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CELEBRATING NEIGHBOURHOOD PEOPLE

Winter 2013 • Issue 18

east


CARPET • HARDWOOD • AREA RUGS • VINYL • LAMINATE • REMNANTS

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meet the nl teAm! Allison Anthony Neighbourhood Promoter/ Contributing Writer/ Photographer A devoted resident of Little Italy and the Annex, Allison Anthony has stuck to her comfortable quadrant for many years. Since joining Neighbourhood Living Magazine, she has travelled east of Yonge Street more than five times and continues to be amazed at just how much Toronto’s east and west end neighbourhoods have to offer. CArolyn tripp Neighbourhood Promoter/ Writer/Photographer/Social Media Manager Carolyn Tripp is an artist, writer and creative consultant living in Toronto’s west end. She has a soft spot for vintage and local fashion and loves showcasing the city’s best boutiques and designers. Her favourite time of year is when she gets to bust open the boxes and revisit all of her favourite seasonal standards–and the accessories she forgot she purchased the year before! pAmelA hiCkey Graphic Designer On Career Day in Grade 5, Pam got up in front of the class and told everyone she was going to be a race car driver. Naturally, she became a graphic designer but still doesn’t own a cool car. She is happy to bring the pages of NL magazine to life and celebrate our vibrant neighbourhoods. trACey CoveArt Editor/Feature Writer/ Photographer A writer, editor, columnist and photographer, Tracey Coveart emerged from the womb with a pen in one hand and a camera in the other and has been fortunate to find a home for her skills in a rich list of publications over the past 30 years. In 2011, upon emigrating from small-town Ontario to the bustling metropolis of Toronto, she landed on the doorstep of Neighbourhood Living Magazine and has made her home within its glorious pages ever since. Tracey has a fierce love of family, chocolate, bubbly things, lightning, a good turn of phrase and orangutans. GreG BArsoski Publisher/Photographer/ Neighbourood Promoter A hammer was the first tool I ever used–putting nails into the kitchen floor–and I have been building ever since: three paper routes as a kid; large businesses for corporate interests; and now a media business building community spirit. I love Toronto, especially its neighbourhoods (great neighbourhoods make a great city!) and I am lucky so many people have allowed me to participate in the life of their neighbourhood by sharing their stories on the pages of this magazine. I have been blessed to make it this far and still retain my sense of humour. My motto is to serve with an open heart.

From the

editor’s Deck It’s winter in the neighbourhood. And sadly, I’m not a winter person. There are stairs to salt, driveways to shovel, car windows to scrape, icy roads to navigate and a dog to walk in subzero temperatures. There are coats and hats and mittens and boots and scarves to clutter my doorway; sweaters and chenille socks and slippers and extra blankets piled beside my bed. There are snowstorms and snow tires and snow days and and snowsuits and snowballs and snow forts and snow angels and snowmen. There are long, dark nights and short, bright brittle days, when nostrils pinch and burn and tree limbs crack under biceps of white or glittering jackets of ice. And it’s freezing. Always freezing. I’m a cold-blooded type; my body adjusts to the temperature around me. Clearly I was meant to live in a place where the mercury never dips below 22 degrees Celsius. Like a snake—a gentle, loving snake like our ball python Taka—I’m a basker, a huddler, a hibernator. But the neighbourhood never sleeps. Not even when the window panes rattle and frost. In fact, it’s a hive of activity. Which is a good thing, because there is no time for hibernating, especially with Christmas just around the corner. Between them, the advertisers that support this magazine will get my winter-weary tuchus through another season of snow and ice, and I’ll barely feel the chill—not just because they’re so close to home, but because they generate a warmth that I haven’t found anywhere else; a familiarity that makes me feel like I’m shopping with friends. Hossein, my Persian carpet man, who keeps my feet warm; Bridget at WOTEVER, who had the thread puller I needed in a pinch; Marilyn and Ralph at Seaport Merchants, who will once again be providing the lobster for our Christmas feast; Andrea at Flaunt Boutique, who tamed this cowlicked, double-crowned crazy hair of mine; John at Garden’s Path, whose whimsical Christmas ornaments have graced the cover of this magazine two winters running; Sharon at Mary Macleod’s Shortbread, who satisfies my Chocolate Crunch cravings; the Masellis brothers, who source my husband Rob’s favourite–only–biscotti; Ed Levesque at Edward’s 1290, who helped Rob and I celebrate our fifth anniversary with gastronomic panache; Ellen and Wendy (and Hudson), at Dimensions who frame our daughter’s STEPHimals and have welcomed her as one of their local gallery artists; and so many more. Visit them. They exist for you and because of you. . A neighbourhood is something so remarkable that social scientists have yet to agree on an exact definition. Some say: ‘A specific geographic area in which face-to-face social interactions occur and residents seek to realize common goals and maintain effective social control.’ But it’s like winter. It’s cold. They’re missing the feeling of a neighbourhood. And it’s the feeling that makes a neighbourhood so special. They way it feels when you walk into your corner store and the owner greets you by name, and asks about your mom and dad and their moms and dads. The way it feels when all the dogs rough and tumble in the dog park while their owners toss balls and chat about kids and politics and work and the weather. The way it feels to belong. A neighbourhood is a beautiful, indescribable thing, and we celebrate ours, here, on the pages of this magazine. Happy Holidays. Happy Winter. Happy Neighbourhood Living. www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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To all my wonderful customers I have too many carpets and am over stocked. I need to clear space for beautiful furniture coming in the new year. If you have thought of buying another carpet to complement the ones you have now, or are a first time buyer, come by my store. Now is the time to give me an offer I can’t refuse. Sincerely, Hossein Rafat

Lashar Rugs 744 Danforth Ave • 416-461-0888 • www.lasharrugs.com

Rug Cleaning and Repair Free pickup and delivery. We offer professional cleaning, stain removal, fringework, repair patchwork and more. 4

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Neighbourhood east

NEXT ISSUE: March 2014 Delivered to homes and targeted businesses in Cabbagetown, East York, Leslieville, Greektown, the Danforth, Riverdale and Riverside. Editor/Feature Writer: Tracey Coveart Graphic Designer: Pamela Hickey Social Media Administrator: Carolyn Tripp Neighbourhood Promoters: Carolyn Tripp, Greg Baroski, Allison Anthony Printer: Ironstone Media Contributing Photographers: Allison Anthony, Greg Barsoski, Judy-Ann Cazemier, Tracey Coveart, Heliographics, Kristina Raimi, Andy Vanderkaay, Carolyn Tripp, Patty Watteyne Photography Contributing Writers: Connie Adair, Allison Anthony, Judy-Ann Cazemier, Tracey Coveart, Paula Deresti, Karie Johnston, Carolyn Tripp

In the Neighbourhood 6 - Rocking the foundations of home ownership 10 - Dial up the heat and turn your yoga practice on its head 12 - Journeys by Judy: Bloor Street Viaduct 16 - Make it a Happy, Healthy Christmas 18 - Give the gifts of health and beauty this Christmas and all year long 19 - Dancing your way to joy in Riverside 20 - Neighbourhood Walking: Chinatown East 23 - Upcoming Events

Publisher: Greg Barsoski

Neighbourhood Living Magazine is now in its 5th exciting year, celebrating the wonderful people and places in our neighbourhood. Do you own a business in the neighbourhood or are you thinking of becoming a local merchant? For ways to increase your cash flow, contact Greg Barsoski at 416-402-4283 or b5@sympatico.ca. 19 Ravina Crescent, Toronto, M4J 3L9

Fashion + Beauty 24 - Fashion Forward 25 - Fashion finds in Your Neighbourhood 26 - The hidden gem of the film industry 28 - A head to toe beauty team 30 - Gift Guide 32 - Neighbourhood Source Guide

Food + Celebration 33 - A Christmas tradition in The Beach 34 - Up front in the kitchen at 1290 Queen 36 - Celebrate the season with service and selection 39 - Best Sicilian treats in the city 40 - A tale of two shortbreads 42 - Danforth bistro is a neighbourhood pioneer

Home + Garden

ON OUR COVER:

44 - Grown food, not lawns 46 - Make short work of kitchen chaos 48 - Dimensions can make anything look good 49 - Why bother with TFSAs? 51 - Turn the winter blues green 52 - New kitchen or kitchen makeover?

Once again, NL celebrates the season with a playful, handmade Patience Brewster Christmas ornament, available at Garden’s Path Floral Design (983 Queen St. E.). Photo by Greg Barsoski

All rights reserved info. No article or ad may be duplicated without the consent of the publisher. Neighbourhood Living makes no representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to the qualification or accreditation of those whose opinions are expressed herein, or with the respect to the accuracy of completeness of information (medical or otherwise) provided to, or published in, this magazine. The views and opinions expressed within are not necessarily those of the publisher.

www.neighbourhoodliving.com Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the latest in what’s happening in your neighbourhood!

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neighbourhood people

Michel Labbe: Rocking the foundations of home ownership by Tracey Coveart

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Could social consciousness be an inherited trait? One could argue the case for Michel (Mike) Labbé, nephew of social justice advocate June Callwood, who, like his late aunt, believes very firmly in the ‘pay-it-forward’ principle. In 1994, Mike put his values and his business acumen to the test by establishing Options for Homes, a non-profit corporation that provides high-quality, cost-effective housing to people with limited capital. In just under 20 years, Options for Homes has developed nine condominiums in Toronto—including the first three condos in the Distillery District and, most recently, the 643-suite Heintzman Place in The Junction— and delivered more than 3,700 units of mixed income housing to people across Canada. The basic premise is to take the surplus (aka profit) from each housing development and channel it into a fund that is used to build more costeffective housing. The more developments you build—developments that deliver social as well as financial returns—the larger the central fund becomes, perpetuating the virtuous cycle. In essence, says Mike, a former volunteer at a housing co-op who graduated with a degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Waterloo, “Options for Homes is a non-profit consultant. We bring groups of people together to build their own homes. On the surface we appear to be the developer but, in fact, we’re acting on behalf of the end user. It’s a completely unique entity in the condo market.” A planner for just three years post graduation, Mike was involved in social housing for 15 years, until government funding for the movement all but disappeared in 1993. He then switched his focus to the affordable housing movement, terminology that has largely been abandoned in favour of terms like “cost effective ownership housing,” which is the underpinning philosophy of Options for Homes. “It’s not social housing. It’s not rental housing. It’s ownership housing. We’re not just building homes, we’re building strength of community.” What makes such a venture possible is that 60 to 70 per cent of the wealth created in the developed world is a direct result of real estate development including housing, says Mike.

The Village by Main Station, a 12-storey, 277-suite condominium featuring solar hot water and car-sharing to be built in the Main and Danforth area

Townhouses soon to be under construction in Limbe, Cameroon

“And the surplus and equity that is generated by cost-effective ownership housing ventures is a critical resource that can drive real social change that is not dependent on government.” Healthy real estate market = healthy economy “The pent-up housing need is the most significant economic resource of any country,” says Mike. “Take Mexico for example. The country currently needs nine million units of housing. If they built one million units a year, it would create three million jobs. Forget about mines—just start building housing for people!”

That realization, Mike says, “is huge. Ten per cent of all jobs in developed countries are directly related to the construction industry, and there are all kinds of secondary jobs that are created as a result of the disposable income generated by those jobs. Building houses is the best way to fight unemployment, and if you want to gather wealth to address social issues, there is no better place to start than real estate.” Ironically, says Mike, “it’s one area the social enterprising movement has completely missed out on.” At the heart of the oversight is the fact that many people don’t have the resources required to effectively tap into the

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equity that real estate and home construction create. And that is where Options for Homes has found its niche. “I was in Johannesburg, South Africa, in the early 90s when apartheid was falling apart and the non-profits were hard at work in the townships trying to solve social problems. The African government had used planning legislation to support apartheid, and white and black neighbourhoods were separated by a buffer zone—a no man’s land of undeveloped property.” The question was how to develop housing in these empty tracts in a way that everyone would benefit. The trend was to give lots to individuals, but many would flip the land for a quick profit and the affordability would be lost. Mike proposed the idea of a second mortgage held by a nonprofit corporation that would be recovered when the original builder/owner sold the unit. It wasn’t a good fit for South Africa at the time, so Mike returned to Canada to test his idea here.

