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j u l ďż˝ a u g ďż˝ s e p 2016 I S S U E 04

mokulele.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS

a.

IN-FLIGHT INFORMATION 60 | Route Map 62 | Airport Maps DO! 10 | The Hibiscus Lady At her farm on O‘ahu’s North Shore, Jill Coryell creates colorful new life.

b.

12 | Simple, Elevated The husband and wife team behind Hilo’s Moon and Turtle restaurant craft elevated food from humble ingredients. 14 | La Vida Dulce How buying a milk goat led Rebecca Woodburn-Rist to start her own caramel company on Maui. 16 | Sweets for the Sweet Madre Chocolate shows how good chocolate can be when its makers are dedicated to the entire process, from bean sourcing to bar making. 18 | Fields of Dreams The unique passions and paths of three Maui farm founders have led to successful, quirky crops. 26 | Get Spirited Three companies bring locally crafted booze to the islands and abroad. 34 | Flower Seekers This farm on Moloka‘i gives life to the classic yellow and white plumeria of the islands. GUIDE 42 | Do / Shop / Eat a. Fresh dragon fruit is harvested and enjoyed at Maui Dragon Fruit Farm in Lāhainā.

b. Proteas, which some scientists believe have been around for nearly 300 million years, prosper in upcountry Maui at Malolo Farm.


2 MASTHEAD

PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

evp & editorial director

jason cutinella

li sa yama da

lisa@nellamediagroup.com editor anna harmon

creative DIRECTOR ara feducia

DESIGNER michelle ganeku

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR john hook

PHOTO EDITOR samantha hook

COPY EDITOR andy beth miller

CONTRIBUTORS jade eckhardt le‘a gleason k e l l i g r atz

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER joe v. bock joe@nellamediagroup.com GROUP PUBLISHER mike wiley

mike@nellamediagroup.com marketing & advertising director k e e ly b r u n s

keely@nellamediagroup.com marketing & advertising executive chelsea tsuchida

chelsea@nellamediagroup.com OPERATIONS DIRECTOR j i ll m i yas h i ro

jill@nellamediagroup.com vp BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT g a ry pay n e

david jordan andy beth miller sarah ruppenthal

junior designer mitchell fong

ki m yag i

IMAGES megan spelman meghan suzuki

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES sales@nellamediagroup.com 808-688-8349

jonas maon

Published By

Nella Media Group 36 N. Hotel St., Suite A Honolulu, HI 96817 nellamediagroup.com ©2016 by Nella Media Group, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reprinted without the written consent of the publisher. Opinions are solely those of the contributors and are not necessarily endorsed by Mokulele Airlines.


4

b.

ABOUT THE ISSUE

a.

Welcome to Hopper, the magazine of Mokulele Airlines.

c.

Late summer in Hawai‘i is a rush of warm days and heaping harvests, when roadside stands in rural areas spill over with mangoes and floral bouquets, and the waters along northern shores shimmer with the last of their seasonal calm. Life thrives in the islands: fields of taro and diverse crops flourish, stories travel the coconut wireless, errant chickens roam, and communities gather to better their surrounds. In this issue, learn about residents who have used the perennially friendly weather to create bountiful offerings, and discover ways you can experience these results yourselves. 

a. The goats of Haleakala Creamery produce milk that is the base of the company’s rich caramel.

b. Soni Pomaski and her husband aspire to exalt humble ingredients at their restaurant Moon and Turtle in Hilo.

c. At Madre Chocolate in Chinatown, hot chocolate is created from scratch.


6 CEO LETTER

E komo mai! Mokulele Airlines is really taking off, and all of us here at the airline appreciate that it wouldn’t be possible without your support, and the support of the tens of thousands of other passengers like you who have made Mokulele their favorite island hopper. So on behalf of myself and my family, and our extended family of the nearly 250 employees that make up the airline, our deepest mahalo. Speaking of the Mokulele family, it’s my great pleasure to introduce you to Rob McKinney, who has assumed the title of President and the position of my co-pilot here at the airline. In short, he’s my right-hand man. Those of you who are familiar with Mokulele know we’re one of the only short-hop airlines in the country that chooses to fly with two pilots aboard to ensure the safest possible inflight experience for our passengers. It is in that spirit of partnership that I’m happy to welcome Rob aboard. While Rob hails from the Pacific Northwest, he’s no newcomer to the islands. In early 2002, Rob directed operations at Pacific Wings, then moved to Mokulele Airlines, where he served as Chief Operations Officer from 2005 to 2007. Most recently, Rob was honored as the distinguished technology alumni from Purdue University. We couldn’t be happier to have Rob back. Meanwhile, we couldn’t be more pleased to announce that we won a very competitive bid to launch service in California, where we’ll be offering the highly competitive prices, convenient schedules, and on-time flights for which you know us. Mokulele started flying between Imperial County Airport and Los Angeles International Airport on March 23rd of this year. So if your travels should take you to Los Angeles, it would be our great pleasure to welcome you aboard at Terminal 6 in LAX, which offers convenient connections to Alaska Airlines, Delta, and United. A hui hou.

Sincerely,

ron

hansen

owner

and

mokulele

,

ceo

airlines


7

MARIAH MILAN PHOTOGRAPHY


8 o‘ a hu image by john

hook

Do! Relish the simple pleasure of waking with the sun and spending all day with the bare necessities. In Hawai‘i, camping is a statewide pastime, and there is an array of campgrounds to prove it. From the black sand of Wai‘ānapanapa State Park on Maui to the shaded ocean view of O‘ahu’s Bellows Field Beach Park, there are diverse campgrounds around the islands to match the desires of any type of nature lover. Try Hulopo‘e Bay campground on Lāna‘i, set in an open area along the beach and just a short hike from Sweetheart Rock; or Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park for a restful sleep in a barebones cabin enshrouded in mist.


10 o‘ a hu text by andy

beth

miller

images by meghan

The Hibiscus Lady At her farm on O‘ahu’s North Shore, Jill Coryell creates colorful new life.

suzuki

W

hen a green-thumbed neighbor told me of Hawai‘i’s “Hibiscus Lady,” having discovered her blooms at a farmers market, I was immediately intrigued. Later, as I stroll the grounds of The Hibiscus Lady Nursery, tucked away on O‘ahu’s North Shore, the caricature that I had conjured of Coryell as a woman similar to the silver-haired grand dame in Mary Poppins is quickly uprooted. Far from an alter ego donned daily, the hibiscus lady is not a role Coryell takes on, it is her identity. Born on O‘ahu and raised on the mainland, Coryell returned to Hawai‘i to attend University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, where she discovered an affection for ethnobotany after taking a course on the subject. This fascination led her to volunteer at Above: Perfected hybridizations of hibiscus at The Hibiscus Lady Nursery.

Waimea Valley, and when its plant collections specialist, David Orr, asked her to act as liaison with the American Hibiscus Society, Coryell accepted. “Of course! I know all about hibiscus,” she recalls assuring him. “I then proceeded to go online and research the society’s website and realize how very little I knew,” she confesses with a chuckle. She reached out to the late Barry Schlueter, a well-known horticulturist specializing in hibiscus, who took Coryell under his wing. “I loved it so much, I started planting on my own land at home, and it literally just grew from there,” she says. “I started with about 30 plants, and then he taught me how to cross-breed. It was exciting and healing, and such a lifeaffirming experience.” As we walk the perimeter of

Coryell’s home and nursery, she shows me the floral fruits of her labor—hybridizations of hibiscus unlike any I have ever seen; multicolored blooms with hues of blue, shades of lavender; swirls of pigment that defy description. Although gracious and humble, Coryell is full of pride when it comes to her crossbred progeny. “I usually only keep about 2 percent of what I create, and compost the rest,” she says. “We only want to carry truly extraordinary plants.” Find Hibiscus Lady blooms most Saturdays at the Kapi‘olani Community College Farmers Market in Honolulu or at her nursery, located in Waialua at 68-240 Mahinaai St. For more information, visit hibiscusladyhawaii.com.


11

Jill Coryell aspires to create the most extraordinary hibiscus at her farm on the North Shore of OĘť a hu.


