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curriculum guide

th Form


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Contents

Introduction: Making a Choice

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A Level Courses

- Art and Design - Biology - Chemistry - Design and Technology - Drama and Theatre Studies - Economics and Business - English Literature - French - Geography - German - Government and Politics - History - History of Art - Information and Communication Technology - Mathematics and Further Mathematics - Music - AS Photography - Physical Education - Physics - Spanish

4 9 11 14 17 19 21 23 26 29 32 34 36 38 40 42 45 46 48 50

GCSE Courses

- English Language - Mathematics

53 54

The Foundation Year

- BTEC Courses - Other Opportunities

55 55

Other Sixth Form Courses

- EPQ - Extended Project Qualification - PSHE

56 57

Physical Education Core

59

Educational Support

60

Please read this document in conjunction with the 6th form Student Guide.

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Introduction: Making a Choice You are about to embark upon the most exciting stage of your school career. As you approach the end of compulsory education, you will need to be thinking of the subjects you wish to study in the Sixth Form.

The qualifications we offer lead to university entrance worldwide. The courses are all designed for specialists, and are therefore excellent preparation for the rigorous demands of top-class universities. Our students gain admission to a large number of Universities, both in the United Kingdom and overseas. At The British School of Paris we are pleased to be able to offer a large variety of subjects to Advanced Level. We can also offer support and extension possibilities: General Certificate of Secondary Education subjects in Year 12, BTEC courses, the possibility to extend beyond A level competence in French and Spanish and EPQ: the Extended Project Qualification created to provide additional stretch and challenge and better prepare students for university demands. Students progressing into the Sixth Form follow a rigorous schedule and helping you to reach your academic potential is one of our primary aims. Our examination results are excellent and we are very proud of the achievements of our students.

Entry into A Level courses is not for everyone. If you are already in the British System, you will need five GCSE passes at grade C and good grades in your chosen subjects, in order to study A Levels. Whatever your educational experience, please be aware, the level of expectation amongst your teachers will be high. If A Level study is not for you consider our Foundation Year Programme. What factors should you consider in your choice of Sixth Form programme?

You should be genuinely interested in the subject you have chosen. Each course will represent a large part of your week. You must be able to enjoy what you are studying. If you have a passion for a particular subject combined with a real desire to extend your learning, success will be an enjoyable challenge.

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There are no easy options in the Sixth Form. You should remember that courses at this level can be markedly different from GCSE courses which bear the same name. Read carefully the course descriptions, written by the various Heads of Departments. Consider not only the syllabus content but the various skills which you will have to develop. Take into account the amount of practical work. Think of the bias in the course towards the mathematical, the scientific or the literary. Some subjects demand a strong GCSE pass; some accept students without a GCSE. Discuss all this with the subject teachers at The British School of Paris.

Naturally you must consider choice of career. We hope that most of you will have at

least a general idea of the type of career you wish to pursue, although you may not yet have decided upon a particular profession. Consult widely: read the University Application and Careers section in the 6th Form Student Guide. Discuss your thoughts with your parents, the Careers Department, your subject teachers and your tutor.

You should be realistic about your ambitions.

For many courses in Higher Education you will require not merely to pass A Levels but to score grades A*, A or B in them. Be aware of this when you make your choices. For some careers you will see that there is little or no room for manoeuvre in your choice of subjects. However, if you are still uncertain, try to leave, in your choice of subjects, the possibility of a change of direction. Certain subjects complement each other. Broadly speaking one can divide the subjects into Arts, Humanities and Sciences. Within each category the skills which are taught reinforce each other. For instance English and History can be allied with Languages, whereas Geography has more in common with scientific subjects, and we strongly advise that Physics should be combined with Mathematics. Finally, of course, there are a large number of University courses available not directly related to specific school subjects. Please check the entry requirements if you are already certain of your University choice.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

The Options Procedure

You should be available during this week to discuss issues with staff at school.

January/February

September

For students at The British School of Paris, Mock GCSE examination results are analysed and discussed by your tutors, subject teachers and if appropriate parents.

Sixth Form Induction. Year 12 courses start.

March

Option choices are made. The Sixth Form Curriculum Guide outlines courses and students are invited to an Options Evening. Most students will choose four subjects from List A. List B allows for support or extension. Option blocks will then be generated. We try to be as flexible as possible to allow everyone to be satisfied. We also know this is not always possible. Difficulties will be discussed at this stage.

May/June

The timetable is completed. Please note that subjects will be confirmed only if there are sufficient numbers of students.

When you and your parents have read through this Curriculum Guide, you should discuss subject choices together and decide on the areas about which you would like further information. You may obtain clarification from a variety of sources: you can ask your subject teachers, your tutor or our Head of Careers. Also you should talk to pupils in Years 12 and 13 who are already following the courses in which you are interested. Finally you may come to see us to discuss your choices.

August

If you or your parents would like further information on any aspect of the courses or careers, we shall be happy to assist in any way we can.

The week before start of term

Dr. J Batters, Deputy Head

Receipt of GCSE results from Examination Boards.

In the light of GCSE results, some students may have to change courses or rethink their educational future.

This table shows the current subjects available. We constantly review the breadth of choice and may develop new courses where appropriate. List A - A Level

List B - Extension/Support

Art & Design

German

EPQ

Biology

Government & Politics

Special Objectives (Accelerated) French

Chemistry

History

Special Objectives (Accelerated) Spanish

Design & Technology

History of Art

AS Photography

Drama & Theatre Studies

ICT

Foundation Year Programme

Economics & Business

Mathematics

Art and Design

English Literature

Music

Money and Finance

French

Physical Education

Sports Leadership Awards

Further Mathematics

Physics

GCSE English

Geography

Spanish

GCSE Mathematics

Music

Please note that whilst you may not have chosen to follow curriculum music in the 6th form, you still have the opportunity to play in the orchestra, sing in the choir and continue with individual instrumental lessons. Through the ABRSM and Rockschool qualifications at grades 6-8, theory and practical, students can gain valuable UCAS points for University entry.

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A Level A Level Art and Design

Edexcel 9FA01

The Art Department is able to take full advantage of The British School of Paris’ special position in the Impressionist region and its proximity to Paris. Visits to temporary exhibitions and museums are organised throughout the year. Lunchtime art activities are offered for all pupils and life classes are offered for Years 12 and 13. Students are encouraged to become involved in designing sets and costumes and in making props for the school plays.

If you are self-motivated and genuinely interested in Art then this is an excellent opportunity to develop a broader understanding of the history and techniques of the subject whilst developing personal skills in both the practical and theoretical aspects of your own work. You will be developing fresh and often unconventional ideas in a new range of materials. The course is taught through coursework units, where students take a personal journey or approach dealing with a variety of techniques covering a wide range of exciting and stimulating themes. We have had several artists-in-residence and professional artists are invited to come to discuss and present their own work and give stimulus and encouragement to students. If you want to undertake further studies in Art, Craft and Design or take up a career for which an art background is relevant then this course is definitely for you.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

The best foundation for success in AS and A level Art is a good grade at GCSE, preferably a C or above. Those without this requirement must submit a portfolio of work prior to acceptance on this course. If you have an aptitude for the subject, if you are creative or ‘good at drawing’, you may have the basic skills to succeed. However, AS / A level Art is not an easy option and you should be prepared to work hard at developing your abilities. You should have an understanding of the basic elements of art – colour, tone, form etc, and also some understanding of the place of art, craft and design in the world – its history and its purpose. Above all, you should have an interest in creating and understanding art and the determination to develop that interest.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course? The main purpose of any course in art, craft and design is to develop your ability to appreciate the visual world, respond in a personal and creative way and perhaps even contribute for the benefit of everyone. The skills you will develop will be varied. Among them, you will develop a working knowledge of

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materials, practices and technology within art. You will develop the skills to interpret and convey your ideas and feelings using art, craft and design. You will develop your imaginative and creative powers and your experimental, analytical and documenting skills. You will also develop a specialist vocabulary and the knowledge and understanding of the place of art, craft and design in history and in contemporary society. The skills you acquire will be determined to some extent by the area of study you choose. However, whether you see yourself as a painter, a photographer, a designer or a filmmaker, the same basic rules and skills apply.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

What can I do outside the classroom to extend my learning? Extra Curricular Activities

There are gallery visits taken in both Year 12 and 13. At this level you would be expected to regularly visit galleries independently to further your personal studies. We also aim to go on a field trip. The costs of field trips are not included in the school fees.

Independent Study

There are opportunities to use the art rooms for study outside timetabled periods and there is an area set aside for 6th form artists.

What equipment will I need?

Although the Department provides an adequate supply of art materials it is advised that you buy an art box with the basic equipment needed throughout the course.

Here is a list of things that you should have before the start of term: Must Have

Good to Have

◊ 2B – 4B Pencils

◊ Palette knives

◊ Rubber

◊ Tracing paper

◊ Pencil sharpener

◊ Oil paint

◊ Putty rubber

◊ Water colour

◊ Charcoal

◊ Inks

◊ Chalk pastels

◊ Selection of different coloured paper and tissue paper

◊ Oil pastels

◊ A –Z of artists e.g. The Art Book (Phaidon) The 20th Century Art Book (Phaidon)

◊ Black fine-liner ◊ Acrylic paint ◊ Selection of paintbrushes ◊ Crayons – karisma / water soluble recommended ◊ Glue ◊ Masking tape ◊ Selection of canvases in different sizes ◊ A2 or A1 portfolio

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A Level A Level Art and Design (Continued)

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

• analysing and using sources and contexts to inform and inspire their own work

AS Level

• development of ideas, ongoing analysis and review

The AS is made up of one coursework unit and an externally set unit of work.

Unit 1: Coursework

Coursework Unit 1 is intended to form the basis on which you will develop your knowledge, skill and understanding in creating a rich visual language within the context of selected ideas. You will be expected to build on and develop your recording skills and demonstrate skilful use of the formal elements, including line, tone, colour, shape, pattern, texture, form and structure. Within this unit it is essential that you learn the skills required for analysis of your own and others’ work. Unit 1 coursework submissions should include evidence of: • an exploration of a theme • appropriate research and recording from primary sources • selecting appropriate sources and contextual images for analysis, demonstrating understanding, meaning and context

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• exploration of media and methods to record information and develop ideas • synthesis of ideas and outcome(s) which connect with appropriate contexts.

Unit 2: Externally Set Assignment

The Externally Set Assignment represents the culmination of the AS GCE course in Art and Design. The examination board will set a question paper which will provide you with a subject. During the taught preparatory period you will expected to generate ideas from the theme, investigating a wide range of appropriate primary and secondary sources. Your developing ideas and exploratory visual work should be subject to ongoing critical review. There is a timed element of 8 hours at the end of the preparatory period. This is done under examination conditions and is unaided. You must meet all the assessment objectives and produce a work journal.

The Externally Set Assignment should involve you showing evidence of the development of visual


6th Form Curriculum Guide

language skills in: • generating a range of ideas • appropriate research into sources and contexts • primary recording and analysis of sources and contexts • sensitive selection and exploration of media and processes • development of ideas, review and refinement • synthesis of ideas and outcome(s), which connect with appropriate contexts.

A Level Unit 3: Coursework

This unit incorporates two linked elements: • Personal study – Students should produce an illustrated written dissertation on a selected aspect of others’ art, craft and design • Practical work - Students should develop their practical, creative ideas in the light of their chosen focus for the personal study for this unit. It is essential for both elements of this unit, the practical work and the personal study, that you build on your prior knowledge and experience developed during the course. The supporting studies for this unit may combine the preparatory research studies for both elements. Sketchbook(s), notebook(s), draft writing, files, worksheets, design sheets, large-scale rough studies, electronic developments, video clips, samples, swatches, test pieces and maquettes may constitute supporting studies. The area of study, theme or focus chosen should link work produced for both the practical work and personal study.

Practical work Must include: • your selected focus

The personal study

• appropriate research from primary and other sources and contexts

Which must include:

• ideas development

• appropriate research from a range of contextual sources, related to ongoing practical work

• media and process exploration

• in-depth analysis and evaluation

• a sustained practical investigation and ongoing review

• exploration of different aspects of historical and contemporary art, craft and design

• a personal response, demonstrating connections to contexts.

• list of references - Bibliography

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A Level A Level Art and Design (Continued)

Unit 4: Externally Set Assignment

The Externally Set Assignment represents the culmination of the Advanced GCE course in Art and Design. The examination board will set a question paper which will provide you with a subject. During the taught preparatory period you will be expected to generate ideas from the theme, investigating a wide range of appropriate primary and secondary sources. Your developing ideas and exploratory visual work should be subject to ongoing critical review. There is a timed element of 12 hours at the end of the preparatory period. This is done under examination conditions and is unaided. You must meet all the assessment objectives and produce a work journal. The Externally Set Assignment should involve you showing evidence of the development of visual language skills in: • generating a range of ideas • appropriate research into sources and contexts • recording and analysis of primary sources and contexts • sensitive selection and exploration of media and processes • developing of ideas, review and refinement • synthesis of ideas which connect to appropriate contexts.

How is it assessed?

AS and A2 are both internally marked and externally moderated.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

There are many careers in art, craft and design. Most of these require further study at an art school, further education college or university. If you are unsure about whether to make a career of the subject, the best thing to do is to speak to your art teacher who will know about the courses on offer in your area or elsewhere.

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At present most students wishing to take art, craft or design will go on to do a one-year ‘Foundation’ course at an art college or college of further education before applying to degree courses in more specialist areas of art and design.

You may wish to do an art AS or A level for its own sake, perhaps to form the basis of a future interest or as part of a range of other subjects. Or you might wish to go into a job where it is useful to have had experience of art, craft and design, or where you will need to use some of the skills developed during this course. These might include careers in such fields as advertising, marketing, design, architecture, publishing and the media. The study of Art can also help you develop transferable skills you can take into any career or job. Success in AS/A level Art requires determination and dedication. However, whichever future path you choose, it can be a very rewarding beginning.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

A Level Biology

AQA 2410

Biology at The British School of Paris benefits from excellent laboratory facilities which the students are encouraged to make use of at all times. During the course there are many opportunities to keep up-todate in this rapidly developing science.

Most topics that the students cover are explored practically as well as theoretically. During Year 13 students have the opportunity to complete a full practical investigation which they plan and carry out independently. As well as preparing students for an academic qualification, this course enables them to form educated opinions on contemporary issues.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

The qualification builds on the knowledge, understanding and practical skills that you gained in GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science or GCSE Biology (to at least a grade C). You should have at least a C grade in GCSE Mathematics, as numerical and mathematical skills are important in Biology. You will need to be able to communicate effectively, be able to plan and carry out research and think critically about problems.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

In Biology you will develop practical skills by planning experiments, collecting data, analysing experimental results and making conclusions. You will also learn how scientific models are developed, the applications and implications of science, the benefits and risks that science brings and the ways in which society uses science to make decisions.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Biology and disease

This unit is designed to augment biological understanding from GCSE and lay the foundations for further development of biological skills. You will discover some of the finer points of cell biology and develop an understanding of the complex biochemistry that occurs within all biological life. As the unit progresses you will investigate the workings of the respiratory system and cardiovascular system, paying particular attention to the heart and lungs. The unit also includes study of enzymes and how your body has become adapted to fight infection.

