traditional tea ceremony, mochi pounding, and a craft fair. Venues are marked by pink banners. ESPN 1420 2017 JERSEY FUN RUN (O‘AHU) February 4, 8 a.m. Aloha Stadium This 3K run or walk invites participants of all ages to wear the jerseys of their favorite teams while they explore parts of the stadium usually only accessible to players, then cross the field to take part in games and challenges. » active.com ARTISTS OF HAWAI‘I (O‘AHU) February 9–May 28 Honolulu Museum of Art Since 1950, the Artists of Hawai‘i exhibition has showcased the talents of the islands’ contemporary artists. This year’s exhibition format pushes artists to take their art to new levels through creating large installations, giving museum visitors fresh experiences. » honolulumuseum.org

THE 10TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL ALOHA KOI SHOW (O‘AHU) February 11 & 12, starting at 9 a.m. Waikīkī Aquarium Admire hundreds of nishikigoi, more commonly known as “koi,” at Hawai‘i’s largest koi show. This two-day event features educational seminars led by koi experts, Japanese performances, and keiki activities. » waikikiaquarium.org HEIVA I HAWAI‘I TAHITIAN DANCE COMPETITION (BIG ISLAND) February 17–19 Kekuaokalani Gym, Kailua-Kona Groups from all over Hawai‘i Island perform cultural Tahitian dance and music traditions, from riveting drumming to the enchanting ‘ahuroa style of dance, alongside booths featuring traditional arts, crafts, and local foods. » heivaihawaii.com WORLD WHALE DAY (MAUI) February 18, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Kalama Park, Kihei Join this daylong celebration of humpback whales that features food vendors, a keiki carnival, onstage performances by talented musicians, an artisans’ fair, and even an ecoalley with local nonprofits and agencies working to protect Maui’s ocean. » pacificwhale.org

HONOLULU FESTIVAL (O‘AHU) March 10–12 Waikīkī & Hawai‘i Convention Center This weekend of festivities honors the plethora of cultures from the Pacific Rim that make Hawai‘i what it is. Guests enjoy grand performances, craft fairs, food booths, educational workshops, and a parade. » honolulufestival.com 22ND ANNUAL KONA BREWERS FESTIVAL (HAWAI‘I ISLAND) March 11 Courtyard King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel, Kailua-Kona Sample craft brews from 40 Hawai‘i and mainland breweries alongside perfect food pairings from local chefs and vendors. » konabrewersfestival.com WIKI WIKI ONE DAY SHOW (O‘AHU) March 19, 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Neal S. Blaisdell Exhibition Hall, Honolulu Shop a wide array of Hawaiiana, art, kokeshi dolls, Ni‘ihau shells, coins, aloha shirts, and more from nearly 100 tables of vintage collectibles vendors. » ukulele.com/wikiwiki.html 29TH ANNUAL HO‘OMAU HAWAIIAN MUSIC CONCERT (MAUI) March 25, 9 a.m.–sunset Maui Nui Botanical Gardens, Kahului This benefit concert for Pūnana Leo o Maui Hawaiian Language Immersion Preschool includes Hawaiian music, crafters, demonstrations, auctions, a keiki zone, food, and even an ’awa bar. » mnbg.org

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O ‘ A H U PICKS

THE GATHERING PLACE, WHERE COSMOPOLITAN DELIGHTS AND SCENIC BEAUTY COLLIDE.

HE‘EIA PIER GENERAL STORE & DELI 46-499 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-235-2192) Located on the water’s edge, this general store is an unlikely venue for savory, gourmet plate lunches—but that’s exactly what it offers. HELENA’S 1240 N. School St. (808-845-8044) This Hawaiian food joint off the beaten path serves up authentic flavors and local favorites. In 2000, it even earned a Regional Classic Award from the James Beard Foundation. Cash only. » helenashawaiianfood.com

DINE BAR 35 35 N. Hotel St. (808-537-3535) Enjoy a selection of more than 200 beers from around the world and an extensive array of cocktails, wine, and sake alongside chewy, gourmet pizza at this Chinatown location’s indoor or outdoor patio bar. » bar35.com BUHO COCINA Y CANTINA 2250 Kalakaua Ave., Ste. 525 (808-922-2846) This restaurant doesn’t just serve up tasty south-of-the-border classics— it elevates them with inventive twists and local ingredients. Also refreshing to enjoy on Buho’s Waikīkī rooftop is one of its specialty cocktails. » buhocantina.com

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THE ELEPHANT TRUCK 59-712 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-638-1854) Loved by celebrities and locals alike, this food truck, befitted with tiki torches and potted plants, serves up affordable and delicious Thai food from its regular location across from Shark’s Cove. GOKOKU SUSHI 7192 Kalanianaole Hwy. (808-888-7777) Dine on traditional and contemporary Japanese cuisine with a view of the Koko Marina. GRONDIN 62 N. Hotel St. (808-566-6768) This French-Latin kitchen features an interpretation of classic dishes from South America and France paired with hand-selected wines, beer, and classically made cocktails. » grondinhi.com

HONOLULU BEERWORKS 328 Cooke St. (808-589-2332) This casual spot is a hit for both its locally crafted brews and its tasty pub fare. If you can’t decide on a beer, order a flight, then get the Bavarian pretzels to accompany it. Growlers are also available. » honolulubeerworks.com IL LUPINO Royal Hawaiian Center, 2201 Kalakaua Ave. (808-922-3400) A mix of delectable Italian fare and local produce, dishes at Il Lupino are enjoyed best with a glass of wine from the wine bar. » illupino.com IRIFUNE 563 Kapahulu Ave. (808-737-1141) This popular neighborhood eatery is famous for its garlic ahi and funky décor. The gyoza is a must-try, homemade and stuffed with tofu, cream cheese, and an additional ingredient that changes daily.


