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key stage 4 guide


key stage 4 guide


Key Stage 4 Guide

Contents Making a Choice

2

Art and Design

4

Business Studies

7

Curriculum Support

8

Drama

9

English and English Literature

12

English as an Additional Language

13

French

14

Geography

15

German

17

Graphic Products

18

History

20

ICT

22

Mathematics

23

Music

25

Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE)

27

Physical Education (Core)

28

Physical Education

29

Resistant Materials Technology

30

Spanish

31

The Sciences

32

Careers

37

1


Key Stage 4 Guide

Making a Choice You are about to take your first steps on the two year courses which lead to the UK Public Examinations ‘General Certificate of Secondary Education’.

The GCSE programme offered at the British School of Paris is excellent. It will bear comparison with the curricula offered in other national and international schools. There is a broad, diverse and stimulating curriculum available, and GCSEs provide excellent preparation for the A Level courses offered in Years 12 and 13, leading to university entrance world-wide. GCSE courses mean a deeper and more challenging approach to the subjects you study. Success in these courses will depend not only on your ability to work hard in class, but also on your willingness to work on your own. Many of the specifications demand that you prepare coursework or Controlled Assessment – this is evidence of your own personal study skills rather than just a test of your ability to memorise material. Much of this work will be assessed under controlled conditions in class. You will study Mathematics, English Language, English Literature, Science and Additional Science, French, PSHE and PE (Core). For some there will be the possibility of extension courses: GCSE French in Year 10 and AS Level in Year 11, three separate sciences at GCSE or Further Maths GCSE in addition to the core Maths course. For some only one English and one science examination will be envisaged. We also ask you to choose three other subjects We offer: • Art and Design • Business Studies • Drama • Geography • German • Graphic Products • History • ICT • Music • Physical Education • Resistant Materials Technology • Spanish. For those needing support we can also offer English as an additional language (EAL) and/or Curriculum Support (CS) during option time. These support classes may be at an extra cost.

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Initially, you will be asked to give an indication of your three subject choices at GCSE. This is an important

step in your school life and you should take the opportunity to discuss your thoughts with your parents, teachers and friends. Of course, you should choose a good balance of subjects to keep future choices open. You should also base your decisions on enthusiasm and interest in a subject area, taking into account any career ideas you may have. Please read carefully all the course outlines which we have prepared for you in this Guide. If you are already here at the BSP, talk to your Tutor, to your subject teachers and to pupils already in Year 10 in order to gain as much information as you can about your options. If you are a new pupil please do not hesitate to contact us to discuss your questions. Subjects at GCSE have two levels of entry: Higher and Foundation. Higher papers are designed for candidates operating at grade C level or above, Foundation papers at grade C level or below. To assist us in our planning we will ask you to indicate a fourth subject alongside your three first options. This must be a serious choice as although every effort is made, it is not always possible to accommodate everyone’s first choice due to timetabling constraints and limitations on group sizes. If difficulties arise the final decision rests with the Headmaster. Life at the British School of Paris in Key Stage 4, however, is not just about academic opportunity and success. All our pupils enjoy a wide variety of lunchtime and after-school activities. The programme varies from term to term but typically involves drama, music and sports clubs and groups of all kinds. In addition we offer an ‘Enrichment’ programme which allows you to extend your learning into new areas.


Key Stage 4 Guide My best experience this year was the Duke of Edinburgh expedition. It was a chance to be outdoors dealing with the difficulties of doing ever ything in the rain! – it brought ever yone who took part together. learning throughout the year. Many of the courses you choose will include experiences outside the classroom. Visits are a compulsory part of some GCSE courses: Drama, Geography and Art all need to use first-hand experience from sources outside school. Other subject areas find it desirable too and will organise trips to complement what you are studying. The costs of these trips are not included in the school fees. Completing the GCSE programme at the BSP will give you far more than just good examination passes – Key Stage 4 offers rigorous and rewarding experiences well-suited to the challenges of moving into university education and beyond. If at any time during the option process, you or your parents would like more information on any aspect of courses or careers, we shall be happy to assist in any way we can. The choices on offer will vary from year to year but typically have included: Marine Biology, Photography, Model United Nations, Media, Music, Creative Writing and Forensic Chemistry. There are different possibilities in different years so check what is being offered.

Dr. J Batters, Head of Senior School

You are encouraged to take positions of responsibility within your peer group and may represent a Tutor Group at Student Council or be part of the Young Managers Scheme, paving the way for future positions of responsibility in the school and society as a whole. Charity work is an important part of our contribution to help those less fortunate than ourselves and you are encouraged to participate in organising various activities for fund-raising. And it is at Key Stage 4 that you first have the opportunity to join the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme, the world’s leading achievement award for young people. We also organise activities and visits to enhance your

Young Managers is a great experience. The inter view was a bit frightening, but it was good experience to write a CV and talk about it. It’s been good to help in an area of the school I love.

The Options Procedure February/March

The Curriculum Guides are made available to the pupils. The Curriculum Guide outlines courses and pupils are informed about GCSE courses by subject teachers. Option choices are made. An Open Evening allows parents and staff to discuss the suitability of various courses.

May/June

The timetable is completed and options confirmed.

September

Year 10 courses begin.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Art and Design: Fine Art

Edexcel 2FA01

The GCSE Art Course is designed as a progression from previous experience gained in the Art Department. It is a course which enables you to develop your creativity and imagination through a wide range of activities.

You will explore new media and techniques and understand the work of artists, all contributing to an aesthetic understanding and appreciation of Art. At this stage in your artistic development, you learn to become personally involved in your work from the point of view of thought, interest and creativity. This requires a mature attitude and careful organisation throughout the GCSE period. You select and organise all the work you produce during the course based on the particular themes chosen. All work must relate to the assessment objectives. Your work will consist of a work journal, larger scale studies and a final realisation. The journal should not merely be seen as a sketchbook but a visual diary of your ideas. It should reflect a journey through the assessment objectives which may at times result in large studies and ultimately lead to a final realisation of work.

Structure of Course Paper 1

Component

Weighting

Method Of Assessment

Coursework 2 Externally Set Assignment

Internally Marked Externally Moderated

Must include work journal

Externally Set

Must show evidence of ALL assessment objectives

Internally Marked 40% Externally Moderated 20 Hour Preparation Time 10 Hours Timed Test

4

Requirements

Internally Set

Coursework 1 60%

2

Art & Design - Fine Art


Key Stage 4 Guide

What Will I Study?

The GCSE is usually made up of two themed units which make up one portfolio of work for coursework and an examination unit. However a short course, with the commitment to just one themed coursework unit, may be an option for some pupils under exceptional circumstances. Examples of Coursework Themes You will be required to work from a given starting theme towards one or more well considered conclusions. Some examples are given below: • Dreams and Nightmares

Examination

The Externally Set Assignment represents the culmination of the GCSE course. Pupils will be given a 20 hours preparatory period for the timed exam which covers approximately eight weeks of lesson time. The controlled examination will last for ten hours and allow you to produce the final realisation. All preparatory studies inform the final realisation and should be handed in at the beginning of the exam. A grade cannot be awarded to a pupil who fails to submit the required work.