Unit 1 is externally assessed with a written examination lasting 75 minutes.

Unit 2: The variety of living organisms

This unit focuses heavily on the development of understanding in the field of genetics. You will look closely at the structure and function of the DNA molecule and see how it interacts within the cell to produce proteins. You will then view these proteins in context and see how insignificant building blocks can be arranged to form impressive macro structures. You will also see genetics applied in a wider, more tangible context when you are introduced to the principles of taxonomy, seeing how all living species can be classified. Unit 2 is externally assessed with a written examination lasting 75 minutes.

Unit 3: Investigative Skills Assessment (ISA)

Aside from learning the biological theory behind the above principles and processes, you will be expected to develop as investigative scientists as the course progresses. This will be facilitated in a variety of different ways, yet the main assessment of these skills will be done using a GCSE style ISA. Unit 3 is externally assessed with a practical task followed by a written examination lasting 60 minutes. This is sat in the spring term of the AS year.

A Level Unit 4: Populations and environment

This unit allows you to indulge in the study of how plants and animals interact with each other within ecosystems. This unit looks at how energy is cycled round an ecosystem, how nutrients are recycled and how humans have perhaps upset the balance of these fragile cycles. At the same time you will be looking in depth into the process of photosynthesis and how important this process is for all life on Earth. Unit 4 is externally assessed with a written examination lasting 90 minutes.

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A Level A Level Biology (Continued)

Unit 5: Control in cells and organisms

In the final theory unit you will look at the fascinating way in which organisms have become sensitive and able to move. The two largest sections of this unit focus upon nerves and muscles and you will study the biochemistry of each, as well as the physiological aspects. You will also look at the fundamentals of the process of homeostasis, and relate adaptations within an organism’s strategy to its ability to survive in certain areas. Finally you will build on the genetic theory learned in unit 2 and look at the wider applications of gene technology, including gene therapy and genetic cloning. Unit 5 is externally assessed with a written examination lasting 90 minutes.

Unit 6: Investigative Skills Assessment (ISA)

Again students will be examined on their practical skills as part of the A2 course. This time the ISA is a little more challenging, to reflect the strides students

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will have made in experimental technique. Unit 6 is externally assessed with a practical task followed by a written examination lasting 60 minutes. This is sat in the spring term of the A2 year.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Biology leads on to a wide range of courses and careers. This could include: • An undergraduate degree in a life science, medicine, environmental science, forensic science and related courses • Employment, for example in the areas of biological testing, biotechnology, independent research and the food industry.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

A Level Chemistry

Edexcel 9CH01

With small class sizes, students benefit from individual attention and support. Practical skills are learned through frequent experiments, both in pair work and individually. Students are encouraged to develop a caring and responsible attitude towards handling and disposing of chemicals safely.

Background reading, discussion on chemical issues in the news, and researching chemistry-related websites complement classroom experience. This course will try to give you the skills and understanding to make decisions about the way chemistry affects your everyday life by applying concepts into contemporary areas of chemistry including: • Climate change • Green chemistry • Pharmaceuticals • Chemistry research. In addition, a GCE in Chemistry allows you to develop a range of generic skills requested by both employers and Universities. For instance, a successful GCE level Chemist will be an effective problem-solver and be able to communicate efficiently both orally and with the written word. Handling data will be a key part of your work, allowing you to demonstrate information retrieval skills as well as use of numeracy and ICT. You will build up a range of practical skills that require creativity and accuracy as well as developing a firm understanding of health and safety issues. As chemistry is a subject in which much learning stems from experimental work it is likely that you will need to work effectively as part of a group, developing team participation and leadership skills. As you become more skilled you will take responsibility for selecting appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods, recording your observations and findings accurately and precisely as well as critically analysing and evaluating the methodology, results and impact of your own and others’ experimental and investigative activities.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

This qualification builds on the knowledge, understanding and process skills inherent in GCSE. It is expected that you will have achieved a GCSE Grade B in Chemistry or Additional Science. The qualification integrates theory and relevant practical work, which are developed at different levels throughout the course. You will need to be able to communicate effectively, research and think critically about chemical problems.

What will I learn on the AS/A Level course?

Edexcel GCE Chemistry gives you the opportunity to study a core of key concepts in greater detail. Many of the ideas first covered at GCSE will be revisited but with a greater emphasis on explaining rather than simply describing the behaviour of substances. While studying GCE Chemistry you will develop practical skills that include making observations, collecting data, analysing experimental results and formulating conclusions. You will also gain an appreciation of how scientific models are developed and evolve, the applications and implications of science, the benefits and risks that science brings and the ways in which society uses science to make decisions. AS or A level Chemistry is suitable if you: • Have an interest in, and enjoy chemistry • Want to find out about how things work in the real world • Enjoy applying your mind to solving problems • Want to use chemistry to progress onto further studies in Higher Education or support other qualifications or enter chemistry-based employment.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: The Core Principles of Chemistry

This unit provides opportunities for students to develop the basic chemical skills of formulae writing, equation writing and calculating chemical quantities. The study of energetics in chemistry is of theoretical and practical importance. In this unit students learn to define, measure and calculate enthalpy changes. They will see how a study of enthalpy changes can help chemists to understand chemical bonding. The study of atomic structure introduces s, p, and d orbitals and shows how a more detailed understanding of electron configurations can account for the arrangement of elements in the periodic table. The unit introduces the three types of strong chemical bonding (ionic, covalent and metallic). Organic chemistry is also introduced with students studying alkanes and alkenes.

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A Level A Level Chemistry (Continued)

This unit is assessed by an examination of 1 hour and 30 minutes in two sections. Section A: Objective test questions. Section B: Mixture of short answer and extended answer questions.

Unit 2: Application of Core Principles of Chemistry

This unit develops the treatment of chemical bonding by introducing intermediate types of bonding and by exploring the nature and effects of intermolecular forces. Study of the periodic table is extended to cover the chemistry of groups 2 and 7. Ideas about redox reactions are applied, in particular, to the reactions of halogens and their compounds. The unit develops a largely qualitative understanding of the ways in which chemists can control the rate, direction and extent of chemical change. Organic chemistry in this unit covers alcohols and halogenoalkanes. The treatment is extended to explore the mechanisms of selected examples. Students have to use formulae and balance equations and have an understanding of chemical quantities. Aspects of green chemistry and climate change are also studied. This unit is assessed by an examination of 1 hour and 30 minutes in three sections. Section A: Objective test questions Section B: Mixture of short answer and extended answer questions. Section C: Contemporary context questions.

Unit 3: Chemistry Laboratory Skills 1

This unit contains practical assessments that cover the content of Units 1 and 2. There is no specific content for this unit. The practical assessments cover the areas of physical, organic and inorganic chemistry. The types of practicals that students must complete are qualitative observations, quantitative measurements and preparations. Four separate activities test students’ laboratory skills in four different ways. The four activities must cover the areas of physical, organic and inorganic chemistry.

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A Level Unit 4: General Principles of Chemistry 1 – Rates, Equilibria and Further Organic Chemistry

In this unit students make a quantitative study of chemical kinetics and further their study of organic reaction mechanisms. The topics of entropy and equilibria show how chemists are able to predict quantitatively the direction and extent of chemical change. The organic chemistry in this unit covers carbonyl compounds, plus carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Students are required to apply their knowledge gained in Units 1 and 2 to all aspects of this unit. This includes nomenclature, ideas of isomerism, bond polarity and bond enthalpy, reagents and reaction conditions, reaction types and mechanisms. Students are also expected to use formulae and balance equations and calculate chemical quantities. This unit is assessed by an examination of a 1 hour and 40 minutes in three sections. Section A: Objective test questions. Section B: Mixture of short answer and extended answer questions. Section C: Data questions, with use of a data booklet.

Unit 5: General Principles of Chemistry II – Transition Metals and Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

In this unit the study of electrode potentials builds on the study of redox in Unit 2, including the concept of oxidation number and the use of redox half equations. Students will study further chemistry related to redox and transition metals. The further organic chemistry section of this unit focuses on arenas and organic nitrogen compounds such as amines, amides, amino acids and proteins. Students are expected to use the knowledge and understanding of organic chemistry that they have gained over the whole GCE in Chemistry when covering the organic synthesis section. This unit draws on all other units within the GCE in Chemistry and students are expected to use their prior knowledge when learning about these areas. Students will again encounter ideas of isomerism, bond polarity and bond enthalpy,


6th Form Curriculum Guide

reagents and reaction conditions, reaction types and mechanisms. Students are also expected to use formulae and balance equations and calculate chemical quantities. This unit is assessed by an examination of 1 hour and 40 minutes in three sections. Section A: Objective test questions. Section B: Mixture of short answer and extended answer questions. Section C: Contemporary context questions.

Unit 6: Chemistry Laboratory Skills II

In Unit 6 you will be assessed on four aspects of your practical work, as in Unit 3, with activities a, b. c and d. In Unit 6 you also have a choice: instead of carrying out activities c and d you could choose to carry out a multi-stage experiment which includes these activities in one longer practical.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

• A degree course in Chemistry, Environmental Science, Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacology, Nursing. These are a small selection of courses with direct links. UCAS handbooks will give you further guidance • A Higher National programme in Applied Chemistry and related programmes, such as Sport Studies, Beauty Therapy, Applied Biology, Engineering, Agriculture, Animal Management, Countryside Management, Environmental Science, Equine Management or Horticulture • Employment in the area of Pharmacy or Biotechnology.

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A Level A Level Design and Technology: Product Design [Graphic Products]

Edexcel 9GR01

This is a fresh and exciting programme emphasising two key considerations for designers of all disciplines – creativity and sustainability. We want the students to explore ideas of originality and value, to question and to challenge, to envisage what could be; but equally we need them to achieve results that will progress their careers.

This qualification will allow students to develop a range of skills and outcomes at Advanced Subsidiary (AS) which demonstrate their creativity and then to apply these in the completion of a major design and make project at A Level. The Design and Technology work areas at The British School of Paris are well equipped and offer a stimulating environment for the delivery of a demanding and rewarding course. Students work both as individuals and as members of a team, simulating common industrial practice. Our location here in Paris makes it possible to take advantage of the many design centres and galleries to both support and enrich classroom activities. For students selecting this course we hope to offer the opportunity of a residential trip designed specifically to support the taught curriculum. The cost of this trip is not included in the school fees.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

It is usual for students embarking on the AS course of study in Design and Technology to have achieved at least a Grade C following the study of a Design and Technology subject at GCSE level. A successful student will not only have a passion for design in general, one that extends beyond a superficial delight

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in beautiful things, but will be eager to grapple with the deeper questioning of why products are made as they are. An interest in learning about industrial and commercial processes and practices is critical. ICT skills are essential as a significant amount of the work will be presented using Desk Top Publishing software (CorelDraw X5) and 3D modelling software (ProDesktop and ProEngineer). The ability to communicate visually using sketches is desirable. Students have access to a wide range of equipment and software both during and after school but would benefit from owning the following, especially for continuing work at home. • Set of quality colouring pencils and drawing pencils • Black fine liner pens • Marker pens • Sketch book • Home computer with internet access • A3 portfolio carry case


6th Form Curriculum Guide

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course? Candidates are taught and then assessed in their ability to:

• Develop and sustain their own innovation, creativity and Design and Technology capability, to recognise constraints and to produce high quality products • Develop a critical understanding of influences on design and technological activity both from an historical perspective and in current practice • Apply knowledge, understanding and skills of design production processes to a range of technological activities and develop an understanding of industrial practices • Use Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in order to produce virtual models and final presentations • Develop an understanding of the social, moral, spiritual and cultural values inherent in design and technological activity • Apply critical evaluation skills in technical, aesthetic, economic, environmental, social and cultural contexts.

This qualification will allow you to demonstrate to universities and future employers that you can perform in a creative problem solving environment, work to deadlines and industry standards, communicate your ideas using a full range of IT and presentation packages, think laterally and use analytical skills.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Portfolio of Creative Skills

• You are required to produce one portfolio with three distinct sections which demonstrate your creativity and flair when investigating, designing and making products. You will undertake three separate focused tasks, internally marked at school and then externally moderated by Edexcel. This counts for 60% of your AS grade and 30% of your A2 grade.

Unit 2: Design and Technology in Practice

• In this unit you will develop a knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in the field of design and technology. You will learn about industrial and commercial practices including the importance of quality controls and safety issues. Assessment is through a 1 hour and 30 minute examination set and marked by Edexcel. This counts for 40% of your AS grade and 20% of your A2 grade.

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A Level A Level Design and Technology (Continued)

A Level Unit 3: Designing for the Future

• You will investigate a range of modern design and manufacturing practices and contemporary design issues including those of sustainability. You will increase your knowledge of the important contributions of designers from the past. Assessment is through a 2 hour examination consisting of both short answer and extended essay writing questions. This counts for 20% of your A2 grade.

Unit 4: Commercial Design

• In this unit you will apply the skills you have previously acquired and developed in the design and realisation of a product of your choice, adopting an approach that closely replicates that employed by a professional working in commercial design. You will therefore work closely with your chosen client and user group at key points throughout the project. A key feature is that you will consider issues of sustainability including material production and selection, manufacturing processes, the use of the product and its disposal/recycling. The unit is internally marked by the school and then externally moderated by Edexcel. This counts for 30% of your A2 grade.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Design and Technology at AS and A2 level could be either a complementary subject to Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Business Studies, History of Art, , Art and Design; or a contrasting subject with English, History, Geography and Modern Languages. Dependent upon the combination, chosen subjects that Advanced level students of Design and Technology have gone on to study at Degree Level have included: • Animation • Architecture • Art / Design • Business • Computer Aided Design • Car Design • Computer Graphics • Engineering • Exhibition Design • Fashion Design • Furniture Design • Graphic Design • Industrial Design • Interior Design • Manufacturing industries • Marketing • Product Design • Prosthetics & Orthotics • Set and Theatre design • Special Effects

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6th Form Curriculum Guide

A Level Drama and Theatre Studies

Edexcel 9DR01

This is an exciting course for everyone who has a serious interest in acting, studying plays and practitioners and evaluating live performances. Drama and Theatre Studies would be suitable for most arts/humanities courses as well as giving useful ’breadth’ to a scientific path. Drama and Theatre Studies is a fully-fledged and academically rigorous A Level accepted by all universities including Oxbridge citing the breadth that the subject gives. Standards are very high and you will have to be motivated to meet the challenges ahead. What do I need to know, or be able to do, before taking this course?