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A hand up, not a hand out “The second mortgage is really the heart and soul of what we discovered,” Mike says. “Any residual value is used by the first owner for their down payment, but we want it back when he or she is ready to move on so we can help someone else.” Options clients, says Mike, although they’re not active clients and only meet every six weeks, “are the end users of housing anywhere we work.” And they are typically first-time homebuyers, new Canadians and retirees, because Options offers the best quality at the lowest price. In addition to the second mortgage, construction parameters and sales structure also play a large role in affordability. “Marketing is about 10 per cent of the cost of a typical condo unit in Toronto. Our marketing cost is $2,500.” As well, Options condominiums do not offer expensive amenities like pools saving another $15,000; and the developments are located where land is less expensive, like The Village by Main Station, a 12-storey,

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277-suite condominium featuring solar hot water and car-sharing to be built in the Main and Danforth area. In total, Options saves about $70,000 per unit in development costs, and reduces the average purchase price by about $20,000 around the world. Another key to the success of the Options for Homes model, explains Mike “is understanding that centralizing power, authority and wealth doesn’t work.” Instead, corporations have to be willing to share both control and assets. It’s one of the things that sets Options apart and one of the hardest things for traditional corporations to embrace. “Whatever they create, they feel they are the best people to handle it,” says Mike. Not Options. The non-profit creates resources beyond what it needs to support the organization, and volunteers control the surplus funds (currently $60,000,000 in Ontario). “People make better decisions and use money more effectively when they’re not entitled to it; when it’s not about satisfying shareholders but making decisions that will


move society forward. It’s still a profit model, but it’s rooted in philanthropy.” And it’s not just Canadian society (there are now 16 Options for Homes affiliates across Canada implementing this non-profit model of housing development) or even North American society that Options is helping to move forward, but societies around the globe. The organization currently has people on the ground in six countries—Bangladesh, Kenya, Cameroon, Peru, Columbia and Jamaica, with 16 more looking to adopt the model. “We’re not proprietary with our knowledge,” explains Mike. “And we’re not going into other countries to implement our model. Instead, we are helping people who were born and educated in the country – people who are invested in their community and knowledgeable about local building approval processes and procedures – to implement the model. When you teach rather than develop, all the secondary commissions structures and corruption suddenly become manageable.”

The ultimate goal? To establish thousands of social enterprises like Options for Homes and Options for Cars (a car sharing service with more than 200 members in Riverdale, the Pocket, Corktown and The Junction): good, solid businesses that deliver value and quality, while directing their surpluses into a central pool. “Using Options as their international link, communities all over the world will establish their own community wealth organizations. We’ll have billions of dollars managed by hundreds of corporations around the planet. Slowly the global economy will change into one that values social outcomes as much as it values material and financial ones.”

reasons Mike. Although he might not stick to the retirement part. “I’ve never had more fun in my life. And I’m finding out that no matter where you go— and no matter what others might say—there are tons of good people who want to make a difference. This kind of work really opens to your eyes to a quality of human spirit. And like anything in life—people, housing, wealth—if you come at it from a different angle you’ll be surprised by what you find.”

100 divided by four If everyone followed Mike Labbé’s personal recipe for a life well spent, we’d be a lot closer to that lofty goal. It’s based on the 25year principle. “You have 25 years to get an education, 25 years to work, 25 years to change the world and 25 years to enjoy retirement,” www.neighbourhoodliving.com

Options for Homes optionsforhomes.ca office@optionsforhomes.ca 416-867-1501 |

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Beatrix Montanile dials up the heat and turns yoga practice on its head at The Flying Yogi

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“We are 80 per cent fluid and, just like bodies of water, we need to keep moving to avoid stagnation.” As slaves to gravity, humans find freedom in weightlessness. And there are very real health and fitness benefits associated with moving through space while being safely suspended. “Suspension yoga is an entirely new concept of wellness and working out,” says Beatrix (Trixie) Montanile, owner, instructor and studio director at Canada’s first suspension yoga studio, The Flying Yogi, in Leslieville. “Suspension yoga was designed as a form of spinal therapy–as a way of managing gravity and its adverse effects on the body–and suspended inversions are particularly good for the spine and for managing those affects.” Failing to experience a full range of motion, including inversion, can be debilitating, she says, and the effects manifest themselves in the form of aging. “With more people focused on getting old gracefully, they are turning to suspension and inversion as a way of managing and even reversing the effects of aging.” Studies have shown that when people invert they became happier. The results may be anecdotal but the the science is solid. Inverting promotes the production of neurotransmitters, which distribute hormones, endorphins and serotonin throughout the body, and supplies the brain with the oxygen it needs to function optimally, explains Beatrix. People are taking prescription medications to treat depression and insomnia but these conditions can be managed and even reversed naturally by supported inversions through suspension yoga. As well, she says, there is a correlation between inverting and a calm heart and mind, which has been the foundation of yoga practice for centuries

in positions like downward dog, and the most important yoga posture–the headstand–which is still used to prepare the mind for meditation. There is a lot of emphasis on cardio-vascular activity to improve blood flow, but the fastest way to pump blood to the brain is by inverting. The effects of inversion on the body have actually been measured. According to studies by gravity boots inventor Dr. Robert Martin, our bodies relax 35 per cent more deeply and our brains function 14 per cent more effectively on an inverted plane. And inversion is critical for our overall homeostasis, or sense of balance, says Beatrix. “We are 80 per cent fluid and, just like bodies of water, we need to keep moving to avoid stagnation.” Using the OmGym suspension system at The Flying Yogi is the safest way to enjoy the health and fitness benefits of inversion, says Beatrix. “You don’t have to rely on upper body strength or your hands, neck, shoulders or spine. And in the sling you can achieve full spinal decompression, using gravity to help you to reverse stretch fully. Suspended inversion is one of the very best things you can do for your body and mind.” And it’s good for the whole family. The Flying Yogi is the first studio to include Family Suspension Playshops for parents and kids in its course calendar, and will be the first to offer preand post-natal suspension yoga classes starting in the New Year. Fancy a restorative winter getaway? The Flying Yogi is hosting a tropical suspension yoga/kite surfing retreat at an eco resort in the Dominican Republic in early March 2014. Check the website for details.

Infrared: a deeper, gentler hot yoga New to The Flying Yogi is Infrared Yoga, a practice that uses state-of-the-art technology to improve the hot yoga experience. “Regular hot yoga uses electricity to heat the air,” explains Beatrix, “which can be problematic for people who have respiratory ailments, high or low blood pressure, diabetes and people who are pregnant or intolerant of heat. In addition, it can also lead to dehydration due to excessive sweating.” By contrast, infrared yoga uses long wave light rays that attach themselves to and move with your body, penetrating deep into your tissue in a way that electric heat can’t. “It warms your body the same way the sun warms the earth, making your indoor yoga experience like practicing yoga outside on a hot summer day.” The deep tissue warmth generated by infrared heat helps to detoxify the body, improve flexibility and joint mobility, promote healing, reduce muscle stiffness and pain, decrease soreness and inflammation, increase circulation, improve skin tone, promote weight loss, reduce cellulite, enhance heart function, lower blood pressure, reduce stress, fight viruses and bacteria and speed recovery. And because it works on the cellular level, far below the surface of the skin, it is even used to treat cancer. “Yoga began in India,” says Beatrix. “It was meant to be performed in a warm environment for maximum effectiveness: to stoke the internal fire, burn off toxins and stimulate the metabolism. There are very real benefits to hot yoga,” says Beatrix, “and the infrared technology we use at The Flying Yogi makes this most natural yoga environment accessible to everyone.”

For class information, email info@theflyingyogi.ca or call 647-993-YOGI (9644). The Flying Yogi • 007-245 Carlaw Ave • www.theflyingyogi.ca www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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Journeys by Judy:

Bloor Street Viaduct by Judy-Ann Cazemier

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This city continues to surprise and delight me. The other day, as I was walking beneath the Bloor Street Viaduct next to the Lower Don River Trail, I saw a deer! I couldn’t believe it. It was the middle of the day and a doe casually strolled past me. A few minutes later, a buck appeared in the bushes. He was much more tentative, so I waited, changed lenses and was rewarded. He came out of hiding. I realized I was too close to the deer’s path, blocking his way, so I moved and he followed his mate into the brush next to the river. Evidence of nature in our metropolis. The Bloor Street Viaduct—a double-decked truss arch bridge that joins Bloor Street to the west and Danforth Avenue to the east—is 494 metres long and 40 metres high, with five vehicle lanes, two bike lanes and tracks underneath for the subway. When I started to collect information on the bridge, which was designed by Edmund W. Burke, I found an archival photograph taken by Arthur S. Goss, the official photographer for the city from 1911 to 1940. In the photo, workers are building the massive structure over the Don River Valley. It is difficult to imagine Toronto without this vital link, but its origins are not without controversy. In 1910 and again in 1912, the citizens of Toronto voted against construction of the bridge for fear of damaging the natural beauty of the Rosedale Ravine, but the plan was passed by council in 1913 with a budget of $2.5 million. A key figure in the development project was Roland Caldwell Harris, the Commissioner of Works and City Engineer. He was the visionary who insisted on a lower trestle that would allow for future subway travel, projected for the 1960s. The bridge took four years to build and, when it was finished 1918, it was named the Prince Edward Viaduct, in conjunction with a visit to Toronto by the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VIII. While I was photographing the viaduct at street level, a fellow stopped me to inquire about the speed limit. I took a guess at 40 km/hr. He thought the cars were whizzing past far too fast at what turns out to be the legal limit of 50 km/hr. Speeding cars are a continuing hazard, but for years the bridge presented another danger. That’s why, in 2003, the city added a suicide barrier of continuous thin bars—a protective wall officially known as the Luminous Veil. As I recall in a news item at the time, a first responder said it was the most beautiful thing he had ever seen. There are plans to install coloured LED lighting along the veil and lower arches in time for the 2015 Pam Am Games, a $1.6 million project that will let the Bloor Street Viaduct shine for the world. Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Viaduct ‘Toronto’s Visual Legacy: Official City Photography from1856 to the Present,’ by Steve MacKinnon, Karen Teeple and Michele Dale http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/plan-to-light-upbloor-viaduct-for-pan-am -games-clears-hurdle/article12980304/

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Make it a Happy, Healthy Christmas at Know Your Body Best Since 1992, Constance Rennett and Donna Micallef have been promoting health and wellness in the Riverdale neighbourhood and around the world through their retail business, Know Your Body Best. It was a venture born out of frustration. Constance, a registered massage therapist, was tired of embarking on a treasure hunt every time she needed products or a piece of equipment, so she and business partner Donna opened a massage therapy clinic with a small storefront in the Carrot Common on the Danforth. “Things just grew exponentially from there,”

says Constance. Today, Know Your Body Best is the largest store of its kind in the country. A true Canadian success story, “sometimes we can’t believe it ourselves,” says Donna. “People shop at KYBB 24/7. We have a huge online interactive presence with specials, features, educational videos and even a classified section, but we haven’t eliminated any mode of shopping. Our telephones and fax machines are always ringing.” And the partners encourage people to drop into the store, especially around Christmas time, to shop for stocking stuffers and gifts of

Pain For pain relief and the management of chronic pain, KYBB carries an array of topical analgesics in creams, gels and sprays, including BIOFREEZE, Anti-Flamme, CryoDerm and Red Feather Pain Spray. Most of these have an arnica base, a natural herb with anti-inflammatory properties. “And once you decrease inflammation,” says Donna, “you decrease pain.” These fast acting products are great for treating arthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, knee, shoulder and back ache, disk and joint pain, pulled muscles and rheumatic pain.

quality the good old fashioned way. “This is a very touchy-feely, aromatic business,” says Constance, and with 8,000 square feet of space and more coming in the New Year, KYBB gets loads of foot traffic year round as a destination location. “Our mission is to help people feel good– or at least feel better–every single day,” says Constance, “and we have carefully selected every product at Know Your Body Best to help us fulfill that mission. We want our customers to feel their very best so they can live well and enjoy the quality of life they deserve.”