KAI MARKET Sheraton Waikiki, 2255 Kalakaua Ave. (808-921-4600) Who doesn’t love a good buffet? Located in the heart of Waikīkī, Kai Market brings a classy setting and stunning view to the popular serveyourself-style meal for breakfast and dinner, and features local ingredients as much as possible. » sheratonwaikiki.com/dining/kai KALAPAWAI CAFÉ 750 Kailua Rd. (808-262-3354) This spacious bistro-style stop offers an impressive small-plate menu with a focus on clean, seasonal flavors and tidy presentation. The sweet potato ravioli in sage brown butter sauce and the bone-in pork chop are two musttry dishes. » kalapawaimarket.com KOKO HEAD CAFÉ 1145 12th Ave. (808-732-8920) From sweet treats like cornflake French toast to savory dishes like don buri chen, breakfast at Koko Head Café is a meal to remember. If you aren’t one for typical breakfast fare, you’re in luck—chef Lee Anne Wong, who founded the restaurant, is known for her creative and tasty dumplings. » kokoheadcafe.com LA MARIANA 50 Sand Island Access Rd. (808-848-2800) The last tiki bar left in Hawai‘i, La Mariana has history that can be seen in its eclectic decorations and unconventional buildout. Located right on the harbor, this is a great spot for cocktails and a shared sunset. » lamarianasailingclub.com

LONGHI’S Ala Moana Shopping Center, 1450 Ala Moana Blvd. (808-947-9899) Though Longhi’s is known for its fresh fish, prime steak, and succulent lobster, this restaurant also has one of the best eggs benedicts on the island. » longhis.com NICO’S 1133 N. Nimitz Hwy. (808-540-1377) Located on Pier 38, this waterfront restaurant serves up fresh, locally caught fish, and is a great gathering place for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. » nicospier38.com THE PIG AND THE LADY 83 N. King St. (808-585-8255) Inspired by his mother’s homecooked meals, chef Andrew Le presents contemporary FrenchVietnamese fare that farmers market regulars have come to know and love. » thepigandthelady.com PINT AND JIGGER 1936 S. King St. (808-744-9593) Escape for a moment at this modern public house, which intertwines craft beers and original cocktails with savory food in a classic social atmosphere. » pintandjigger.com

UNCLE’S FISH MARKET & GRILL 1135 N. Nimitz Hwy. (808-275-0063) Located at Pier 38, this waterfront restaurant uses only the freshest fish to produce an unpretentious seafood experience based in classic European and Asian cuisines. » unclesfishmarket.com VIA GELATO 1142 12th Ave. (808-732-2800) Flavors such as caramel swirl and guava sorbetto change daily at this spacious Kaimukī shop that has quickly become a neighborhood favorite. » viagelatohawaii.com THE WILLOWS 901 Hausten St. (808-952-9200) Pick your favorite dishes from The Willows’ sprawling AmericanHawaiian buffet, and then enjoy your meal in the restaurant’s lush garden setting. » willowshawaii.com WOLFGANG’S STEAKHOUSE Royal Hawaiian Center, 2201 Kalakaua Ave. (808-922-3600) Wolfgang’s Steakhouse serves delicious dry-aged USDA Prime Grade Black Angus beef and succulent seafood. » wolfgangssteakhouse.net

TOWN 3435 Waialae Ave. (808-735-5900) This American bistro’s menu changes daily based on the freshest ingredients available, leaving customers eager to return. » townkaimuki.com

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O ‘ A H U PICKS

GO BISHOP MUSEUM 1525 Bernice St. (808-847-3511) This museum of history and science is located off the beaten path in Honolulu, but is worth a stop to learn about Hawaiian and Pacific cultures. » bishopmuseum.org DIAMOND HEAD BEACH PARK 3451 Diamond Head Rd. Though this beach is just a narrow strip of sand, its a less crowded alternative to Waikīkī Beach. With breathtaking views from the lookout point, a stop here is worth the trip. ‘EHUKAI BEACH PARK Across the street from Sunset Beach Elementary School, 59 Kamehameha Hwy. This legendary beach fronts the Banzai Pipeline surf break, a popular spot which offers up perfect barreling waves surfed by local and professional surfers alike. HAWAII OPERA THEATRE (808-596-7372) HOT’s year-round opera season features productions that are sure to provide drama, action, unrequited love, revenge, tears, smiles, and the world’s most beautiful music sung by leading opera singers. Performances take place at the Blaisdell Concert Hall and other venues in Honolulu. » hawaiiopera.org

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THE GATHERING PLACE, WHERE COSMOPOLITAN DELIGHTS AND SCENIC BEAUTY COLLIDE.