It is useful to have taken Drama at GCSE level but not essential. It is important that you are interested in gaining a greater understanding of how theatre and plays work, and that you are keen to be involved with performances.

What will I study on this AS/A Level course?

The course demands practical, creative and communication skills in almost equal measure. You will extend your ability to create drama and theatre, either in a performing or production role. You will also be required to write about drama and to develop your powers of analysis to become an informed critic. The course will involve taking part in drama productions, as well as studying plays and playwrights. You need to be curious about issues and ideas and have a creative instinct for communicating your views through drama. You may be keen on acting, writing or on the visual and technical side of theatre and wish to develop your skills in some or all of these areas. Equally you will be interested in going to the theatre to see plays performed by different theatre companies. Since the emphasis in most GCE Drama or GCSE Drama and Theatre Arts courses is on improvisation, devised work and/or performing, the AS in Drama and Theatre Studies deliberately focuses on working with plays. In this way, the AS in Drama and Theatres Studies aims to bridge the gap between GCSE and full A level by providing an opportunity to study plays from the point of view of a director, designer, performer and informed audience member. The qualification is designed to enable students to acquire a knowledge and understanding of the language of drama and theatre as well as to develop their performing and analytical skills.

and structures gained from AS to the creation of their own work. In performing theatre, students are required to apply their knowledge, skills and understanding within the structure of a director’s interpretation of a play, and to operate at a highly intellectual level as well as at a highly skilled practical level. The aim of the full A level is to enable students to operate more autonomously and with confidence within a drama and theatre context. In the role of director, students are individual thinkers determining their own interpretation of a play. As informed members of the audience, they are making independent judgments in their analysis of the way other directors, designers and performers have applied their craft to the production of a play.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Level Unit 1: Exploration of Drama and Theatre

This unit introduces students to the content of plays written for the theatre. They will learn how to analyse plays in a variety of ways so that they become familiar with the way written plays can be interpreted for realisation in performance. This internally assessed unit requires students to explore two contrasting play texts, chosen by the centre, in a practical and active way. At least one of the plays must be explored in the light of a recognised theatre practitioner such as Konstantin Stanislavski. Bertolt Brecht, Antonin Artaud and Peter Brook.

The full A level in Drama and Theatre Studies aims to extend the knowledge, skills and understanding acquired in the AS units by enabling students to apply what they have learned in their own creative work. In devising theatre, students alternate between the roles of playwright, performer, designer and director, and apply their knowledge of different theatre forms

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A Level A Level Drama and Theatre Studies (Continued)

A set of Exploration Notes must be submitted. Students are also required to experience a live theatre performance and submit an evaluation.

AS Unit 2: Theatre Text in Performance

This unit offers students the chance to demonstrate skills in a performance environment. The knowledge and understanding gained during the study of two plays in Unit 1 can now be applied with a view to delivering a performance to an audience. This is an externally assessed unit. The first section requires students to offer either a monologue or duologue. The second section requires students to contribute to a performance of a professionally published play by a known writer. Students may offer either acting or a design form and must also provide a concept of the interpretation of their chosen roles or designs.

A2 A2 Unit 3: Exploration of Dramatic Performance

This unit requires the creation of a unique and original piece of theatre. The knowledge and understanding gained in the AS units can now be applied to a created production. Students will be assessed on both the process of creation and the finished product in the form of a performance to an invited audience. They are also required to complete an evaluation on both the process and performance of their work. Written evidence will be required reflecting the research and development work as well as a video/ DVD of the final performance.

A2 Unit 4: Theatre Text in Context

This externally examined written unit requires the detailed study of one set play text and one prescribed historical period of theatrical development. It takes the form of a 2 hour and 30 minute written paper in three sections. Sections A and B require students to explore one play, from a choice of three set play texts, from the point of view of a director in both an academic and practical way.

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In Section C a selection must be made of one from a choice of three historic periods of theatre history. A live performance of a play from the chosen period must be experienced and evaluated and a comparison made with the original staging conditions of the play.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

This AS /A level can lead to further study in Drama, Theatre Studies and Performing Arts in Higher Education at degree or HND level. It would fit well with most careers including the arts, media, public relations, advertising, journalism, education and law. Drama and Theatre Studies AS /A level complements a range of subjects and is useful in building confidence and improving presentation skills in a range of careers.

Extra Curricular

It is important that you realise that Drama will take up more than just lesson time. You will be required to give up lunchtimes or stay after school for extra rehearsals if needed plus attend live theatre performances in the evening. There will also be a weekend trip to London at some point during the course. The cost of this trip is not included in the school fees.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

A Level Economics and Business

Edexcel 9EB01

Economics and Business is an A Level, building upon Business Studies, which has been a popular option for GCSE.

The subject enjoys dedicated facilities with access to a computer room. The teaching methods employed are very much student-centred, with problem-solving group work, presentations, individual research, project work and visits to and from businesses all being part of this varied approach. For students selecting this course we hope to offer the opportunity of a curricular trip. The cost of this trip is not included in the school fees.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

It is not a requirement that you should have studied Business Studies at GCSE level. Several topics in the course are developments of work covered at GCSE, but others are new. It is however important that you have a strong interest in Enterprise, International Business and in Economics and want to learn how a business is organised, operates, plans and makes its decisions.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course? • How to develop a critical understanding of organisations, the markets they serve and the process of adding value • The internal workings and management of organisations • The process of decision-making in a dynamic external environment • How business behaviour can be influenced by a range of people and organisations including customers, managers, creditors, owner/ shareholders and employees

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Developing New Business Ideas

This unit covers the characteristics students would need to develop to be successful in business and how new or existing businesses generate their product or service ideas and test them through market research. Students should also consider the competition in the market; the economic climate; how the business might be financed and how much revenue the idea might generate. This unit is assessed by an examination of 1 hour and 15 minutes in two sections. Section A: Supported multiple-choice in two sections. Section B: Questions based on data.

Unit 2: Business Economics

This unit considers the market that the business may be operating in; how competition in the market and macroeconomic change is likely to affect it and how businesses can seek to minimise uncertainty through their actions. This unit is assessed by an examination of 1 hour and 15 minutes in two sections. Section A: Supported multiple-choice in two sections. Section B: Questions based on data.

• What outside factors influence the operations of a business, such as the state of the economy, the environment, ethical considerations, the government, the law, social and technological issues associated with business activity • Techniques to analyse and solve business problems • The importance in a business of setting objectives • How a business markets its products or services, what production is all about, financial control of businesses and how human resources are planned.

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A Level A Level Economics and Business (Continued)

A Level Unit 3: International Business

The aim of this unit is to introduce the student to the world of International Business and issues which a company trading internationally would have to consider. This unit is assessed by an examination of 1 hour and 30 minutes in two sections Section A: Questions based on data Section B: Case study and questions

Unit 4: The Wider Economic Environment and Business In this unit, students consider why certain markets fail: how government decision making affects the economy and markets in which companies operate, and the income and welfare of private individuals. The unit should enable students to assess why government economic policy can succeed or fail and why regulation of some markets is necessary.

This unit is assessed by an examination of 1 hour and 30 minutes in two sections. Section A: Questions based on data. Section B: Decision-making report and questions based on pre-released material.

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What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Students with AS or A Level Economics and Business have access to a wide range of possible career and Higher Education opportunities. You learn and use a variety of transferable skills throughout the course. These include the important business skills of decision making and planning. You can start a career in business armed with an excellent knowledge of how businesses operate. In particular you will have a head start in careers within Accountancy, Marketing and Human Resources. Economics and Business combines well with a range of Social Science, Humanities and Mathematics subjects to lead to University subjects in such areas as Business, Economics, Law and Accountancy.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

A Level English Literature

Edexcel 9ET01

Besides careful preparation for A Level examinations and University entrance, the English Department encourages the participation of students in theatre and in their personal writing.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

In order to study this subject it is important to have a GCSE qualification in English. Several areas covered in the course are developments of work at GCSE, but others are new. You will need to be prepared to study prose, poetry and drama texts and, at A level, to make comparisons between texts and study ‘unprepared’ texts. You will have the opportunity to study both modern texts and texts from previous centuries. You will need an ability to analyse what you have read and to communicate your ideas effectively in writing.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Explorations in Prose and Poetry Examination 2 hours and 15 minutes Prose; The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro Howards End - EM Forster Poetry; A selection of poems concerned with work from the Edexcel anthology

Those students who have studied GCSE English Literature will find that the skills they have learned will prove a valuable foundation for further studies at this level.

The first question of the paper is a passage of unseen poetry or prose for comment.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

Unit 2: Explorations in Drama

The course will enable you to:

Coursework 2000-2500 words

• Develop your interest and enjoyment in literature by reading widely

Shakespeare and Drama

• Gain an understanding of the traditions of English Literature

Othello - Shakespeare The Winter’s Tale - Shakespeare

• Communicate your response to a wide variety of texts and respond to texts of different types and periods • Make informed opinions and judgements on literary texts • Gain an understanding of cultural, historical and other influences on texts.

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A Level A Level English Literature (Continued)

A Level Unit 3: Interpretations of prose and Poetry Examination 2 hours and 45 minutes Section A Unprepared Prose or poetry Section B Analytical essay The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald Tess of the d’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy Rapture - Carol Ann Duffy

Unit 4: Reflections in Literary Studies Coursework 2500-3000 words All’s Well that Ends Well - (core text) Shakespeare Persuasion - Jane Austen Dancing at Lughnasa - Brian Friel Either one extended essay or two shorter studies.

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What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Students with AS or A Level English Literature have a wide choice of possible Higher Education and career possibilities. You will learn and use a wide variety of skills during the course. These include writing for a variety of purposes, informed discussion, the expression of independent opinions, intelligent reading, and advanced knowledge of the English language and an awareness of literary tradition. These skills are valuable in their own right and required by Universities and Colleges. English Literature can be studied as a single subject in Higher Education or combined with a wide variety of subjects. It forms a necessary basis for study in any Arts based subject in preparation for History, Modern Languages, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law or Politics. Students of English Literature will usually go on to do a Higher Degree in Humanities and often find themselves working in Journalism, Teaching, the Media or the Law.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

A Level French

Edexcel 9FR01

What better place to study French at AS or A Level than The British School of Paris? In class we place much emphasis on the development of excellence in all four language skills and our teaching is supported at all stages by the vast amount of authentic material readily available.

We use magazines, newspapers, radio, television, cinema and theatre productions on a regular basis. We also introduce the study of literature, with the aim of providing a strong basis for the development of language skills and an in depth appreciation of French culture. Students are encouraged to make full use of resources available locally and in Paris in the choice of their own topic work and in the research needed for those topics. The wealth of opportunities for any student learning French at The British School of Paris is beyond question. The challenge is for each student to benefit to the utmost from this unique situation.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

Students will normally have achieved at least the equivalent of GCSE Grade B in French before taking this course. You will need to feel confident at this level in the four language skills of Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. You must also have some knowledge and understanding of the culture and way of life of the target-language country. You need to be interested in developing this understanding and in exploring in much more depth the topic areas that you will have covered at GCSE.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

The course will help you to develop your general study skills, but most of all you will learn to communicate at a higher level in the language that you have chosen. You will also learn much more about a wide range of aspects of the society or societies in which the language is spoken.

Reading

You will be able to read, understand and extract information from written passages in the target language that are taken from authentic sources, such as magazines and newspapers, reports or books.

Speaking and Writing

You will learn how to write essays or longer pieces and to hold conversations and discussions in the target language. You will learn all the appropriate grammar, words and phrases that will help you to: • Present information in the target language • Organise your arguments • Provide opinions • Analyse your ideas.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Spoken Expression and Response in French

This unit rewards you for your ability to converse in French on a general topic area which you have chosen in advance. You will need to demonstrate that you can engage in a discussion in French that relates to a chosen general topic area and allied subtopics. The first part of the assessment will focus on an Edexcel provided stimulus that links to the chosen general topic area but the conversation will then move away from the stimulus to consider other aspects of the chosen topic area. You will be expected to give relevant and appropriate information, convey opinions, interact and respond to a range of questions. You must choose one of the following general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: Health and fitness • The world around us: travel, tourism, environmental issues and the French speaking world • Education and employment.

Listening

You will be able to listen to, and understand contemporary spoken language and answer questions on what you have heard. The passages that you will learn to listen to will be taken from a range of sources such as news reports on the radio or TV, weather forecasts, announcements, interviews and discussions.

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A Level A Level French (Continued)

The examination is divided into 2 sections: Section A: Requires you to respond to four Edexcel set questions on a stimulus passage related to your chosen general topic area. Section B: Requires the teacher examiner to engage you in a discussion which, although still relating to the same general topic area and its linked subtopics, moves away from the main focus of the stimulus. You will have a 15 minutes preparation period prior to the test and the test itself will last between 8 and 10 minutes.

Unit 2: Understanding and Written Response in French

This unit requires you to understand and convey your understanding of French-language texts and recordings. In addition, you will need to produce an essay to demonstrate an ability to manipulate the French language in continuous writing. You will be expected to recognise and use the French language in a variety of contexts and in relation to a prescribed range of general topic areas. This unit draws upon four general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: Health and fitness

• The world around us: travel, tourism, environmental issues and the French speaking world • Education and employment. This unit is assessed by a written examination of 2 hours and 30 minutes and is divided into 3 sections. Section A: Requires you to listen to a range of authentic recorded French-language material and to retrieve and convey information in the recording by responding to a range of French-language questions. Section B: Requires you to read authentic Frenchlanguage printed materials and to retrieve and convey information by responding to a range of mainly French language test types. Section C: Requires you to write 200-220 words in the form of a letter, report or article based on a short printed French-language stimulus.

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A Level Unit 3: Understanding and Spoken Response in French

This unit requires you to demonstrate the effectiveness of your French-language skills by presenting and taking a clear stance on any issue of your choice. You will be expected to interact effectively with a teacher examiner, defend your views and sustain discussion as the teacher examiner moves the conversation away from your chosen issue. You will be expected to use the language of debate and argument to discuss the issue and will also be assessed for understanding as well as communication and quality of spoken language. The examination will last for 11-13 minutes in all. You first outline your chosen issue for about 1 minute, adopting a definite stance towards the issue. You should then defend and justify your opinions for up to 4 minutes. The teacher examiner will then initiate a spontaneous discussion in which a minimum of two further unpredictable areas of discussion will be covered.