Red Feather Pain Spray

BIOFREEZE 3oz roll-on or 4 oz tube

(herbal remedy) 4oz

1895

$

2295

$

Anti-Flamme 100g tube

CryoDerm 3oz roll-on or 4oz gel

1695

$

2000

$

14x14

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7995

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14x27 |

9495

$

For moist heat therapy, Donna recommends Thermophore by Battle Creek–a moist electric heating pad. The outer flannel cover draws and stores moisture from the air. “Unlike dry heat, which is more superficial,” she explains, “moist heat penetrates deeper.” For home use, KYBB carries the One Touch model in two sizes: 14x14 and 14x27, which gives full back coverage. Use the pad to alleviate pain, for muscle relaxation and for comfort.

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Rest and Relaxation

“And make sure you keep a bamboo towel next to the tub,” says Constance. “You’ll want that next to your skin when it comes time to dry off.” Silky, soft and breathable, bamboo is a renewable product that is naturally antibacterial and anti-fungal. KYBB has a full line of bamboo sheet sets (Q $94.95, K $106.95), towels and socks ($3.95 to $6.95).

Nothing promotes rest and relaxation like a nice, warm bath. “Learning to relax helps to create balance in the body,” says Constance, who recommends anything by Kneipp from Germany. These highly concentrated aromatherapy herbal bath products come in liquid form or single-use bath salt sachets and target all your systems, including: Lavender for relaxation; Rosemary to wake up your system; Camomile for your skin; Valerian and hops for deep sleep and rejuvenation; Eucalyptus for sinus relief, colds and flu; Juniper for sore, aching muscles. Mix and match to combine properties.

2975

Three-piece towel set 6.8 fluid ounces

2695

$

2.1oz

individually priced from

$

4

$ 95

to

2895

$

2895

$

4

$ 95

“Set the mood with our vast selection of 100 per cent pure essential oils in 10ml bottles. They make great stocking stuffers,” says Constance.” KYBB sources its own private label brand of superior quality essential oils from around the world. From basil to patchouli to sandalwood to ylang-ylang, “we import oils from their country of origin: South Africa, India, Slovenia, Italy, Mexico, Bulgaria, Italy, Argentina, Egypt, Somalia and China.” Use a candle diffuser and a few drops of the highly concentrated oil to release its aromatherapeutic properties into the air.

10 kilo bag

1995

$

Sensitive to fragrance but still want the benefits of a good soak? Try some 100 per cent natural epsom sea salts. Use two to four cups in a full bath and soak for 20 minutes, one hour before bed, to detoxify and relax your body. Great for those sore, aching muscles after an evening of show shovelling! Give the gift of relaxation by putting epsom salts in fancy jars and tying with a festive bow.

Once you’re towelled off and into full spa mode, slip into some comfy slippers and a thick white cotton bath robe ($27). Snuggle up with a heating pad, enjoy a massage with a hand-held manual or electric device ($6 to $150) from KYBB. “The Thumper is our best seller for deep but gentle percussive massage,” says Constance. Thumper Sport Massager

14995

Thumper Mini Pro

$

21095

$

1295 to $6295

$

Exercise and Rehabilitation Bring in your copy of Neighbourhood Living Magazine to receive 10% off any of the products featured in this article.

To incorporate exercise into your healthy lifestyle, KYBB stocks a full range of hand held weights (from two to 10 lbs), kettle bells (from three to 10 lbs), medicine balls, fit balls, body balls, foam rollers, yoga matts/straps/blocks, meditation cushions by Zafu and a full range of supporting educational materials: books, CDs, DVDs and walls charts. “There are Thera-Bands and Thera-Balls for people recovering from things like stroke and carpal tunnel surgery,” says Constance, “and balance boards to improve proprioception during rehabilitation from a broken leg, for example, when the body is building new motor pathways back to the brain.” And for registered massage therapists and people really serious about wellness, KYBB also has a full range of massage therapy oils, lotions and gels as well as custom made table linens, bolsters, pillows and everything else you need to create the perfect massage room environment in your home. A great entry point, says Donna, is the Oakworks One Plus Package, which includes the portable table, $ 365 head rest and storage case.

This holiday season and all year round, give the gifts of health and wellness to yourself and those you love. Visit Know Your Body Best, in person or online, to discover hundreds of quality, proven products that will help you to feel better and live better. TC 461 Carlaw Avenue 416-367-3744 knowyourbodybest.com

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Give the gifts of health and beauty this Christmas and all year long at YogaFit

Mention this article and receive an essential oil sample kit!

Searching for one-of-a-kind gifts this holiday season? In addition to a fabulous yoga studio and an extensive yoga teacher training program, the YogaFit Training Centre at 898 Danforth Avenue also boasts a beautiful retail space with many handmade items by local artists and friends of YogaFit. Lisa Greenbaum, part owner of the shop and a former clothing designer, carefully selects each item for quality, environmental impact and, of course, beauty. As someone who has worked in retail, design and manufacturing for most of her adult life, Lisa understands the changing face of the retail landscape. While customers can make their purchases online at www. yogafitcanada.com, they are also encouraged to visit the boutique to discover unique finds —like ting sha bells, singing bowls and a full line of essential oils—and enjoy the complete shopping experience. YogaFit carries its own branded line of clothing – including a few pieces designed by Lisa herself—as well as CDs and DVDs and a wide range of health and beauty products, from bolsters and meditation cushions manufactured in Toronto by Triple Gem, to a line of Ts from Me to We, to jewelry designed by a variety of artists including Skila Ramirez, a YogaFit Master Trainer from Texas, and Lisa’s favourite piece—a sterling silver yoga necklace featuring the YogaFit logo designed by Aimee Kennedy of Fine & Good Designs. “It is very important to me to bring in as many locally sourced products as possible,” says Lisa, “so I can give back to independent designers in the same way the retail community supported me through all my years as a designer.”

YogaFit Training Centre 898 Danforth Ave., Toronto 416-792-9492

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Dancing your way to joy in Riverdale

by

Connie Adair

In a world where bad news and everyday stresses can weigh you down, it’s nice to know there’s a place you can go to find pure joy. “With so much going on, we don’t consider making a commitment to joy,” says Jennifer Jones, CEO and dean of Joy of Dance College. “We invest in providing that. It’s magical to sit at the front door and see how people look when they come in and how they look when they leave. Three-year-old little ballerinas come in crying and go out twirling.” The studio has the same effect on adults. They may enter stressed or feeling down but they leave with joy in their hearts, she says. “After lyrical classes, they may not be twirling, but they feel like they’ve left it all on the dance floor.” Jennifer fondly recalls the dance lessons she took as a child. “I remember the happiness I felt and I wanted to make it happen here.” A little over a decade ago, Jennifer was ready to leave the corporate world to create a better workplace. All it took was a suggestion from her mother, Joyce Jones, that they join forces and open their own studio. The search for suitable studio space was long and hard – a large space without pillars wasn’t easy to find. As luck would have it, they discovered an 8,000-square-foot space on The Danforth, around the corner from the Broadview subway station and in the middle of a family neighbourhood. A renovation created four bright studios with rich hardwood floors and high ceilings. Jennifer and Joyce opened their doors and

their hearts in 2005 and Joy of Dance College has been a neighbourhood fixture ever since, first starting as a ballroom dance studio. Following requests to open classes to other age groups, it now offers “every type of dance except Flamenco to dancers from three to 93.” The studio offers a scholarship program, an instruction program for dancers who want to become teachers and a recreational program. “Our biggest joy is the teen program, because teen dancers choose to be here,” says Jennifer. “They’re kids who are motivated and who recognize the therapeutic aspects of movement. They need an outlet and there’s nothing better than dance.” Dance is great for “all things that ail us,” regardless of age, she says. Sixty-nineyear-old dancer Ellen Nichols suffers from Multiple Sclerosis. “From her second lesson she said she was profoundly affected by her ability to move, to get past the constraints of the disease.” The mission at Joy of Dance College is, quite simply, to inspire joy through dancing. “Joy is a specific feeling; a confidence, a happiness that enables you to go out and live positively in the world”, Jennifer says. Ask any of the dancers and they’ll tell you, mission accomplished.

There are few shortcuts to joy. Dance is one. Jennifer Jones

Joy of Dance Centre

95 Danforth Ave @ Broadview 416.406.3262 www.joyofdance.ca

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NEIGHBOURHOODWalking Chinatown East Culinary Stroll by Carolyn Tripp

The smaller, more quaint eastern cousin of the behemoth that is Spadina and Dundas Chinatown West, Chinatown East is an incredible neighbourhood in the heart of Riverdale. Start your stroll a bit to the north to get some fresh air in [1] Riverdale Park East (west end of Broadview Ave.). [2] The Rooster Coffee House (479 Broadview Ave., north of Riverdale Ave., 416-995 -1530) serves up delicious pastries and fresh, organic coffee. Their patio, which is fun even in the chillier weather, has an amazing view of the park. Open from 7am to 7pm every day, it’s great a great place to relax before taking a stroll south. Be sure to check out the twin lion statues at the [3] Eastern Gates, which guard the entrance to East Chinatown at Gerrard Street East and Hamilton Street. Head east, then south to [4] Ka Ka Lucky Seafood and BBQ at 349 Broadview Ave. (416-461-3811), where you’ll find friendly service and incredible prices for Chinese dishes. The steam table is always stocked with sweet-and-sour pork, tofu and veggies. Ka Ka Lucky is the long-time darling of East Chinatown, and if you’re looking for an authentic, delicious Chinese food experience at a great price, look no further. Start your grocery shopping with fresh fish and lobster from [5] Bill’s Lobster at 599 Gerrard St. E., (416778-0943, www.bills-lobster.com). With more than 10 years of business in East Chinatown underneath their belts, Bill and Judy offer the catch of the day, including lobster, oysters, salmon, mussels and seasonal seafood delicacies. If you’re still hungry, pop in next door to Rose’s Vietamese Sandwiches at 601 Gerrard St. E. (416-4069906). With great food and friendly service, they serve up Banh Mi sandwiches featuring a variety of fresh meats and veggies. Try a different one every time you visit. You won’t be disappointed!

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In the mood for something sweet? Make sure that [6] Phoenix Bakery & Restaurant at 613-615 Gerrard St. E. is your next destination. Doubling as a restaurant, Phoenix Bakery is known for its Chinese donuts ($0.70), translated into English as ‘deep fried oil sticks.’ The incredible egg tarts are also incredibly priced, so be sure to pick up a bag to take home for the family. Even with so much selection, these confections go fast. Show up earlier in the day for the best pickings. For dinner, [7] Pearl Court Restaurant is your answer. Located at 633 Gerrard St. E. (416-463-8778, www.pearlcourt.ca), Pearl has the very best dim sum, dumplings, hot pork soup and more. Try the deep fried bean curd with spicy sweet garlic sauce and coriander on your next visit. Open from 9am to 2am, this is a great place for traditional Chinese fare in a traditionally decorated, upscale venue. If you’re looking to impress a date who loves all things Chinese, this is the place to go at any time of day or night. For dessert, stop in at [8] Andrea’s Gerrard St Bakery at 635 Gerrard St. E. (416-

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465-4567, andreasbakery635.com). You can’t go wrong with this western-style bakery. Andrea’s serves delicious cakesto-go and pastries, including delectable butter tarts ($3.00), chocolate chip and spiced ginger cookies ($1.75) and her signature cheesecake made with Monforte chevre cheese ($6.00). After Andrea’s, be sure to stock up on fresh fruit and veggies at [9] Fu Yao Supermarket, 643 Gerrard St. E. (416-7781920, fuyaosupermarket.com), before taking a quick detour to find your personal beast on the [10] Zodiac Charts at the 653 Gerrard St. E. car park. [11] Maple Garden Flowers at 673 Gerrard St. E is your last – and only non-food – stop on this epic journey of all things edible. Pick up a bouquet of fresh cut flowers for yourself or a loved one on your way home. You might want to backtrack and grab a little takeout for the family, but you sure won’t need any dinner!