HAWAI‘I STATE ART MUSEUM 250 S. Hotel St. (808-586-0900) Presenting the largest and finest collection of work by Hawai‘i artists, this museum honors and inspires artists excellence and promotes education and cultural enrichment. Free admission. » state.hi.us/sfca HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART 900 S. Beretania St.; 2411 Makiki Heights Dr. (808-532-8734) Enjoy art spanning 5,000 years and all around the globe at this museum, which has two airy indooroutdoor locations. At its main hub on Beretania Street, it presents its recognized main collection, while at the Spalding House location in Makiki, it features contemporary works. » honolulumuseum.org HONOLULU’S CHINATOWN Maunakea St. and Hotel St. Wander this intimate neighborhood, filled with fantastic eateries, Chinese medicine shops, and an array of stores ranging from boutiques to lei stands. ‘IOLANI PALACE 364 S. King St. (808-522-0832) The official residence of Hawai‘i’s former monarchy, ‘Iolani Palace is a marvel of opulence, innovation, and political intrigue. Come enjoy one of the most spectacular living restorations in all of Polynesia. » iolanipalace.org

KOKO CRATER BOTANICAL GARDEN 7491 Kokonani St. (808-522-7060) Tucked away within Koko Crater, this free garden is home to a wide array of plants from regions around the world, and is intersected by a looping path. KUALOA RANCH 49-560 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-237-7321) This ranch on O‘ahu’s east side offers an array of adventures, including ziplining, ATV and horseback tours of the ranch and locations where movies have been filmed, as well as educational tours. » kualoa.com LANIKAI BEACH Park along Mokulua Drive and take one of eight public access paths Picture-perfect Lanikai Beach is one of the island’s best snorkeling and swimming beaches. An offshore reef keeps waters relatively calm. A popular adventure is to paddle by kayak to the nearby Mokulua Islands, which function as seabird sanctuaries. MĀNOA FALLS The end of Manoa Road (808-464-2924) Head back into the mountain valley of Mānoa with this moderate hike through tropical forest to a 150-foot waterfall. Parking in the nearby lot is $5. » manoafalls.com


POLYNESIAN CULTURAL CENTER 55-370 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-293-3333) Enjoy the authentic feel of Polynesian villages before partaking in an elaborate lū‘au affair, complete with a full meal and a performance that includes hula and other Polynesian dance. Also on site are an iMax theater, gift shops, and various restaurants. » polynesia.com SHANGRI LA 4055 Papu Cir. (808-734-1941) This elegant former home of Doris Duke overlooks the ocean, and is now a center for Islamic art. Tours leave from the Honolulu Museum of Art, which is another great place for spending an afternoon. » shangrilahawaii.org WAIALUA SUGAR MILL 67-106 Kealohanui St. At this old sugar mill—now home to surfboard makers, jewelry designers, a soap factory, and more—stop in to see makers at work, and to shop for local goods and souvenirs. » waialuasugarmill.com YOKOHAMA BAY Drive west to the end of Farrington Highway Near the western-most tip of the island, Yokohama Bay is one of the most remote beaches on the island and is a nice alternative during high-traffic periods on the North Shore. Mostly frequented by local residents. Be careful of large waves and strong current in the winter.

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A Guide to Galleries in Hawai‘i

maui / k aua ‘ i promotional

When in the Hawaiian Islands, do as both locals and visitors do and find beautiful art by talented residents to liven up living spaces.

aFeinberg Gallery

F PRINCEVILLE, KAUA‘I St. Regis Princeville Resort 5520 Ka Haku Rd. POIPU, KAUA‘I Shops at Kukui‘ula 2829 Ala Kalanikaumaka St.

WAILEA, MAUI Shops at Wailea 3750 Wailea Alanui Dr.

ine-art photography has a fresh new presence in Hawai‘i with one of the industry's most awarded and collected young stars. At 34, Aaron Feinberg has garnered more than 70 awards for his incredible imagery. Visit the aFeinberg Gallery at The Shops at Wailea on Maui, or stop in on Kaua‘i at the St. Regis Princeville Resort or Shops at Kukui‘ula, and you'll discover the grandeur of Haleakalā and the Na Pali Coast in a way you've never seen before, as well as a diverse range of landscapes, abstracts, and nudes in custom sizes and highly Limited Editions and Artist Proofs. Artistry, integrity, and authenticity define this exclusive portfolio, and you'll be sure to feel the heart and soul in every image.


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Village Galleries

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stablished in 1970, Village Galleries represents nearly 100 Hawai‘i artists in a variety of mediums. The galleries and gift shop specialize in original fine art, including paintings, koa wood, pottery, sculptures, and prints. A large and unique assortment of jewelry is a favorite treasure hunt among locals and visitors alike. Featured at Village Galleries in February is Macario Pascual, a plein-air oil painter well known for his series of paintings of Hawai‘i’s plantations, their workers, and the surrounding landscape. As sugarcane production ceases, experience Pascual’s understanding and sensitivity to this era and take home a memory of Hawai‘i’s history. January 6–26: Carleton, Plein Air Oil January 27–February 16: Michael Clements, Plein Air Oil and Pastel February 17–March 9: Macario Pascual, Plein Air Oil Landscapes and Plantation Life March 10–30: George Allan and Virginia Pierce, Oil and Pastel

© Macario Pascual

LĀHAINĀ, MAUI 120 Dickenson St. 808-661-4402 Toll Free: 800-346-0585 » villageartmaui@me.com