• Desserts • Iconic • Movement. It is extremely important that you keep up to date with all coursework assignments.

Assessment Objectives There are four assessment objectives to meet during each unit of work. Pupils must: AO1

Develop their ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and cultural understanding.

25%

AO2

Refine their ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes.

25%

AO3

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions in visual and/or other forms.

25%

AO4

Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating analytical and critical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements.

25%

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Key Stage 4 Guide Art and Design (Continued)

Assessing Work

The work is marked in the following way: Coursework 60% total marks Externally Set Assignment 40% total marks The two units of work are assessed internally at regular intervals through tutorials and recording of data throughout the course. Pupils therefore have the opportunity throughout the coursework period to review and refine work based on advice given. Coursework and exam units are then assessed internally and an external moderator decides the overall grade.

Master Class

Lunch time and After School sessions where you can continue with coursework and have personal tuition aimed at furthering your work. The master class will operate throughout the course and pupils will be informed when these take place.

Equipment

Although the Department provides an adequate supply of art materials it is advised that you buy an art box with the basic equipment needed throughout the course.

Here is a list of things that you should have before the start of term: Must Have

Good to Have

◊ 2B – 4B Pencils

◊ Palette knives

◊ Rubber

◊ Tracing paper

◊ Pencil sharpener

◊ Oil paint

◊ Putty rubber

◊ Water colour

◊ Charcoal

◊ Inks

◊ Chalk pastels

◊ Selection of different coloured paper and tissue paper

◊ Oil pastels

◊ A –Z of artists e.g. The Art Book (Phaidon) The 20th Century Art Book (Phaidon)

◊ Black fine-liner ◊ Acrylic paint ◊ Selection of paintbrushes ◊ Crayons – karisma / water soluble recommended ◊ Glue ◊ Masking tape ◊ Selection of canvases in different sizes ◊ A2 or A1 portfolio Art and Design is a demanding and technically difficult subject which requires a lot of self-motivation and sustained concentration. However it is an extremely rewarding and enjoyable subject for those of you who are prepared to do your very best in every unit of work.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Business Studies

Edexcel 2BS01

If you are interested in studying the GCSE in Business you should start to find out more about the subject by: • Visiting the Edexcel website (www.edexcel.com/ gcse2012). There is a lot of useful information about what you will be studying and how you will be assessed • Talking to the Head of Business who will be able to describe the course in detail and advise you of what you need to do next when it comes to your options • Finding out what is happening in the world of business by watching BBC programmes like The Apprentice and Dragons’ Den or visiting the BBC Bitesize website (www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ gcsebitesize)

What will I Study?

You will be introduced to the world of small businesses and will look at what makes someone a successful business person. You will find out how to develop an idea and spot an opportunity, and turn that into a successful business. You will understand how to make a business effective and manage money. You will also see how the world around us affects small businesses and all the people involved. You will learn more about how small businesses are developed and discover how businesses promote themselves and keep their customers happy. You will learn how businesses manage both their finances and the people who work for them.

If you enjoy: • Communicating and explaining your ideas • Thinking creatively and making decisions • Working with numbers to solve business problems • Learning about the world of business through research and investigation, as well as through practical tasks

then GCSE Business Studies is the right subject for you.

How will I be assessed? Unit 1 Examination (45 mins)

Unit 2 Controlled Assessment Unit 3 Examination (1hr 30 mins)

You will take a written examination paper with multiple choice and objective test questions based on the unit.

You will be given a list of controlled assessment tasks to choose from. The tasks will be based on what you have studied in Unit 1.

The questions will be a mixture of multiplechoice, data response, short-answer, extended-writing and scenario-based questions. For example, you might be given details of a business and asked a few questions based on that business.

7


Key Stage 4 Guide

Curriculum Support The British School of Paris aims to provide an environment where all pupils are able to realise their full potential. The most important role of the Curriculum Support Department is to help the pupils to achieve this.

The school operates a policy of integration. This promotes the effective inclusion of pupils with learning difficulties in mainstream classes. In years 10 and 11, there is the possibility of taking Curriculum Support instead of an option choice. The work then carried out by the Curriculum Support department is structured in such a way to support and assist the work required for other subjects chosen for GCSE examination, including organisational skills and examination preparation. The students work in small groups. The special educational needs of pupils with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia or dyspraxia are addressed individually through Educational Support which is subject to additional charge. Short-term intervention programmes are available to support pupils with emotional and behavioural problems and those who find it difficult to adjust to the norms and work culture of the BSP. The Curriculum Support Department carries out assessments of pupils who are referred either through internal procedures or by parents. A referral usually comes from a class teacher, through the department, to the tutor. If further action is required the parents are consulted and permission sought for an educational assessment by the Head of Learning Support. This will be in the areas of intelligence, reading, writing, spelling, numeracy and oral and listening comprehension. A report will be written with recommendations which will go to the parents and the pupil’s teachers and action will be taken accordingly. If consultation with an outside agency is required the Curriculum Support Department will provide liaison. Examination access arrangements for external examination may be put in place according to JCQ (Joint Council for qualifications) procedures and following recommendations and assessments by specialist staff or psychologists.

8


Key Stage 4 Guide

Drama

Edexcel 2DR01

If you enjoy: • expressing yourself in an active and exciting way • working in a group • contributing your ideas and taking onboard those of others • exploring ideas by putting yourself in other people’s shoes • playing many parts in different imaginary situations • creating your own drama work • looking at plays written by other people

then GCSE Drama is the ideal subject for you. You will probably have had experience of drama during Key Stage 3 in English lessons. You may also be a member of a drama club. Any of these experiences can help if you choose drama as a GCSE subject. You will develop your improvisation and acting skills to a higher level. You will also look at plays in more detail and at different ways of bringing a script to life on stage. If you are more interested in the technical aspects of drama (for example set design or lighting) you could focus on these for part of the course.

What will I Study? You will learn:

• how drama is created, including all the acting and staging skills that are needed to put a piece of drama on to the stage • how to create a character and play this character in a performance • many skills that are highly valued in any walk of life including teamwork and confidently presenting yourself in public.

During the course pupils will be introduced to: Explorative strategies Still image Thought-tracking Narrating Hot-seating Role play Cross-cutting Forum theatre Marking the moment

The drama medium

The use of costume The use of masks and/or make-up The use of sound and/or music The use of lighting The use of space and/or levels The use of set and/or props The use of movement, mime and gesture The use of voice The use of spoken language

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Key Stage 4 Guide

The elements of drama Action/plot/content Forms Climax/anti-climax Rhythm/pace/tempo Contrasts Characterisation Conventions Symbols

Forms of stimuli

Poetry Artefacts: photographs, pictures, masks, props, costume, sculpture, objet d’art Music Play scripts Live theatre performance Television, films, DVDs and videos Newspaper and magazine articles Extracts from literary fiction and non-fiction

Assessment

Almost all assessment is practical. You will be required to keep a written record of your practical work which will need to be written up under controlled conditions. You will explore themes, ideas and plays in a wholly practical way and your teacher will assess how well you have done.