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2261w1_ZK_Neighbourhood_Living_Ad_WRK.pdf

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November.13.13

10:20 AM

DANFORTH LIVING It only gets better! What a wonderful and vibrant place to live. It has been my home since 1969 and I have helped people move into the neighbourhood since 1984. I love it! From having a great time at the neighbourhood events like our block street sale, walking and doing our daily shopping on the “Danny”, watching kids enjoy Halloween trick or treating (we had about 150 goblins at the door this year), and fabulous Christmas shopping in the increasingly diversified shops and boutiques. And don’t forget the wide world of dining experiences offered. It is “the Taste of the Danforth” every day for us who live here! Thank you “Neighbourhood Living” for putting the focus on the fabulous restaurants, shops and people! Considering buying or selling in our neighbourhood? Looking ahead to buying-up or right-sizing? Considering an eventual sale and want advice updating, renovating or staging your home? Give me a call or email now. The best time to get the right advice is in the planning stage! Put my 30 years of real estate experience to work for you! Happy Holidays!

Zelinde

Zelinde Kaiser

P: 416.560.8430

Salesperson, ABR F: 416.778.4886

C: 416.462.1888 E-mail: zelinde@zelinde.com

www.zelinde.com

We sell gently used Medela breast pumps for up to 60% off their retail prices.

Not Just For Kids

Bumbleberry Kids believes that from pregnancy to birth can be done on a budget without having to sacrifice quality. At BBK we sell carefully curated maternity clothing and accessories that expecting parents need to prepare for baby’s arrival including bathing suits and nursing tops; belly bands and pregnancy pillows. We sell diaper bags like Skip-Hop to a statement piece by Kate Spade at a fraction of their original cost. Breast pumps are a necessity for many moms. 22

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We have receiving blankets, swaddles, cloth diapering systems and products of various brands for committed environmentalists. Decorating a nursery on a budget? We can help. Frequently we carry: cribs, bassinets, change tables and gliders; linens; wall hangings, paintings and unique decorative items to complete a look. One of our favorite lines that we love having the opportunity to sell is the Toronto brand Pi’lo.

Bumbleberry Kids can also help you prepare for baby by offering a shower registry. Reserve all the items you would like and we will hold them until your baby shower!

www.neighbourhoodliving.com

Bumbleberry Kids

1584 Queen St. East, 416 691-5556 bumbleberrykids.blogspot.com bumbleberrykids@gmail.com


Upcoming Events ■

december 6 & 7

Jeff Goodman Glass Studio’s Open Studio Visit one of Canada’s internationally acclaimed glass studios and view one-of-a-kind creations. Meet the creative team and enjoy live blown glass demonstrations while perusing the studio’s finest blown and cast glass work. Friday, December 6, 2013 10am – 8pm & Saturday, December 7, 2013 10am – 6pm, 51 Cranfield Rd, 416-532-8073, jeffgoodmanstudio.com. ■

december 7

Pegasus Community Project Holiday Bazaar 10am-4:30pm, Beaches Recreation Centre, 6 Williamson Road. Gifts that give back! Quality handmade gifts by Pegasus participants, staff and volunteers, from vintage tea towels to snowman soup! Curated items from the famous Pegasus Thrift Store on Kingston Road. Limited edition prints. Homemade chocolates and baked goods. Crafts supplies and beads for jewelry making. Hundreds of gift-worthy items! Info at 416-691-5651, info@pegasustoronto.ca or pegasustoronto.ca ■

december 13

Riverside Antler Breakfast Sponsored by An Sibin Pub, and Culinary Adventure Company, with proceeds going to St John’s The Compassionate Mission. Irish Fry Up w/ Live Music! Friday December 13th, 2 Seatings - 8AM & 10AM, $20 for the Antlers, An Sibin Pub, 709 Queen St E, 647- 748-2111, Riverside-TO.com. ■

december 14 & 15

Against the Grain Theatre Presents: Live Opera Performance with “AtG’s Messiah” Staged by Joel Ivany, choreographed by Jennifer Nichols. Conducted by Christopher Mokrzewski. AtG chorus and orchestra. Singers Jacqueline Woodley, Jacqueline Woodley, Krisztina Szabo, Isaiah Bell. Dec 14th & 15th, Doors 7:30PM, 19+, $40-$60, againstthegraintheatre.com, facebook.com/ AtGTheatre.

december 19

Creative and Fibre Arts Join Cathy Thomson, expert knitter and spinner, in an exploration of the fibre arts. All skill levels welcome. Bring your needles and join with others in fun evenings of knitting and creating with fibre. Free, Dec 19 2013, 5-7pm, S. Walter Stewart Library, 170 Memorial Park Ave, 416-396-3975.

december 21

Arts & Crafts Holiday Show & Sale ArtCave is hosting this one of a kind arts and crafts show of handmade & hand picked pieces from local artists. A perfect place to by unique & quality handmade gifts just in time for the holidays. Shop local, and avoid the malls! During this time ArtCave is also hosting a free Holiday photo booth for families to have their family portraits taken for free! Happy Holidays! Dec 21st, 10am-6pm, 416-670-9450, art-cave.ca/news. ■

january 6

Leslieville Zumba Discount Day & Giveaways Join us at Leslieville Zumba and try a free class! January 6th is discount day! Save 10% on 5 or 10 Zumba class cards and enter a draw to win 5 free classes! Zumba is a Latin inspired dance fitness program that is fun and addictive! Jan 6 2014, 7-8pm, St. Joseph’s Parish Hall, 65 Curzon St, 416686-9832, leslievillezumba.com. ■

january 12 & february 13

Infant CPR & Baby First Aid Baby CPR training is a must for new parents, grandparents, babysitters and nannies. Learn resuscitation skills from an experienced Toronto EMS Paramedic and Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation resuscitation expert. Space is limited. Jan 12 2014, 1-3:30pm, $45 + HST, 1402 Queen St E, 416-606-0116, torontoyogamamas.com/infant-cpr-training.html. ■

january 20 - march 17

Mosaic Story Telling Festival Mosaic offers multicultural storytelling performances every two weeks. The Open Door East End Arts Collective and St. David’s Anglican Church celebrate the diversity and creativity of our rich East End neighbourhood – and our world – through five afternoons of storytelling with tellers and tales from all across the globe. Jan 20th to Mar 17th at 3PM, St. David’s Anglican Church, Parish Hall, PWYC suggested $5, 416-466-3142, mosaicstorytelling.ca. ■

february 7

Get Inspired: Washer Pendants Workshop Learn how to re-purpose washers into fantastic pendants. Free. Supplies provided. Feb 7th, 4-5pm, S. Walter Stewart Library, Auditorium, 170 Memorial Park Ave, 416-396-3975, torontopubliclibrary.ca ■

february 13

T.O. Rising: V-Day Dance Celebration One Billion Rising Toronto is part of a global movement to end violence against women founded by author of The Vagina Monologues and activist Eve Ensler. One Billion Rising Toronto joins together with women and those who love them around the world to raise its voice and to dance for an end to violence against women. We will be joyful, expressive, loud, spontaneous, fun, inclusive, accessible, community driven. We will RISE, DANCE and will SHAKE this city together! 7pm-12am, The Opera House, 735 Queen St E., ticketbreak.com/event_details/5725, facebook.com/ events/352503024839456.

A whimsical Santa ornament from Garden’s Path www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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fashion + beauty

Welcome to Neighbourhood Living’s introduction to fashion, a place for us to feature the designers you know and love, and for you to learn more about the boutiques you’ve always meant to visit. This season we’re pleased to be fashion forward with...

Ziliotto designer and owner, Jennifer Ziliotto Durand, began her career in fashion at the studios of Chanel in Paris, France working along-side Karl Lagerfeld in the accessories department. Upon returning to Toronto, she set out to realize her dream of launching her own label. In 2002, Ziliotto was born. Today, Jennifer has three boutiques in Toronto's Danforth, Queen West and, Bloor West neighbourhoods. She caters to a loyal clientele who praise her for her timeless, comfortable and unique pieces. Her made-in-Canada brand includes organic or bamboo fabrics that are luxurious to the touch. Her clothing is beautifully made; basics that easily take you from day-to-evening and season-to-season. Living | www.neighbourhoodliving.com 24 | Neighbourhood

You can find Ziliotto designs in three Toronto neighbourhoods and at ziliotto.com 764 Queen W (416) 867-1632 592 Danforth (416) 463-0632 2380 Bloor W (416) 604-1102


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Leslieville’s

WOTEVER INC. The hidden gem of the film industry WOTEVER INC. keeps Toronto’s Hollywood North warm. Our city is the third largest screenbased production centre in North America, with more than 1,300 television, movie and commercial projects filmed here each year. Standing on set all day or night —especially from October to March—can get brutally cold. That’s why stars, directors, producers, crew and extras have been trusting the experts at WOTEVER INC. with all their winter gear needs for the past 10 years. The Leslieville company is the hidden gem of the film industry. “A lot of the film people who come to the city from LA are not used to Canadian winters,” says WOTEVER co-owner Bridget Faroo. But with quintessential winter gear from such brands as Canada Goose, Sherpa Adventure Gear, Nobis, Quartz Nature, Kombi, Woods and Ibex, “we can outfit them from head-to-toe. Electric gloves, merino thermal (and electric) underwear, shells, wool insoles, hats, mitts, snow pants, parkas. If we can’t keep them warm and dry, no one can.” WOTEVER INC. also retails to the general public, and despite being a ‘destination’ store at Dundas and Carlaw, it is frequented by neighbourhood shoppers. “We have all kinds of clients who come to us for cold-weather solutions,” says Bridget. “Police officers—who also work as extras and security on film sets —dog walkers, newspaper carriers, crossing guards and hockey moms and dads are among our regular customers. Basically anyone who has to spend time in the cold.” Bridget, who managed wardrobe departments

for production companies, and her business partner, Anne Dixon, a costume designer for stage, film and television, started WOTEVER INC. (the ‘WOT’ stands for Wardobe and Other Things) as an industry house that specialized in renting and retailing all-weather gear, kits and supplies to costume designers and stylists. “As far as we know, we are the only company in the world that has combined this kind of rental and retail for the industry,” says Bridget, and certainly the only business of its kind to open its doors to the neighbourhood. “Part of our mandate is to promote Canadian companies and businesses with a philanthropic, social or ethical mission,” says Bridget. “Let’s face it, only Canadian companies really understand Canadian winters. Kombi is a Quebec company that has been in business for generations and Canada Goose has been an internationally esteemed name for around 60 years.” Sherpa donates a portion from every item sold to The Paldorje Education Fund for less fortunate Sherpa children, many of whom live in impoverished conditions and are the ones who suffer the most when a Sherpa guide is injured or killed in a climbing accident. Ibex is trying to keep its manufacturing strictly North American. With manufacturers like that on your side, “there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing,” Bridget is fond of saying. “The bottom line is, if you buy the right gear that fits correctly, it will keep you warm on the coldest Canadian winter day. If that weren’t true, we’d be out of business!”