KAPALUA, MAUI One Ritz-Carlton Dr. 808-669-1800 Toll Free: 800-660-1500 » villagegalleriesmaui.com

Maui’s Only Art Outlet

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LAHAINA PRINTSELLERS PRODUCTION STUDIO & ART OUTLET 1013 Limahana Pl. 800-669-7843 » printsellers.com

ahaina Printsellers Production Studio and Art Outlet is Maui’s best-kept secret. With great deals on discontinued stock and a large collection of original artwork, antique maps, and wholesale giclées, visitors and locals alike can select the perfect piece for their homes, condos, or offices for a fraction of the retail price. The Production Studio and Art Outlet is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visitors are also welcome to peruse Lahaina Printsellers’ main gallery, located at 764 Front Street. The main gallery features contemporary local artists and an original antique map gallery that was established in 1978. With a combined tenure of more than 65 years, its art consultants are experts in their field and can help you navigate the impressive collection of historic maps of Hawai‘i, the Pacific, and the world. The Lahaina Printsellers’ main gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.


M A U I | M O LO K A ‘ I PICKS

THE VALLEY ISLE, FILLED WITH AN ARRAY OF NATURAL WONDERS.

KULA BISTRO 4566 Lower Kula Rd. (808-871-2960) This homestyle café serves downhome meals with Italian flair, and is perfect for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. A bonus at this local gem is that it is BYOB, with no corkage fee. » kulabistro.com LAHAINA GRILL 127 Lahainaluna Rd. (808-667-5117) This contemporary bistro favorite serves up seafood, steak, and Hawaiian favorites in a refined yet comfortable atmosphere. » lahainagrill.com LEODA’S KITCHEN & PIE SHOP 820 Olowalu Village Rd. (808-662-3600) Dine casually in a family-style, plantation-era eatery, where a focus on using farm-fresh and sustainable ingredients in handcrafted sandwiches, salads, baked goods, and pie is sure to charm. » leodas.com

DINE THE RESTAURANT AT HOTEL WAILEA 555 Kaukahi St. (808-879-2224) Experience unparalleled ocean views in a lush garden dining area, partaking in dishes made from fresh Italian ingredients using New World cooking techniques. » capische.com HALI‘IMAILE GENERAL STORE 900 Haliimaile Rd. (808-572-2666) An old plantation-style home is converted into a dining experience marked by eclectic American food with Asian undertones. » bevgannonrestaurants.com/ haliimaile

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KA‘ANA KITCHEN 3550 Wailea Alanui Dr. (808-573-1234) At Ka‘ana Kitchen, the menu changes with the season, so you won’t find the same thing twice. If you’re a bonafide foodie, a fun treat is to request a seat at the chef’s table. » maui.andaz. hyatt.com/en/hotel/dining/ka_anakitchen.html KANEMITSU BAKERY & COFFEE SHOP (MOLOKA‘I) 79 Ala Malama Ave. (808-553-5855) Stop by this Moloka‘i bakery for an assortment of sweet papaya, cinnamon apple, and taro breads, as well as its pull-apart loaves, tempting treats filled with jelly, cream cheese, butter, and sugar.

MAMA’S FISH HOUSE 799 Poho Pl. (808-579-8488) Rated one of Maui’s finest dining establishments, this restaurant is celebrated for its seafood dishes and fine hospitality. Its staggering menu changes daily according to the fresh catch. » mamasfishhouse.com MERRIMAN’S KAPALUA Kapalua Resort, One Bay Club Pl. (808-669-6400) Merriman’s serves only the freshest products, at least 90 percent of which are locally grown or caught using sustainable methods. Dining with a view of Kapalua Bay is an added bonus, and the complimentary valet parking tops it all off. » merrimanshawaii.com/kapalua


MONKEYPOD KITCHEN 10 Wailea Gateway Pl. (808-891-2322) A place for foodies, beer lovers, and families alike, Monkeypod Kitchen is dedicated to mastering the craft of food with fresh island fish, hand-tossed pizzas, and homemade cream pies. » monkeypodkitchen.com

Get FLUX Hawaii before it hits the stands.

PACIFIC’O 505 Front St. (808-667-4341) A dining experience setting the new standard for farm-to-table cuisine, this beachfront restaurant features a contemporary menu from land and sea. » pacificomaui.com PĀ‘IA FISH MARKET 100 Baldwin Ave. (808-579-8030) Grab a seat on the bench and enjoy a fish burger at this Pā‘ia gem, served with a side of friendly conversation.» paiafishmarket.com STAR NOODLE 286 Kupuohi St. (808-667-5400) Enjoy fresh house-made noodles and other Asian specialties, like the Filipino bacon and eggs or the Vietnamese crêpe, at this contemporary restaurant. » starnoodle.com

Discover the latest in local arts and culture with FLUX Hawaii, the magazine for today’s Hawai‘i.