Unit 4: Research, Understanding and Written Response in French This unit requires you to demonstrate skills in advanced level French writing (discursive or creative essay) and translation from English into French. The unit also requires you to demonstrate evidence of independent, advanced level French-language reading and research of a chosen text, play, film or topic area that links to the culture and/or society of a French-speaking country, countries or community.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

The content of this unit will be linked to the following general topic areas:

language course at AS or A Level is an excellent step towards achieving your goals.

• Youth culture and concerns

For students who are of native or near native competence we offer a ‘fast track’ route to full A Level qualification and a possibility to extend beyond A Level competence in Year 12 and Year 13 with the opportunity to prepare for the DALF (Diplôme Approfondi de la Langue Française).

• Lifestyle: Health and fitness • The world around us: travel, tourism, environmental issues and the French-speaking world • Education and employment • Customs, traditions, beliefs and religions • National and international events; past, present and future • Literature and the Arts. This unit is assessed by an examination of 2 hours and 30 minutes and is divided into three sections. Section A: A short written translation exercise to test your ability to transfer meaning from English into French effectively. Section B: A French language essay in response to one from a choice of seven questions, linked to the prescribed general topic areas that invite either discursive or creative writing.

The DALF is a prestigious and internationally recognised Diploma which exempts students who may wish to apply for a French University course from having to sit an entry language test. The DALF is also a challenging and highly stimulating qualification which requires a remarkable degree of sophistication in the French language. In order to succeed in this examination, students need to demonstrate skills of analysis and synthesis; they are also required to sit an oral examination in front of a jury. Discuss with the Language Department if you feel you fit this category. You will need to opt for French in list B - Extension/Support.

Section C: A research-based essay in French (240 to 270 words) to reward you for French-language research skills linked to an area of interest to you that relates to the culture and/or society of a Frenchlanguage country, countries or community. You have freedom to determine the content of your research (potentially in negotiation with your teacher) but it must relate to the four research-based essay topic areas for this unit.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

There will be a range of opportunities open to you, where you can continue to use and further develop your language skills and knowledge of contemporary society. Some students choose to do degree courses in Languages; others choose to pursue a Higher Education course in another subject, but choose a language option alongside it. Having a language at AS or A Level will certainly improve your employability, in particular with companies which have international branches. Whether you are interested in continuing your studies or working at home or abroad, a

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A Level A Level Geography

Edexcel 9GE01

Geography is renowned for its transferable skills. Geography gives you the opportunity to develop your ICT skills as well as interpreting maps, graphs, statistics, satellite images and photos. Using GIS now forms an integral part of the A level course.

Field work is mandatory and encourages independent learning and critical thinking. Group work and debates are part of the programme as well as decision making and developing analytical skills.

• Rural deprivation studies have been carried out during fieldwork in France, England, Iceland, Scotland, Spain, Guilin (Southern China) and Morocco.

Within the school we have three large dedicated classrooms with full access to the laboratories and ICT rooms. An automatic digital weather station has now been put in place for investigating local climates. There is a specialist library within the Department to supplement the School Library.

The costs of these trips are not included in the school fees.

As a compulsory part of the Geography course, we have carried out fieldwork studies in many richly diverse locations throughout the world: • Urban fieldwork has been carried out by our pupils in Shanghai, Barcelona, Paris and Marrakech. • The ‘Kasbah’ field centre in the High Atlas Mountains, amid striking scenery, has provided a spectacular back drop to river studies. Flash floods have also been studied in the The Lake District, North East Spain, Isle of Arran and the Cevennes in Southern France. • We have also studied downstream changes in rivers in Morocco, Iceland, Spain, France, Scotland and England.

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What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

It is not a requirement that you should have studied Geography at GCSE in order to take an AS level or A level course in the subject. Several topics covered in the course build upon work covered at GCSE, but others are new. What is more important is that A level students should have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in the environment and current affairs, a willingness to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. Those students who have studied GCSE Geography will find that the material and the skills they have learned will prove a valuable foundation for further studies at this level.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course? You will consider the following questions:

• What are the forces influencing our natural


6th Form Curriculum Guide

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A Level A Level Geography (Continued)

environment - the landscapes, the plants and animals, and the weather and climate? • What are the issues affecting people and the places where they live? How are cities and the countryside changing? Why are they changing? How can that change be managed to improve the quality of life? • How are people affecting the environment we all live in? What are the opportunities, the challenges and the constraints? • What are the economic forces that drive the world economy, and how they are changing? • What decisions are being made about the use and management of resources, and who makes these decisions?

• Crowded coasts

• Rebranding places Unit 2 is assessed by a one hour and 15 minutes written paper based on coastal, urban and rural fieldwork you have carried out. This unit carries 40% of the AS qualification.

A Level At A2, candidates will continue to study a combination of social, environmental, economic and physical geography. Unit 3: contested planet:

There are six compulsory units of study

You will also gain an appreciation of current events and world problems such as the effects of natural hazards and the plight of refugees, learn how to plan a fieldwork investigation – the collection of primary and secondary evidence and how to analyse it and develop the ability to make links and connections across a wide variety of topics.

• Energy security

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

• The technological fix.

AS: All AS geographers will study both Human and Physical core topics Unit 1: Global Challenges • Global hazards, including tectonic hazards, geomorphicological hazards and climatic hazards

• Water conflicts • Biodiversity under threat • Super power geographies • Bridging the development gap

Unit 3 will be assessed by a two hour written paper including two essay questions and a synoptic paper. This unit carries 60% of the A2 exam.

Unit 4: Geographical research

Students choose one out of the following six topics: 1. Tectonic activity and hazards. 2. Cold environments; landscapes and change.

• Climate change; its causes, impacts, predictions and mitigation strategies.

3. Life on the margins; the food supply problem.

• Globalisation.

5. Pollution and human health at risk.

• World cities.

6. Consuming the rural landscape; leisure and tourism.

• Global challenges for the future.

Candidates are required to undertake research and if possible, investigative fieldwork to enable them to write a report essay under exam conditions.

Unit 1 will be assessed by a one hour and thirty minute written examination. The questions are structured and include data response questions and includes an extended essay question. This unit carries 60% of the marks at AS.

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Unit 2: Geographical Investigations

4. The world of cultural diversity.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

A Level German

Edexcel 9GN01

German is a demanding yet rewarding AS or A Level course at The British School of Paris. Groups are small and students benefit from individual attention. Much emphasis is placed on the development of practical competence in all the four skill areas and German is used as much as possible for communication in the classroom.

Our teaching is based on the desire to create an authentic language learning environment and German materials, magazines, newspapers, radio, websites and television are exploited to the full. German literature is also studied to help extend students’ appreciation of German culture.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

Students will normally have achieved at least the equivalent of GCSE Grade B in German before taking this course. You will need to feel confident at this level in the four language skills of Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. You must also have some knowledge and understanding of the culture and way of life of the target-language country. You need to be interested in developing this understanding and exploring in much more depth the topic areas that you will have covered at GCSE.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

The course will help you to develop your general study skills, but most of all you will learn to communicate at a higher level in German. You will also learn much more about a wide range of aspects of the society or societies in which the language is spoken.

Reading

You will be able to read, understand and extract information from written passages in the target language that are taken from authentic sources, such as magazines and newspapers, reports or books.

• Provide opinions • Analyse your ideas.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Spoken Expression and Response in German

This unit rewards you for your ability to converse in German on a general topic area which you have chosen in advance. You will need to demonstrate that you can engage in a discussion in German that relates to a chosen general topic area and allied subtopics. The first part of the assessment will focus on an Edexcel provided stimulus that links to the chosen general topic area, but the conversation will then move away from the stimulus to consider other aspects of the chosen topic area. You will be expected to give relevant and appropriate information, convey opinions, interact and respond to a range of questions. You must choose one of the following general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: Health and fitness • The world around us: travel, tourism, environmental issues and the German speaking world • Education and employment.

Listening

You will be able to listen to, and understand contemporary spoken language and answer questions on what you have heard. The passages that you will learn to listen to will be taken from a range of sources such as news reports on the radio or TV, weather forecasts, announcements, interviews and discussions.

Speaking and Writing

You will learn how to write essays or longer pieces and to hold conversations and discussions in the target language. You will learn all the appropriate grammar, words and phrases that will help you to: • Present information in the target language • Organise your arguments

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A Level A Level German (Continued)

The examination is divided into 2 sections:

A Level

Section A: Requires you to respond to four Edexcel set questions on a stimulus passage related to your chosen general topic area.

Unit 3: Understanding and Spoken Response in German

Section B: Requires the teacher examiner to engage you in a discussion which, although still relating to the same general topic area and its linked subtopics, moves away from the main focus of the stimulus. You will have a 15 minutes preparation period prior to the test and the test itself will last between 8 and 10 minutes.

Unit 2: Understanding and Written Response in German This unit requires you to understand and convey your understanding of German-language texts and recordings. In addition, you will need to produce an essay to demonstrate an ability to manipulate the German language in continuous writing. You will be expected to recognise and use the German language in a variety of contexts and in relation to a prescribed range of general topic areas. This unit draws upon four general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: Health and fitness • The world around us: travel, tourism, environmental issues and the German speaking world • Education and employment. This unit is assessed by an examination of 2 hours and 30 minutes and is divided into three sections. Section A: Requires you to listen to a range of authentic recorded German-language material and to retrieve and convey information in the recording by responding to a range of German-language questions. Section B: Requires you to read authentic Germanlanguage printed materials and to retrieve and convey information by responding to a range of mainly German language test types. Section C: Requires you to write 200-220 words in the form of a letter, report or article based on a short printed German-language stimulus.

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This unit requires you to demonstrate the effectiveness of your German-language skills by presenting and taking a clear stance on any issue of your choice. You will be expected to interact effectively with a teacher examiner, defend your views and sustain discussion as the teacher examiner moves the conversation away from your chosen issue. You will be expected to use the language of debate and argument to discuss the issue and will also be assessed for understanding as well as communication and quality of spoken language. The examination will last for 11-13 minutes in all. You first outline your chosen issue for about 1 minute, adopting a definite stance towards the issue. You should then defend and justify your opinions for up to 4 minutes. The teacher examiner will then initiate a spontaneous discussion in which a minimum of two further unpredictable areas of discussion will be covered.

Unit 4: Research, Understanding and Written Response in German This unit requires you to demonstrate skills in advanced level German writing (discursive or creative essay) and translation from English into German. The unit also requires you to demonstrate evidence of independent, advanced level German-language reading and research of a chosen text, play, film or topic area that links to the culture and/or society of a German-speaking country, countries or community. The content of this unit will be linked to the following general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: Health and fitness • The world around us: travel, tourism, environmental issues and the German speaking world • Education and employment • Customs, traditions, beliefs and religions


6th Form Curriculum Guide

• National and international events; past, present and future

must relate to the four research-based essay topic areas for this unit.

• Literature and the Arts.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

This unit is assessed by an examination of 2 hours and 30 minutes and is divided into three sections. Section A: A short written translation exercise to test your ability to transfer meaning from English into German effectively. Section B: A German language essay in response to one from a choice of seven questions, linked to the prescribed general topic areas that invite either discursive or creative writing. Section C: A research-based essay in German (240 to 270 words) to reward you for German-language research skills linked to an area of interest to you that relates to the culture and/or society of a Germanlanguage country, countries or community. You have freedom to determine the content of your research (potentially in negotiation with your teacher) but it

There will be a range of opportunities open to you, where you can continue to use and further develop your language skills and knowledge of contemporary society. Some students choose to do degree courses in languages; others choose to pursue a Higher Education course in another subject, but choose a language option alongside it. Having a language at AS or A Level will certainly improve your employability, in particular with companies which have international branches. Whether you are interested in continuing your studies or working at home or abroad, a language course at AS or A Level is an excellent step towards achieving your goals.

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A Level A Level Government and Politics

Edexcel 9GP01

Government and Politics is an exciting course for the Sixth Form at The British School of Paris. It will allow you to develop a critical awareness of the nature of politics and the relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes. It will also help you to acquire knowledge of Government and Politics and of the rights and responsibilities of individuals.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

This subject does not require you to have any previous study experience in Politics or other Social Sciences. It is more important that you have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in politics and current affairs, a desire to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. Government and Politics continues to be a very popular subject at University Level and is regarded highly by University Admissions. We hope to organise educational visits to London, The Houses of Parliament and conferences relating to Political Science. The costs of these trips are in addition to the school fees.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

The course will enable students to develop a critical awareness of the nature of politics and the relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes. You will learn and use a variety of transferable skills throughout the course. These include collecting and analysing information and evaluating different political ideas and systems. Your written communication skills will develop greatly, as will your ability to question information given to you. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, universities and colleges as being of great value.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: People and Politics

This unit introduces students to the study of politics by looking at the central ideas of citizenship, democracy and participation, and by examining the representative process in the UK. Studying these topics will enable you to understand the answers to important questions in government and politics such as:

This unit provides an introduction to the major institutions of the UK Government, examines their relationships with one another and considers their effectiveness. Studying these topics will enable you to answer important questions in government and politics such as: • What is the role of the House of Commons? • What is cabinet government and how does it work in the UK? • How powerful are Prime Ministers? • Do Judges uphold civil liberties effectively? This unit will be assessed by an examination lasting 1 hour and 20 minutes. There will be two structured questions from a choice of four.

A Level The full Advanced GCE qualification is made up of the two AS units plus two more units which are studied at A2 level.

Route C – Politics in the USA Unit 3: (Topic C): Representative Processes in the USA This unit examines the representative process of the US political system and considers its adequacy in terms of popular participation and full democracy. The topics covered are: • Elections and voting • Political parties • Pressure groups • Racial and ethnic policies.

• What are the main functions of political parties?

This unit will be assessed by an examination lasting 1 hour and 30 minutes. There will be three short questions from a choice of five and one question from a choice of three essays.

• What are the rights and responsibilities of citizens?

Unit 4: (Topic C): Governing the USA

• Why is it important to exercise the right to vote?

• How do pressure groups exert influence? This unit will be assessed by an examination lasting 1 hour and 20 minutes. There will be two structured questions from a choice of four.

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Unit 2: Governing the UK

This unit examines the institutional framework of the US Government and considers the inter-relationships between its legislative, executive and judicial processes and the health of US Federalism.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

The topics covered are: • Constitution • Supreme court • Congress • Presidency. This unit will be assessed by an examination lasting 1 hour and 30 minutes. There will be two short questions from a choice of five and one question from a choice of three essays.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Students with AS or Advanced GCE Government and Politics have access to a wide range of possible careers and Higher Education opportunities. Government and Politics combines well with a range of Science, Social Science and Humanities subjects to lead to university courses in such areas as Business, Economics, Law, Media, Philosophy and, of course, Politics.

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A Level A Level History

Edexcel 9HI01

The History Department at The British School of Paris combines a dynamic teaching approach with the reinforcement of traditional skills of research and essay-writing. A Level History classes are small and students are offered the opportunity for in depth research using the excellent resources available.