Unit 1

The unit requires pupils to explore a theme, topic or issue. Stimuli, chosen by the teacher, will allow pupils to deepen their understanding of the central aspects of the chosen theme, topic or issue and come to appreciate how the dramatic medium and strategies can be used to create drama form and communicate meaning. Pupils will have the opportunity to make connections between different stimuli which support the theme, topic or issue and explore the creative potential of the material. Pupils will produce a documentary response to the work conducted during the six-hour practical exploration that will allude to the process in the following terms: • a reflection on the pupil’s own work and the work of others • an evaluation of the pupil’s understanding of the explored theme, topic or issue • an evaluation of how the use of explorative strategies informed the pupil’s understanding of the explored theme, topic or issue • an evaluation of how the drama medium can contribute to the creation of dramatic form.

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The response can include any form of suitable documentation, for example drawings, plans, sketches, illustrations, photographs.

Unit 2

This unit introduces pupils to the content of plays written for the theatre. They will learn how to interpret a play in various ways and understand how a play works in performance. There should be a focus on the communication of meaning in the play through: • the interpretation of a complete and substantial play text • recognition of the ways in which playwrights, directors, designers and performers communicate meaning through the medium of drama • the selection of appropriate elements of drama. • gaining a practical understanding of the medium of drama. Evaluating the effectiveness of different interpretations of a complete and substantial play text • developing performance skills and rehearsal techniques • developing and realising ideas in response to a play within a group • using the language of drama to communicate ideas to others • recognising the ways in which playwrights record their instructions in a script • applying drama skills to the realisation of extracts from a complete and substantial play text • approaches to developing characters and/or roles • exploring different staging methods • understanding the social, cultural and historical context of a complete and substantial play text. Pupils must have experience of live theatre as a member of the audience. The live theatre could be a performance of: • the play chosen for exploration • any other play • a play performed by peers within a centre. Pupils will produce a documentary response to the work conducted during the six-hour practical exploration (see above) plus a review of a live theatre performance seen during the course. The response can include any form of suitable documentation, for example drawings, plans, sketches, illustrations, photographs. You will also be required to perform in a play or contribute a form of design to a production such as costume, lighting or sound, decided by the exam


Key Stage 4 Guide

Drama (Continued)

board during Year 11 (40% of the final mark). You will perform the play with a visiting examiner in the audience.

Performance support

Unit 3

the performance (chosen from the above options):

This unit provides pupils with the opportunity to: • demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of practical drama skills through their application to a live performance • communicate to an audience. Pupils have the opportunity to show either their skills as a performer or as a performance support pupil in one performance only. Pupils can be examined in one of the following options. • Performance devised by the pupils from a stimulus chosen by the centre and related to the assignment brief. • Performance of a complete short published play. • Performance of an extract from a full length published play. • Performance of an adaptation of a selection of scenes from a full length published play. • Performance based on a full length published play using some of the original text with additional devised work based on the situations and roles in the original text.

Pupils can be examined in only one of the following options to support

• lighting • sound • setting/props • costume • masks/make-up. Performance support pupils are required to produce documentation and a justification of the final design decisions. They must give a presentation of their work to the visiting examiner.

Extra Curricular

It is important that you realise that Drama will take up more than just lesson time. You will required to give up lunchtimes or stay after school for extra rehearsals if needed plus attend live theatre performances in the evening. There will also be a weekend trip to London at some point during the course. The cost of this trip is not included in the school fees.

• Performance of a Theatre in Education piece to a target audience chosen by the centre. • Performance based on the assignment brief that can include devised work plus existing play texts, poetry, song lyrics and factual material. Whichever option is chosen pupils will be required to: • work collaboratively with all other group members • take advice, guidance and direction from the teacher • prepare and rehearse for a sustained period • show their vocal and movement practical skills in performance • communicate with other performers and the audience • demonstrate an understanding of style and form within their chosen option • demonstrate an understanding of the content and purpose of the performance • perform to the visiting examiner

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Key Stage 4 Guide

English Language English Literature

AQA English 4705 AQA English 4710

The GCSE examinations are an assessment and recognition of work carried out in Key Stage Four. The areas of study are laid out in the National Curriculum and English work is a continuation and broadening of work done earlier in the school. The study of English Language and Literature encourages pupils to develop the skills of enquiry and investigation. Pupils learn to make informed personal responses, supporting interpretations with evidence from texts. GCSE English Language allows pupils to demonstrate the ability to use English in real life contexts and uses an analytical approach to language topics drawing on personal experience.

English Literature GCSE English Literature requires candidates to explore texts from a personal perspective and offers an experience of: • Literature today • Literature globally • The literary heritage.

Unit 1

There are two certificates, English Language and English Literature. Pupils will normally be entered for both examinations but a single English entry is possible for pupils needing to concentrate on accuracy and fluency in the language.

Exploring Modern Texts

English Language

Poetry across time

Unit 1 Examination

a. Poetry cluster from the anthology

Understanding and producing non fiction A Reading

1 hour

Two compulsory writing tasks 60%

20%

b. Exploring cultures

20% 1hr 30

Unit 2: Examination

b. Responding to an unseen poem 35% 1hr 15

1 hour

Four compulsory questions based on non-fiction reading sources B Writing

a. Modern Prose or Drama

Unit 3: Controlled assessment The significance of Shakespeare and the English literary heritage 3 to 4 hours

25%

2 hours and 15 minutes External

Unit 2 Controlled Assessment

For pupils who join the course late or who find the Literature work difficult there is the possibility of a single English Language examination.

Speaking and Listening a. Presenting

b. Discussing and listening c. Role playing Certificated Separately

Unit 3 Controlled Assessment

Understanding Spoken and Written texts and Writing Creatively a. Extended reading

3 to 4 hours

15%

b. Creative Writing

3 to 4 hours

15%

c. Spoken Language study 2 to 3 hours

10%

40%

12

Controlled Assessment

There are plenty of opportunities and the people (pupils and teachers) are ver y helpful and friendly.


Key Stage 4 Guide

English as an Additional Language (EAL) English as an Additional Language (EAL) classes can be offered to pupils whose first language is not English or whose previous educational work has not been in English. It is also recommended for pupils who have been in the Intensive English programme in Year 9. EAL replaces one GCSE option and maybe subject to an additional charge. EAL pupils are taught in a small group where the level of instruction is adjusted to suit each pupil’s needs. In addition to following an integrated language learning programme, pupils are given time and help with their work from other GCSE subjects. This is particularly beneficial with regard to written assignments and preparation for controlled assessment assignments.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

French

Edexcel 2FR01

The aims of the GCSE French course are: • to develop pupils’ ability to understand and communicate effectively • to encourage pupils to acquire language learning skills • to encourage pupils to develop an understanding of grammar and syntax • to encourage pupils to understand language in its cultural context • to encourage enjoyment and intellectual stimulation and to provide a basis for further study.