S U B S C R I B E N OW FLUXHAWAII.COM/SUBSCRIBE

TASAKA GURI GURI 70 E. Kaahumanu Ave. (808-871-4513) This shop tucked down a pathway at a shopping mall serves a treat dreamed up in Hawai‘i, guri guri, which is similar to soft-serve sherbet, and comes in strawberry and pineapple flavors. Cash only. TIN ROOF 360 Papa Pl. (808-868-0753) Renowned chef Sheldon Simeon gets back to his culinary roots at this casual plate lunch shop serving meals inspired by Simeon’s childhood in Hilo and local flavors. » tinroofmaui.com

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M A U I | M O LO K A ‘ I PICKS

GO ALI‘I KULA LAVENDER FARM 1100 Waipoli Rd. (808-878-3004) On the slopes of Haleakalā, this farm is regularly covered in mist. Lavender grown here is used for teas and scones that can be purchased onsite. » aliikulalavender.com AQUA ADVENTURE Maalaea Small Boat Harbor (808-573-2104) Explore the waters of Molokini Island by snorkeling, or if you are feeling extra adventurous, through Snuba dive, an effortless way to experience deeper waters safely and comfortably. » mauisnorkelsnuba.com ATLANTIS ADVENTURES (800-381-0237) Dive into the underwater world with Atlantis Adventures, which gives patrons first-hand insight into the value and importance of reefs, as well as up-close views of the beauty of Hawai‘i’s marine life, all aboard the world’s most technologically advanced passenger submarines. » atlantisadventures.com BABY BEACH Western end of Baldwin Beach Park, mile marker 5 Hana Hwy. This beach outside of Pā‘ia offers a protected lagoon perfect for a relaxing float or for families with young children.

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THE VALLEY ISLE, FILLED WITH AN ARRAY OF NATURAL WONDERS.

FRONT STREET 900 Front St. The main thoroughfare for Lāhainā, Front Street is lined with tons of great restaurants, shopping, art galleries, and plenty of sightseeing opportunities. It is also a popular nightlife spot, with many bars and clubs dotting the block. » frontstreetlahaina.com HALEAKALA BIKE COMPANY 810 Haiku Rd. #120 (808-575-9575) Bike down the Haleakalā with more freedom and enjoy beautiful panoramic views at your own pace. Guides bring cyclists to the top and offer roadside assistance on the way down. » bikemaui.com HALEAKALĀ NATIONAL PARK Mile Marker 41 Hana Hwy. (808-572-4400) World-famous for its sunrise and silversword plants, Haleakalā is well worth the early morning drive to its summit—just be sure to bundle up and watch where you step. » nps.gov/hale HO‘OKIPA BEACH PARK Hana Highway at mile marker 9 A mecca for surfers of all ages and the home of contemporary surfing, this breath-taking white sand beach boasts some of the best waves along the Maui coastline. ‘IAO VALLEY STATE PARK End of Iao Valley Rd. (808-882-6206) Famous for being a setting of Jurassic Park, and for its Hawaiian history, this lush valley boasts a state park with a short walking path, as well as a stunning view of ‘Iao Needle. » iaovalleystatepark.org

KAUNAKAKAI TO KALAUPAPA OVERLOOK (MOLOKA‘I) West on Hwy. 460, then north on Hwy. 470 This short journey leads to sacred Pālā‘au State Park, which boasts a beautiful view of Kalaupapa and the coast. MAUI ARTS & CULTURE CENTER 1 Cameron Way (808-242-2787) Connecting artists and community, MACC presents a wide range of musical and theatre events from symphony to hula, ballet, and taiko drumming. » mauiarts.org MAUI HIKING SAFARI (808-573-0168) Learn about island history, geology, flora, and culture while hiking West Maui’s trails with a knowledgeable guide. Tours are offered at various levels of difficulty. » mauihikingsafari.com OCEAN VODKA ORGANIC FARM AND DISTILLERY 4051 Omaopio Rd. (808-877-0009) Take a tour of Maui’s only vodka distillery, where just outside, they grow the sugarcane used for the distilling process. Tip: Book your tour at least 24 hours in advance. » oceanvodka.com O‘O FARM 651 Waipoli Rd. (808-667-4341) This gorgeous property is home to a sustainable and biodynamic farm that produces coffee, fruits, vegetables, herbs, and flowers for local eateries like Pacific’O and The Feast at Lele. Sign up for a “seed to cup” morning coffee tour, or take the lunch and farm tour. » oofarm.com


PĀ‘IA’S BALDWIN AVENUE 1 Baldwin Ave. Wander this bustling avenue, and you are sure to find something you like, from teeny bikinis at Maui Girl Beachwear to souvenirs at Alice in Hulaland. Its crossroad, Paia Highway, boasts additional local shops. PIIHOLO RANCH ZIPLINE 799 Piiholo Rd. (808-572-1717) Home to Hawai‘i’s longest side-by-side zipline, Piiholo Ranch Zipline offers more ziplines than any other course in the state. Its new Canopy Tree Top course and Quick Jump are now open. » piiholozipline.com RED SAND BEACH End of Uakea Rd. If you make the trek to Hāna, it’s worth the hike around a cliff face to reach this red sand beach. Note: Clothing is optional here. THE UPCOUNTRY FARMERS MARKET 55 Kiopaa St. This weekly farmers market takes place every Saturday from 7 to 11 a.m. and features delightful local vendors, including Maui Cones, which serves up homemade mochiko chicken over rice in nori cones. » upcountryfarmersmarket.com ‘ULALENA Maui Theatre, 878 Front St. (808-856-7900) ‘Ulalena proves there’s life beyond the lū‘au, according to Travel+Leisure magazine. Indulge in Hawai‘i’s rich history through authentic Hawaiian music, dance, and more than 100 instruments played live, masterfully portrayed in a dynamic, colorful, emotional stage performance.» mauitheatre.com WAI‘ANAPANAPA BLACK SAND BEACH Highway 360, past mile marker 32 With its remote, low-cliffed volcanic coastline, this beach offers solitude and respite from urban life. Families can camp, fish, and hike the coastal trail that leads into Hāna.