Students are encouraged to read widely around the subject and to use weekends to visit the many places of historical interest in and around Paris. One of the key themes that connects the history units together over the AS and A2 courses is revolutionary change. A look at the images on this page might provoke a thought or two about the link between these leaders and revolutionary change. Lenin, Mao, Ho Chi Min and Britain’s own Henry VIII all caused a transformation in the way their countries were ruled. You might be thinking what the Wall Street

that they use to discuss their ideas • To understand the nature of historical evidence and the methods used by historians to analyse and evaluate it • To develop an understanding of how the past has been interpreted and represented • To express your own historical ideas confidently and effectively.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

Students have the opportunity to follow a specification that has been designed to ensure length, depth and breadth and to enable students to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required to achieve the AS and A2 qualifications.

AS Unit 1: Historical Themes in Depth Crash has to do with these famous or infamous men. Yet, the Great Depression which followed had its own revolutionary effect upon how the USA governs its people.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

It is not a requirement that you have studied History at GCSE in order to take AS or GCE Advanced course in the subject. A number of the topics offered for study are developments from GCSE, but there are also plenty of topics offered which are likely to be new to most students. It is more important that you have an enquiring mind, an interest in the past and its relevance to current affairs and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. Those students who have studied History GCSE will find that the skills they have learned and the knowledge they have acquired will form a solid foundation for further studies at AS and A Level.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course? During your course you will learn:

• About the significance of events, individuals, issues and societies in history

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Option D: A World Divided: Communism and Democracy in the 20th Century. D2 Mao’s China, 1949 -76, D6: Ideology, Conflict and Retreat: the USA in Asia, 1950-73 This option concentrates on themes of contrasting ideologies, with particular emphasis on how Communism developed and, in some societies, succeeded in overthrowing existing authority in the first half of the 20th century. This option also concentrates on how the USA responded to the challenge of Communism during that time and on the development of and challenges to democracy in the USA. China under Mao and the USA in Asia enable students to understand the importance of ideas and beliefs in the policies developed by states, how and why ideology is frequently a cause of both challenge and conflict, within and between states, and also gives rise to debates about the rights of citizens.

Assessment:

Written examination: 1 hour and 20 minutes Candidates will be required to answer two questions worth 30 marks each;

• How and why societies have changed over time

One question must be taken from D2 and one from D6

• About the theories of historians and the language

The questions will require candidates to present


6th Form Curriculum Guide

historical explanations and assess their significance in the historical context of events, individuals’ ideas, attitudes and/or beliefs, and the ways in which they influenced behaviours and action.

Unit 2: British History Depth Studies

Option A1: Early Modern British History: Crown and Authority – Henry VIII: Authority, Nation and Religion, 1509-40. Students will study British history in some depth. Grounded in an exploration of source material in its historical context, this unit enables students to develop an in-depth understanding of the attitudes, beliefs and structures of the societies they study. Working with selected sources, students will be required to demonstrate evidence skills which enable them to make reasoned and supported judgements and to address a historical view or claim.

Assessment:

Written examination: 1 hour and 20 minutes. Within each option paper, candidates are required to answer two source-based questions on Henry VIII. The first question is worth 20 marks and will focus on reaching a judgement by analysis, cross-referencing and evaluating source material. The second question is worth 40 marks and will ask candidates to address an historical view or claim using two sources in conjunction with their own knowledge. A choice of questions will be provided for each topic.

A Level Unit 3: The United States, 1917-54: Boom, Bust and Recovery. • The economy of the United States in the 1920s

• Political and social tensions, 1917-33: the Ku Klux Klan; Prohibition and organised crime; immigration policy; the Red Scare • Opposition to Roosevelt as President, 1933-45

b) How successful was the impact of the New Deal to 1941? This unit is assessed by a written examination of 2 hours.

Unit 4: The Making of Modern Russia, 18561964.

Similarities and differences between the rule of the Tsars and communist rule and the impact on the peasantry of the main economic changes throughout the period. • The nature of Tsarist rule in Russia, 1856-1917 • The structure of the Soviet system • The attempt to reform Stalin’s Russia to 1964 • A comparison between dictators, communist leaders and Tsars. This unit is assessed by coursework of 4000 words.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Students who study AS or A Level History have access to a wide range of career and Higher Education opportunities. By the end of your course you will have learned how to evaluate and analyse information, how to weigh up evidence and how to communicate complex ideas effectively. These skills are recognised and valued by employers, Universities and Colleges. History combines well with Maths and Science subjects to create an attractive portfolio of qualifications, enabling a student to move on to a University Sciencebased course. Combined with English and a Modern Foreign Language it would provide a good basis for an Arts or Languages-based Degree. History provides an excellent foundation for a number of popular careers including Journalism, Law and Business.

• The USA, 1941-54: the impact of war and the significance of anti-communism. Associated controversies; a) Why did the United States suffer such a serious depression in the years 1929-33?

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A Level A Level History of Art

AQA 2250

The British School of Paris offers an excellent opportunity to study History of Art in the unique surroundings of Paris. History of Art is an exciting multi-faceted subject that studies the process of artistic creation and the meaning of works of art. In seeking to give our students knowledge of the roles and achievements of past and contemporary artists, they learn to understand and appreciate works of art from the perfection of Greek sculpture to the expressive beauty of Picasso and modern art.

The course concentrates on painting, sculpture, and architecture and includes visits to important collections.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

History of Art is assessed by formal essays so you will have to be prepared to be exact and careful in your writing. Lessons are illustrated by an interactive whiteboard and PowerPoint. In fact, technology plays an important role and the department has developed a new online learning facility to help you research and analyse important works of painting, sculpture and architecture both at school and home. We often go outside the school - to museums, galleries and churches – and to places outside the country such as Rome. The cost of the trips to Italy is in addition to the school fees. You must be prepared to develop a genuine interest in art and history and find pleasure in discussion.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

History of Art teaches you to think differently. It teaches you to ask interesting questions, to reject standard answers and conventional wisdom, to look beyond surfaces and obvious appearances, to see nuances and shades of grey. Art History will help you develop skills in visual analysis and critical reading; you will learn to build solid arguments and to express your ideas effectively, both verbally and in writing. This training will not only help you if you want to become an art historian; it will also enhance your ability to practice a wide range of difference professions. Moreover, History of Art is closely connected with other A Level subjects. Pupils studying Art will already have some experience of the history of their subject and will be familiar from personal experience with the materials of art; oil paint, pastel or acrylic. Students of History will find a major reinforcement and extension of their subject in the study of Art. AS/A Level Historians benefited from accompanying a recent History of Art visit to London. Students of English will find a great deal of common ground in the composition of formal essays and in the description, comparison and analysis of works of art. The subject can also help develop and improve the standard of written English since close attention is paid to the students’ written work. Students interested in

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French, Spanish or German will find an extension and reinforcement of their study by considering the works of art of their country of study; the Spain of Goya, or the Germany of Albrecht Dürer. Those with an interest in Technology will find much to learn from the study of new techniques constantly used in art and design, from the Eiffel Tower to the Stade de France.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Visual Analysis and Interpretation

This exciting module focuses upon the formal structure of works of architecture, sculpture and painting. The unit teaches students how to look at, think about and engage in critical discussion of the visual arts. Rather than an historical survey it is an analytical study of a number of monuments and artists, which in turn helps to cultivate an appreciation of visual language and an understanding of subject specific terminology. This unit is assessed by a written examination of 1 hour.

Unit 2: Themes in History of Art

This fascinating module enables students to develop a sense of the chronology of Western art from Antiquity to the present. We look at artists and architects drawn from classical Greece to the end of the twentieth century. Study of particular themes such as patronage, form and style, historical and social contexts as well as materials, techniques and processes is also made central to this engaging introduction to Art History. This unit is assessed by a written examination of 1 hour and 30 minutes.

A Level Unit 3: Art and Architecture in NineteenthCentury Europe

This engaging topic investigates European painting, sculpture and architecture in the nineteenth century. We study different styles, movements and artistic groups from Neoclassicism to Symbolism. At the heart of this period is Impressionism and Post Impressionism which The British School of Paris is ideally situated to study. Candidates will become aware of the


6th Form Curriculum Guide

predecessors of the Impressionists and of the evolution of plein-air techniques, of scientific theories of colour, and of the influence of photography and of Japanese prints. The major figures studied are Monet, Renoir, Degas, Manet, Rodin and Courbet. Students learn about the relationship between Manet and the Impressionists, the Parisian paintings of Caillebotte, and Cézanne’s works produced under the influence of Pissarro as well as Seurat’s Une Baignade, Asinères and Un Dimanche Après-Midi à l’Ile de la Grande Jatte. The changing face of Paris from 1852 under Baron Haussmann and the creation of new spaces for leisure and entertainment are also considered; the boulevard, the café-concert, the train station and outdoor places of pleasure were amongst the new experiences that the artists of the period sought to capture. This unit is assessed by a written examination of 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Unit 4: Art and Architecture in Sixteenth Century Europe – High Renaissance and Mannerism

This absorbing study of the Italian Renaissance is closely linked to our obligatory trips to Florence and Rome to study the artistic achievements of these great cities in context. In addition to Michelangelo’s painting, sculpture and architecture, other major figures including Raphael, Bramante and Sebastiano del Piombo are studied. Themes explored include Papal patronage (especially that of Julius II), urban improvement, church building, palazzo, painted narrative and decorative cycles in religious and private buildings, the concept of the High Renaissance and the emergence of Mannerist tendencies.

galleries. They may become teachers or work in public or private institutions dealing with heritage, exhibitions, environment or tourism. Increasingly there is work to be found in the commercial art world. The arts and culture industry, in all its forms, is a major contributor to the prosperity of both France and Great Britain. History of Art is a practical choice at A Level - besides the pleasure of personal learning - it encourages clarity of thought, exactness of expression and skill in informed communication. The commercial world of the 21st Century is highly visual. The marketing and advertising world is constantly seeking the visually aware. One important aim of History of Art is to produce visual literacy; the ability to assess images of all kinds critically and perceptively and discover proof. This unique combination of visual sensitivity and intellectual rigour has proven valuable in areas such as journalism, advertising, publishing, law and film and television work. More directly related careers include those in teaching and research, conservation and restoration, museum and gallery administration, commercial galleries and auction houses. It must be remembered too that many students study the subject at school but go on to further study in a wide range of other subjects some of which relate to History of Art such as art therapy, archaeology, anthropology and architecture.

This unit is assessed by a written examination of 1 hour and 30 minutes

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

History of Art provides a sound basis for progression to higher education and employment. History of Art will provide you with excellent preparation for further specialisation in a range of areas at degree level. History of Art can be studied as a single subject at university or can be combined with many other subjects ranging from the humanities to design and media studies. Graduates in this subject can follow an academic career or find work in museums and

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A Level AS & A2 Level in Information and Communication Technology

AQA 2520

With Information & Communication Technology (ICT) impacting many aspects of our daily lives, the ability to use information systems to a high level becomes an invaluable skill in both academic study and many aspects of our working lives.

At AS level the two units are complementary and aim to develop students’ ability to use ICT to solve problems, together with an understanding of the opportunities and impact of ICT in modern life. Students will be able to use a wide range of software and hardware to create solutions and develop their skills. At A level in the second year, students study the concepts associated with the use of ICT in the real world, as well as making practical use of this knowledge. They’ll have the opportunity to work alongside people from organisations outside their school or college - in real, or realistic, environments and to work on projects that interest them, developing valuable life skills of project management and working co-operatively with others. This specification is designed to encourage candidates to: • work co-operatively and manage projects • develop personal learning and thinking skills • provide quality ICT-based solutions to a range of realistic problems • develop an awareness of developments in technology The AQA specification has recently been updated to reflect changes in the ICT environment and has the backing of a range of industries, higher education and the National Computing Centre. The specification allows greater opportunities for practical work that can be carried out using a wide range of software and hardware. The course is designed for students who wish to go on to higher education or to the world of work where understanding how ICT can be used in society and organisations, and the implications of its use, will be a valuable asset.

What do I need to know or be able to before taking this course?

To study Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at AS or A level you will normally be expected to have achieved a high grade in GCSE ICT particularly since the practical coursework elements build on skills learnt at GCSE, students should also have a good standard of Maths and English at GCSE. The most important factor however is that you have an interest in, and are enthusiastic about Information and Communication Technology.

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What will I learn on this AS/A level course? • The study of ICT at AS/A level will enable you to learn about the administration and management of Information and Communication Technology systems.

• You will learn a good deal of technical background knowledge to support your study of the running of Information and Communication Technology systems. • The course is designed to encourage you to develop your problem solving skills and examine your solutions not only from an academic, but also from an ethical or social point of view. • You will need to apply the theory of managing and developing ICT systems into practice at AS level to produce project work to be taken into the examination and at A2 level to be submitted as an assessed coursework module.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

At AS, the two units are complementary and are concerned with applying ICT to solve problems and the study of the opportunities for and affects of using ICT in the world today. Candidates will have the opportunity to put into practice a wide range of software and hardware to create solutions to solve problems. At A2, students will study the concepts associated with the use of ICT in the 21st century. They will also have opportunities for acquiring skills needed in the IT profession such as co-operative working and project management. These practical skills can be developed in areas of ICT that are of interest to them. Students can also use these newly acquired skills as a springboard into other qualifications and working environments.

AS AS Unit 1: Practical Problem Solving in the Digital World INFO1 This unit includes practical use of ICT, identifying, designing, producing, testing, documenting and evaluating solutions. Data entry, storage, output of information, use of software, current health and safety legislation. The examination consists of a 1½ hr question paper/answer booklet examination,


6th Form Curriculum Guide

externally marked by AQA. Section A: short answer questions; Section B: 3 or more structured questions requiring discursive answers. All questions are compulsory, and the paper comprises 50% of the total AS marks 25% of the total A-level marks. In the course of studying this module, students gain practical experience of using a wide range of hardware, software and communication technologies in a structured way, so that they can apply transferable skills, knowledge and understanding gained from this practical work to the solution of problems. Candidates must take into the examination room sample project work to which they must refer in the course of the examination.

AS Unit 2: Living in the Digital World INFO2

This unit includes ICT systems, their components, uses, users, safety and security. Data and information, data transfer, backup and recovery. The examination consists of a 1½ hr question paper/answer booklet examination, externally marked by AQA. Section A: short answer questions; Section B: 3 or more structured questions requiring discursive answers. All questions are compulsory, and the paper comprises 50% of the total AS marks 25% of the total A-level marks. Unit 2 is designed to give students the wider picture of the use of ICT, to enable the understanding of basic terms and concepts involved in the study of the subject. Students should be able to discuss and comment on issues from a position of knowledge and they can only do this if they have the knowledge and understanding that underpins the subject.