WOTEVER INC. • 11 Dickens St. • 416-461-1033 wotever-inc.com • info@wotever-inc.com 26

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DESSY

Belo Fashions B O U T I Q U E

4 2 0

R O N C E S V A L L E S

www.belofashionsboutique.com

A V E N U E

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6 4 7 . 3 4 9 . 8 8 2 2

brides@belofashionsboutique.com www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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The ‘head to toe’ beauty by Tracey Coveart

n o s m o h T a e r d An

Growing up in a Campbellford, Ontario, salon with her hairdresser mom, “it took me a while to fall in love with hair,” Andrea Thomson admits. “In fact, for years, I hated everything to do with it.” She wanted a career in the fashion industry, but her parents convinced her that her future was in hair. With hair, you have a trade, they said, and a job, even in a recession. She took their advice and went to hairdressing school—and hated every minute of it. It wasn’t until five years into her career when she started doing hair for photoshoots and fashion that the pendulum finally swung the other way. “When I started to see hair as an art form, I fell in love with it,” says Andrea. It was while she was living and working in a Victoria, BC, salon that she met Jehn Philip. But Andrea wasn’t cut out for island life. She moved back east to Belleville, and eventually made her way to Toronto. Jehn was working at Flaunt by then and introduced Andrea to Ivan. Andrea knew immediately that, “This is where I’m supposed to be. I like making people feel beautiful. And I like to think that I bring them happiness.” The girl who once hated hair is now obsessed. “I just love hair. I love everything about it. I’m always studying trends; looking at photoshoots for inspiration. I owe it to my clients to know what’s hot; to change things up and make sure it never gets boring or old; and to always be at the top of my game. And I’m blessed with clients who trust me to do whatever I want with their hair.” Now 29 and 11 years into her dream career, she doesn’t choose sides. “I love short hair. I love playing with the shape; working with all the cowlicks. I love the challenge. Right now I am really getting into barbering, which is scary, because if you screw up a short hair cut you almost have to shave the head. There’s no room for error.” At the other end of the spectrum, “With long hair you don’t have to worry about cowlicks, but I get my workout, blow drying and styling. My goal is to revolutionize the ponytail. Girls who have long hair totally get it.” Andrea knows there’s a lot of pressure on the person standing behind the chair but she’s okay with that. “As a stylist, you can make or break somebody’s day,” she says, quoting studies that have shown 85 per cent of women who have a bad hair day have a bad day in general. But Andrea flips that statistic around. “I like to think that 85 per cent of women who have a good hair day have a good day in general.” And that’s what makes hair so rewarding. “Every 45 minutes,” she says, “I get to make someone’s day.” Hours: Monday 12-8pm Tuesday 12-9pm Friday 11am-7pm Saturday 9:30am-4pm Sunday 10am-6pm

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team at Flaunt Boutique Jehn Philip used to be a piercer. “Then I decided I wanted to something a little more grownup, without actually growing up.” A career behind a desk was definitely out. “I wanted a job that would be different every day; a job that would allow me to be creative; a job where I could be social and make people happy.” Working with hair seemed like the perfect choice. She trained in Vancouver, lived and worked on the island for a while, then came to Flaunt as a colourist/stylist four and a half years ago. Now 28, “I love it,” she says. Jehn has a particular fondness for colour. “Everybody colours their hair—especially in a neighbourhood like Leslieville, which is full of artists and photographers and filmmakers. They don’t have to conform to professional standards.” But even when you have to maintain a corporate appearance, there are cool things you can do, says Jehn, like hiding a panel of colour underneath your hair so you can look conservative in the office by day and funky when you go out at night. Colouring long hair is especially rewarding. “People with long hair crave change but they don’t want to commit to chopping it off. With a cut, there’s no going back, but with colour you can switch things up without taking the plunge.” As for cutting, “The big change—going from long to short—is very exciting. Donation cuts are the best because these people grow their hair with the intention of cutting it so you know they’re ready. With others, you always wonder what’s going on in their life? Is this a stable decision? As a stylist, I feel it’s my responsibility to try to talk them out of it. If they’re going through a dramatic change—like women who’ve just had a baby—I try to get them to wait a couple of months.” The bottom line, says Jehn, is that “your hair has to fit your lifestyle. There’s no point having gorgeous hair when you leave if you can’t take care of it when you get home. Unless you’re going to be married to your flatiron, a geometric Vidal Sassoon haircut doesn’t make sense. But a busy woman juggling a job and a family can have a great wash-and-go hairstyle if she has the right cut and the right products.” Jehn’s clients depend on her to help them make the right choices. “I’m honoured that people let me take them through the different stages of their life and trust me enough to take chances with new styles and colours. I started cutting their hair before they had partners and kids. Now I know their whole family. I did their hair for their job interview; for their wedding; for their baby’s christening. I get these little glimpses into their lives and it’s really cool to know that I’m a part of it.”

Jehn Philip

Hours: Monday-Friday 1-9pm

Flaunt Boutique 260 Carlaw Ave., Suite 101B • 416-469-4826 • flauntboutique.ca bookings@flauntboutique.ca • info@flauntboutique.ca Like us on Facebook at FlauntBoutique-Toronto. All the cool kids are doing it! www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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gift guide

BEADWORKS Create your own Accessories Jewellery Making Workshops Custom Jewellery

ACRYLIC SOLAR U . V. G E L BIO GEL BRISA GEL SHELLAC-CND AXXIUM-OPI PINK & WHITE

Jewellery Repair Children’s Birthday Parties Party Space For Rent

1 7 9 D A N F O R T H AV E , T O R O N T O , O N M 4 K 1 N 2

complimentary herbal tea or spring water + available private parties Call us at 416.778.8288 or book online at info@UrbanNails.ca

www.beadworksjo.com

“Smooth and creamy or dark and dreamy? Either way, I’ll take your breath away.”

647.922.6991

mthompsonchocolates.com |

416-778-8288

INFO@URBANNAILS.CA W W W. U R B A N N A I L S . C A

2154 Queen St. East 416.693.0780

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The neighbourhood spot for gals on the go, a stylish Danforth salon with a luxe-looking backdrop and a warm, friendly atmosphere.

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179 DANFORTH AVENUE

www.UrbanNails.ca


photo courtesy of Patagonia

Gifts of Warmth, Fun & Adventure

Swing into savings with our special ‘no tax’ pricing for all of December Club Threads Members save even more!

950 Kingston Rd. Toronto, ON

416.690.1806

www.threadslifestyle.com

mon-sat 10 - 6 sun 11 - 5

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NeighbourhoodSource Guide w Dorly Designs

w Parade Clothing Boutique

2138A Queen St E • 647-345-4300 • 4cats.com/thebeaches

1173 Queen St E • 416-778-0009 • dorlydesigns.com

The Best, Most Fun Art Studio Ever!

Indie Boutique for Trendsetters

261 Danforth Ave • 416-461-8833 Parade315@yahoo.ca • Paradeonthedanforth.blogspot.ca

A quality arts education can make a dramatic difference in a child’s life. We use professional artists’ materials to create a variety of projects, including silkscreening, clay, sculpture, drawing, painting and stop motion animation. Messy, informative and fun. Art is good! Classes, parties, workshops and camps for ages 2 to adult.

Jewelry, clothing and eco-friendly accessories designed, created and produced in Toronto. Staff show you how to accessorize, style and complement, for a look that is enviable and unique. Custom orders and design services available.

w 4Cats Art Studio

w El Pipil 267 Danforth Ave • 416-465-9625

w Aroo

A Danforth Fixture For More Than 20 Years

320 Danforth Ave, Unit 4 • 416-463-7690

Natural, Fashionable Styles We are a family business providing natural, fashionable clothing for the neighbourhood woman. We support Toronto designers, including May Aruj, Shwing & Animale, and offer personalized service to help clients discover their fashion flair.

El Pipil is a one-stop shop offering everything from accessories for the home, to women’s fashions and jewelry. Great brands, including Tribal clothing, French Dressing Jeans, Espe handbags and Tashi jewelry. Open M-F 10am-7pm, Sat 10am-6pm and Sun 12pm-5:30pm.

w Everywhere Garment Co. w Beach Business Hub

793 Broadview Ave (north of Danforth Ave) • 416-466-6202

2181 Queen St. E., #301 • 647-748-1311 info@beachbusinesshub.ca • beachbusinesshub.ca

Activewear, Swimwear, and Leisure Clothes Manufactured on location. 100% Canadian quality. Always new designs. Custom fitting available.

Coworking for entrepreneurs and freelancers. We are the number one neighbourhood resource and networking hub for small business owners east of the Don Valley. Affordable workspace and meeting rooms when you need it, plus networking with other creative small-business owners. Contact Martina for details.

w Birthia 1882 Queen St E • 647-342-7894

Handmade by Local Designers Handcrafted kids’ clothing and accessories and home décor, made with love by 17 GTA designers. We also carry recycled products, including duct tape wallets and purses.

w Boa 2116B Queen St E • 416-694-6867 • theboaroom.com

Stylish, Unique and Affordable If you dread being seen in the same dress or top as someone else, then you will love Boa! Our in-store stylists will help you find the right fit for your body.

w Flying Yogi 007-245 Carlaw Ave • 647-993-9644 • theflyingyogi.ca

Super fun workout for the entire family The Flying Yogi, offers classes in Suspension Yoga with the revolutionary OmGym Suspension System, combining traditional yoga poses with resistance training and aerobatics.

w Incanto 275 Danforth Ave • 416-778-5978

Fashion Clothes for Women Wanting to Dress Up For women who see clothing as an investment and enjoy looking good. Quality French and Italian clothes and many unique pieces. We also carry Canadian manufacturers. Cartise dresses, tops and pants.

w Jexy & Jax 375 Danforth Ave • 416-465-5557

Unique Apparel Made in Canada Jexy & Jax carries two of its own unique in-house designer labels, and boasts a selection of lifestyle apparel appropriate for casual and formal wear. Our mens’ and ladies’ attire is sourced, designed and manufactured in Canada.

w BMA Cleaning Services 647-206-1053

22 Years Experience Cleaning Houses, condos, stores, salons, clinics and help with parties (day or night). Reliable Maria is honest and responsible. References available on request.

w Claire Watson MS, Psychotherapist 1395 Bayview Ave • 416-559-5537 • leasidetherapycentre.com

Parent Child Psychotherapy (birth to four) Attachment-based therapy for parents who have difficulty forming a bond due to depression, marital problems, unresolved grief/trauma or because their infant has medical, adoptive or developmental needs. Loving relationships lead to confident parents and resilient children.

w Mira & Sons 2238 Queen St E • 416-699-4005

One of a Kind Fashion and Consignment Shop Designer names and vintage. Second hand – nearly new. End of the line – new. Custom-made draperies and curtains, alterations. Vintage and new jewelry, fascinators, shoes and designer handbags.