Future plans, education and work

The course content is divided into four areas for the external examinations.

• Basic language of the internet

Out and about

• Simple job applications and CV

• Visitor information

• School and college

• Basic weather

• Work and work experience.

• Local amenities

Pupils have the opportunity to choose between themes for speaking and writing components. The themes are: Media and Culture, Sport and Leisure, Travel and Tourism, Business, Work and Employment.

• Accommodation • Public transport • Directions.

Customer service and transactions • Cafes and restaurants • Shops • Dealing with problems.

Personal information • General interests • Leisure activities • Family and friends • Lifestyle.

• Advertisements

Our approach is entirely topical. Emphasis in the teaching is placed on authenticity; on using the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in real life practical situations. We use a core textbook which is supplemented by additional material such as Internet resources, films and Interactive whiteboard activities. The final examination assesses pupils’ performance in the four language skill areas and at two different levels, Foundation and Higher Tiers.

The exam consists of four distinct parts: Unit 1:

Listening and Understanding in French

(20%)

Unit 2:

Speaking in French

(30%)

Unit 3:

Reading and Understanding (20%) in French

Unit 4:

Writing in French

Special Objectives

14

(30%)

For pupils with an advanced level of French we offer a Special Objectives programme. For this programme the study material is carefully selected and provides extra intellectual stimulation. Pupils in Special Objectives classes are taught a specific course in grammar and literature and sit their French GCSE examination at the end of Year 10, one year earlier than the norm and then continue to sit the AS Level, Unit 1 and 2, examination in Year 11.


Key Stage 4 Guide

Geography

Edexcel 2GB01

Is Geography the right subject for me? In order to answer this difficult question, ask yourself what you enjoy about the study of geography. Try these questions; do I want to: - Learn more about the world I live in? - Develop skills that will help me in other areas, such as IT and research?

Assessment

Assessment is organised into four units. Three of the units are written examinations which are all one hour. The fourth is the coursework element which is done as a controlled assessment during the school year. Each unit is worth 25 per cent of the final mark.

- Do some of my work away from the classroom? - Work in a team with other pupils? - Learn through investigating and doing, not listening and reading?

What will I Study?

The world is always changing. Geography gives you the chance to learn about these changes.

If you are interested, start to find out more. Here are some ideas. Talk to your geography teacher or anyone in the geography department to find out what they are planning for you. Ask pupils in Years 10 and 11 how much they enjoy geography.

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Key Stage 4 Guide Unit 1 Dynamic Planet

Overview of content This unit has three sections. Section A is compulsory, and Sections B and C contain optional topics. Section A – Introduction to the Dynamic Planet Compulsory topics: Restless Earth, Climate and Change, Battle for the Biosphere and Water World. Section B – Small-scale Dynamic Planet Optional topics: complete one of either Coastal Change and Conflict or River Processes and Pressures. Section C – Large-scale Dynamic Planet Optional topics: complete one of either Oceans on the Edge or Extreme Climates. This unit is assessed through a 1-hour, tiered, written examination.

Unit 2 People and the Planet 5% of the

Overview of content This unit has three sections. Section A is compulsory, and Sections B and C contain optional topics. Section A – Introduction to People and the Planet Compulsory topics: Population Dynamics, Consuming Resources, Living Spaces and Making a Living. Section B – Small-scale People and the Planet Optional topics, complete one of either Changing Cities or Changing Countryside. Section C – Large-scale People and the Planet Optional topics, complete one of either Development Dilemmas or World at Work. Overview of assessment This unit is assessed through a 1-hour, tiered, written examination.

Unit 3 Making Geographical Decisions Overview of content This unit will assess students’ ability to make decisions about geographical issues and justify them. The unit includes the pressures (conflicts), players and options that are involved in making geographical decisions and which are related to sustainable development and environmental issues. Overview of assessment This unit is assessed through a 1-hour, tiered, written examination. The theme of the resource material will be released in advance of the examination. A pack of resource material will be pre-released for each sitting of the exam.

Unit 4 Researching Geography Internally assessed under controlled conditions Overview of content For this unit students need to complete a fieldwork investigation and report. They must complete one of the tasks provided by Edexcel, on one of the following themes: coastal environments, river environments, rural/ countryside environments, town/city environments. Overview of assessment This unit is internally assessed under controlled conditions. Students complete one of the fieldwork tasks from the list provided by Edexcel. They must write up the fieldwork task under controlled conditions. The task is marked out of a total of 50 marks, across the following areas: planning, methods of data collection, data presentation and report production, analysis and conclusions and evaluation. The task will be marked by the teacher and moderated by Edexcel using the assessment criteria CA field trip week is organised by the Geography department to allow for the collection of data. The cost of this trip is not included in the school fees.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

German

The aims of the German GCSE course are: • to develop pupils’ ability to understand and communicate effectively • to encourage pupils to acquire language learning skills • to encourage pupils to develop an understanding of grammar and syntax • to encourage pupils to understand language in its cultural context • to encourage enjoyment and intellectual stimulation and to provide a basis for further study. The course content is divided into four areas for the external examinations (listening and reading)

Out and about

• Visitor information • Basic weather • Local amenities • Accommodation • Public transport • Directions.

Edexcel 2GN01

Pupils have the opportunity to choose between themes for the speaking and writing components. The themes are: Media and Culture, Sport and Leisure, Travel and Tourism, Business, Work and Employment. Our teaching approach is entirely topical. Emphasis in the teaching is placed on authenticity; on using the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in real life practical situations. The themes are: Media and Culture, Sport and Leisure, Travel and Tourism, Business, Work and Employment. We use a core textbook which is supplemented by additional material such as Internet resources, films and Interactive whiteboards activities. The final examination assesses pupils’ performance in the four language skill areas and at two different levels, Foundation and Higher tiers.

Customer service and transactions • Cafes and restaurants • Shops • Dealing with problems.

Personal information • General interests • Leisure activities • Family and friends

The exam consists of four distinct parts: Unit 1:

Listening and Understanding in German

(20%)

Unit 2:

Speaking in German

(30%)

Unit 3:

Reading and Understanding in German

(20%)

Unit 4:

Writing in German

(30%)

• Lifestyle.

Future plans, education and work • Basic language of the internet • Advertisements • Applications and CV • School and college • Work and work experience.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Graphic Products

Edexcel 2GR01

Graphic Products are all around us. The course at Key Stage 4 investigates the extent to which these products influence our everyday lives. Pupils will develop their problem-solving and creative thinking skills through a series of project-based challenges and tasks.

What is a graphic product?