12 big isl a nd text by le‘a gleason images by megan

Simple, Elevated The husband and wife team behind Hilo’s Moon and Turtle restaurant craft elevated food from humble ingredients.

spelman

M

oon and Turtle restaurant, which has simple but inviting décor and a casual atmosphere, serves a small revolving menu of dishes inspired by the freshest local ingredients available. A crowd favorite is the smoky sashimi, featuring thinly sliced ahi or ono, Hawaiian chili pepper water, kiawesmoked soy sauce, and olive oil. “The dish reminds me of my childhood. It tastes like home,” says Mark Pomaski, who owns and operates the Hilo restaurant with his wife, Soni. For the restaurateurs, food has represented tradition and fusion since childhood. Soni’s mother was from New Jersey, and her father was a passionate home-chef from Mumbai. Mark grew up in Hilo with a mother who cooked traditional Vietnamese cuisine. At the age of 19, Mark began his culinary experience as a sushi chef. Ten years later, he was approached by the corporate executive chef for Roy’s Hawai‘i because of his extensive knowledge of sushi. While working at this restaurant group on O‘ahu, working his way to corporate chef, he met Soni at Roy’s Waikiki. “Mark had always talked about wanting to do his own restaurant, specifically in Hilo,” Soni remembers. So the couple moved to New York in 2011 to see what was happening in the modern culinary world. “The food we ate kind of changed the way I cooked. It was very revelatory because it was so simple,” Mark says. In August 2013, they returned to Hilo, and two months later, they took

a.

b.

c.

a. A crispy brussels sprouts dish served as a starter.

b. Soni and Mark at the entrance to Moon and Turtle.

over Full Moon Café, renaming it Moon and Turtle in 2014. “The [concept is that the] moon is very high and the turtle is very low, and we work hard to bring them together,” Mark says. “We love both the humble ingredients and the exalted.” With this in mind, they create pairings like popcorn and truffles, or potatoes and caviar. Since opening the restaurant, the two have worked countless double shifts to keep everything running smoothly. “It’s grueling, it’s intense, but at the end of the day, we get to see each other all day every day,” Mark says. “When people come in we tell them, ‘Thanks for coming in,’ and they say, ‘Thanks for being here.’” Moon and Turtle is located in Hilo at 51 Kalakaua St. For more information, call 808-961-0599.

c. The smoky sashimi is a regular menu item, prepared perfectly thanks to Mark’s past as a sushi chef.


13

Husband and wife Mark and Soni Pomaski at their restaurant Moon and Turtle in Hilo.


14 m aui text by kelli

gratz

images by john

La Vida Dulce How buying a milking goat led Rebecca Woodburn-Rist to start her own caramel company on Maui.

hook

S

weet, ephemeral aromas float out from a small kitchen in Wailuku, Maui. Inside, Rebecca Woodburn-Rist, owner of Haleakala Creamery, is churning out her latest batch of artisanal goat’s milk caramel sauce, and here I am, ready to lick the spoon. “The caramel-making process is about four hours,” she explains to me. “It begins by combining milk and sugar and bringing it to a boil, then simmering until the water in the milk evaporates and the milk fat solids are left behind. This is what gives the final product its rich, buttery flavor.” The process she describes is what sets her caramel apart from other caramels made by burning sugar and then adding butter and cream afterward. That, and her herd of happy dairy goats that roam free Above: Rebecca Woodburn-Rist got her start selling caramel made with milk from her goats at Maui’s Upcountry Farmers Market.

on her farm in Kula. Her caramels are similar in style to those found in Mexico or South America, referred to as “dulce de leche,” which is made with cow’s milk, and “cajeta,” which is derived from goat’s milk. What began as a simple desire to make her own ice cream resulted in Woodburn-Rist buying a milking goat, and just a few years later, Haleakala Creamery was born. It all began with her selling caramel on the side of the road in Kula in 2013. Today, in addition to cooking up delicious sauces with local and home-raised ingredients, Woodburn-Rist and her husband are building a micro goat dairy and kitchen facility on their farm in Kula, where they live and keep their goats. “I wanted to start Haleakala Creamery to be a part of the local food movement,” she says. “I hope

to create more goat’s milk candy products, and I’m really looking forward to sharing goat’s milk ice cream with Maui.” Already, Haleakala Creamery’s staple caramel sauces offer a warm, ethereal, and delectable experience of the island. For more information about Haleakala Creamery and where to buy its caramel, visit haleakalacreamery.com.


16 o‘ a hu text by kim

yagi

images by jonas

maon

Sweets for the Sweet Madre Chocolate shows how good chocolate can be when its makers are dedicated to the entire process, from bean sourcing to bar making.

N

at Bletter attributes his love of chocolate to his mother, but his interest in it grew after he was asked to write a chapter for the book Chocolate in Mesoamerica while studying ethnobotany at the City University of New York. Having debated between graduate and culinary schools, Bletter’s two passions were combined, for the love of chocolate. After earning his Ph.D., Bletter came to the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa for a postdoctorate. It was here where he met his business partner, Dave Elliot, by introduction of Dave’s wife, a fellow ethnobotanist. Elliot initiated the idea to start a chocolate company in an email he sent from Oaxaca, Mexico to Bletter, who was doing fieldwork in Northeastern Thailand at the time. The distance didn’t keep the concept from gaining traction—in 2010, the two sold their first chocolate bar at the Hawai‘i Food and Wine Festival. The company’s name, Madre Chocolate, is inspired by the origins of the cacao that they source. To them, the name “madre”—which means “mother” in Spanish—encourages caring for Mother Earth. The company logo is derived from the Mayan glyph for cacao, a nod to the sophisticated society that first perfected turning cacao beans into celebrated treats. Today, the company has two shops, one in Honolulu’s Chinatown and the other in Kailua, where their product is made. These locations sell Madre Chocolate bars made with cacao sourced from a range of places

Above: At Madre Chocolate, a cup of hot chocolate is made from scratch starting with the cacao bean.

including Hawai‘i and Central America, as well as cacao nibs, kava, Adoboloco hot sauces, Big Island Bees honey, and more. Behind its Chinatown shop, the company has been cultivating a 2,000-square-foot garden featuring sugarcane, hibiscus, figs, liliko‘i, and 10 cacao trees alongside plants used for traditional Mexican chocolate making, such as achiote. Starting this summer, customers will be able to enjoy the garden while sipping chocolate drinks and munching on savory foods. Both O‘ahu locations offer weekly programming for fellow chocolate lovers, including monthly pairings and bean-to-bar classes. The company’s bars are also available at farmers markets and shops across the islands. Bletter’s recommendation for anyone who is curious about Madre Chocolate? Come by to get a taste of the process, and its result, firsthand. Madre Chocolate is located in Chinatown at 2 N. Pauahi St. and in Kailua at 201 Hamakua Dr. For more information, visit madrechocolate.com.


17

Dave Elliot and Nat Bletter, who started Madre Chocolate in 2010, at the company’s Chinatown location.


18 m aui text by sarah

ruppenthal

images by john

hook

Fields of Dreams The unique passions and paths of three Maui farm founders have led to successful, quirky crops.

At Maui Bees Farm, a pick-your-own garden pollinated by the bees is available for visitors to harvest from.


19


20

M

aui may be known for its resorts and sun-drenched beaches, but the island is also home to a range of agricultural pursuits. Venture inland and you’ll find a patchwork of fields filled with the usual suspects: sugarcane, pineapple, and coffee beans. But Maui is also a hotbed for small, family-run farms that go against the grain. Meet three of these beyondgarden-variety operations, and the farmers behind them.

a.