Since 1975 “When you don’t think like everyone, you don’t have to dress like everyone.” From film and advertising execs to teachers, real-estate agents and moms, Parade offers fashions by Susana Monaco, Bailey 44, Alexia Admor, Fine Collection, Michael Kors and more. “Only by supporting local business can we ensure our creative survival.”

w Pert Lingerie 1817 Queen St E • 416-230-8826 • pertlingerie.ca

New Local Lingerie Boutique We want our customers to feel comfortable and fabulous every day. Inside this charming, boudoir-style boutique, you will find a tasteful selection of basic, higher-end lingerie, nightwear, loungewear and hoisery from a variety of European and North American labels.

w Snob 388 Carlaw Ave #202F • 416-778-8778 • snobstuff.com

Unique and Innovative Pieces Owner Denise Zidel returns from her monthly travels to a dozen African countries with authentic African furniture and accessories embellished with ostrich feathers, zebra skins and horns.

w Spiros Custom Tailors 335 Danforth Ave • 416-466-6646

Men’s & Women’s Custom Suits for 35 Years Hand measured, hand fitted, fully customized to the individual in any style that the customer prefers. Up-to-date on the latest fashion trends.

w Tilt Fitness 416-561-1013 • andrew@tiltfitness.net • tiltfitness.net

Group Training Great for friends, family or co-workers with common goals. Workout is drill-based and class size is kept to a maximum of 8 participants for more personal attention. Contact us and start your own group class today!

w The Toronto Tool Library & Makerspace 1803 Danforth Ave, East of Coxwell www.TorontoToolLibrary.com Got projects on the mind? Tools available for home renovation, gardening, store upkeep, including a Kitchen Library, a Seed Exchange, and weekly Wednesday community nights. Come visit!

w Yoka 2115J Queen St E • 416-686-0836 • yokafashions.com

Your Local Beach Fashion Boutique For individuals seeking unique and interesting everyday pieces. Specializing in European brands with a classic twist: men’s and ladies’ clothing, footwear, bags and everything in between. Let our staff dress you from head to toe! Check in store for current promotions or discover us on Facebook.

Neighbourhood Living www.neighbourhoodliving.com 32 Call 416-402-4283 or email: b5@sympatico.ca to find out how to introduce yourself to the neighbourhood! |

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A CHRISTMAS TRADITION IN THE BEACH This festive season, make Pippins tea shop in The Beach your one-stop shopping destination for everyone on your Christmas list. From stocking stuffers to gift baskets to exquisite packages for under the tree, owner Barb Snow DeAngelis is proud to offer an eclectic mix of made in Canada giftware and fine international china perfect for any holiday occasion. Start with the teas, over 150 different Pippins teas, Bewleys, Taylors of Harrogate, Clipper, Yorkshire Teas, Tea Forté. “And of course we have our ever-popular Pippins house blend ‘Christmas’ tea,” laughs Barb. “It’s a running joke with our customers. From January to November the label reads Pippins Winter Blend. In December we turn the jar so the Pippins Special Christmas Blend label faces out. People love it so much they want it all year round!” And Pippins sells everything tea related: tea pots (more than 90), tea cups and saucers, and full tea sets. There is Emma Bridgewater china, Sophie Conran for Portmeirion teapots and dinnerware, La Rochere French glassware, a huge assortment of vintage teacups and saucers, and at least 80 different mugs. “This year we’re going big with Brown Bettys made in Stoke on Trent,” says Barb with a twinkle, and there are commemorative teacups, saucers and mugs for Queen Elizabeth’s Jubilee and Coronation and for the birth and baptism of Prince George of Cambridge. There are tea gadgets, tea canisters, teacup puzzles, tea towels and tea cozies, including a Dutch version that looks like a giant handbag with a clasp on the top. “We have beautiful wooden tea chests that are very hard to find,” says Barb, “and we’re carrying a new line of tea party supplies – Talking Tables Tea Party Accessories – that includes tea party crackers, invitations and cards, paper plates, napkins and bunting and more.” For the little ones, Pippins offers the whimsical Maileg Danish Mice in Matchboxes and children’s china tea sets, including Alice and Wonderland. For the sweet tooth,

“we have a whole table of festive foods,” says Barb. Mouthwatering rum and double cream Christmas puddings from England; chocolate dipped orange peel, chocolate dipped Australian ginger, Chocolate Popcorn Sensation, chocolate covered potato chips, and peanut butter and jam chocolate bites; shortbread and cookies in tins shaped like bagpipers and music boxes; Greaves jams and marmalades; and authentic Turkish delight that Barb purchases from a local Turkish lady. There is a whole window of Christmas novelties from festive aprons, tea towels, tablecloths and napkins, to beautiful tree ornaments and holiday Bearington Bears. And then there’s the giftware. Slippers by Hides in Hand. Jewelry made from teacups. Delightful gurgle pots. Soaps and lotions. Travel mugs and infusers. Tongue-in-cheek Anne Taintor wall and engagement calendars, luggage tags, change purses and magnets. Flip and Tumble Tote bags. And a wide selection of Beach memorabilia: hoodies and sweatshirts by Overkill, night lights, magnets, canvas prints, tea towels, totes, calendars, cards and books. Gift packs and baskets – lovingly pre-selected or made-toorder – are a great idea for the busy holiday season, and Barb and her staff will happily ship your special package anywhere in the world, from Oshawa to Australia.

With so much to choose from and so many ways to please, why not make this year a Pippins Christmas?

Pippins Tea Company Inc. • Simply Good Taste • 2098 Queen St. E (at Wineva) • 416-694-7772 • Pippins.ca

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food + celebration

Up front in the kitchen at Edward’s 1290 by

If you’ve ever had a meal out in Toronto, chances are Edward Levesque has served you. “I waited tables for a long time,” says the executive chef and owner of Edward’s 1290 in Leslieville, formerly known as Edward Levesque’s Kitchen. In 1992, Edward decided to get on the other side of the food service equation and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College. After graduation he worked as a chef in numerous restaurants around the

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Tracey Coveart

city. “I never stayed very long at any of them,” he says. “If they didn’t change the menu in six months I moved on. I figured I had nothing else to learn.” Edward got his greatest on-the-job training as the antipasto chef working at the elbow of celebrity chef Massimo Capra at showbiz chic Prego Della Piazza in Yorkville, a favourite hangout for A-list actors and the place to go for Saturday afternoon lunch in its heyday in the 90s.

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A Leslieville resident since 1992–“before Value Village!”–Edward worked at Joe Rana’s restaurant for three days in 2001 before spotting the ‘For Rent’ sign in the window at 1290 Queen Street East. With good friends backing him financially, “I went to see the landlord and took it on the spot. I opened Edward Levesque’s Kitchen six weeks later– without a car–and lost 10 pounds.” Day number one was hell, he says, but 12 years later, “I am very content. People call


Roast Chicken with Garlic

me the pioneer. I don’t know about that, but somedays I do feel like the last man standing. There’s something to be said for running an independent restaurant for this long.” So what is it that has kept Edward’s tables full—especially on weekends when hungry customers are lined up out the door for brunch—when so many restaurants close down after a year? “Good honest flavours,” says Ed, who fell in love with food at the age of 24. “We’re not hiding anything here.” A good deal of the credit goes to his ingredients, which are wholesome, organic and fresh. His ethically raised, grainfed beef is delivered once a week in small numbered packages from the Enright Cattle Company outside Tweed, Ontario, and is cooked fresh never frozen. Hooked supplies Edward’s fresh fish. Vegetables (Swiss chard, leeks and kale are still being harvested) and herbs—coriander, marjoram, oregano, chives, mint, lovage, basil, garlic, parsley, sage—are grown on a 52-acre pesticide-free farm west of the city in Dunnville, which is owned and groomed with love by Edward’s partner. The herbs are moved

indoors to a greenhouse for the winter so they can be hand picked all year long. Poultry— free-range ducks and chickens—come from the farm next door. “The only thing you’ll find in a can in my restaurant is tomatoes,” says Edward, and that’s only when he runs out of the San Marzano tomatoes he brings down from the farm. Then there’s the food, which Edward describes as simple fare—“nothing fancy.” But that’s grossly understated chef speak. Consider some recent items on the weekend brunch menu: sauteed cremini mushrooms, stilton, chives on challah toast; two poached eggs with curried puy lentils, lamb sausage, paratha, coriander and toasted cumin; smoked trout and caramelized onion scramble; and grilled chicken salad, avocado, mango, toasted hazelnuts, feta, chickpeas, tomato on California greens. Appetizers on the dinner menu, which changes at least monthly, include duck confit wontons, apple/celeriac slaw with toasted peanuts and concord grape/ginger dipping sauce; and chive biscuit sliders with smoked trout, Matsu apple, aged cheddar and Pommery mustard. For a main, try the butter

poached Maine diver scallops, parsnip puree, Brussels sprouts and lobster cream. Just reading the menu is enough to make a hungry diner salivate, but it’s the way the flavour makes your tastebuds sing that is so extraordinary. “If I’m making a rosemary and mushroom sauce for my ribs, that’s what I want you to taste.” Edward’s secret? Lots of flavour, and very little butter and salt. “I have a steady supply of dried herbs all year long and I make my own oils and vinegars. I don’t need a lot of butter.” As for salt, “My customers are a sensible demographic. They get salt in every processed food they buy. Why would they want it here?” And finally, there’s Edward himself, who is there at 10 in the morning, blanching the frites, reducing the stock and making the stew for the day. At 54, he still likes working hard, and other than swimming in the tropics, there’s no place he’d rather be than up front in the kitchen of his own Leslieville restaurant. Part of what sold Edward on 1290 Queen 12 years ago was the kitchen in the window. “I like the honesty of the kitchen being at the front. I see everyone come in hungry and leave fed and happy.” And just like people want to be more connected to the farmers who grow their food, they want to have that relationship with the chef who prepares their meal. “Being up front gives customers the opportunity to look me in the eye and either praise me or criticize me,” although the latter is hard to imagine. What does the future hold for this Leslieville food fixture? “I’m not sure I want to die with a frying pan in my hand,” says Edward with a laugh, but he stops short, as if that might not be such a bad way to go, after all.

Lamb Leg stuffed with Chick Peas and Apricots

Edward’s 1290 1290 Queen Street East 416-465-3600 Twitter @Edwards1290 Facebook.com/EdwardLevesques

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Helping you celebrate the season at

Masellis Supermarket BY

Allison Anthony

The impressive wall of panettone boxes is the first indication that the holiday season has arrived at Masellis Supermarket on The Danforth. These uniquely shaped packages contain fluff y sweetened bread that has become a staple in homes around the world during Christmas and New Year celebrations. Panettone bread originated in Milan, and by the early 20th century it was produced in large quantities and sold throughout Italy. It is a difficult and time-consuming confection to prepare. The dough must rise several times—a process that can take up to 20 hours—to produce the recognizable domed shape and the traditional light and airy texture. Traditionally served on December 26 after the enormous holiday feast, panettone is also served before and after Christmas for breakfast with coffee and as an afternoon snack. As if it is not rich enough, in some regions of Italy it is topped with mascarpone cheese and consumed with a sweet liqueur, such as amaretto. The Masellis family carries several different brands of panettone in the store, in a wide variety of flavours, and they have been

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sharing their holiday traditions and delectable treats with the neighbourhood and the rest of Toronto for more than 50 years. “Most Italian families have the classic panettone made with candied fruit and raisins,” says Andy Masellis, “but we also carry ones filled with tiramisu or Limoncello. You can even buy a panettone filled with prosecco—an Italian style of sparkling wine.” Whatever your tastes, Masellis Supermarket has the perfect panettone for every holiday occasion—including the Tre Marie Il Pandoro, which is shaped like a star and dotted with chocolate morsels. These golden wrapped boxes are adorned with bows and make for a perfect hostess gift during the holiday season. The Danforth store, which is run by Andy, Costantino and Mario Masellis, with help from their mother Tina, has always been a family affair. The three brothers grew up here, working alongside their late father Leonardo, who opened the grocery in 1959. Half a century later, Masellis Supermarket remains true to Leonardo’s values of quality service and commitment to the neighbourhood and

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is one of the oldest family run businesses on The Danforth. The impressive selection of deli meats and cheeses makes this small store the perfect place to shop for any festive gathering. Their delicious Italian-style meatballs are a customer favourite and do not contain any bread or fillers. Masellis also sells Ontario rabbit and several different types of sausages, with and without fennel. The holiday turkeys are ethically sourced from a local farmer in Queensville who, like the Masellis brothers, believes in pride and tradition. All of the turkeys are free range, antibiotic- and hormone-free and can be ordered in a variety of sizes, depending on how many people are coming to dinner. Andy says they have sold turkeys as small as

13 pounds and as large as 30 pounds, “but they need to be pre-ordered, preferably two to three weeks before the holiday. The earlier the order is placed, the better chance I have of getting you the perfect turkey.” While customers can order a frozen bird any time of the year, fresh turkeys make the holidays extra special. Torrone is another traditional winter treat and Masellis Supermarket specialty. The nougat candy—made with egg whites and honey—comes in a variety of flavours and textures: soft and chewy or crunchy with toasted nuts. Much like panettone, torrone is eaten after lunch and dinner from Christmas Day until January 6. If torrone is not to your

tastes, Masellis also caries an assortment of specialized biscotti made by Forno Cultura in addition to tasty treats by Pernigotti, a purveyor of fine Italian chocolate. “Multiculturalism is one of the best things about Toronto,” says Andy. “There is so much that is available to us here.” And year after year, the Masellis family continues to do its part, making sure their customers and neighbours have access to the fine Italian foods and friendly service they have come to expect over the past 54 years. This holiday season, shop at Masellis Supermarket. Support tradition, celebrate local businesses and enjoy some of the best seasonal delectables the city has to offer.