52 m aui promotional

Surfing Goat Dairy

S SURFING GOAT DAIRY 3651 Omaopio Rd. 808-878-2870 » surfinggoatdairy.com

urfing Goat Dairy is an awardwinning dairy farm located on the beautiful slopes of Maui’s Haleakalā Crater in lower Kula that has produced award-winning “Maui Gourmet Goat Cheeses” for more than 12 years. It has won 18 awards for its gourmet goat cheeses, including “Best Goat Cheese Spread" in 2004, 2005, and 2006. Not only does it offer delicious goat cheeses, but its team also recommends you try the handmade gourmet goat cheese chocolate truffles. Surfing Goat offers tours of its beautiful farm, during which you

hear how the dairy was started and have the opportunity to milk goats, see the cheese-making process, and sample the delicious cheeses. It also has a great café and gift shop on the property where its cheeses, goat milk soaps, incredible truffles, and many other things like books, signs, stuffed animals, and logo souvenirs are sold. Visiting the award-winning Surfing Goat Dairy is a fun and unique Maui agritourism experience for the whole family! Guests can't seem to get enough of the products, so Surfing Goat Dairy has also established a shipping


system that allows you to order the product from back home, providing a delicious reminder of your time on Maui. The company ships out gourmet goat cheeses, gourmet goat cheese truffles, handmade soap, Hawaiian salts, logo t-shirts, and other memorabilia. If you've never visited the dairy and you want to order its products, you are in luck because you can purchase from its website and have everything delivered right to your doorstep. The farm also ships the products out in gift baskets, which are a great gift for the holidays. These baskets are handcrafted by the employees with the utmost care and can be filled with cheese spreads, soaps, logo apparel, or aprons. There is a basket for everyone, from the experienced cheese lover to someone who has yet to try goat cheese. Surfing Goat Dairy takes pride in providing its customers with the best quality products and an unforgettable experience. The goal of its team is that when you leave the farm, you have a new appreciation for gourmet goat cheese, and a new favorite stop on Maui.


B I G I S L A N D PICKS

THE BIG ISLAND, HOME TO UNRIVALED WONDERS AND CONTRASTING WORLDS.

HOLUAKOA GARDENS AND CAFÉ 76-5900 Old Government Rd. (808-322-2233) Dine in the restaurant’s enchanting garden setting while enjoying fare prepared—as much as possible—from ingredients sourced within five miles of where you are sitting. » holuakoacafe.com ISLAND NATURALS MARKET & DELI 1221 Kilauea Ave. (808-935-5533) This spot was voted the best health food store in Hawai‘i nine years in a row. Here, you will find an awardwinning deli and an extensive salad bar. If you don’t make it into Hilo, no worries, they have three other locations on the island. » islandnaturals.com

DINE DA POKE SHACK 76-6246 Alii Dr. (808-329-7653) Rated the best restaurant in the nation by Yelp in 2014, this nondescript joint offers unique poke bowls and Hawaiian plates. » dapokeshack.com DON THE BEACHCOMBER 75-5852 Alii Dr. (808-930-3286) At the original home of the mai tai, enjoy beachfront dining and a retro tiki-chic atmosphere, including Don’s original mai tai. » royalkona.com/dining.cfm

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HAWAIIAN STYLE CAFÉ 65-1290 Kawaihae Rd. (808-885-4295) This small country kitchen serves up local favorites for breakfast in large portions. The pancakes are a great pick. » hawaiianstylecafe.com HILO BAY CAFÉ 123 Lihiwai St. (808-935-4939) At the heart of this restaurant’s food is the belief that local and organic ingredients are better for the Earth and you. Hidden in plain sight in a strip mall, this café has great burgers and cocktails.» hilobaycafe.com

MANAGO HOTEL RESTAURANT 82-6151 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-323-2642) Hawai‘i’s version of an old-school diner, this restaurant located within the Manago Hotel is known for its pork chops and complementary side dishes that rotate daily. » managohotel.com/rest.html MIYO’S 564 Hinano St. (808-935-2273) Melt-in-your-mouth sashimi and other traditional Japanese dishes make this rustic restaurant near Waiakea Pond one of the best places for Japanese food in Hilo. » miyosrestaurant.com MOON & TURTLE 51 Kalakaua St. (808-961-0599) A foodie favorite in downtown Hilo, this Asian-fusion, New American eatery utilizes local meat, fish, and vegetables when possible. Menu changes daily.