Maui Bees Farm If Norman Rockwell were around today, he’d want to set up an easel at Mark and Leah Damon’s Kula farm. The picturesque four-acre property has all the trappings: a quaint farmhouse, roaming livestock, a sprawling garden, a nascent apple orchard, and a cluster of white boxes nestled in the shade. The final are manmade beehives, called “bee boxes,” each housing a colony of roughly 60,000 honeybees. Mark, who has been interested in bees since he stumbled across the book The Joys of Beekeeping as a teenager, manages these colonies, along with 175 others throughout upcountry Maui. He is known as the “bee whisperer,” as he rarely wears a veil or gloves when he pulls honeycombs from his bee boxes— instead, he protects himself with an antique handheld smoker that calms the bees with its emissions. According to Mark, a single colony can produce up to 150 pounds of

b.

a. Bees live in manmade beehives on the Maui Bee Farms property.

b. Owner and beekeper Mark Damon at his farm’s pick-your-own garden.

honey each year; on average, bees collectively travel 24,000 miles and visit between three and nine million flowers to make a single pound of the sweet nectar. Mark and Leah harvest their allnatural Maui Wildflower Honey in a building called the “honey house,” where the honeycomb is coldprocessed (as opposed to being heated) in order to separate the honey from the beeswax—a technique that locks in its natural flavor and color, as well as maintains its live enzymes. Each year, the honey house churns out roughly 500 gallons of the thick, golden liquid. Jars of Maui Wildflower Honey are available at local health food stores and farmers markets. Visitors to the farm can also purchase honey in quarts, half-pints, and pints on site, where the Damons also offer beekeeping classes and a small plot of vegetables from which visitors can harvest. “Bees are a good thing to have on your property,” Mark says. “Once you get to know them, you’ll see why.” Maui Bees Farm is located in Kula at 150 Pulehu Nui Rd. For more information about its honey, the bee classes, and the you-pick garden, call 808-280-6652 or visit mauibees.com.


22

Maui Dragon Fruit Farm

a.

In 2008, Crystal Schmitt was strolling through a street market in China’s Hainan Province when a flash of pink on a fruit cart caught her eye. She picked up the oddly shaped produce, marveling at its exquisite beauty. “I’d never seen anything like it before,” Schmitt recalls. “It was breathtaking.” The fruit she was holding was a pitaya, more commonly known as dragon fruit. Two years and much research later, the mechanical engineer quit her job to start Maui’s first dragon fruit farm. Crystal and her husband, Larry—whose family background in farming has proven priceless—imported 16 varieties of pitaya, planting them on a 27-acre parcel of land in Lāhainā, with a view of the ocean, and setting two rules for their growing and harvesting: the dragon fruit must be self-pollinating, and it has to taste good. Hardy by nature, a single dragon fruit plant can last up to 25 years in the right conditions. Schmitt says Lāhainā’s sunny, arid climate is a perfect fit. “I never thought I’d be doing this,” she admits of the couple’s agricultural endeavor. “It seemed crazy at first, but I knew I had to make this happen.”

b.

c.

a. Dragon fruit, also known as pitaya, dished up at Maui Dragon Fruit Farm.

b. The cactus plant that dragon fruit grows on at the Lāhainā farm.

The USDA-certified organic farm also produces bananas, papaya, pineapples, avocados, sugarcane, and tropical flowers, and is available for special events such as weddings. The couple has also introduced paid tours of the farm that can include ecofriendly adventures such as ziplining and aquaballing. But at the end of the day, it’s all about the dragon fruit. “We believe it’s the future crop of Maui,” Schmitt says. “Someday, we want Maui to be the dragon fruit capital of the country.” Maui Dragon Fruit Farm is located in Lāhainā at 833 Punakea Loop. For more information, or to learn about tours, call 808-264-6127 or visit mauidragonfruitfarm.com.

c. The sprawling Maui Dragon Fruit Farm property is also home to eco-friendly adventures.


24

Ali Minney of Malolo Farm with freshly cut protea grown onsite.


Malolo Farm As a kid, Mark Minney helped out at his uncle’s protea farm, the first of its kind on Maui. “I wanted to have a flower farm since I was in high school,” he says. Years later, the general contractor planted a field of proteas on his own six-acre property in Kula, which he named Malolo Farm. Malolo is the Hawaiian word for “flying fish,” and is a sentimental name for Mark and his wife, Ali, who met while sailing around the world. As the demand for their proteas grew, flower farming eventually became a full-time job for the Minneys. Today, they grow and harvest the protea blooms from bushes that reach up to 30 feet in height. “We do everything by sight and touch,” Mark explains. “It takes a lot of common sense and patience to get it right, and that comes from years of experience.” Proteas are native to South Africa and Australia, and are thought to be one of the oldest groups of flowering plants in the world—some scientists say they’ve been around for 300 million years. These dramatic flowers exist in more than 1,400 varieties of shapes, sizes, textures, and colors (appropriately, the plant was named after the Greek sea god, Proteus, who could change his form at will). Malolo Farm grows hundreds of varieties of proteas, including three crowd favorites: pincushions, silky-soft pink minks, and the ethereal king proteas. Several years ago, the Minneys, who are the only certified protea propagators in the state, partnered with the University of Hawai‘i’s hybridization program to create new varieties unique to the islands. The resulting blooms, which include varieties of leucospermum and pincushion, are now available from the farm. For more information, or to order a floral package, call 808-878-6382 or visit proteasofmaui.com.


26 maui / o‘ a hu kaua ‘ i text by david

jordan

images courtesy of ocean and

organic

kōloa

vodka

rum

Get Spirited Three companies bring locally crafted booze to the islands and abroad.

An aerial view of Ocean Organic Vodka’s farm and distillery, courtesy of HawaiiONTV.com.


28

H

awai‘i imports the majority of its consumer products. From electronics to furniture to foodstuffs, many island residents rely on the continental United States and international sources to ship over goods. Alcohol is no exception. Whether it’s beer from Germany, bourbon from the mainland, or vodka from Russia, most alcoholic beverages are brought in from sources external to Hawai‘i. However, three local distillers have emerged in the past decade, offering highquality spirits made using Hawai‘i’s own natural resources. The vodka of Ocean Organic Vodka, the dark rum of Kōloa Rum Co., and the moonshine— or ‘ōkolehao, as it’s known in Hawai‘i—of Island Distillers are three top-shelf alcoholic commodities that exhibit a distinctly Hawaiian flair.

a.

b.

Ocean Organic Vodka Ocean Organic Vodka is unique because unlike most vodkas, which are typically distilled from carbohydrate sources such as wheat and corn grown on vast fields in nondescript locations, it is distilled from organic sugarcane—and some of it cultivated on the slopes of Haleakalā on Maui at that, a locale complete with panoramic views of the north and south shores of the island. Besides the organic sugarcane, sourced in part from Ocean Vodka’s own farm, only one other ingredient is utilized in the production of its vodka: water. In fact, it is made with

c.

a. The family behind Ocean Organic Vodka, courtesy of Jessica Pearl.

b. Kyle Smith bottling vodka on site, courtesy of Kristin Hettermann.

deep-ocean mineral water, which is extracted 3,000 feet below the Kona Coast. Here, the water is ice-cold, pure, and full of naturally occurring minerals. After extraction, it is organically purified and desalinated via reverse osmosis. During the purification process, Ocean Vodka intentionally retains trace minerals such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, which aid in imparting the light, crisp taste unique to the spirit. The juice from the organic sugarcane is then distilled in state-ofthe art columns, running continuously through the columns’ more than 100 polished-steel filtration plates over a two-week period. This multi-step method results in an exceptionally pure spirit, which is bottled on site. Ocean Vodka has won numerous accolades over the years, including a gold medal from the Beverage Tasting Institute in November 2011, a rating of 92 in the Ultimate Spirits Challenge, and, most recently, a triple gold medal in the Beverly Hills World Spirits Competition. For those interested in seeing the place where it is made, tours of the farm and distillery are offered daily, complete with tastings alongside the sugarcane field. Ocean Organic Vodka’s farm and distillery are located in Kula at 4051 Omaopio Rd. For more information or to book a tour, visit oceanvodka.com.

c. A vodka martini featuring raspberry and lemon, courtesy of Jessica Pearl.


29

A martini made with Ocean Vodka and Kula lavender, courtesy of Jessica Pearl.


30

Island Distillers

a.