Graphic products are all around us. A few examples are:• The newspapers we read • Glossy magazines • The packaging our products come in • Printed advertisements • Drawing packages for products and architecture proposals Pupils will learn what materials, processes and design techniques are employed to produce all of the above.

What qualities make a successful Graphics pupil? A genuine interest in:• How things work • Fashion and trends • Famous designers and their designs • Researching what interests them • CAD/CAM (such as SketchUP and Photoshop) • The future of technology • Sustainable living A successful Graphics pupil: • Is a divergent creative thinker • Has an analytical mind-set • Can work independently • Has access to a computer at home.

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What will I Study? Pupils will come up with a conceptual design for a new product that satisfies a real need or issue. Pupils will ultimately choose how they respond to this problem, generating their own unique outcomes. They are encouraged to design for a clearly identified client, rather than themselves, effectively introducing them to the world of a real designer. They produce a folder showing how they approached the issue, what they learnt and how they tested their individual solutions to the identified problem. This coursework is worth 60% of the GCSE. The remaining 40% is gained through an examination at the end of two years which tests their knowledge and understanding of the subject.


Key Stage 4 Guide

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Key Stage 4 Guide

History

Edexcel 2HA01

History is a very popular subject at GCSE, and one in which many pupils do very well.

There are many good reasons for taking history. Some of the best are: - You enjoy it. - You can do well in it. Colleges, universities and employers are all interested in seeing the study of a range of subjects, and good grades in those subjects. - It will help you understand the world you live in, the events of the last 100 years help to explain the problems and opportunities of the world today. - You will develop very valuable skills. This could be the most important of all – in history you deal with real people, and you can work out why they did what they did. You will improve your ability to judge whether you are being told the truth, only part of the truth, or something completely untrue.

What will I Study?

- International Relations – what leads to conflicts between the countries, and how these conflicts are settled - A period of history of one nation in depth – which will help you understand how people in another time and place thought about the world - How historians use sources to find out about what happened – it could be revolts in Germany or Civil Rights in the USA.

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Course Title

Unit 1: Peace and War International Relations 1900-1991

Unit 2: Modern World Depth Study Germany 19181939

Unit 3: Change in British Society 1955-75

Unit 4: A divided union? The USA

Course Overview

Pupils study 3 sections: Section 4: How did the Cold War Develop? 1945-56 Section 5: Three Cold War Crisis 1957-69 Section 6: Why did the Cold War end 1979-1989 Candidates should develop their knowledge of the following: • The widening gulf between the Allies 1945-47 • The development of the Cold War 1948-49 • Hungary: the tightening of control. • Berlin a divided city • Cuba: the world on the brink of war • Czechoslovakia: The Prague Spring • Detente- Star Wars • Gorbechev, Perestroika and Glasnost • Fall of the Berlin Wall, Disintegration of the USSR

Candidates should develop an overview of the following: • The Weimar Republic • Hitler and the growth of the Nazi Party • The Nazi dictatorship • Nazi domestic policies

Candidates should develop an overview of the following: • Immigration • Sex Discrimination • The Liberalisation of Society • The Swinging Sixties

• Social and cultural divisions and their importance political attitude and divisions in the USA • The Civil Rights movements and their impact on US society • Protest movements in the 1960s and early 1970s • Unit 4 is a controlled assessment and a task will be researched and written up in school under strict conditions laid out by edexcel.


Key Stage 4 Guide

Assessment

For Units 1, 2 and 3 you will have an exam. Unit 4 is a controlled assessment and you will research a task then write it up in the classroom. Many of the questions styles will be like those you have already done in Key Stage 3. There will be questions which ask you what you know and have learnt, and other questions which are more about your own opinions and letting you give your own explanations and reasons for something that happened in the past. Each Unit is worth 25% towards the GCSE. If you enjoy learning about how the events of the last 100 years help explain the problems and opportunities of the world today then this GCSE History A: Modern World course is the ideal subject for you. *Controlled Assessment is carried out in Year 10. Units 1, 2 and 3 will be assessed: Summer 2016.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

ICT (Single Award)

Edexcel 2IT01

GCSE ICT builds on young people’s love of digital devices. It explores how technology impacts on every aspect of our daily lives in a range of contexts: learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and well being and on the move.

It will teach you to be ‘savvy IT users’, who understand the risks as well as the benefits and use ICT safely and responsibly. The nature of the Controlled Assessment, with its emphasis on ‘doing’ rather than ‘writing about’ helps develop important transferable skills including problem solving, creative thinking and collaborative working. • The Single Award is two units: • One exam paper worth 40% of the total marks, and controlled assessment coursework worth 60%.

UNIT 1: Living in a Digital World In this unit, you explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society. You learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by their use in a range of contexts (learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and well-being, on the move). You develop awareness of the risks that are inherent in using ICT and the features of safe, secure and responsible practice. Assessment Written paper: 90 minutes Weighting: 40% of Single Award

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UNIT 2: Using Digital Tools This is a practical unit. You broaden and enhance your ICT skills and capability. You work with a range of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts. You learn to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT and to adopt safe, secure and responsible practice. You put into practice what you learned about digital technology in Unit 1. Assessment Coursework: Controlled Assessment completed in class You have 40 hours to complete the CAB Weighting: 60%


Key Stage 4 Guide

Mathematics

AQA Maths 4365

The aims of the GCSE Mathematics course are to:

The course content is organised into three areas:

• Develop knowledge, skills and understanding of mathematical methods and concepts

• Number and algebra

• Acquire and use problem-solving strategies • Select and apply mathematical techniques and methods in mathematical, everyday and real-world situations • Reason mathematically, make deductions and inferences and draw conclusions • Interpret and communicate mathematical information in a variety of forms appropriate to the information and context Mathematics provides the oral, written and practical skills needed to solve everyday problems and to acquire knowledge in other subjects particularly Science and Technology. Mathematics itself is an important discipline; its power lies not only in the capacity to explain and describe but also to predict and solve. Pupils will this subject challenging but accessible, useful and enjoyable.

• Geometry and measures • Statistics and probability Grading

There are two courses and two distinct examinations to cater for different levels of ability. Foundation tier is designed to be accessible to those pupils who find maths difficult and Higher tier is designed for those pupils who are ready to accept a challenge. Talented pupils are provided with extension material in the form of UKMT Intermediate Challenge questions; these pupils are also encouraged to train with the School’s International Maths Competition squad. Foundation tier

Grades C - G available

Higher tier

Grades A* - D available

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Key Stage 4 Guide

The Scheme of Assessment

At both tiers the specification has two question papers which cover all assessment objectives and are taken in the same examination series, in June. All content and assessment objectives within a particular tier may be assessed on either paper. All questions are compulsory.

• a simple scientific calculator • a simple sturdy compass with pencil • a 20cm flat, clear plastic ruler

Paper 1

Written paper (no calculator)

• a small clear plastic protractor

40% of the assessment

• an eraser, a sharpener with a box, an HB pencil

Foundation tier

1 hour 15 mins

70 marks

• 3 or 4 colouring pencils.