Masellis Supermarket • 906 Danforth Ave • 416-465-7901 www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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“Canada’s Best Shortbread” is Leslieville’s best-kept secret! “Crisp on the outside with a meltingly tender heart” Cynthia David - Food and Drink Magazine

As voted by the National Post

Visit the Coach House Shortbread Company Store on Carlaw Ave, where you may purchase our many delicious sweet and savoury Shortbread flavours – baked right on the premises NEW THIS YEAR:

Patty Watteyne Photography

‘Coach House Shortbread Food Artisan Collection’ – the highest quality food artisan products we could find, filled to overflowing in beautiful sisal French Market Bags. A gorgeous gift for the foodie in your life. Order online or at the store for pick up.

Open 10am -5pm Mon-Sat and 11am - 4pm Sundays in December 2013 or by appointment • Check website for 2014 Hours

235 Carlaw Ave. Lower Lobby,Toronto, Ontario, 416-907-8356 info@shortbread.ca • www.shortbread.ca 38

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North Pole offers best Sicilian treats in the city BY

Behind an unassuming storefront on The Danforth just east of Greenwood awaits a treasure for the tastebuds and for the soul. Those ‘in the know’ create a steady stream throughout the day, calling out “Hi Lucy,” as they step through the door under the faded North Pole Bakery sign. They place their order—a hot sandwich made with a freshly baked crusty roll, or a cappuccino and a cannolo—some partaking right in the bakery because they can’t wait until they get home with their tasty treats. While filling orders, Lucy Liozzo catches up on the news of the day from people who have been customers for decades, regulars who are now friends. Even when they move away from the ‘hood, they return for food and friendship. People travel from Oshawa, Whitby and Woodbridge, all over, she says. Following a story in a daily paper in 1983, customers turned up, paper in hand, from Ottawa and Montreal. A photograph of Lucy and her sisters that accompanied the story hangs on the wall and is printed on her business cards. Lucy has built her business on friendship. “People move away but come back (to the bakery). It’s like coming home.” Once in a while, she used to work in the kitchen, but customers would march through the store and into the

Open Monday to Saturday. Closed Sunday

Connie Adair

back to see her. Now she stays in front, resting on a stool by the cash register for a few moments between customers. Lucy knows just about everyone who comes in, but recalls one stranger’s visit last year. He came in and left with six Sicilian cannoli. A week later, customers called Lucy to tell her that Toronto food critic Rob Gentile had raved about her cannoli in a newspaper feature on the city’s best food. Everything—cookies, cheesecakes, pies, the popular round pretzels called tarallini, semolina bread and hot table specials, including two pasta dishes and pizzas—is made fresh. In addition to the bakery, Lucy also caters small weddings and holiday parties. Word of mouth brings new customers, like Jodi Blakey, who moved to the neighbourhood a year ago. “I’ve heard about it at parties in Leslieville and The Beach. People are raving about this place,” she says as Lucy busies herself cutting a warm roll and filling it with veal parmigiana and peppers. “I came to see what it was all about.” Lucy emigrated to Canada from Bari, Italy, in 1965. She took over North Pole in November 1973, intending to stay “a little bit.” In November, North Pole Bakery celebrated its

40th anniversary. And Lucy has no intention of leaving her customers without their sensational Sicilian cannoli anytime soon. “As long as I’m healthy and my brain works straight, I will be here.”

1210 Danforth Avenue, Toronto Lucy Loizzo • 416.466.6435 www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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BEST Cannoli and Zeppole!

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A tale of two shortbreads by

As a young girl growing up in Glasgow, Scotland, Mary Macleod learned to bake a patois shortbread with her Scottish mother and French grandmother. When she emigrated to Canada at the age of 22, she brought her family’s secret shortbread recipe with her, opening Mary Macleod’s Shortbread in a tiny shop under the marquee of the Capitol Theatre in Toronto in 1981. Hers was the first business in Canada devoted exclusively to baking hand-made shortbread, and her cookies were an instant hit. But it was her signature Chocolate

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Tracey Coveart

Crunch shorbread that made her famous. “Mary had a friend who was a chocolatier,” explains daughter-in-law Sharon Macleod. Mary, a lifelong chocolate lover, wanted to marry the two flavours. It was something that had never been done before, and something that was considered a bit of a sacrilege in the cloistered world of shortbread, where ‘variety’ refers to shape, not flavour. “The Scottish Society of Canada sent Mary a strongly worded letter stating that she could not put chocolate

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in a cookie and call it shortbread,” laughs Sharon. But Mary was undeterred. “She mailed them a sample and they sent a followup letter apologizing, telling her of course she could call her Chocolate Crunch cookie a shortbread. It was delicious!” In those early, experimental days of the Chocolate Crunch, Mary used her neighbours as guinea pigs: customers, shopkeepers and the police officers who worked at the station around the corner. “The men and women in blue would


the business. I had to bear two grandchildren and celebrate my 10th wedding anniversary before I could be trusted with the family formula!” Sharon started working weekends at Mary Macleod’s, then came on board full time in 2010, heading straight into the test kitchen. After more than two years of research, experimentation and taste testing, she launched her Maple Crunch cookie this September. It may be Sharon’s flavour, but it’s a Mary Macleod’s Shortbread cookie through and through. “I used the same principles Mary does. I started with a clean ingredient deck. All our ingredients are 100 per cent natural and preservative-free, and we source the best products in the world—like the maple—which comes from Quebec. Then I balanced the dough, removing some of the sugar from the traditional recipe as I added the maple sugar.” The result is a melt-in-your mouth butter cookie that is not overly sweet, riddled with crunchy explosions of delicate maple flavour and finished off with a crown of pure maple on top. For Sharon, the choice for her first cookie was an easy one. “Maple is the quintessential Canadian flavour and it ties in perfectly with our company goal: to be the top quality Canadian shortbread.” Right now, the test kitchen at the shop on Queen Street East sits empty. With Christmas just a few weeks away, there is no time for experimentation. All hands are on deck filling festive boxes and tins with Mary Macleod’s Shortbread that will be tucked away under Christmas trees across the city and around the world. But after the holiday rush, Mary and Sharon will put on their aprons and start work on their newest shortbread cookie. It should be ready for release by September of next year. Until then, the mother/daughter-inlaw baking duo will be looking for guinea pigs...

come by to check on her when she was baking at three in the morning and sample her latest trial batch,” says Sharon. There were plenty of disasters as Mary tried to figure out how to keep the chocolate solid. “It melted. It marbled. The shortbread turned brown. The officers were well fed!” The cookie took 18 months to perfect, but when Mary finally released it to the general public, there were lineups outside the store. “Within two hours she’d be sold out and had to close.” Never content to rest on her laurels, Mary has been experimenting and perfecting in the test kitchen ever since, bringing on new flavours like Dutch Cocoa, Hazelnut Chocolate Crunch, Orange Chocolate, Mint Chocolate, Espresso Chocolate, Rolled Coconut, Cranberry Almond, Butterscotch Bars and Wholewheat Walnut, in addition to the always popular Traditional. “She

starts with her traditional shortbread recipe, then looks for ingredients that will complement it in a variety of textures and shapes and sizes. Then she goes into the kitchen and “plays,” paying close attention not just to taste but also to smell, texture, visual appeal and shelf life. “We taste test the raw dough for flavour and consistency, then get our friends, family and customers to try the baked product. It’s more a creative process than a scientific one,” says Sharon. “We’re looking for the yum factor. If people like it–if we like it–then we know we’re on the right track.” The newest flavour on offer at Mary Macleod’s Shortbread is Maple Crunch–except the credit for this cookie goes to Mary’s daughter-in-law. “This is the first flavour I’ve ever developed–with Mary’s approval, of course!” says Sharon. Married into the family in 1997, “I’ve been slowly easing into www.neighbourhoodliving.com

Mary Macleod’s Shortbread 639 Queen Street E 416-461-4576 www.marymacleod.ca Open 7 days a week |

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Danforth bistro is a neighbourhood pioneer by

Allison Anthony

Melanie Ferreira and Arul Chettiar may believe in the ‘less is more’ approach to life but the fresh handmade burger on their lunch menu disagrees with them. It arrives on the table stacked high with thick bacon, ripe tomato and oozing with cheese. It’s no wonder the Bistro Burger has become a lunchtime favourite for everyone who orders it. Melanie’s Bistro opened in 2008, a pioneer in an area that continues to grow. “We believe in this neighbourhood,” Melanie says. The couple not only lives and works in The Danforth and East Lynn Park area, but they also shop and play here as well. They take great pride in giving value for money and supporting other local businesses, such as Silly Goose and Plank Road Market. Classical cooking techniques are executed wonderfully during both lunch and dinner service and the Newfoundland Breakfast Special with poached eggs, hollandaise and homemade cod cakes makes for a delicious brunch choice on the weekends. The artfully selected wine list reflects the same care and attention that Chef Arul displays in the kitchen. Great finds like the Certified Angus Beef striploin or the unique ‘free form’ lasagna are popular for dinner but it is the panko crusted crab cakes that their guests are always talking about. And to finish, you can’t beat the the fabulously decadent desserts that are always made in-house. In addition to the great beer and wine selection, Melanie’s Bistro also participates in the Bring Your Own Wine program. Although the regular corkage fee throughout the week is very reasonable, on Wednesday nights the price drops to a mere $10 per bottle. Dining at Melanie’s Bistro is refined, yet unpretentious and offers high quality cuisine in a warm, inviting atmosphere where families are welcome, returning guests are greeted by name and everyone leaves with a full belly and a smile.

3 course prix fixe Sunday Steak Dinner at $32 3 course prix fixe Dinner $28 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

Brunch on Saturday & Sunday 10am-3pm

1870 Danforth Avenue • 416-422-1870 www.melaniesbistro.ca

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For all your party needs! 1101 Victoria Park and St.Clair • 416-755-9960

Because Christmas without Mary Macleod’s Shortbread is unthinkable

We deliver sweetness - anywhere! Place orders early. Order online or shop in person.

639 Queen Street East • 416.461.4576 • www.marymacleod.ca

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home + garden

Grow food, not lawns with Truly Local Scott Sneidzins is going to revolutionize the way we eat, one rooftop, yard, garage, basement, living room wall and kitchen cupboard at a time. “We can grow our own fresh produce all year round in Toronto,” says Scott, whose company, Truly Local, is turning city dwellers into urban farmers. From fortified soil to hydroponics to aquaponics, both inside the house and out, Scott and his team are helping people to find the perfect balance between living comfortably in their space and growing their own food. “You can grow 100 plus tomatoes in your sunny window sill and all the leafy greens–arugula, spinach, mesclun mix and romaine lettuce–you can eat on an eight foot by 10 foot vertical wall,” says Scott. “Urban space is limited, so we need to be creative. Think ‘up’ by using sunexposed walls and large windows or introduce grow lighting to transform any vertical space into a green eatable space.” Install a countertop growbed for your wheatgrass or food-growing cabinets on the walls in your hallway to maximize unused space. Do you have a dark little corner somewhere in your basement? Mushrooms and sprouts don’t need light and they’re super easy to grow. Nutrient-dense sprouts–great on sandwiches and in salads–can be harvested within days.