Dave Flintstone is the owner, founder, and primary operator of the facilities of O‘ahu-based Island Distillers. Although he created the company in 2008, Flintstone’s relationship with high-quality alcohol goes back many years, and can be traced to the island of Maui, as well as Hispaniola in the Caribbean. While on Maui, Flintstone worked as a bartender and a scubadiving instructor. His experience bartending exposed him to a wide range of alcohol, which resulted in the development of his appreciation for well-made spirits. And it was on one of his scuba-diving trips to Hispaniola that Flintstone was first exposed to the craft of distillation. The globetrotting entrepreneur recalls spending several years in casual internships at distilleries both large and small, including “one guy on the side of the dirt road with a tiny 55-gallon barrel over a fire.” When he returned to Hawai‘i in 2002, Flintstone didn’t begin his own distillery straightaway, but the idea was always in the back of his mind. “I’m going to make this stuff someday,” he remembers thinking. Now, 14 years after Flintstone’s return to Hawai‘i, Island Distillers boasts three liquors currently in production: Hawaiian Vodka, Coconut Hawaiian Vodka, and Hawaiian Moonshine. This summer marks the debut of his new distillery and tasting room in Hawai‘i Kai, a venture that

b.

a. Island Distillers produces vodka, coconut vodka and ‘ōkolehao, also known as Hawaiian moonshine. Photo by Jonas Maon.

b. Dave Flintstone started Island Distillers on O‘ahu in 2008. Photo by Jonas Maon.

includes a distilling and blending operation called the Hawaiian Rum Station. While his unique brand of vodka and rum remain popular spirits, Flintstone truly sets himself apart with his signature ‘ōkolehao, a Hawaiian moonshine, of sorts. “Originally produced in 1790, I have recreated it through years of research and trial and error,” Flintstone says. “A high-proof spirit of ti root and sugar cane, un-aged, powerful, and smooth. It has a light vegetal flavor with no overpowering aromas, and a hint of sweetness.” Unlike the vodka of Ocean Organic Vodka and the rums of Kauai Rum Company, both of which are 80 proof spirits, Flintstone’s Hawaiian Moonshine is 100 proof. Yet despite its higher alcohol content, Hawaiian Moonshine is surprisingly smooth. For more information, and cocktail recipes, visit islanddistillers.com.


32 a.

b.

a. KĹ?loa Rum Company produces a variety of twicedistilled rums, including dark, spiced, and coffee rums.

b. At the company’s tasting room and store in Kilohana Plantation, visitors can sample its offerings.


Kōloa Rum Company A quintessential tropical drink, the mai tai is perfect for enjoying with a view of a Hawai‘i beach. In fact, the only thing that might make this mixed cocktail better is the addition of Kōloa Rum Company’s Kaua‘i dark rum. The company was started on the Garden Isle because of the deep ties that all of its founders have to the island—all are either from Kaua‘i or have family there. Bob Gunter, president of Kōloa Rum Company, points to three components that make Kōloa Rum distinctive. The first is that cane sugar is used in production, differentiating it from most rums produced in the Caribbean and other locales that use molasses. The second element that distinguishes Kōloa Rum is, like Ocean Vodka, its use of pristine water collected from underground aquifers of Mount Wai‘ale‘ale and surrounding mountain peaks. The water is filtered through porous volcanic rock until it coalesces in vast subterranean caverns, and by the time this water is extracted, it is remarkably pure. The third factor is the 1,210-gallon copper pot still, built in 1947, that Kōloa Rum utilizes to distill its products. This process ensures that each bottle of the company’s rum originates from a single-batch selection. Each of Kōloa Rum Company’s rums has received an award, but its Kaua‘i dark rum is especially decorated, having won gold medals from the Miami Rum Renaissance Festival in 2014 and 2011, a bronze medal from the San Francisco Spirits Competition in 2012, and a silver medal at the 5th Annual International Rum Festival in 2010. Kōloa Rum Company’s tasting room and company store are located in Līhu‘e at 3-2087 Kaumualii Hwy. For more information, and cocktail recipes, visit koloarum.com.


34 M O LOKA ‘ I text by jade

eckardt

images by john

hook

Flower Seekers This farm on Moloka‘i gives life to the classic yellow and white plumeria of the islands.

Richard Wheeler at his family plumeria farm, which he started with his wife in 1989.


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t first glance, the plumeria flower appears to lead a simple existence, a pretty little thing perched atop a tree, tucked behind an ear, or strung on lei alongside its friends. Each blossom flaunts a watercolor blend of pink or yellow and a scent of lemon or creamed butter and sugar. But upon closer inspection, the plumeria, which many in Hawai‘i associate with the spirit of aloha, means different things to different cultures around the world. In Vietnam, plumeria trees are believed to penetrate the ethereal world as harbors for spirits and demons. In Laos and Nicaragua, where the plumeria is the national flower of both countries, the blossoms are seen as a sign of loyalty, and are often found moonlighting as wedding accessories. In Malay folklore, the flowers are associated with a female vampire called a pontianak. As guardians of the dead in Southeast Asia, plumerias have been dubbed the “graveyard flower” because they thrive beautifully, alone and unattended in the most unlikely of locations— cemeteries. And in Polynesia, a plumeria placed behind the ear declares one’s romantic status: a flower tucked behind the right ear indicates taken, and behind the left, available. Just two miles west of Kaunakakai, Moloka‘i’s main and largest (yet still quite small) town, the crew at Molokai Plumerias has completed a morning pruning session. “Pruning is important to keep the trees at an ideal height for us to pick the flowers,” explains Richard “Dick” Wheeler, who founded the family farm in 1989 with his wife, Aome.

Above: Many of the farm’s plumerias are shipped around the islands or to the mainland to be used for lei making.

The farm is a contrast of colors, from the vibrant deep green and yellow of the resident trees to the surrounding golden sea of dry grass and fields of deep red dirt. Kamakou, the island’s highest and wettest point, provides a lush backdrop for the area. Lāna‘i is visible from the farm as well, seen just past the barrier reef of Moloka‘i’s eastern shore. The thousands of trees that make up Molokai Plumerias are relatives of the first plumeria trees the Wheelers found on the property decades ago, when a beekeeping job first brought Dick to the island. Standing outside of their ground-level workroom located below the family home, Dick explains the couple’s somewhat random start on Moloka‘i: “I came here on an offer to work for Moloka‘i Honey Company after a year on the Big Island breeding queens.” Before moving to the Big Island, the pair spent 10 years beekeeping in North Dakota. Unlike North Dakota, which Dick says “never felt like home,” Moloka‘i did right away. “I saw a diamond in the rough, and after the honey company shut down, we saw an opportunity to purchase the farm,” he says. “After that, we started making cuttings from the original plumerias.” The flowers the farm grows and ships nationally are the “celadine” cultivar of the plumeria rubia, with bright yellow and white blossoms and a refreshing lemony scent. Introduced to Hawai‘i around the 1860s, celadines are the quintessential plumerias associated with the frangipani fragrance that the bloom was nicknamed after. But at Molokai Plumerias, “We call them classic yellow,” Dick says.


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Visitors are welcome at Molokai Plumerias for weekday morning tours booked in advance, or to pick up blossoms for lei making.


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Weaving through the trees, he continues, “We ship a lot of loose flowers to hula hālau (groups) in the mainland for them to make lei for performances. There’s a pretty tight-knit group of Hawaiians in the mainland, and they still look back home when they need plumerias for celebrations or performances.” During a visit to Moloka‘i, visitors can get a peek at a day in the life of a plumeria farmer at Molokai Plumerias by making a lei or joining in on a farm tour and workshop, available weekday mornings by appointment. For those who wish to encircle themselves with the heavenly scent of plumeria, they can pick up loose plumerias for 8 cents each (the same petals go to the mainland for 12 cents apiece). “We feel strongly that this should be the go-to lei flower in Hawai‘i and so we try to keep them relatively affordable,” Dick says. A self-guided plumeria-picking session to make a lei costs $20, and the full farm tour and workshop is $25. After moving full circle around the property, Dick comes to a stop and says, “We always wanted a family business, and we were able to do this with our daughter and son.” While the kids are now grown and living off-island, Dick hopes the farm will stay in the family. Opening both arms toward the field, he says, “I’m thinking I might have to get one of the grandsons to come run this place.” Molokai Plumerias is located in Kaunakakai at 1342 Maunaloa Hwy. For more information, visit molokaiplumerias.com. Above: The plumeria grown at Moloka‘i Plumeria is the “Celadine” cultivar of rubra, but it is commonly known as Hawaiian Yellow or the Graveyard Flower.