Higher tier

1 hour 30 mins

70 marks

To encourage students to respond positively to challenging situations and further enrich their learning experience, the department enters many students for the UK Maths Challenge, trains and sends teams to the ISMTF Maths leagues and gives students the opportunity to participate in the UK Cipher Challenge.

Paper 2

Written paper (calculator allowed) 60% of the assessment

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The maths teachers are keen to help pupils enjoy mathematics and to be successful in the examinations. However, to benefit fully from lessons every pupil must bring to each maths class:

Foundation tier

1 hour 45 mins

105 marks

Higher tier

2 hours

105 marks

For the very able mathematician, we also offer Further Maths GCSE, which is taken at the same time as Maths GCSE, at the end of Year 11.


Key Stage 4 Guide

Music

Edexcel 2MU01

The GCSE Music specification is firmly centred on a practical approach and candidates will need to have some ability on an instrument or voice at the start of the course and be able to read and write music.

Pupils should be enthusiastic and committed to playing their instrument or singing and will need to be supported by an appropriate peripatetic teacher.

well as digital and analogue multi-track recorders, keyboards, and a range of acoustic and electric guitars.

Work continues to be based on the Elements

Listening and Appraising

of Music: Rhythm and Metre Harmony and Tonality Texture and Melody Timbre and Dynamics Structure and Form The syllabus is divided into three sections and each part complements the others throughout the course.

Performing

By the end of Year 11, pupils must have performed solo and in an ensemble, any two pieces of their own choice, on any instrument or voice, to the standard of Grade 4 ABRSM, Trinity, Rockschool or equivalent exam board. Individual lessons can be arranged in school if required and it is helpful to have the input and support of an instrumental teacher to ensure adequate preparation of performance coursework. You are obliged to be a member of either Choir or Orchestra, and it is hoped that you would be invited to join one of the many other smaller ensembles on offer. For instrumentalists this means that the ensemble requirement may be easily fulfilled. For pianists membership of the choir enhances and hones their listening skills and general musicianship. Class recitals are held regularly throughout the course and pupils thus build up a repertoire of performances from which their coursework submissions can be selected.

Through listening to a wide variety of musical examples, from c. 1600 to the present day, pupils learn to appreciate what they hear and to express themselves using appropriate musical terminology. Studies will encompass elements of form, texture, instrumentation, style, melody, harmony, rhythm, compositional devices and techniques. This part of the course is taught throughout and is examined by a listening and written paper. Three set works are studied in each of the following four Areas of Study: • Western Classical Music • 20th Century Music • Popular Music • World Music. The Listening paper is taken under formal examination conditions in the Summer Term. Assessment of final compositions and performances take place at school, during the school day, and are administered by the Music Department. This course is designed to follow on from the foundations laid in Years 7-9 and is therefore suitable for all pupils who can already play a musical instrument. You are relied upon and expected to play a major part in all musical activities and will be promoted as the more Senior Musicians in the school.

Composing

Candidates have to submit two compositions at the end of the course, based on two different areas of study. Pupils should expect to perform and record these Compositions to the standard of a solo performance. Within each of the areas of study there is a certain amount of choice to allow pupils to develop areas of music in which you are particularly interested. The course allows the use of music technology in the preparation and submission of pieces. Logic Pro, Guitar Pro and Sibelius 6, Pod Line 6 and Prodikeys, itrack solo Garage Band are all available to pupils as

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Key Stage 4 Guide

To help as much as possible we can offer tuition in the following instruments: • Violin, viola, cello and double bass • Clarinet, flute, recorder • French horn, trumpet, cornet, euphonium and trombone. • Guitar, classical and electric and Bass Guitar • Piano, electronic keyboard • Saxophones throughout the family i.e. Alto and Tenor • Voice. We can usually recommend teachers for other instruments on request. We strive to provide a stimulating and exciting course and you will be given as much assistance as possible yet should be motivated enough to work on your own compositions and to practise your instruments unprompted. The facilities of the Department are available for GCSE pupils at any time and you are positively encouraged to spend break and lunchtimes there. The BSP is the centre for the ABRSM in France. The practical and theory examinations are offered two or three times a year, and results are excellent with many distinction and merit grades being obtained. Grades 6 and above attract UCAS points for UK university entry. Rockschool examinations are held at school in May/June and these are becoming very popular with pupils who play keyboard, guitar, bass, drums or sing. These exams also attract UCAS points.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) The PSHE scheme of work follows the UK national curriculum non-statutory guidelines for Personal, Social and Health Education and the KS4 statutory curriculum for Citizenship.

The pupils are encouraged to develop:

Lessons are often discussion based, making use of worksheets, newspaper articles, video, role-play, debate and pupil presentations.

• a healthy and safe lifestyle • good relationships while respecting the differences between people

In addition, we have now incorporated a PSHE package of interactive lessons and materials. These and other PSHE resources are now available on the school’s VLE.

• skills of enquiry and communication • methodical and successful work habits.

The programme for Years 10 and 11 remains flexible and responsive but includes a majority of the following areas along with relevant teacher initiatives and ongoing resource developments.

Year

10

Term 1

Term 2

Class ethos/Presentation

Pressures

Careers – Pathways

Team & Personal Goals

Identity and image

Post 16 Options

E-safety

Managing your money

BTEC

Mental Health

Budgeting

International Baccalaureate

Study skills and target setting Changing relationships

Parenthood and parenting Managing decisions and transition Study skills and time

Coping with crises

management

Contraception and safe sex Target setting

Charities

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Term 3

Class ethos/Presentation

CVs

Study skills

Homework and time management

Applying for jobs

Managing your time and studies

E-safety

Problems at work

Revision techniques

Study skills

Stress and depression

Alcohol

Study skills

Media and ethics Importance of celebrity Self esteem and the media As with all areas of the curriculum, parents are welcome to contact us to discuss any concerns about the issues we cover.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Physical Education (Core) In Key Stage 4 students have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of sports activities, both individual and team as well as extending their knowledge of health and physical activity through specific fitness sessions. The school is fortunate to have access to extensive outdoor facilities at the local Croissy Municipal Stade in addition to a Sports Hall, Artificial Pitch and modern Fitness Suite on-site. The students take part in major team sports such as Football, Hockey, Rugby, Basketball, Netball, Cricket and Softball as well as many other activities including Badminton, Dance, Table Tennis, Gymnastics and Athletics. The Sports Hall also boasts a Climbing Wall that is also used for lessons and extra-curricular activities. The school fields representative teams in the following sports: Football, Hockey, Rugby, Netball, X-Country, Climbing, Cricket, Athletics, and Volleyball and if a pupil is selected for a school team, he/she is expected to attend all training sessions and fixtures. The school has an International fixture list for all of its teams with regular fixtures in France, Belgium, Holland and the UK. To maintain an International Fixture list we have to host visiting teams overnight, which is reciprocated when we travel away.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Physical Education

The Physical Education examination course aims:

To promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles. Candidates will be taught:

Edexcel 2PE01

Assessment

Pupils will be assessed through both practical assessment and a written examination:

• to be physically active

Unit 1 The Theory of Physical Education

• to adopt the best possible posture and the appropriate use of the body

Written paper 40% - 1h 30 mins

• to participate in activities that develop cardiovascular health, flexibility, muscular strength and endurance • the increasing need for personal hygiene in relation to vigorous activity.