PUNALU‘U BAKE SHOP 5642 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-929-7343) Just because this bakery also offers souvenirs doesn’t mean it’s not authentic—the establishment serves tasty sweetbread made from a family recipe, as well as fresh malasadas. Enjoy your treats outside underneath the gazebo. » bakeshophawaii.com RAYS ON THE BAY 78-128 Ehukai St. (808-930-4949) Relish the flavors of local favorites while majestic manta rays swim a few feet away from the tables at this familyfriendly restaurant. SWEET CANE CAFÉ 1472 Kilauea Ave. (808-934-0002) This cafe serves up locally made juices and smoothies that are refreshing and healthy, made with organic sugarcane juice grown on the island, which is rich in antioxidants and complex carbohydrates and low in simple sugars. » livinghealthyhawaii.com/sweet-cane-cafe VILLAGE BURGER 67-1185 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-885-7319) Supporting Big Island ranchers one burger at a time, this gourmet burger joint located in Parker Ranch Center uses only local, pasture-raised beef that is ground fresh, grilled to perfection, and served on local brioche buns. » villageburgerwaimea.com

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B I G I S L A N D PICKS

GO BIG ISLAND BEES 82-1140 Meli Rd. (808-328-1315) Enter the world of bees and beekeeping, and learn about how organic, single-floral honey is made. View actual hives, while learning how the hives are organized and experiencing what makes bees so special. » bigislandbees.com HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK 45 minutes south of Hilo (808-985-6000) Home to the Earth’s most massive volcano, Mauna Loa, and the world’s most active volcano, Kīlauea, a trip to Volcanoes National Park is a must. In addition to the active lava flow, check out Pu‘u Loa petroglyphs, Thurston Lava Tube, Crater Rim Drive, and more than 150 miles of hiking trails. » nps.gov/havo HILO FARMERS MARKET Mamo Street and Kamehameha Avenue Stock up on local produce and freshly made treats like liliko‘i butter or smoked meat, and shop variety of handmade goods. » hilofarmersmarket.com

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THE BIG ISLAND, HOME TO UNRIVALED WONDERS AND CONTRASTING WORLDS.

‘IMILOA ASTRONOMY CENTER 600 Imiloa Pl. (808-969-9703) This comprehensive educational facility showcases the connections between the rich traditions of Hawaiian culture and the groundbreaking astronomical research conducted at Mauna Kea, and features a planetarium complex and extensive exhibit hall. » imiloahawaii.org KIKAUA POINT BEACH Adjacent to Kukio Golf Resort This white-sand-bottomed cove is surrounded by lava rock and a grove of trees, making for one of the nicest family beaches. KONA COFFEE LIVING HISTORY FARM Between mile markers 110 and 111 on Mamalahoa Highway (808-323-3222) This Smithsonian-affiliated outdoor museum tells the story of early 20th century Japanese immigrants who became Kona coffee pioneers. Walk among coffee trees, watch how farmers milled their worldfamous coffee, and visit the original 1920s farmhouse. » konahistorical.org

KUA BAY End of Kua Bay Access Road This white-sand beach has waves for body surfing, and crystal-clear waters perfect for snorkeling, when conditions allow. MAUNAKEA SUMMIT Head to the highest heights in Hawai‘i at Maunakea, but first check in at the visitor center to make sure the weather allows passage (4-wheel drive only) and learn more about this sacred place. » ifa.hawaii.edu/info/vis PARKER RANCH 66-1304 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-885-7311) Visit Hawai‘i’s largest ranch, and enjoy a self-guided tour through two historic homes to learn about the land. Or, the more adventurous can book a time to hunt Ibex goats or wild boar. » parkerranch.com PUNALU‘U BLACK SAND BEACH Unlike most of Hawai‘i’s beaches, which feature golden sand, this one has an expanse of black sand, which gets its color from basalt created when lava once reached the ocean.


PU‘UHONUA O HŌNAUNAU NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK Highway 160 and Hale O Keawe Road In ancient times, Hawaiians would flee here to be absolved of kapu offenses. Today, visitors can learn Hawaiian history through cultural events, a reconstructed heiau, and the remains of life in a place of refuge. SNORKEL WITH MANTA RAYS Kona Coast offshore of Sheraton Kona Resort Tours take off around sunset from Honokohau Harbor and transport snorkelers to waters where manta rays dine on plankton. SOUTH POINT End of South Point Road Also known as Ka Lae, South Point is believed to be where Polynesians first arrived in Hawai‘i. Here, enjoy views from dramatic cliffs. SOUTH POINT GREEN SAND BEACH Mamalahoa Hwy. between mile markers 69 and 70 Also known as Papakōlea Beach, this green sand beach is accessed only by foot or four-wheel-drive vehicle, and is one of the most unusual and beautiful beaches in Hawai‘i.


58 ROUTE map

O‘AHU Honolulu

MOLOKA‘I

Ho‘olehua

Kalaupapa

Barbers Point Kalaeloa

Kapalua

MAUI

Kahului Hana

Lana‘i

HAWAI‘I

(THE BIG ISLAND)

Waimea-Kohala

THE MOKULELE EXPERIENCE We proudly fly out of Hawai‘i’s local commuter airports and international airports, providing passengers with many convenient options for traveling. That means plenty of free parking, short walks to the gates, and quick check-ins. It also means no lines, no removing your shoes, belt, laptop, or toiletries, and no emptying the contents of your pockets, because with the exception of Honolulu International, there’s no TSA screening. So you’ll be relaxed even before your flight takes off. Once we’ve reached cruising altitude, you’ll enjoy an experience that’s much more like a private charter than a typical airline flight. Each seat is a first-class seat offering unparalleled views of the islands’ most majestic, aweinspiring sights.

Scan QR code for flight schedule, or visit mokulele.com.

Kona

Daily Flights Charters


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O‘AHU

HONOLULU INTERNATIONAL HONOLULU INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (HNL), O’AHU

AIRPORT (HNL)

RODGERS BLVD.