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MAUI PINEAPPLE TOURS For reservations, call 808-665-5491 883 Haliimaile Rd., Makawao Âť mauipineappletour.com

Get a Taste of the Islands

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othing is as synonymous with the Hawaiian landscape and culture as the pineapple. At Maui Pineapple Tours, the passion is to share with guests the history, culture, and hard work that goes into producing this iconic fruit. It is the only company in America that offers a tour of a working pineapple plantation, and its staff makes sure guests get a firsthand look into such operations. Nestled in the tiny plantation town of Hali‘imaile in beautiful upcountry Maui, the small tour begins in an air-conditioned vehicle that

transports you into the pineapple fields. While traveling through them, knowledgeable guides explain the planting and harvesting techniques of the pineapple and show how plantation workers still cultivate the fruit by hand. Visitors are also able to observe the growing cycles of pineapples, and stop in the fields to taste several varieties. Maui Pineapple Tours wants to make sure you are full of your favorite types of pineapple before you leave the fields! After exploring the plantation, guests are guided through the processing factory and shown how


pineapple is tested, sorted, and packaged. Everyone on tour receives a boxed famous Maui Gold pineapple as a souvenir. This pineapple is all clear for the airport and can easily be taken on the plane to share with friends and family back home. Also, this brand of Maui pineapple was made famous by its extra sweet flavor and can’t be found anywhere else in the world, so nobody will blame you if it never makes it to the airport. Following the tour, the surrounding town has a lot to offer guests. Maui Pineapple Tours has partnered with the award-winning Hali‘imaile General Store and Hali‘imaile Distilling Company to offer exclusive lunch and distillery experiences for tour guests. The company’s team looks forward to sharing the history and culture of Maui pineapple with you, and hopes to see you in its fields soon!


42 o‘ a hu image courtesy of duke’s oceanfest

Events Each year, Duke’s OceanFest celebrates the life of waterman Duke Kahanamoku with nine days of ocean sports and festive happenings. Spectators and participants gather at Waikīkī Beach to watch or take part in more than 20 ocean and beach competitions, ranging from outrigger racing to volleyball to tandem surfing, and even an event for surfing animals, which last year included pigs and dogs. Also popular are its “Waikiki Nights,” which feature beachside music and movies. At the center of the festivities is the sunrise lei draping of the Duke Kahanamoku statue on August 24, which marks the 126th anniversary of the famous Hawaiian’s birthday.

The event runs from Saturday, August 20 to Sunday, August 28. For more information, visit dukesoceanfest.com.


D O ! E V E N T PICKS

MOILIILI SUMMER FEST (O‘AHU) July 2, 5–10:30 p.m. Varsity Office Building, 1100 University Ave. Gather in the Moili‘ili neighborhood of Honolulu for the city’s largest Bon Odori, a folk dance performed during the Obon festival season, a traditional Japanese Buddhist event celebrating the dead. Expect dance, taiko drumming, food and retail booths, and keiki activities. » moiliilisummerfest.com ALA MOANA FIREWORKS (O‘AHU) July 4, 8:30 p.m. Ala Moana Center & Beach, 1450 Ala Moana Blvd. Celebrate the 4th of July with one of the largest fireworks shows in Hawai‘i. The fireworks show begins at 8:30 p.m. but arrive early, since parking fills up fast. PARKER RANCH ANNUAL JULY 4TH HORSERACES & RODEO (BIG ISLAND) July 4 Parker Ranch Rodeo Arena Big Island ranchers and paniolo participate in fast-paced horseraces and rodeo events including team roping, mugging, and po‘o wai u. There are also food trucks and keiki activities, including roping practice and pony rides. » parkerranch.com

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NOTE: EVENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH ORGANIZER FOR THE MOST UPDATED DETAILS.

HAWAII STATE FARM FAIR (O‘AHU) July 9 & 10, various times Kualoa Ranch, 49-560 Kamehameha Hwy. This family-friendly event provides a wide range of activities like cookoffs and eating contests, livestock exhibits, and fresh produce at Kualoa Ranch. » hawaiistatefarmfair.org 8TH ANNUAL MANGOES AT THE MOANA (O‘AHU) July 16 Moana Surfrider, 2365 Kalakaua Ave. Celebrate all things mango with a mango judging contest, a farmers market, and even a mango-themed culinary showdown featuring wellknown Honolulu chefs. » moana-surfrider.com/dining/ mangoesatthemoana 34TH ANNUAL KONA DAIFUKUJI ORCHID CLUB SHOW AND SALE (BIG ISLAND) July 17 Daifukuji Soto Mission Hall, 79-7241 Mamalahoa Hwy. This year’s orchid show salutes the centennial of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park with a central blooming display backdropped by a volcano, and offers complimentary refreshments and an orchid boutonniere corsage. » facebook.com/orchidsinparadise

PRINCE LOT HULA FESTIVAL (O‘AHU) July 16–17, various times Moanalua Gardens, 2850A Moanalua Rd. The Prince Lot Hula Festival is the largest non-competitive hula event in Hawai‘i. » moanaluagardensfoundation.org THE 46TH ANNUAL UKULELE FESTIVAL (O‘AHU) July 17, 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Kapiolani Park Bandstand, 3840 Paki Ave. Watch a two-hour concert that showcases the world’s finest ‘ukulele players, along with Hawai‘i’s top entertainers, and much more. » ukulelefestivalhawaii.org HAWAII HORSE EXPO 2016 (BIG ISLAND) August 6 & 7 Pukalani Stables, 67-139 Pukalani Rd. Join hundreds of other riding enthusiasts for clinics like equine psychology and basic groundwork, as well as hands-on options, like yoga for the equestrian. » hawaiihorseexpo.com DON THE BEACHCOMBER MAI TAI FESTIVAL (BIG ISLAND) August 13 Royal Kona Resort, 75-5852 Alii Dr. This day of fun includes a barbecue cook off, an open marketplace, a pool party with live music by Henry Kapono, and a mix-off with 21 of the world’s best bartenders competing for the title of the world’s best mai tai. » donsmaitaifest.com


MAUI CALLS (MAUI) August 19, 6 p.m. Yokouchi Pavilion and A&B Amphitheater, 1 Cameron Way Enjoy delectable pupu created by chefs from top Maui restaurants, paired with premium wines from around the world, Hawaiian music, and silent and live auctions benefitting the Maui Arts and Cultural Center. » mauiarts.org MADE IN HAWAII FESTIVAL (O‘AHU) August 19–21, various times Neal S. Blaisdell Exhibition Hall & Arena, 777 Ward Ave. Take part in this three-day showcase featuring local produce, art, live music and more. » madeinhawaiifestival.com DUKE’S OCEANFEST (O‘AHU) August 20–28 Waikīkī, various venues This weeklong festival features a variety of exciting water sports competitions along with other events, including a sunrise lei-draping ceremony at Duke’s statue on August 24, the anniversary of his birthday. » dukesoceanfest.com HANA CULTURAL CENTER’S ANNUAL HO‘OLAULE‘A (MAUI) August 20, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Grass lot by Hana Ranch Store, 1 Mill St. Take the long drive to Hāna and be rewarded with food booths, live music, hula performances, kapa-cloth making demonstrations, a range of traditional Hawaiian games, and even a petting zoo.

34TH ANNUAL OKINAWAN FESTIVAL (O‘AHU) September 3 & 4 Kapiolani Park, 3840 Paki Ave. Come down to Kapi‘olani Park and experience the vibrant culture of Okinawa alongside ono food and fun activities. » okinawanfestival.com 47TH ANNUAL WAIKIKI ROUGHWATER SWIM (O‘AHU) September 5, 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Sans Souci Beach (Kaimana Beach), 2863 Kalakaua Ave. This open water swim is slightly more than 2 miles long, beginning near the New Otani Hotel and ending near the Hilton Hawaiian Village. » waikikiroughwaterswim.com KU MAI KA HULA (MAUI) September 8, 7:30 p.m. Castle Theater, 1 Cameron Way Featuring award-winning hālau from Hawai‘i, the continental U.S., and Japan, this competition showcases solo and group performances. » mauiarts.org CHINESE MOON FESTIVAL (MAUI) September 16 & 17, 10 a.m–8.p.m. Wo Hing Museum, 858 Front St. Celebrate the agricultural harvest during a traditional Chinese Moon Festival. Chinese tea and moon cakes will be served, and traditional Chinese cuisine will be offered for sale. » lahainarestoration.org

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O ‘ A H U PICKS

DINE BAR 35 35 N. Hotel St. (808-537-3535) Enjoy a selection of more than 200 beers from around the world and an extensive array of cocktails, wine, and sake alongside chewy, gourmet pizza at this Chinatown location’s indoor or outdoor patio bar. » bar35.com

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THE GATHERING PLACE, WHERE COSMOPOLITAN DELIGHTS AND SCENIC BEAUTY COLLIDE.