Unit 2 Performance in Physical Education This unit is assessed under controlled conditions and is worth 60% of the final qualification.

To develop attitudes. Candidates will be taught: • to observe the conventions of fair play, honest competition and good sporting behaviour in individual and team games both as participants and as spectators • to cope with both success and limitations in performance • to consolidate and improve their performance skills in a range of activities • consideration for others and for the environment.

To ensure safe practice. Candidates will be taught: • to respond readily to instructions • to recognise and follow the relevant rules and safety procedures associated with different sporting activities • about the safety risks of wearing inappropriate clothing, footwear and jewellery, and why particular clothing, footwear and protection are worn for different activities • how to use and store equipment safely • how to warm-up for and cool-down from exercise.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Resistant Materials Technology

Edexcel 2RM01

Resistant Materials Technology comes under the Design and Technology banner, a popular study option in the UK. In common with the other studies in this area there is a strong emphasis on coursework and learning through doing.

What will I Study?

Within this area, a major coursework project utilises the design process established within the KS3 National Curriculum whereby pupils are given guidance to identify an area of investigation of their own choice, working through to the realisation and testing of their product.

The course is popular with those pupils who: • want to develop their skills in making

• like to express their ideas through drawing • have an interest in CAD/CAM • are inquisitive and like to know how things work • have creative flair and are resourceful • Want to apply their understanding of: materials technology, mechanisms, structures and forces.

Assessment

A terminal examination 1h30 – 40% A coursework project (assessed under controlled conditions) – 60%.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Spanish

The aims of the Spanish GCSE course are:

Edexcel 2SP01

Future plans, education and work

• to develop pupils’ ability to understand and communicate effectively

• Basic language of the internet

• to encourage pupils to acquire language learning skills

• Simple job applications and CV

• to encourage pupils to develop an understanding of grammar and syntax • to encourage pupils to understand language in its cultural context • to encourage enjoyment and intellectual stimulation and to provide a basis for further study. The course content is divided into four areas for the external examinations (listening and reading).

Out and about

• Visitor information • Basic weather • Local amenities

• Advertisements

• School and college • Work and work experience. Students have considerable control of content in the speaking and writing units and are free to focus on a broader variety of themes. The themes are: Media and Culture, Sport and Leisure, Travel and Tourism, Business, Work and Employment. Our teaching approach is entirely topical. Emphasis in the teaching is placed on authenticity; on using the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in real life practical situations. We use a core textbook which is supplemented by additional material such as Internet resources, films and Interactive whiteboard activities.

• Public transport

The final examination assesses pupils’ performance in the four language skill areas and at two different levels, Foundation and Higher Tiers.

• Directions.

The exam consists of four distinct parts:

• Accommodation

Customer service and transactions • Cafes and restaurants

Unit 1:

Listening and Understanding in Spanish

(20% of full course)

Unit 2:

Speaking in Spanish

(30% of full course)

Unit 3:

Reading and Understanding in Spanish

(20% of full course)

Unit 4:

Writing in Spanish

(30% of full course)

• Shops • Dealing with problems.

Personal information • General interests • Leisure activities • Family and friends • Lifestyle.

Whenever possible we organise cultural trips to Spain for pupils to enrich their knowledge of the Spanish language and culture. The costs of these trips are not included in the School fees.

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Key Stage 4 Guide

The Sciences at GCSE

AQA GCSE Biology 4401 AQA GCSE Chemistry 4402 AQA GCSE Physics 4403

AQA GCSE Science A 4405 AQA GCSE Additional Science 4408 New specifications for the GCSE Sciences started in September 2011. They have been designed to: • offer a range of interesting and familiar topics • provide more ideas for practicals • offer flexibility and choice to pupils • support pupils of all abilities • help teachers to motivate and inspire pupils • help to develop an interest in science – both in the surrounding world and as part of future lives • build on KS3 Science and provide progression to A-level. At The British School, we offer pupils three different routes through the GCSE Sciences.

Option 1: GCSE Biology, GCSE Chemistry, GCSE Physics (‘separate sciences’)

Pupils study biology, chemistry and physics over two years as three separate subjects and obtain three separate GCSE qualifications. Each science consists of three written papers (Papers 1, 2 & 3) and a coursework module. All nine examination papers are sat at the end of Year 11. The coursework will also be submitted at the end of Year 11.

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This option is offered as part of the School’s enrichment programme and uses enrichment time to contribute to the extra 1½ hours per week required for its teaching. This means that anyone who takes the individual sciences cannot take part in any other activities offered by the enrichment programme. In addition, the course is demanding and intensive. It is suitable only for those at the top end of the ability range and who have a very strong ambition and work ethic. For this reason, the Science Department, as fairly and as rigorously as possible, chooses which pupils can be accepted for this individual sciences option. We particularly look for pupils with the ability to gain three A* grades. Each pupil has two and a half hours per week in each of biology, chemistry and physics throughout Years 10 and 11. The three sciences are taught by subject specialists; thus each pupil has three different teachers for Science.

Option 2: GCSE Core Science and GCSE Additional Science (‘double science’) GCSE ‘Core’ Science

In Year 10, pupils in Year 10 are taught biology, chemistry and physics towards a GCSE Science qualification – often referred to a Core Science.


Key Stage 4 Guide

The Sciences (Continued)

Each pupil has six one-hour lessons per week, divided equally between biology, chemistry and physics. The three sciences are taught by subject specialists; thus each pupil has three different teachers for Science. At the end of the course, you sit written papers in the three subjects. You will have also completed a coursework module. Pupils will sit the examinations and submit coursework for GCSE Science at the end of Year 10.

GCSE Additional Science

In Year 11, double science pupils progress to a different course – GCSE Additional Science. You are taught biology, chemistry and physics towards the GCSE Additional Science qualification. At the end of Year 11, you sit written papers in the three subjects. You will have also completed a coursework module and be awarded a final grade for GCSE Additional Science. All pupils following this Option 2 therefore achieve two science GCSE grades (hence ‘double science’). It is important to note that Option 2 forms a perfectly good preparation for continuing with the sciences at A Level. Indeed, the exam boards, when designing their syllabuses for Core and Additional Science, were instructed to ensure that this was the case. We therefore advise the majority of BSP pupils to take this option. It has proved immensely successful over the years, leading subsequently to very successful A Level results.