A Level A Level Unit 3: The Use of ICT in the Digital World INFO3

This unit includes the study of developments in technology, information needs of organisations, ICT systems, and management of ICT. Developing ICT systems, introducing large ICT systems into organisations and training and supporting users of ICT systems. This module looks at the fast changing subject of ICT, including developments in technology and ICT system capabilities, and how this might affect the world that makes use of ICT. The content is designed to address issues associated with the management of ICT and its use within organisations. The examination consists of a 2hr Question paper/

answer booklet examination that is externally marked by AQA. Section A: structured questions based on pre-release ‘case study’ material; Section B: questions requiring extended prose answers. All questions are compulsory. This unit comprises 60% of the total A2 marks 30% of the total A’ level marks.

A Level Unit 4: Practical Issues Involved in the Use of ICT in the Digital World INFO4

This unit includes practical issues involved in managing the use of ICT in organisations; investigating, analysing, defining requirements; selecting and using appropriate technologies, designing solutions, methods for testing and installation, documenting and evaluating. Students produce a written project report based upon their practical work/investigation. The report will be internally marked and externally moderated by AQA. This module provides candidates with the opportunity to complete a project involving the production of an ICT-related system over an extended period of time and in so doing candidates will enhance their transferable practical skills. This comprises 40% of the total A2 marks 20% of the total A level marks.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

A Level ICT is an exciting and ever changing course. Students acquire technical and personal skills which complement other A Level subjects. Whether you wish to pursue a career in an ICT related industry, or whether you are merely interested in the subject, this course offers a strong foundation for further study at university, or a path which leads straight to employment.

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A Level A Level Mathematics and Further Mathematics

AQA 6361 AQA 6371

Mathematics is an important and useful discipline; its special power lies in its capacity not just to describe and explain but also to solve and predict. The subject itself is an endless source of wonder and delight.

To encourage all pupils to be brave and robust when faced with challenging situations, the AS/A Level mathematicians enter the UKMT Senior Challenge; a postal competition sent from the University of Leeds with the intention of inspiring the talented maths pupils. The BSP also sends teams to represent the school at the annual International Schools Maths Competition. This is a prestigious event involving approximately 180 of the best maths students from a variety of International Schools in Europe.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

The Department welcomes all pupils wishing to embark upon A Level or AS Level Mathematics courses. The warm welcome is however accompanied with a clear warning; experience has shown that only strong Maths students (grades A* or A at GCSE) are successful with A Level Mathematics. Algebra skills are particularly important. Further Mathematics builds on and extends the work of A Level Mathematics. The techniques studied are more challenging and are an excellent preparation for students considering Mathematics, Computing Science, Engineering or Economics courses at Oxbridge or other top Universities.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course? While studying Mathematics you will learn to:

• Use Mathematical skills and knowledge to solve a multitude of problems • Resolve complicated situations by using Mathematical arguments and logic. You will also have to understand and demonstrate what is meant by proof in Mathematics • Simplify real life situations so that you can use Mathematics to show what is happening and what might happen in different circumstances • Use Mathematics to solve problems that are given to you in a real-life context • Use calculator technology and other resources (such as formulae booklets or statistical tables) effectively and appropriately; understand limitations and when it is inappropriate to use such technology. Mathematics and Further Mathematics at AS and A

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Level cover 4 branches of mathematics. The major branch is pure Mathematics and there are 3 applied branches: Statistics, Mechanics and Decision Maths.

Pure Mathematics

When you study Pure Mathematics at AS and A Level, you will be extending your knowledge of such topics as Algebra and Trigonometry as well as learning some brand new ideas such as Calculus. If you enjoyed the challenge of problem solving at GCSE using algebra and trigonometry then you should find the prospect of this course very appealing. Although many of the ideas you will meet in pure Mathematics are interesting in their own right, they also serve as an important foundation for other branches of Mathematics, especially Mechanics and Statistics.

Mechanics

When you study Mechanics you will learn how to describe mathematically the motion of objects and how they respond to forces acting upon them, from cars in the street to satellites revolving around a planet. You will learn the technique of mathematical modelling; that is, of turning a complicated physical problem into a simpler one that can be analysed and solved using mathematical methods. Many of the ideas you will meet in the course form an almost essential introduction to such important modern fields of study as Cybernetics, Robotics, Biomechanics and Sports Science, as well as the more traditional areas of Engineering and Physics.

Statistics

When you study statistics you will learn how to analyse and summarise numerical data in order to arrive at conclusions about it. You will extend the range of probability problems that you started for GCSE by using the new mathematical techniques studied on the Pure Mathematics course. Many of the ideas you will meet in this course have applications in a wide range of other fields - from assessing what your car insurance is going to cost to how likely the earth is going to be hit by a comet in the next few years.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Decision Mathematics

When you study Decision Mathematics you will learn, amongst other things, how to solve problems involving networks. Problems might include finding the shortest route by road from one city to another or perhaps the cheapest way of laying telephone cables to connect towns. You meet a range of methods and algorithms, which enable such problems to be tackled. Many of the ideas you will meet in this course have important applications in very different areas such as in electronic circuits and the scheduling of tasks in the Construction Industry.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification? The examination modules you will need to take are shown below: Each module is assessed with a 90 minute written paper. A Level Physics students take the Mechanics Modules whilst students not taking Physics opt for the Statistics Modules.

Further Mathematics offers a wider choice of exam modules: Further Pure 1 to Further Pure 3 as well as Mechanics, Statistics and Decision Modules.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

An AS in Mathematics is very valuable as a supporting subject to many courses at A Level and degree level, especially in Science, Geography, Psychology, Sociology and Medical courses. A Level Mathematics is a much sought after qualification for entry to a wide variety of full-time courses in Higher Education. There are also many areas of employment that see a Mathematics A Level as an important qualification and it is often a requirement for the vocational qualifications related to these areas. Higher Education courses or careers that either require A Level Mathematics or that are strongly related include: • Economics • Medicine • Architecture • Engineering • Accountancy • Teaching • Psychology • Environmental Studies • Computing • Information and Communication Technology.

AS Mathematics

Core 1, Core 2 plus Mechanics 1 or Statistics 1

A Level Mathematics

Core 3, Core 4 plus Mechanics 2 or Statistics 2

AS Further Mathematics

Further Pure 1, Decision 1 and Statistics 1

AS and A Level Further Mathematics are prestigious qualifications and expected of students applying for Maths related courses at top universities.

A Level Further Mathematics

Further Pure 2, Further Pure 3 and Mechanics 3

If you wanted to continue your study of Mathematics after A Level you could follow a course in Mathematics at degree level or even continue further as a postgraduate and become involved in mathematical research.

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A Level A Level Music

Edexcel 9MU01

The study of Music at AS/A Level draws together the elements of Performing, Composing, Listening and Analysing and all classroom work will focus upon these elements.

The location of the school, situated as it is in the western suburbs of Paris, is of enormous benefit to music students as Paris is a wonderful resource for musicians. As a concert-going venue, the city offers almost an unlimited variety of music. Music for choir and orchestra is performed regularly in the many churches, the smaller churches offer chamber music performances, the major radio and television networks broadcast live from their Paris studios and these concerts are open to the public. The larger concert halls in Paris present concerts by worldfamous performers, and of course, the Paris Opera is renowned the world over. There are many music societies, which promote concerts and competitions in many diverse venues. Jazz, Blues, and Popular music venues are equally abundant. Our students perform regularly in the Paris International Flute Festival and our orchestra performs in St. Michael’s Church in the 8th arrondissement. Paris is a rich resource, but it is by no means the only jewel in the crown. More locally the town of Croissy places a particular emphasis on cultural events. Life in France is very much town-based and the school is often involved in musical events within Croissy our groups perform in the town’s cultural events and festivals such as the Fête de la Carotte in September, the Mayor’s New Year Celebrations and the European Day celebrations in May. Le Vésinet, our neighbouring town, has a thriving musical scene and several of our students perform with the town orchestra and big band. Other nearby towns such as Saint Germain en Laye, Versailles, and Poissy have a well-established programme of concerts. Most of our visiting instrumental teachers have active performing careers in the capital and the surrounding areas and are able to bring their professional expertise with them into the teaching situation. Music is not always strong in French schools, but each town has its own conservatoire, and we have sometimes turned to these institutions to provide tuition on more unusual instruments. The existence of such resources within easy travelling distance of the school offers the opportunity for students to really enhance and enrich their musical education whilst here at The British School of Paris.

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What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

This exciting new course builds upon the foundations laid during the GCSE course and it is therefore useful to have taken Music at GCSE level, but this is not essential as long as you can already play a musical instrument to a reasonable standard (currently Grade 4 ABRSM, Trinity, Rockschool or equivalent exam board), and you are able to read music and have had some experience of composing.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

In this innovative and stimulating new course performing, composing, listening and analytical skills are taught in almost equal measure. You will improve your skills in all these areas and have the possibility of incorporating Music Technology into your work. You will perform music of your choice, compose music in a style which interests you, listen to a wide variety of music and through analysis of set works you will develop a more informed appreciation of how and why it was written and/or performed.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Performing

In this unit you will develop your skills as a musical performer. You can perform on any musical instrument or sing and will have the opportunity to take part in ensemble performances as well as performing solo. You will perform pieces of your choice, in any style, from written notation or improvised, with or without accompaniment, lasting between 5 and 6 minutes. Your teacher assesses this unit through a recording of your work, using assessment grids provided by Edexcel, which will then be moderated externally. At the time of recording during Year 12 you are expected to be performing at grade 5 level of the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music, but you do not need to be taking the Associated Board examination. If your programme is at a higher level than the required grade 5 then you can receive bonus marks under the assessment scheme.

Unit 2: Composing

In this unit you will learn the craft of composing. You will develop musical ideas in the form of an original


6th Form Curriculum Guide

composition composed to a brief set by Edexcel. There are four set briefs which give rise to a very wide choice of musical styles and possibilities. This work is divided into research/preparation and writing. Research and preparation takes place initially and then a period of 15 hours for ‘writing time’ under controlled conditions enables the student to produce the final score on Sibelius. A recording on CD is made and CD sleeve notes are generated by responding to short questions set by Edexcel about the composing process and your intentions. One hour is allowed for the completion of these sleeve notes.

Unit 3: Developing Musical Understanding

The New Anthology of Music forms the basis of the study in this unit. This book is divided into three Areas of Study entitled Instrumental Music; Vocal Music; and Applied Music. Several set works are prescribed for study each year by Edexcel. Throughout the course, you will be expected to develop and improve your listening skills, your analytical skills and your understanding of music in its social and historical context. Assessment of this unit is by a single two hour examination taken at the end of the course. The examination has three equally-timed parts entitled Listening; Investigating Musical Styles; and Understanding Musical Lines. The Listening test uses the set works prescribed by Edexcel. You will listen to recordings on CD and complete answers in your answer booklet whilst referring to a skeleton score of the prescribed work. At AS Level only the Instrumental Music and Vocal Music areas are studied. The Investigating Musical Styles section asks you to provide written responses to questions on either of the two Areas of Study of your choice and to comment on musical features and historical context.

Understanding Musical Lines assesses your ability to use a score to analyse simple harmonic and melodic features in the set works which you have studied, and in the second part of this section you will have to complete a short harmony exercise.

A Level Unit 4: Extended Performance

As the title suggests this unit goes on to extend the work undertaken in Unit 1 of the AS course, and the structure is the same as Unit 1. Now though there is a requirement to perform 12 -15 minutes in a planned programme, and the expected level is grade 6 of the Associated Boards of the Royal Schools of Music. Work of a higher level of difficulty receives bonus marks by scaling, which allows more advanced and confident performers to take full advantage of their skills in this area.

Unit 5: Composition and Technical Study

In this unit you will build on the work of Unit 2 and complete two pieces, which can be a mixture of Technical Studies and Compositions or two of the same. Four composition briefs are set which allow you a wide choice of style. Three Technical Studies are proposed (Baroque counterpoint, Chorale and Popular Song). As in Unit 2 this work is done under controlled conditions, entirely in school. Fourteen hours are allocated for each composition and three hours allocated for the completion of each Technical Study.

Unit 6: Further Musical Understanding

This unit extends the work undertaken in Unit 3 of the AS course. Assessment of this unit is by a single two hour examination taken at the end of the course. The examination has three equally-timed parts entitled Aural Analysis; Music in Context; Continuity and Change in Instrumental Music.

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A Level A Level Music (Continued)

In the Aural Analysis section you will listen to recordings on CD and complete answers in your answer booklet and although the extracts will be based upon the Areas of Study from the New Anthology of Music they will not be taken from the prescribed set works. At this level only the Instrumental Music and Applied Music areas are studied. The Music in Context section asks you to provide written answers to a range of questions about musical features in their historical and social context. There is a choice of questions and you will have access in the examination to a copy of the New Anthology of Music. The Continuity and Change section asks you to provide a longer written answer in continuous prose in response to a question about key musical features and how these illustrate continuity and change between works. Again, there is a choice of questions and you will have access in the examination to a copy of the New Anthology of Music.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

This stimulating and challenging AS/A Level in Music can lead to further study in Music or Performing Arts in Higher Education at Degree Level. This course could be used as part of your Sixth Form studies as an enjoyable alternative to some of the more “writing-based” subjects, or as a means of broadening your studies. The same is true of music in your post-18 studies. It may also lead on to a career in the music industry. Opportunities for a career in performing are artistically rewarding, if not always financially rewarding at the outset. Rock bands, jazz bands, orchestras, smaller ensembles, choirs and the Armed Forces all offer performance opportunities.

Other careers using music can be found in fields such as: • TV and radio • Theatre • Sound recording • Music administration • Music publishing • Music journalism • Music sales • Healthcare (Music Therapy) • Music instrument manufacture, service and repair • Advertising and marketing • Teaching and education • Conducting.

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6th Form Curriculum Guide

AS Photography

8PY01

Photographers capture images that visualise a story or event. Both creative and technical skills help create quality photographs. The AS Photography Course is an endorsement from the Art and Design A level syllabus with Edexcel and focuses on the Digital aspect of photography.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? Students who wish to take up this course should have a keen interest in taking photographs and have gained some knowledge through reading photographic journals and visiting Galleries. It is also desirable that you have a strong sense of creativity and a good technical knowledge with computer graphic packages. Good coordination, organisation and an imagination would also be advantageous for the budding photographer who should also be highly motivated and have the ability to work independently.

What will I learn on this AS Level Course? The photography programme looks at the creative and technical aspects of the art. Areas covered are composition, formal elements, design, software manipulation techniques and processes and using and understanding functions of other equipment.