BUHO COCINA Y CANTINA 2250 Kalakaua Ave., Ste. 525 (808-922-2846) This restaurant doesn’t just serve up tasty south-of-the-border classics—it elevates them with inventive twists and local ingredients. Also refreshing to enjoy on Buho’s Waikīkī rooftop is one of its specialty cocktails. » buhocantina.com

THE ELEPHANT TRUCK 59-712 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-638-1854) Loved by celebrities and locals alike, this food truck, befitted with tiki torches and potted plants, serves up affordable and delicious Thai food from its regular location across from Shark’s Cove.


GOKOKU SUSHI 7192 Kalanianaole Hwy. (808-888-7777) Dine on traditional and contemporary Japanese cuisine with a view of the Koko Marina. » gokokuhonolulu.com HE‘EIA PIER GENERAL STORE & DELI 46-499 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-235-2192) Located on the water’s edge, this general store is an unlikely venue for savory, gourmet plate lunches—but that’s exactly what it offers. HELENA’S 1240 N. School St. (808-845-8044) This Hawaiian food joint off the beaten path serves up authentic flavors and local favorites. In 2000, it even earned a Regional Classic Award from the James Beard Foundation. Cash only. » helenashawaiianfood.com HONOLULU BEERWORKS 328 Cooke St. (808-589-2332) This casual spot is a hit for both its locally crafted brews and its tasty pub fare. If you can’t decide on a beer, order a flight, then get the Bavarian pretzels to accompany it. Growlers are also available. » honolulubeerworks.com IL LUPINO Royal Hawaiian Center, 2201 Kalakaua Ave. (808-922-3400) A mix of delectable Italian fare and local produce, dishes at Il Lupino are enjoyed best with a glass of wine from the wine bar. » illupino.com

IRIFUNE 563 Kapahulu Ave. (808-737-1141) This popular neighborhood eatery is famous for its garlic ahi and funky décor. The gyoza is a must-try, homemade and stuffed with tofu, cream cheese, and an additional ingredient that changes daily. KAI MARKET Sheraton Waikiki, 2255 Kalakaua Ave. (808-921-4600) Who doesn’t love a good buffet? Located in the heart of Waikīkī, Kai Market brings a classy setting and stunning view to the popular serveyourself-style meal for breakfast and dinner, and features local ingredients as much as possible. » sheratonwaikiki.com/dining/kai KALAPAWAI CAFÉ 750 Kailua Rd. (808-262-3354) This spacious bistro-style stop offers an impressive small-plate menu with a focus on clean, seasonal flavors and tidy presentation. The sweet potato ravioli in sage brown butter sauce and the bone-in pork chop are two musttry dishes. » kalapawaimarket.com KOKO HEAD CAFÉ 1145 12th Ave. (808-732-8920) From sweet treats like cornflake French toast to savory dishes like don buri chen, breakfast at Koko Head Café is a meal to remember. If you aren’t one for typical breakfast fare, you’re in luck—chef Le Anne Wong, who founded the restaurant, is known for her creative and tasty dumplings. » kokoheadcafe.com

LA MARIANA 50 Sand Island Access Rd. (808-848-2800) The last tiki bar left in Hawai‘i, La Mariana has history that can be seen in its eclectic decorations and unconventional buildout. Located right on the harbor, this is a great spot for cocktails and a shared sunset. » lamarianasailingclub.com LONGHI’S Ala Moana Shopping Center, 1450 Ala Moana Blvd. (808-947-9899) Though Longhi’s is known for its fresh fish, prime steak, and succulent lobster, this restaurant also has one of the best eggs benedicts on the island. » longhis.com NICO’S 1133 N. Nimitz Hwy. (808-540-1377) Located on Pier 38, this waterfront restaurant serves up fresh, locally caught fish, and is a great gathering place for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. » nicospier38.com THE PIG AND THE LADY 83 N. King St. (808-585-8255) Inspired by his mother’s homecooked meals, chef Andrew Le presents contemporary FrenchVietnamese fare that farmers market regulars have come to know and love. » thepigandthelady.com PINT AND JIGGER 1936 S. King St. (808-744-9593) Escape for a moment at this modern public house, which intertwines craft beers and original cocktails with savory food in a classic social atmosphere. » pintandjigger.com

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TOWN 3435 Waialae Ave. (808-735-5900) This American bistro’s menu changes daily based on the freshest ingredients available, leaving customers eager to return. » townkaimuki.com UNCLE’S FISH MARKET & GRILL 1135 N. Nimitz Hwy. (808-275-0063) Located at Pier 38, this waterfront restaurant uses only the freshest fish to produce an unpretentious seafood experience based in classic European and Asian cuisines. » unclesfishmarket.com VIA GELATO 1142 12th Ave. (808-732-2800) Flavors such as caramel swirl and guava sorbetto change daily at this spacious Kaimukī shop that has quickly become a neighborhood favorite. » viagelatohawaii.com THE WILLOWS 901 Hausten St. (808-952-9200) Pick your favorite dishes from The Willows’ sprawling American-Hawaiian buffet, and then enjoy your meal in the restaurant’s lush garden setting. » willowshawaii.com WOLFGANG’S STEAKHOUSE Royal Hawaiian Center, 2201 Kalakaua Ave. (808-922-3600) Wolfgang’s Steakhouse serves delicious dry-aged USDA Prime Grade Black Angus beef and succulent seafood. » wolfgangssteakhouse.net

GO BISHOP MUSEUM 1525 Bernice St. (808-847-3511) This museum of history and science is located off the beaten path in Honolulu, but is worth a stop to learn about Hawaiian and Pacific cultures. » bishopmuseum.org ‘EHUKAI BEACH PARK Across the street from Sunset Beach Elementary School, 59 Kamehameha Hwy. This legendary beach fronts the Banzai Pipeline surf break, a popular spot which offers up perfect barreling waves surfed by local and professional surfers alike. HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART 900 S. Beretania St.; 2411 Makiki Heights Dr. (808-532-8734) Enjoy art spanning 5,000 years and all around the globe at this museum, which has two airy indoor-outdoor locations. At its main hub on Beretania Street, it presents its recognized main collection, while at the Spalding House location in Makiki, it features contemporary works. » honolulumuseum.org

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HONOLULU’S CHINATOWN Maunakea St. and Hotel St. Wander this intimate neighborhood, filled with fantastic eateries, Chinese medicine shops, and an array of stores ranging from boutiques to lei stands. ‘IOLANI PALACE 364 S. King St. (808-522-0832) The official residence of Hawai‘i’s former monarchy, ‘Iolani Palace is a marvel of opulence, innovation, and political intrigue. Come enjoy one of the most spectacular living restorations in all of Polynesia. » iolanipalace.org KOKO CRATER BOTANICAL GARDEN 7491 Kokonani St. (808-522-7060) Tucked away within Koko Crater, this free garden is home to a wide array of plants from regions around the world, and is intersected by a looping path. KUALOA RANCH 49-560 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-237-7321) This ranch on O‘ahu’s east side offers an array of adventures, including ziplining, ATV and horseback tours of the ranch and locations where movies have been filmed, as well as educational tours. » kualoa.com MĀNOA FALLS The end of Manoa Road (808-464-2924) Head back into the mountain valley of Mānoa with this moderate hike through tropical forest to a 150-foot waterfall. Parking in the nearby lot is $5. » manoafalls.com POLYNESIAN CULTURAL CENTER 55-370 Kamehameha Hwy. (808-293-3333) Enjoy the authentic feel of Polynesian villages before partaking in an elaborate lū‘au affair, complete with a full meal and a performance that includes hula and other Polynesian dance. Also on site are an iMax theater, gift shops, and various restaurants. » polynesia.com SHANGRI LA 4055 Papu Cir. (808-734-1941) This elegant former home of Doris Duke overlooks the ocean, and is now a center for Islamic art. Tours leave from the Honolulu Museum of Art, which is another great place for spending an afternoon. » shangrilahawaii.org WAIALUA SUGAR MILL 67-106 Kealohanui St. At this old sugar mill—now home to surfboard makers, jewelry designers, a soap factory, and more—stop in to see makers at work, and to shop for local goods and souvenirs. » waialuasugarmill.com

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M A U I | M O LO K A ‘ I PICKS

DINE CAPISCHE 555 Kaukahi St. (808-879-2224) Experience unparalleled ocean views in a lush garden dining area, partaking in dishes made from fresh Italian ingredients using New World cooking techniques. » capische.com

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HALIIMAILE GENERAL STORE 900 Haliimaile Rd. (808-572-2666) An old plantation-style home is converted into a dining experience marked by eclectic American food with Asian undertones. » bevgannonrestaurants.com/ haliimaile

THE VALLEY ISLE, FILLED WITH AN ARRAY OF NATURAL WONDERS.