Option 3: Core Science over two years (‘single science’) This is intended for pupils who struggle with the sciences.

These pupils will study the GCSE Core Science specification over two years. In a small set, you can receive more individual attention and cover the material at a pace more suited to you. You will still study biology, chemistry and physics separately and with three specialist teachers. At the end of the course, you sit written papers in the three subjects. You will also complete a coursework module and will receive your final grade for GCSE Science at the end of Year 11.

You therefore achieve one science GCSE grade. This option has also proved successful over the years, with the majority of pupils achieving their aim of a pass grade C in GCSE Core Science. Our view is that one pass is better than two possible fail grades had Option 2 been followed.

Examinations

Each written paper lasts 60 minutes and carries 60 marks. Whatever GCSE qualification is being taken, each paper will count 25% towards the final grade. Each paper consists of mainly shorter structured questions. However, one question will require pupils to write a much longer well-constructed and well-argued response using appropriate scientific terminology so that you can be assessed on your quality of written communication. There are also two tiers of examination papers – Higher and Foundation. Higher papers are designed for candidates capable of operating at grade B level and above, However, grades from A* down to grade E are available on these papers. Foundation papers are designed for candidates operating at about pass level or below. Grades C down to G are available on these papers, which are designed to be more accessible to the lower achievers in Science. Pupils are allowed to mix higher tier papers with foundation tier papers at the same sitting e.g. a pupil can take a higher tier paper in biology but a foundation tier paper in physics.

Syllabus Content

The syllabuses emphasise concepts that have direct relevance to everyday life and will enable pupils in later life to make informed judgements on important scientific issues. There is also an intentional emphasis on the development of good experimental practice. The new syllabuses have a slight reduction in content compared with previous specifications so that pupils have more time to learn and develop these skills

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Key Stage 4 Guide

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Key Stage 4 Guide

The Sciences (Continued)

Unit 1 Taken by pupils following Options 1, 2 & 3

Biology 1 • Keeping healthy • Nerves and hormones • The use and abuse of drugs • Interdependence and adaptation • Energy and biomass in food chains • Waste materials from plants and animals • Genetic variation and its control • Evolution

Chemistry 1 • The fundamental ideas in chemistry • Limestone and building materials • Metals and their uses • Crude oil and fuels • Other useful substances from crude oil • Plant oils and their uses • Changes in the Earth and its atmosphere

Physics 1 • The transfer of energy by heating processes and the factors that affect the rate of that heat transfer • Energy and efficiency • The usefulness of electrical appliances • Methods we use to generate electricity • The use of waves for communication and to provide evidence that Universe is expanding

Unit 2

Taken by pupils following Options 1 and 2.

Biology 2

Chemistry 2

Physics 2

• Cells and simple cell transport

• Structure and bonding

• Forces and their effects

• Tissues, organs and organ systems

• How structure influences the properties and use of substances

• The kinetic energy of objects speeding up or slowing down

• Photosynthesis

• Atomic structure, analysis and quantitative chemistry

• Currents in electrical circuits

• Organisms and their environment • Proteins - their function and uses

• Rates of reaction • Exothermic and endothermic reactions

• Aerobic and anaerobic respirations

• Acids, bases and salts

• Cell division and inheritance

• Electrolysis

• Using mains electricity safely and the power of electrical appliances • What happens when radioactive substances decay and the uses and dangers of their emissions • Nuclear fission and nuclear fusion

• Speciation

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Key Stage 4 Guide

Unit 3

This is taken only by pupils following Option 1. The syllabus content is intended to avoid duplication with that taught at AS and A level in the three subjects.

Biology 3 • Movement of molecules in and out of cells • Transport systems in plants and animals • Homeostasis • Humans and their environment

Chemistry 3

Physics 3

• The Periodic Table

• Medical applications of physics

• Water

• Using physics to make things work

• Calculating and explaining temperature changes

• Keeping things moving

• Further analysis and quantitative chemistry • The production of ammonia • Alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters

How Science Works

Throughout the course and especially through practical work, pupils will be taught a variety of skills connected with the design, carrying out, analysis and evaluation of practical work. You will learn about good methodologies for practical investigations as well as some basic ideas of the philosophy of science. In particular, you will acquire skills associated with:• Planning an investigation • Assessing and managing risks • Collecting, processing, analysing and evaluating data – both primary and secondary. The assessment of these skills forms the coursework component of the new Science courses.

Controlled Coursework (ISAs)

Whatever GCSE qualification is being taken, 25% of the final grade will come from investigative skills assignments (ISAs) made during the course. In these ISAs.... • you research, plan and then perform a practical exercise proposed and outlined by AQA. • during lesson time, you then take the ISA test papers (done in two sections).

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The ISA papers are done under controlled exam conditions. You answer a series of questions set

by the examination board directly related to the practical exercise they performed. For some questions, you make use of your own data and, for others, you use knowledge and understanding of ‘How Science works’. • You will normally take at least two ISAs for each qualification; these will be marked internally. Only the higher/highest scoring ISA is submitted for moderation to count towards the final grade.


Key Stage 4 Guide

Careers At this stage it is essential to keep as many “doors” open as possible and subjects should be chosen with this in mind.

Virtually all career areas are kept open by taking the basic five subjects listed above. However some points are worth noting: • If one wishes to study another European language at A Level, e.g. German or Spanish, then it is necessary to take it at GCSE. The same would apply for most A level subjects. Although it is not impossible to start a subject at A Level, it is not always advisable.

During the ‘Careers’ part of the PSHE programme pupils are made aware of their strengths, interests and the world of work so that you can make reasoned choices at 15+. During Year 10 you will use the Pathfinder Job Interests Questionnaire and sit the Morrisby test provided by the Independent Schools Careers Organisation (ISCO). This will give a sound information base for future decisions.

Civil service Actuary Law

Media

• If you are considering Humanities then it would

Please do not hesitate to ask your teachers, tutors and/or Head of Careers for further advice in your final choice of subjects.

Diplomatic service Auditing

Marketing Information technology

Scientific research Education Tax

Advisory Volunteering International organisations Journalism

Insurance

• By not doing these subjects am I going to close any possible ‘career doors’?

• History, Business Studies or perhaps Geography would be useful for the study of social sciences.

Advertising

• Do I ‘like’ these subjects?

• If you are considering a more artistic, designorientated course, then Art or Design Technology would be useful

Politics Management consultancy Public sector

• Am I good at these subjects?

be wise to include History, Geography or perhaps another language in your option

Charity

A sensible combination of subjects at GCSE level would be: - Mathematics, English, a foreign language, sciences and a humanities subject. The extra subjects could be chosen according to the following criteria:

Investment banking 37


The British School of Paris 38 quai de l’Ecluse 78290 Croissy sur Seine Tel: +33 (0)1 34 80 45 94 Fax: +33 (0)1 39 76 32 21 Website www.britishschool.fr Email ssc@britishschool.fr February 2014


Bsp ks4guide feb14