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COMMUTER TERMINAL

EAST TO WAIKIKI

PAIEA ST.

PARKING

AOLELE ST.

WEST TO PEARL CITY

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GATES 14-23

MEA-KOHALA AIRPORT L), O’AHU

KONA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (KOA),HAWAI‘I

BIG ISLAND

N WAIMEA-KOHALA AIRPORT (MUE)

BIG ISLAND

KONA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (KOA)

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COMMUTER TERMINAL

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N KAPALUA AIRPORT (JHM), MAUI

MAUI

MAUI HANA AIRPORT (HNM), MAUI

KAPALUA AIRPORT (JHM)

HANA AIRPORT (HNM)

HONOAPI’ILANI HIGHWAY

N A I R P O R T ACC E S S R OA D

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MN O L O K A ‘ I

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LANA’I CITY AIRPORT (LNY),LANA’I

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CALIFORNIA

C A L I F O R N(SMX) IA SANTA MARIA AIRPORT

SANTA MARIA AIRPORT (SMX)

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LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (LAX) TERMINAL 6, GATE 65A

CALIFORNIA IMPERIAL COUNTY AIRPORT (IPL)

TERMINAL 3 TERMINAL 4

TERMINAL 2 TERMINAL 5 GATE 65A

TERMINAL 6

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Ticketing & Bag Drop


Ahhh-inducing Benefits

63 kaua ‘ i / maui big isl a nd / o‘ a hu promotional

A

t Starwood Hotels & Resorts in Hawai‘i, you will find countless ways to relax and recharge. Everything from spa renewal to an exhilarating ocean adventure are great ways to start fresh and focus on the new year ahead. KAUA‘I Located on the Garden Isle’s pristine north shore, The St. Regis Princeville Resort provides the perfect starting point to experience the destination. Golfers and non-golfers alike will revel in the new Sunset Golf Cart Tour—a six-stop expedition featuring the Makai Golf Course’s iconic sights. Instagram-worthy views of Queen’s Bath, Kīlauea Lighthouse, and Hanalei Bay will have family and friends in awe. MAUI Located oceanfront at The Westin Maui Resort & Spa, Ka‘anapali Surf Club offers kayak and snorkel eco-tours off Ka‘anapali Beach. These low-impact eco-tourism activities are designed to enrich the visitor experience by building environmental and cultural awareness of West Maui’s famed Black Rock. The professionally guided twohour tours include basic safety and paddling techniques. Guides then escort paddlers toward Black Rock to enjoy prime snorkeling. During the kayaking, the knowledgeable guides share ancient Hawaiian history, local folklore, and information about Maui’s marine wildlife.

BIG ISLAND Manta rays can be viewed year-round off the Big Island’s Kona Coast, and the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa offers the best location to witness these graceful and hauntingly beautiful gentle giants. Its signature restaurant, Rays on the Bay, features a special viewing area to observe manta rays while sipping cocktails and enjoying the best of Big Island cuisine. O‘AHU We can’t talk about relaxation without mentioning the oceanfront spa at the legendary Moana Surfrider,

A Westin Resort & Spa. Overlooking Waikīkī Beach, the Moana Lani Spa offers Hawaiian healing traditions and signature rituals to inspire the spirit. The Lomi Lomi Ola is the islands' traditional massage, and its lomilomi practioners are trained with kumu (teachers), whose lineage are from “kahuna lomilomi,” the healers of the body through massage. Share your memories with Starwood Hawaii throughout the year by following @starwoodhawaii. For more information and to book your next adventure, visit onlyinhawaii.com.


64 o‘ a hu mokulele cares

Giving an Ocean of Experience Mokulele Airlines was a proud sponsor of the 2016 Surfers Healing Event on O‘ahu.

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urfers Healing was founded by Israel and Danielle Paskowitz of San Clemente, California. Their son, Isaiah, was diagnosed with autism at age 3. Like many autistic children, he often suffered from sensory overload—simple sensations could overwhelm him. The ocean was the one place where he seemed to find respite. A former competitive surfer, Israel hit upon an idea: with Isaiah on the front of his surfboard, and Israel steering from the back, the two spent the day surfing together. Surfing had a profound impact on Isaiah. Israel and Danielle decided they wanted to share this unique therapy with other autistic children.

They began to host day camps at the beach, where autistic children and their families could be exposed to a completely new experience of surfing. Today, Surfers Healing strives to enhance the lives of kids with special needs, specifically those with autism. They achieve this by sharing the therapeutic experience of surfing with autistic children and their families, which also provides them with a beautiful day together at the beach. With a close-knit, passionate, and expert volunteer base, and a support system that offers care and acceptance, Surfers Healing is accomplishing its goals. Surfers Healing attains greater mainstream

acceptance for both the families of and kids living with autism through the transformative experience of surfing. In November 2016, Mokulele Airlines partnered with Surfers Healing for the Hawai‘i part of the tour, and contributed to ensuring the event in Waikīkī will maintain its ongoing efforts. Mokulele is proud to have provided flight benefits to the Surfers Healing volunteers from the Big Island so that they could better afford the expense of traveling to O‘ahu. The Aloha spirit this spread to everyone involved was a testament to the power of giving.


Hopper - Issue 6 (January–March 2017)  

The in-flight magazine for Mokulele Airlines.