KA‘ANA KITCHEN 3550 Wailea Alanui Dr. (808-573-1234) At Ka‘ana Kitchen, the menu changes with the season, so you won’t find the same thing twice. If you’re a bonafide foodie, a fun treat is to request a seat at the chef’s table. » maui.andaz. hyatt.com/en/hotel/dining/ka_anakitchen.html


KANEMITSU BAKERY & COFFEE SHOP (MOLOKA‘I) 79 Ala Malama Ave. (808-553-5855) Stop by this Moloka‘i bakery for an assortment of sweet papaya, cinnamon apple, and taro breads, as well as its pull-apart loaves, tempting treats filled with jelly, cream cheese, butter, and sugar. KULA BISTRO 4566 Lower Kula Rd. (808-871-2960) This homestyle café serves downhome meals with Italian flair, and is perfect for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. A bonus at this local gem is that it is BYOB, with no corkage fee. » kulabistro.com LAHAINA GRILL 127 Lahainaluna Rd. (808-667-5117) This contemporary bistro favorite serves up seafood, steak, and Hawaiian favorites in a refined yet comfortable atmosphere. » lahainagrill.com LEODA’S KITCHEN & PIE SHOP 820 Olowalu Village Rd. (808-662-3600) Dine casually in a family-style, plantation-era eatery, where a focus on using farm-fresh and sustainable ingredients in handcrafted sandwiches, salads, baked goods, and pie is sure to charm. » leodas.com

MAMA’S FISH HOUSE 799 Poho Pl. (808-579-8488) Rated one of Maui’s finest dining establishments, this restaurant is celebrated for its seafood dishes and fine hospitality. Its staggering menu changes daily according to the fresh catch. » mamasfishhouse.com MERRIMAN’S KAPALUA Kapalua Resort, One Bay Club Pl. (808-669-6400) Merriman’s serves only the freshest products, at least 90 percent of which are locally grown or caught using sustainable methods. Dining with a view of Kapalua Bay is an added bonus, and the complimentary valet parking tops it all off. » merrimanshawaii.com/kapalua MONKEYPOD KITCHEN 10 Wailea Gateway Pl. (808-891-2322) A place for foodies, beer lovers, and families alike, Monkeypod Kitchen is dedicated to mastering the craft of food with fresh island fish, handtossed pizzas, and homemade cream pies. » monkeypodkitchen.com

PĀ‘IA FISH MARKET 100 Baldwin Ave. (808-579-8030) Grab a seat on the bench and enjoy a fish burger at this Pā‘ia gem, served with a side of friendly conversation. » paiafishmarket.com STAR NOODLE 286 Kupuohi St. (808-667-5400) Enjoy fresh house-made noodles and other Asian specialties, like the Filipino bacon and eggs or the Vietnamese crêpe, at this contemporary restaurant. » starnoodle.com TASAKA GURI GURI 70 E. Kaahumanu Ave. (808-871-4513) This shop tucked down a pathway at a shopping mall serves a treat dreamed up in Hawai‘i, guri guri, which is similar to soft-serve sherbet, and comes in strawberry and pineapple flavors. Cash only.

PACIFIC’O 505 Front St. (808-667-4341) A dining experience setting the new standard for farm-to-table cuisine, this beachfront restaurant features a contemporary menu from land and sea. » pacificomaui.com

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M A U I | M O LO K A ‘ I PICKS

GO ALI‘I KULA LAVENDER FARM 1100 Waipoli Rd. (808-878-3004) On the slopes of Haleakalā, this farm is regularly covered in mist. Lavender grown here is used for teas and scones that can be purchased on site. » aliikulalavender.com BABY BEACH Western end of Baldwin Beach Park, mile marker 5 Hana Hwy. This beach outside of Pā‘ia offers a protected lagoon perfect for a relaxing float or for families with young children. FRONT STREET 900 Front St. The main thoroughfare for Lāhainā, Front Street is lined with tons of great restaurants, shopping, art galleries, and plenty of sightseeing opportunities. It is also a popular nightlife spot, with many bars and clubs dotting the block. » frontstreetlahaina.com HALEAKALĀ NATIONAL PARK Mile Marker 41 Hana Hwy. (808-572-4400) World-famous for its sunrise and silversword plants, Haleakalā is well worth the early morning drive to its summit—just be sure to bundle up and watch where you step. » nps.gov/hale

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THE VALLEY ISLE, FILLED WITH AN ARRAY OF NATURAL WONDERS.

‘IAO VALLEY STATE PARK End of Iao Valley Rd. (808-882-6206) Famous for being a setting of Jurassic Park, and for its Hawaiian history, this lush valley boasts a state park with a short walking path, as well as a stunning view of ‘Iao Needle. » iaovalleystatepark.org

PĀ‘IA’S BALDWIN AVENUE 1 Baldwin Ave. Wander this bustling avenue, and you are sure to find something you like, from teeny bikinis at Maui Girl Beachwear to souvenirs at Alice in Hulaland. Its crossroad, Paia Highway, boasts additional local shops.

KAUNAKAKAI TO KALAUPAPA OVERLOOK (MOLOKA‘I) West on Hwy. 460, then north on Hwy. 470 This short journey leads to sacred Pālā‘au State Park, which boasts a beautiful view of Kalaupapa and the coast.

RED SAND BEACH End of Uakea Rd. If you make the trek to Hāna, it’s worth the hike around a cliff face to reach this red sand beach. Note: Clothing is optional here.

OCEAN VODKA ORGANIC FARM AND DISTILLERY 4051 Omaopio Rd. (808-877-0009) Take a tour of Maui’s only vodka distillery, where just outside, they grow the sugarcane used for the distilling process. Tip: Book your tour at least 24 hours in advance.  » oceanvodka.com O‘O FARM 651 Waipoli Rd. (808-667-4341) This gorgeous property is home to a sustainable and biodynamic farm that produces coffee, fruits, vegetables, herbs, and flowers for local eateries like Pacific’O and The Feast at Lele. Sign up for a “seed to cup” morning coffee tour, or take the lunch and farm tour. » oofarm.com

THE UPCOUNTRY FARMERS MARKET 55 Kiopaa St. This weekly farmers market takes place every Saturday from 7 to 11 a.m. and features delightful local vendors, including Maui Cones, which serves up homemade mochiko chicken over rice in nori cones. » upcountryfarmersmarket.com


$14.95 for annual subscription L E I C U LT U R E .C O M / S U B S C R I B E

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B I G I S L A N D PICKS

DINE DA POKE SHACK 76-6246 Alii Dr. (808-329-7653) Rated the best restaurant in the nation by Yelp in 2014, this nondescript joint offers unique poke bowls and Hawaiian plates. » dapokeshack.com

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THE BIG ISLAND, HOME TO UNRIVALED WONDERS AND CONTRASTING WORLDS.