Theme based projects will give you chance to acquire your own unique style that separates you from others and helps you with developing a portfolio to present your work.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification? Coursework is worth 60% of the marks and the timed examination of 8 hours including eight weeks preparation is worth 40%.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Because of its appeal to many different people, careers in photography are highly competitive. This course would give you the basis to go on to study photography at a higher level. Journalism, Architecture, Commercial/Industrial photography, Professional Photographer (Portraits, Weddings etc) are just a few of the careers that you could choose.

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A Level A Level Physical Education

AQA 2580

Physical activity is a fundamental necessity to enhance a healthy lifestyle and at The British School of Paris we seek to promote this through recreational sport and examination courses. As sport and leisure continues to play an increasingly bigger part in many people’s lives, the new look A Level specification reflects the increased interest in this subject area and covers a wide range of topics that are relevant to both the recreation and elite level performer. A Level PE gives students opportunities to discover the science behind sport and sporting performance, gives an insight into the psychological factors that can affect an athlete and looks at the various social and cultural aspects that have a bearing on how sport is perceived. What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

It is not a requirement that you should have studied Physical Education at GCSE in order to take an AS Level or A Level course in the subject. Several topics covered in the course are developments of work covered at GCSE, but others are new. What is more important is that you should have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in Physical Education, a willingness to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. It is, however, a requirement that any pupil deciding to take A Level PE must be actively involved in at least two sports throughout the year Whilst A Level PE is a very interesting and enjoyable course it is important to emphasise that the majority of the work undertaken is theoretical and that students will spend the majority of their time in the classroom. It is a challenging course that must not be taken lightly.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1: Opportunities for and the Effects of Leading a Healthy and Active Lifestyle (PHED1)

The unit content is divided into three sections, with each section outlining the specific knowledge and understanding required by the student: • Applied exercise physiology. In this section students will cover topic areas such as pulmonary function, transport of blood gases and nutrition. This section also introduces students to the mechanics of movement • Applied skill acquisition. The applied skill acquisition section covers topics such as information processing, learning and performance and the differentiating of skill and ability

• Study applied exercise physiology and discover the effects that exercise and training have upon the systems of the body

• Opportunities for participation. In the opportunities for participation section the course covers area such as equal opportunities, initiatives in sport and the historical and cultural factors that have contributed toward the development of sport.

• Examine the relationships between training and performance

The assessment of this unit is through a 2 hour written examination paper.

• Study the various psychological aspects that help optimise performance

This paper constitutes 60% of AS, 30% of A Level

You will:

• Learn to evaluate the effects of contemporary influences on elite sporting performance

Unit 2: Analysis and Evaluation of Physical Activity as a Performer and/or Leader and /or Official (PHED2)

• Learn how biomechanical analysis can aid performance

This unit represents the coursework section for AS students.

• Gain an understanding of the various social and cultural issues that can have an effect on sports participation

Students are required to take part in two sports activities outside of the classroom. They can either take part in these activities as a performer or can choose to be a coach or an official. It is possible to choose the same activity for two different roles.

• Have the opportunity to enhance your role as a performer, leader and official.

Students will be examined on their ability to perform, analyse and evaluate certain core skills and techniques, both in isolation and in structured practice. This unit is examined through internal moderation. The unit constitutes 40% of AS, 20% of A Level.

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6th Form Curriculum Guide

A level Unit 3: Optimising Performance and Evaluating Contemporary Issues within Sport (PHED3) This is unit consists of three sections:

Section A: How exercise physiology can optimise performance. Students will study topic areas such as energy systems, sports injuries and biomechanics

Section C: Application of knowledge and understanding to optimise performance: Following the pupil’s identification of weaknesses in their practical performance they need to be able to critically evaluate other theoretical factors that may lead to further weaknesses, again, drawing on the theoretical content acquired throughout the A Level course. The assessment of this unit is through internal assessment with external moderation

Section B: How the application of psychological knowledge can optimise performance. Students will study topic areas such as personality, anxiety, aggression and leadership.

Section A: Practical coursework

Section C: Evaluating contemporary issues. Students will study topic areas such as world games, the structure of the world class performance pathway and the causes of deviance in sport.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

The assessment of this unit is through a 2 hour written examination paper. This unit constitutes 30% of A Level

Unit 4: Optimising Practical Performance in a Competitive Situation (PHED4) This unit builds upon the practical work covered at AS Level whereby students have to perform, analyse and evaluate theirs and others performance in a competitive setting. The unit consists of three sections: Section A: Practical performance: Students will be examined on their ability to perform, analyse and evaluate certain core skills and techniques in a competitive situation. Students need to choose one role in one activity, either that of a performer, official or coach/leader. Students also need to be able show that they can plan both physiologically and psychologically for their activity using information gained from the theoretical part of the course. Section B: Observation, analysis and critical evaluation: Students are required to observe, analyse and evaluate their performance. They are required to comment upon their weaknesses, drawing on the theoretical content acquired throughout the A Level course and compare these weaknesses to an elite performer.

Sections B and C: Written coursework The unit constitutes 20% of A Level

Students with AS or A Level Physical Education have access to a wide range of possible career and Higher Education opportunities. You learn and use a variety of transferable skills throughout the course. These include collecting, analysing and interpreting data, communicating your findings in different ways, and identifying and developing the links between different parts of the subject. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, Universities and Colleges as being of great value. Physical Education combines with a range of AS and A Level subjects. Taken with sciences like Biology it supports applications for a wide range of university courses like Sports Science, Physiotherapy, Recreation, Leisure Studies and Sports Coaching. Many students choose to use their qualification to go straight into employment, rather than go on to Higher Education. Because AS and A Level Physical Education develop the transferable skills and the key skills that employers are looking for, they can lead to a very wide range of employment opportunities. This can include further training in such areas as Recreational Management, Leisure Activities, Armed Forces and the Civil Services.

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A Level A Level Physics

AQA 2450

Physics is, without doubt, going through very exciting times. The Large Hadron Collider, the search for the Higgs Boson, measurements showing neutrinos apparently travelling faster than light have all hit the headlines recently. A Level Physics challenges the intellect, but to rise to that challenge and succeed represents a real and satisfying achievement.

The course is taught by highly qualified and experienced teachers. AS and A Level results achieved in Physics over the years have been consistently excellent. Yes, there is some tough theory to assimilate and understand. However, there will be also be regular practical work, designed not only to develop and perfect experimental skills but also to discover or verify various theories and relationships. This includes providing opportunities to use data-logging techniques. Equally, although traditional hand-drawn tables and graphs remain a very important skill, we encourage pupils to use ICT skills for presenting and analysing their practical work.

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competent mathematician with at least a grade C in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent). Numerical and mathematical skills are vital in physics. Our recommendation is that students who wish to do AS Physics must at least also take AS Mathematics.

AS Physics is right for you if you: • want to progress to the full A-level • want a grounding in a relevant worthwhile qualification of recognised value • want to broaden your educational experience before making a decision about which A-levels to take

The teaching is designed not only to instil a thorough understanding of physics principles but also to make the material interesting, fun and relevant to everyday experiences. We encourage a wide range of reading - much wider than just the textbooks - as well as an appreciation of the history and development of Physics. Our VLE provides many links to interesting video clips and documentaries.

• have an interest in, and enjoy, physics

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

• want to find out about how things work in the physical world

• are taking A-levels in the other Sciences and/ or Mathematics or other relevant courses such as Design and Technology and want to take another course that will support your studies.

A2 Physics is the right choice if you:

In Physics, we follow the course offered by AQA. The methodology and terminology, especially in relation to coursework, builds on that already met by students and teachers at GCSE, where AQA is also used.

• enjoy applying your mind to solving problems

The qualification builds on the knowledge, understanding and process skills that were taught in GCSE Science. You will need at the very minimum a GCSE grade C in Physics or Additional Science (or equivalent). You should also be a very keen and

• want to use physics to move on to further studies in Higher Education, support other qualifications or enter physics-based employment(more information later).

• enjoy carrying out investigations by the application of imaginative, logical thinking


6th Form Curriculum Guide

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

Unit 1

• The nucleus including particles, antiparticles and photons; hadrons and leptons; the quark model • Quantum phenomena including photoelectricity, energy levels and photon emission, wave particle duality • Electricity including electrical quantities, resistivity, circuits and components, alternating current. • Mechanics, including motion along a straight line, projectile motion, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and power

Unit 2

• Properties of materials, including density and the Young modulus • Waves, including longitudinal and transverse waves, progressive and stationary waves, refraction, diffraction and interference. • Further mechanics, including momentum, circular motion and simple harmonic motion

Unit 4

• Fields, including gravitational fields, electric fields, capacitors, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction.

Section A: Nuclear and Thermal Physics • This section builds on key ideas about particles and energy from AS physics and covers probing the nucleus, radioactivity, nuclear instability and nuclear energy as well as the thermal properties of materials, ideal gases and the kinetic theory of gases

Section B: Option Units Unit 5

There is a choice to specialise in one of four options. Candidates choose one option from: • Astrophysics: lenses and telescopes, non-optical telescopes, classification of stars, cosmology • Medical Physics: physics of the eye, physics of the ear, biological measurements, non-ionising imaging, X-ray imaging • Applied Physics: rotational dynamics, thermodynamics, engines • Turning points in physics: the discovery of the electron, wave-particle duality, special relativity.

While studying these units you will develop a range of practical skills; planning experiments, collecting data, analysing experimental results and making conclusions. You will also gain an appreciation of how scientific models are developed and then evolve, the applications and implications of science, the benefits and risks that science brings, and the ways in which society uses science to make decisions.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Two other units (3 and 6) are not shown in the above table. These units involve the assessment of practical and investigative skills. Centres are required to provide opportunities for students to use and develop their practical skills throughout the course. AQA offers two routes for the assessment of this unit.

• a degree course such as Physics, Natural Sciences, Medicine, Metrology, Sports Science, Engineering (including Chemical Engineering) and related programmes.

• Route T: Practical Skills Assessment (PSA) and Investigative Skills Assignment (ISA) which is teacher marked (assessed by centres) • Route X: Practical Skills Verification (PSV) and Externally Marked Practical Assignment (EMPA), taken at a centres’ convenience and marked by AQA. We use route T, since it follows naturally on from the coursework taken at GCSE. There will be 50 raw marks in this unit.

For AS Physics, you will need to study Units 1, 2 and 3. For A Level Physics, you will need to study all six units.

Physics leads on to a wide range of courses and careers. You could use Physics to support other qualifications or move on to further studies or employment, including:

[Note that a good A Level grade in Physics is an essential requirement for nearly all university engineering courses] • employment in the area of, for example, radiography or biotechnology. Physics is recognised as an entry qualification for a wide range of Higher Education courses and employment opportunities. A good grade in A Level Physics can open many doors.

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A Level A Level Spanish

Edexcel 9SP01

Spanish is a demanding yet rewarding AS/ A Level course at The British School of Paris. Groups are small and students benefit from individual attention. Much emphasis is placed on development of practical competence in all the four skill areas and Spanish is used as much as possible for communication in the classroom.

Our teaching is based on the desire to create an authentic language learning environment and Spanish materials; magazines, newspapers, websites, radio and television are exploited to the full. Literature is also studied to help extend students’ appreciation of the cultural issues of Spanish speaking countries. Visits to Spain are encouraged. We hope that students have a chance to take part in a school trip to Spain. The costs of these trips are in addition to school fees.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

Students will normally have achieved at least the equivalent of GCSE Grade C Spanish before taking this course. You will need to feel confident at this level in the four language skills of Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. You must also have some knowledge and understanding of the culture and way of life of the target-language country. You need to be interested in developing this understanding and exploring in much more depth the topic areas that you will have covered at GCSE.

What will I learn on this AS/A Level course?

The course will help you to develop your general study skills, but most of all you will learn to communicate at a higher level in Spanish. You will also learn much more about a wide range of aspects of the society or societies in which the language is spoken.

Reading

• Organise your arguments • Provide opinions • Analyse your ideas.

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

AS Unit 1 Spoken Expression and Response in Spanish

This unit rewards you for your ability to converse in Spanish on a general topic area which you have chosen in advance. You will need to demonstrate that you can engage in a discussion in Spanish that relates to a chosen general topic area and allied subtopics. The first part of the assessment will focus on an Edexcel provided stimulus that links to the chosen general topic area but the conversation will then move away from the stimulus to consider other aspects of the chosen topic area. You will be expected to give relevant and appropriate information, convey opinions, interact and respond to a range of questions. You must choose one of the following general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: Health and fitness

You will be able to read, understand and extract information from written passages in the target language that are taken from authentic sources, such as magazines and newspapers, reports or books.

• The world around us: Travel, tourism, environmental issues and the Spanish speaking world

Listening

The exam is divided into 2 sections:

You will be able to listen to, and understand contemporary spoken language and answer questions on what you have heard. The passages that you will learn to listen to will be taken from a range of sources such as news reports on the radio or TV, weather forecasts, announcements, interviews and discussions.

Speaking and Writing

You will learn how to write essays or longer pieces and to hold conversations and discussions in the target language. You will learn all the appropriate grammar, words and phrases that will help you to:

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• Present information in the target language

• Education and employment.

Section A: Requires you to respond to 4 Edexcel set questions on a stimulus passage related to your chosen general topic area. Section B: Requires the teacher examiner to engage you in a discussion which, although still relating to the same general topic area and its linked subtopics, moves away from the main focus of the stimulus. You will have a 15 minutes preparation period prior to the test and the test itself will last between 8 and 10 minutes.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Unit 2: Understanding and Written Response in Spanish

This unit requires you to understand and convey your understanding of Spanish-language texts and recordings. In addition, you will need to produce an essay to demonstrate an ability to manipulate the Spanish language in continuous writing. You will be expected to recognise and use the Spanish language in a variety of contexts and in relation to a prescribed range of general topic areas. This unit draws upon four general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: Health and fitness

• The world around us: Travel, tourism, environmental issues and the Spanish speaking world. • Education and employment. This unit is divided into three sections and is assessed by a written examination of 2 hours and 30 minutes. Section A: Requires you to listen to a range of authentic recorded Spanish-language material and to retrieve and convey information in the recording by responding to a range of Spanish-language questions. Section B: Requires you to read authentic Spanishlanguage printed materials and to retrieve and convey information by responding to a range of mainly Spanish language test types. Section C: Requires you to write 200-220 words in the form of a letter, report or article based on a short printed Spanish-language stimulus.

and quality of spoken language. The exam will last for 11-13 minutes in all. You first outline your chosen issue for about 1 minute, adopting a definite stance towards the issue. You should then defend and justify your opinions for up to 4 minutes. The teacher examiner will then initiate a spontaneous discussion in which a minimum of two further unpredictable areas of discussion will be covered.