DON THE BEACHCOMBER 75-5852 Alii Dr. (808-930-3286) At the original home of the mai tai, enjoy beachfront dining and a retro tiki-chic atmosphere, including Don’s original mai tai. » royalkona.com/dining.cfm

HAWAIIAN STYLE CAFÉ 65-1290 Kawaihae Rd. (808-885-4295) This small country kitchen serves up local favorites for breakfast in large portions. The pancakes are a great pick. » hawaiianstylecafe.com


HOLUAKOA GARDENS AND CAFÉ 76-5900 Old Government Rd. (808-322-2233) Dine in the restaurant’s enchanting garden setting while enjoying fare prepared—as much as possible—from ingredients sourced within five miles of where you are sitting. » holuakoacafe.com MANAGO HOTEL RESTAURANT 82-6151 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-323-2642) Hawai‘i’s version of an old-school diner, this restaurant located within the Manago Hotel is known for its pork chops and complementary side dishes that rotate daily. » managohotel.com/rest.html MIYO’S 564 Hinano St. (808-935-2273) Melt-in-your-mouth sashimi and other traditional Japanese dishes make this rustic restaurant near Waiakea Pond one of the best places for Japanese food in Hilo. » miyosrestaurant.com PUNALU‘U BAKE SHOP 5642 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-929-7343) Just because this bakery also offers souvenirs doesn’t mean it’s not authentic—the establishment serves tasty sweetbread made from a family recipe, as well as fresh malasadas. Enjoy your treats outside underneath the gazebo. » bakeshophawaii.com RAYS ON THE BAY 78-128 Ehukai St. (808-930-4949) Relish the flavors of local favorites while majestic manta rays swim a few feet away from the tables at this familyfriendly restaurant. VILLAGE BURGER 67-1185 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-885-7319) Supporting Big Island ranchers one burger at a time, this gourmet burger joint located in Parker Ranch Center uses only local, pasture-raised beef that is ground fresh, grilled to perfection, and served on local brioche buns. » villageburgerwaimea.com

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B I G I S L A N D PICKS

GO BIG ISLAND BEES 82-1140 Meli Rd. (808-328-1315) Enter the world of bees and beekeeping, and learn about how organic, single-floral honey is made. View actual hives, while learning how the hives are organized and experiencing what makes bees so special. » bigislandbees.com HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK 45 minutes south of Hilo (808-985-6000) Home to the Earth’s most massive volcano, Mauna Loa, and the world’s most active volcano, Kilauea, a trip to Volcanoes National Park is a must. In addition to the active lava flow, check out Pu‘u Loa petroglyphs, Thurston Lava Tube, Crater Rim Drive, and more than 150 miles of hiking trails. » nps.gov/havo ‘IMILOA ASTRONOMY CENTER 600 Imiloa Pl. (808-969-9703) This comprehensive educational facility showcases the connections between the rich traditions of Hawaiian culture and the groundbreaking astronomical research conducted at Mauna Kea, and features a planetarium complex and extensive exhibit hall. » imiloahawaii.org

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THE BIG ISLAND, HOME TO UNRIVALED WONDERS AND CONTRASTING WORLDS.

PARKER RANCH 66-1304 Mamalahoa Hwy. (808-885-7311) Visit Hawai‘i’s largest ranch, and enjoy a self-guided tour through two historic homes to learn about the land. Or, the more adventurous can book a time to hunt Ibex goats or wild boar. » parkerranch.com SKI MAUNA KEA Base of Mauna Kea (808-885-4188) Though there are no ski lifts, and access is by four-wheel drive vehicles only, skiing can be found on Mauna Kea, making for one of the most exotic skiing experiences anywhere. » skihawaii.com SOUTH POINT GREEN SAND BEACH Mamalahoa Hwy. between mile markers 69 and 70 Also known as Papakōlea Beach, this green sand beach is accessed only by foot or four-wheel-drive vehicle, and is one of the most unusual and beautiful beaches in Hawai‘i.


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O‘AHU Honolulu

MOLOKA‘I

Ho‘olehua

Kalaupapa

Barbers Point Kalaeloa

Kapalua

MAUI

Kahului Hana

Lana‘i

HAWAI‘I

(THE BIG ISLAND)

Waimea-Kohala

THE MOKULELE EXPERIENCE We proudly fly out of Hawai‘i’s local commuter airports and international airports, providing passengers with many convenient options for traveling. That means plenty of free parking, short walks to the gates, and quick check-ins. It also means no lines, no removing your shoes, belt, laptop, or toiletries, and no emptying the contents of your pockets, because with the exception of Honolulu International, there’s no TSA screening. So you’ll be relaxed even before your flight takes off. Once we’ve reached cruising altitude, you’ll enjoy an experience that’s much more like a private charter than a typical airline flight. Each seat is a first-class seat offering unparalleled views of the islands’ most majestic, aweinspiring sights.

Scan QR code for flight schedule, or visit mokulele.com.

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Daily Flights Charters


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CALIFORNIA

IMPERIAL COUNTY AIRPORT (IPL)

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Ticketing & Bag Drop


Starwood Hotels and Resorts in Hawai‘i: After Hours

63 o‘ a hu promotional

Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Four exciting entertainment options set the tone for a memorable evening in Waikīkī. Start with the captivating Polynesian performance Te Moana Nui–Tales of the Pacific, featuring authentic music and dancing that weaves legends of Polynesia with Old Hawai‘i. Feeling a bit nostalgic? Catch the electrifying Fourever Fab as they jam out favorite hits from The Beatles. For a good laugh, the hilarious Aloha-Ha Show showcases live comedy paired with animatronic characters, impersonations, and unique robotics. And the poolside Splash! Bar and Bento is the perfect place to unwind during late-night happy hour. The Royal Hawaiian, a Luxury Collection Resort A Royal Hawaiian Luau, ‘Aha ‘Aina, Waikīkī’s only oceanfront dinner and show, is a culinary and sensory celebration in grand Royal Hawaiian style. It is held Monday evenings at The Royal Hawaiian’s Ocean Lawn, with the breathtaking backdrop of Waikīkī Beach and Diamond Head. After the show, visit the oceanfront Mai Tai Bar for a quintessential Island evening experience. Sip a Royal Mai Tai under the stars while the sound of the rolling surf blends harmoniously with sweet tropical music.

Sheraton Waikiki To amp up the evening, head to RumFire Waikiki restaurant and bar in the Sheraton Waikiki to experience liquid aloha (featuring the largest selection of vintage rums in Waikīkī—101, to be exact), innovative Pacific Rim of Fire menu selections, entertainment, and dancing in an indoor-outdoor setting overlooking Diamond Head and Waikīkī Beach. RumFire brings a new level of excitement and energy to its already hip and happening venue on Waikīkī Beach with more than 10,000 feet of pure energy and excitement.

Moana Surfrider, A Westin Resort and Spa The Banyan Courtyard continues a 115-year tradition as a favorite gathering spot for visitors and kama‘aina (locals) to enjoy daily and nightly live performances of acoustic guitar, contemporary Hawaiian music, and more. Don’t miss Mele at the Moana, live concerts by Hawai‘i’s hottest musical talents, on the last Friday of every month. Call Waikīkī reservations at 808-921-4600. Ask about validated parking and happy hour specials.


64 o‘ a hu giving back

text by kelli

gratz

image by john

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Pitch In at MA‘O Organic Farms Help this west-side farm reap the benefits of healthy land and community.

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ooted in their desire to grow organic food locally and support Hawai‘i’s youth, Gary Maunakea-Forth and his wife, Kukui, started MA‘O Organic Farms in 2001 (MA‘O is an acronym for Mala ‘Ai ‘Opio, which translates to “youth garden”) as a way to reach out to at-risk youth in Wai‘anae. Since then, their youth leadership training program has helped hundreds of students obtain college educations, as well as inspired many to become

farmers. Along with building and raising a community through agricultural activity, they’ve also raised awareness of the current instability of Hawai‘i’s food and economic security through an authentic farmto-table experience. Today, you can get a taste of the farm’s produce at farmers markets, local restaurants, and through its Community Supported Agriculture box. G.I.V.E. (Get Involved and Volunteer Environmentally) back with MA‘O’s

community work days every last Saturday of the month. Plant, weed, harvest, and talk story with local residents while learning about the deep connection between the land, the food, and the people of Hawai‘i. For more information, visit maoorganicfarms.org.



Hopper - Issue 4 (July–September 2016)