Unit 4: Research, Understanding and Written Response in Spanish This unit requires you to demonstrate skills in advanced level Spanish writing (discursive or creative essay) and translation from English into Spanish. The unit also requires you to demonstrate evidence of independent, advanced level Spanish-language Reading and research of a chosen text, play, film or topic area that links to the culture and/or society of a Spanish-speaking country, countries or community.

The content of this unit will be linked to the following general topic areas: • Youth culture and concerns • Lifestyle: health and fitness • The world around us: travel, tourism, environmental issues and the Spanish speaking world • Education and employment • Customs, traditions, beliefs and religions • National and international events; past, present and future

A level

• Literature and the arts.

Unit 3: Understanding and Spoken Response in Spanish

This unit is divided into three sections and is assessed by a written examination of 2 hours and 30 minutes.

This unit requires you to demonstrate the effectiveness of your Spanish-language skills by presenting and taking a clear stance on any issue of your choice. You will be expected to interact effectively with a teacher examiner, defend your views and sustain discussion as the teacher examiner moves the conversation away from your chosen issue. You will be expected to use the language of debate and argument to discuss the issue and will also be assessed for understanding as well as communication

Section A: A short written translation exercise to test your ability to transfer meaning from English into Spanish effectively. Section B: A Spanish language essay in response to one from a choice of seven questions, linked to the prescribed general topic areas that invite either discursive or creative writing. Section C: A research-based essay in Spanish (240 to 270 words) to reward you for Spanish-language

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A Level A Level Spanish (Continued)

research skills linked to an area of interest to you that relates to the culture and/or society of a Spanishlanguage country, countries or community. You have freedom to determine the content of your research (potentially in negotiation with your teacher) but it must relate to the four research-based essay topic areas for this unit.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

There will be a range of opportunities open to you, where you can continue to use and further develop your language skills and knowledge of contemporary society. Some students choose to do degree courses in languages; others choose to pursue a Higher Education course in another subject, but choose a language option alongside it. Having a language at AS or A Level will certainly improve your employability, in particular with companies which have international branches. Whether you are interested in continuing your studies or working at home or abroad, a language course at AS or A Level is an excellent step towards achieving your goals.

Special Objectives

For students with an advanced level of Spanish we can offer a fast track programme to A Level. Furthermore this programme of study material is carefully selected and provides extra intellectual stimulation. To extend our most able linguists, Year 12 and 13 students have the opportunity to take the “Diploma de EspaĂąol Lengua Extranjeraâ€? (DELE). The DELE is an internationally recognised diploma awarded by the Spanish government and is regarded as a prestigious qualification in universities around the world. It is the equivalent to the DALF qualification in French. This diploma offers an additional qualification which will enhance university application.

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GCSE Courses

6th Form Curriculum Guide

GCSE English Language

AQA English 4705

A pass at C grade of above in English Language GCSE is a prerequisite for entrance to UK Universities. We strongly advise students who do not have a GCSE English Language qualification and who wish to pursue a university career in the UK to follow this course in Year 12.

The study of English Language encourages students to develop the skills of enquiry and investigation. Students learn to make informed personal responses, supporting interpretations with evidence from texts. GCSE English Language allows students to demonstrate the ability to use English in real life contexts and uses an analytical approach to language topics drawing on personal experience.

English Language Unit 1: Understanding and producing non fiction A Reading

1 hour

Four compulsory questions based on non-fiction reading sources B Writing

1 hour

Two compulsory writing tasks 40%

2 hours

External

Unit 2: Speaking and Listening a. Presenting b. Discussing and listening c. Role playing 20%

Controlled Assessment

Unit 3: Understanding Spoken and Written texts and Writing Creatively a. Extended reading

3 to 4 hours

15%

b. Creative Writing

3 to 4 hours

15%

c. Spoken Language study 2 to 3 hours

10%

40% Controlled Assessment

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GCSE Courses GCSE Mathematics

AQA Maths 4365

Mathematics provides the oral, written and practical skills needed to solve everyday problems and to acquire knowledge in other subjects particularly Science and Technology. Mathematics is an important discipline; its power lies not only in the capacity to explain and describe but also to predict and solve. A GCSE qualification in Maths is highly recommended for those wishing to pursue a university career in the UK. Willing students will find mathematics challenging but accessible, useful and enjoyable. The Maths department teaches the AQA GCSE syllabus and students are entered for written papers appropriate to their ability. • Foundation, aimed at grades G – C • Higher, aimed at grades D – A* The specification requires candidates to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills in following units:

Unit 1: Statistics and Number

Written exam (calculator) 1 hour (54 marks 26.7%) Content includes: • The data handling cycle • Data collection • Data presentation and analysis • Data interpretation • Probability.

Unit 2: Number and Algebra

Written exam (no calculator) 1 hour 15 minutes (66 marks 33.3%) Content includes: • Working with numbers and the number system • Fractions, decimals and percentages • Ratio and proportion • Expressions and equations • Sequences and linear functions.

Unit 3: Geometry and Algebra

Written exam (calculator) 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks 40%) Content includes: • Properties of angles and shapes • Geometrical reasoning and calculation • Measures and construction • Mensuration • Graphical methods • Solving problems with algebra.

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The maths teachers are keen to help students enjoy mathematics and to be successful in the examinations. However, to benefit fully from lessons students must bring to each maths class: • a simple scientific calculator • a simple sturdy compass with pencil • a 20cm flat ,clear plastic ruler • a small clear plastic protractor • an eraser, a sharpener with a box, an HB pencil • 3 or 4 colouring pencils.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

The Foundation Year For those students unable to contemplate moving straight into AS and A Level courses, we offer a one year Foundation Programme. This could lead to vocational courses or be a preparation for a two year 6th Form programme at the BSP.

Students will typically take English and Maths GCSE, one AS Level subject as well as Level 2 BTEC courses which have GCSE equivalence. There will be the possibility of Learning Support if that is required.

BTEC Courses We are currently able to offer:

BTEC Art & Design (Edexcel) The BTEC Art and Design course has been designed to allow learners to investigate a selection of specialist disciplines in art and design. The units provide vocational themes, including 2D visual communication, photography, visual arts and the development of a personal portfolio.

performing, composing or music technology. The music industry offers many opportunities for employment and is not limited to those who are able to play an instrument. Units on the music industry, developing as a musical performer and working as an ensemble are included in the qualification. Learners may choose to follow a practical performing course and may choose to complete this qualification through the use of music technology or by using a mixture of both performing and music technology.

The qualification provides opportunities for learners to develop communication skills needed for working in the art and design sector. There will be opportunities to undertake trips in order to see original artworks and produce studies outside school in relation to project themes.

BTEC Money and Finance (Edexcel)

In the current financial climate, it’s important that young people learn how to manage their money and avoid getting into debt. In partnership with Nationwide Building Society, Edexel has created a financial literacy qualification that will introduce you to financial awareness.

BTEC Music (Edexcel)

BTEC Music is a qualification that gives learners an overview of employment opportunities within the music industry and development of skills in

Other Opportunities Sports Leadership Awards (Sports Leaders UK)

Awards in Community Sports Leadership are nationally recognised qualifications that enable successful learners to lead groups of people in sport/ activity, under indirect supervision. The qualification teaches generic leadership skills such as organisation, planning, communication and teamwork through the medium of sport. They are fun and practical qualifications with no entrance requirements or final examinations to sit.

Rock School

There is also the possibility to prepare for Rock School Music qualifications in electric guitar, bass, keyboard, drums and vocals.

Learning Support (LS)

An extra charge will be levied for any LS hours. Please consult Admissions for current charges. Other courses are being constantly researched so we can offer a balanced programme to all.

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Other Sixth Form Courses EPQ – Extended Project Qualification

(Edexcel)

The Level 3 Extended Project aims to support learners with the transition to Higher Education or into the world of work. It provides opportunities for the development of critical, reflective, problem-solving and independent learning skills through the planning, research and evaluation of a self-selected project.

In Year 12 you will attend lessons to introduce you to a variety of planning, research and evaluation tools as well as a multitude of academic questions. During the course you will have the chance to broaden your skills, widen your perspectives and deepen your understanding of a wide range of issues. Throughout your in-depth study, you will develop and apply skills creatively, resulting in one of the four following project outcomes: • A dissertation;

• identify and draft an objective(s) for your project (eg in the form of a question, hypothesis, problem, challenge, outline of proposed performance, issue to be investigated) and provide a rationale for your choice • produce a plan for how you will deliver your intended outcome • conduct research as required by the project brief, using appropriate techniques • develop the intended outcome using selected tools and techniques safely demonstrating the ability to pursue an extended project through to completion

• An investigation; • A performance; or • An artefact. In Year 13 you will work with a mentor to demonstrate that you can: • select a topic/area of interest for an in-depth study that provides opportunities to develop skills, knowledge and understanding,

• share the outcome of the project, including an evaluation of the outcome and your own learning and performance with another or others, using appropriate communication methods. The Extended Project outcome is graded A* to E. Level 3 Projects are worth half a GCE for UCAS points status.

Fashion around the world

Internet safety

Pneumatics and hydraulics

Global warming

Poetry recital

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Celebrity photography

• negotiate with your mentor the scope of that project

EPQ TOPIC IDEAS

Performance enhancing drugs in sport ID cards

Is graffiti art? How Formula 1 cars have developed

Eco-houses

Banksy’s art

Mountain bike manufacture


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) The PSHE scheme of work follows the UK National Curriculum non-statutory guidelines for Personal, Social and Health Education. Lessons are often discussion based, making use of worksheets, newspaper articles, video, role-play, debate and student presentations. In addition, we make use of a PSHE package of interactive lessons and materials. These and other PSHE resources are now available on the school’s VLE. Students are encouraged to develop: • A healthy and safe lifestyle • Good relationships while respecting the differences between people • Skills of enquiry and communication • Methodical and successful work habits. In sixth form classes there is an increased emphasis on the pupils making wider progress through development of personal, learning and thinking skills. The aim is to enable our young adults to become: • Independent enquirers and reflective learners • Creative thinkers and effective participators • Self managers and good team workers.

The following specialist inputs are integrated into the PSHE programme: • Careers • Study and library skills • Sex education and life skills presented by the School Nurses.

Our programme for Years 12 and 13 remains flexible and responsive and includes a majority of the following areas: Year 12

13

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Class ethos / Presentations Performance Review Study skills and Target setting Time management Constructing a CV Letters of application Human Rights Economic well-being Financial capability Careers

Presentation on a controversial issue Addiction Problem drinking Drugs Personal statement Study skills and Target setting Economic well-being Financial capability Careers

Careers Contraception Relationships Attitudes to AIDS Study skills and Target setting Economic well-being Financial capability

Class ethos Interview skills Performance Reviews Study skills and Target setting Personal finances Economic well-being Financial capability

Political parties Personal finances Drugs / Alcohol Relationships Contraception Sexually transmitted infections Study skills and Target setting Economic well-being Financial capability Careers

Issues in sexual behaviour Study skills and Target setting Economic well-being Financial capability

Careers

Careers

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In recent years the tutors have been exploring new topics of relevance and interest and these include the following headings.

Year 12

Year 13

Gender differences

Confidence/Self esteem

Positive Thinking

Binge Drinking

Can drugs be recreational?

Media manipulation

Personal Fitness

God is Good

Informed decision making

Pros and Pitfalls of University Life

Personal Finances

Responsible Budgeting

Establishing personal limits

Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll

Discussion & Debating Skills

Discussion & Debating Skills

Healthy Lifestyle Choices

You are what you eat

Pressure

Personal safety

Adult Peer Pressure

Gap Year possibilities

As with all areas of the curriculum, parents are welcome to contact us to discuss any concerns about the issues we cover.

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6th Form Curriculum Guide

Physical Education Core Each student in the Sixth Form has the opportunity to take part in a range of recreational sporting activities. These sessions are designed to engender enjoyment, social interaction and learning as well as, hopefully, to set a trend for an active life in the future.

Popular choices include football, tennis, volleyball, basketball, hockey, badminton and aerobics. Interschool matches are regularly organised so that students can still enjoy the challenge and camaraderie of competitive situations.

Additionally, our school is a member of the International Schools Sports Tournament Organisation. Our senior teams compete against all the other major International and American Schools in prestigious tournaments throughout Europe.

The school fields representative teams in the following sports; Football, Hockey, Rugby, Netball, X-Country, Climbing, Athletics and Volleyball and if a student is selected for a school team he/she is expected to attend all training sessions and fixtures. The school has an international fixture list for all of its teams with regular fixtures in France, Belgium, Holland, and the UK. To maintain an International fixture list we have to host visiting teams overnight, which is reciprocated when we travel away.

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Educational Support The Learning Support Department aims to provide a personalised programme for all students with Special Educational Needs to aid their inclusion in the Sixth Form academic courses.

Not all students are able to directly access the curriculum but accommodations can be made and special arrangements for examinations are possible within the guidelines laid down by the Joint Qualifications Council. Our aim is to enable the students to achieve their personal best through developing different learning styles and by reinforcing belief in themselves that they can succeed in achieving something of value. The highly professional staff of the Learning Support Department is led by an Educational Psychologist and is experienced in working with Sixth Formers with a variety of Special Needs including Aspergers, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia ADD and Social and Emotional issues. Several of the staff hold qualifications from the Dyslexia Institute and all regularly attend INSET courses and the SEN Conference run by the Independent Schools Council to keep up with the new research and current practice in the UK. The philosophy of the Department is to respect individual differences and cultures, to share knowledge, and then to work together to achieve high academic standards within the British School system. Students with special educational needs will be able to access a range of new technology, both hardware and software, in the Learning Support area. Many students use word processing to benefit from spelling, punctuation and language programmes. Other students benefit from Inspiration software for mind-mapping and concept formation planning. Various options are available or could be investigated according to individual needs.

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The Learning Support Department staff work closely with the Pastoral and Academic teams to give a united, caring, total school approach, which is one of the greatest strengths of The British School of Paris. In the past we have held information meetings for the staff on how to work with and what to expect when working with a certain student. Speaking up front and discussing differences has proved to be a great success and has enriched the community of The British School of Paris. We acknowledge that it is the responsibility of everyone in the school to ensure that those with the greatest differences are acknowledged and catered for. We are also fortunate in the Paris area to have access to the SPRINT organization which is an English speaking Anglo-American network of medical practitioners, psychiatrists, psychologists and therapists who are available for family or individual consultations if necessary.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

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B O D Y

A N D

M I N D

The British School of Paris 38 quai de l’Ecluse 78290 Croissy sur Seine Tel: +33 (0)1 34 80 45 94 Fax: +33 (0)1 39 76 32 21 Website www.britishschool.fr Email ssc@britishschool.fr

February 2013

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Bsp 6th Form Curric Guide Feb13  
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