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Outside, add a lean-to greenhouse to the back of your home or a rooftop garden to your garage. Raised garden beds work well in front or back yards, as do all-season hoop houses, and there are a variety of hydroponic systems that are perfect for balconies and decks. If you have grass, consider pulling it up and revitalizing the soil to grow foods, not lawns. “Indoor renovations and structural framing can be done year round,” says Scott, “but it’s not too late to think about the outdoors.” This is the perfect time of year to install your raised beds and start drafting your farm plan so you’re ready to plant as soon as the frost is out of the ground next spring.” Truly Local will be holding classes in successional planning and aquaponics in January and February to get people of all ages growing their own food indoors and out, and kids’ workshops will give the next generation of urban farmers a chance to get their hands dirty and their minds engaged. “A succession plan ensures that you plant in a way that allows you to harvest continuously throughout the year from your spring, summer and fall crops,” explains Scott, “while aquaponics is a sustainable indoor ecosystem in which fish waste creates fertilizer for your plants and your plants create clean water for your fish. And everything is edible!” Scott’s vision is to bring the neighbourhood together over food. “We want people to eat well and to live healthy,” he says. The movement starts with a free on-site consultation with Truly Local. From there, Scott and his team will develop an individualized farm plan that meets your needs and your budget. You decide how much help you need, from the building of your farm, to planting and maintenance, to garden replenishing, to farming supplies, to weekly educational workshops, seminars and free food documentary movie nights. “We want to change the conversation,” says Scott, who makes sure that everything he has learned is available free online. “Instead of people asking, ‘How’s the weather?’ We want them to ask, ‘How’s your farm?’”

Truly Local 245 Carlaw Ave., Unit 4 647-799-0679 farming@trulylocal.ca www.trulylocal.ca

Truly Local offers everything you need to become food independent. Just fill out a farm intake form at trulylocal.ca and find out how you can become an urban farmer.

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makes short work of kitchen chaos

The pain-free way to a perfect pantry Looking at the chaos in your cupboard, it’s hard to believe you can create the perfect pantry in just two hours. But Howards Storage World is ready with the advice and the organizational solutions that will break the job down into two simple, 60-minute tasks.

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60 MIN

Task 1

Transfer your packaged goods to standardized airtight containers. This not only extends the shelf life of your wares, but also increases your storage space by making products stackable. Be sure to label every container with an easy-to-read best-before date.

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60

Task 2

MIN

Organize your pantry so your storage system is accessible in a way that makes sense for your family. Make sure items that are used most frequently are front and centre. Roll-out baskets are a great way to maximize your bottom-shelf storage, while the top shelf should be reserved for bulky but lightweight items like bags of chips. Consider labelling your shelves to keep everything in its place.

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Aamina Storers 9.6L PLF005 $17.99 Aamina Storers 4.8L PLF004 $12.99 Amalie Narrow Pull Out Organiser PLF009 $10.99 Amalie Wide Pull Out Organiser PLF010 $14.99 Mimi Wide Separator PLF008 $9.99 |

www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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What you need to get started Baskets with handles – like the Marie Medium Storage Basket (PLF028 $6.99) – are very useful in the pantry and are particularly handy for items that you tend to move in a group, like condiments. When it’s barbecue time, take the whole basket out of the pantry and onto the patio. Use labels to create a simple system to indicate what items go in each basket (jams and jellies, salad dressings, mustards, etc.). This will help your family stick with the system and encourage them to return items to the correct containers.

Storing bottles can be tricky, as they tend to topple over when you try to reach past them. To keep all your bottles in one place and in one piece, use Mimi Wide Separator Baskets (PLF008 $9.99). With their handles for easy lifting in and out, Aamina Easy Access Storers (from $12.99) are perfect for dry goods such as cereal, pasta and flour.

Pot and pan lids piling up? Free up precious cupboard space with the Euro Kitchen Organizer (EIC9979 $13.99). This sturdy metal rack is divided into eight sections, allowing you to organize your serving platters, lids and baking sheets effortlessly and efficiently. And don’t stop there. Try the Euro Kitchen Organizer in your home office, too. With its clean design and modern look, it makes a sleek and stylish desktop organizer that’s perfect for all your business files and folders!

Kat’s cupboard magic Kat the Organized Housewife rarely used mugs and stowed them away in a hard-to-reach lower cupboard – until she discovered the joys of coffee. Now she needs to grab a mug several times a day! Kat installed the simplehuman Cabinet Organizers (SHC0119 from $59.99) and can’t believe how much accessible space she managed to create with a simple organizational tool. (You can follow Kat’s blog at theorganisedhousewife.co.)

Give chaos the chop To keep your chopping boards handy, it makes sense to store them on your kitchen counter. But how to keep them neat and tidy? Look no further than the Index Chopping Board (DAN20190 $99.99) from Joseph Joseph. These chopping boards are colour coded and earmarked according to task to prevent cross contamination and come in their own upright storage container. Clever. Convenient. Conscientious.

TIP: Free up space in seconds by placing your plastic bags in a simplehuman Grocery Bag Holder (SHC1166 $14.99) Brilliant!

2060 Queen Street East • 647-748-5517 • howardscanada.com www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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Dimensions can make anything look good! Dimensions Custom Framing and Gallery partners Ellen Davidson and Wendy Palmer prove the old adage that one person’s trash is another person’s treasure. It’s all in how you look at it–or frame it. Passionate about art and enormously creative, the collaborative duo has been in business together for more than 14 years, bringing their expertise and imagination to each custom framing project. “Most people have no idea how many matting and framing options are available today,” says Ellen. “You can pretty much frame anything. Not just photographs and pictures, but three dimensional art and objects as well. Anything you want to display and preserve.” Stuck for a fun Christmas gift idea for the girl who has everything–including a glovebox full of little yellow slips from the City of Toronto? Who knew a parking ticket could be turned into a clever conversation piece? What about your eco-conscious pal who is out to save the world, one recyclable item at a time? A crushed orange metal pop can in a shadowbox frame is a perfect way to recognize his efforts. And, for a great novelty gift this holiday season, nothing beats a framed politician. All three of these demonstration pieces—the yellow infraction notice, the crushed can, the mayor—are currently on display in the gallery at Dimensions. And they look fantastic. The series is a little tongue in cheek, but it’s the partners’

way of showing customers how to think outside the box. “Whether you’re looking at traditional or shadow box mounting, you’re limited only by your imagination,” says Ellen. “One of our customers had her grandfather’s license plate framed. When she was a child, she and her grandpa made a joke about the funny word the letters on the plate spelled. After he died, she kept the plate as a way of remembering their game and remembering him. It was tucked away in a box of keepsakes, but she wanted to find a way to make the plate a more visible reminder. Framing was the perfect solution. It now hangs in her living room where she sees it every day.” Humorous or sentimental, creatively framed objects and memorabilia make beautiful pieces– and unique and extraordinary gifts for Christmas or in celebration of any special event or occasion. Perhaps your sister kept her favourite teddy bear or the reins from her first pony. Do you have a few of great-grandpa’s antique hand tools or the gloves your grandmother wore on her wedding day? What about the deed to your parents first house, their marriage and birth certificates, their love letters? The little silver box your kids left under their pillow for the tooth fairy or the cast signed by everyone on the T-ball team? “We look at everything as art,” says Wendy, who has been a framer for 25 years. “Whether it’s a sock puppet or a priceless painting, our job is to protect your treasure and display it in a way

that enhances its intrinsic value. When you choose the right mat and the right frame, even a parking ticket, a pop can and Rob Ford can look beautiful.” TC

HAPPY HOLIDAYS SPECIAL Bring in your custom framing project before Christmas and get $25 off the price of your order.

The Small Works Christmas Show at Dimensions Starts Dec. 15th Featuring small pieces–6x6 to 12x12–by local artists.

You can follow Dimensions on twitter @dimensionscf and facebook.com/dimensionscustomframing. You can also visit online at dimenisonsframing.com, drop in to visit Hudson and the girls at 732 Queen St. E. or call 416-463-7263.

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Why bother with TFSAs? by Karie Johnston

Tax Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs) are a big deal! In fact, it’s been said that this federally regulated investment plan is the most important thing our government has offered us since Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSP) were introduced in the 1960s. “The amazing thing about a TFSA,” says Karie Johnston, a marketing director with World Financial Group, “is that you can grow your savings inside and never pay a penny of tax when you take your money out. You don’t get that benefit with an RRSP withdrawal.” Karie’s job is to help people review their current financial situation and provide them with solutions for any identified insurance and investing needs. “A lot of people feel overwhelmed by all the information they receive about how to manage their finances. They hear and see so much on television, on the car radio on their way to work, on the Internet, in newspapers and magazines, that a lot of them just tune out. They figure they’ll sort it out later when it seems more relevant. But when they take the time to sit down with someone like me, the majority really want to learn what choices they have and appreciate assistance in putting a plan of action in place.” When you fit together the many pieces of your unique fiscal situation—including your monthly budget, disability income replacement, life insurance, workplace pensions, real estate holdings, Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security, RRSPs, Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs), and any nonregistered investments—understanding how a TFSA can serve you as part of your overall financial plan is extremely beneficial, says Karie. The TFSA at a glance The Tax Free Savings Account was introduced on January 1, 2009. It was designed to encourage Canadians to save more of their disposable (after-tax) income for retirement or unforeseen events that can happen in life, like a major house or car repair, job loss, illness or disability.

Every Canadian over the age of 18 is allowed to contribute $5,500 per year (increased from $5,000 in 2013) to their TFSA. If you have not yet opened a TFSA, the contribution limit is cumulative, meaning you can deposit a total of $25,500 to date. Unlike an RRSP, the contribution limit is not based on earned income, so you can continue to contribute, even in retirement. In addition, you don’t need to have filed a tax return or even set up a TFSA to accumulate contribution room. You can even put money into the TFSA of your spouse or common-law partner or kids (as long as the kids are over 18). You can make tax-free withdrawals anytime for any reason and you can recontribute up to the maximum allowable in the year following the withdrawal. Over-contributing in any given year results in a Canada Revenue Agency penalty of 1% per month of the excess amount until it is removed. You can open multiple TFSAs as long as you don’t go over the maximum contribution limit, and can consolidate multiple TFSAs into one account by means of a direct transfer from one institution to another. You cannot take money out of one TFSA and put it in another TFSA because, according to the rules, you will have to wait until the following year to recontribute. And what can you put in this great savings account? Pretty much anything you can have in your RRSP account: stocks, bonds, mutual funds, GICs and even cash. An important consideration for tax purposes is that, like an RRSP, you cannot claim any investment losses or tax-advantaged capital gains. Younger clients with a longer investing horizon should be heavily weighted for growth but should carefully evaluate their personal risk tolerance to establish a suitable asset allocation. In other words, they need to figure out how much money to put in each asset class. Older clients who don’t have enough RRSP contribution room to continue tax-sheltered growth of their savings will find a TFSA an excellent alternative. “All eligible Canadians would be wise to open a TFSA,” advises Karie, “and speak with a financial advisor to find out how it can serve them well in the years to come.”

Karie Johnston, Insurance/Mutual Fund Representative Transamerica Securities Inc. WFG Securities of Canada Inc. 905-264-6949 (office) • 647-883-7799 (cell) worldfinancialgroup.com • kjohnston21rpec@wfgmail.ca

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21 ST ANNUAL

Riverdale Share

JUMP for JOY !!!

Concert A Benefit Concert for Families

Sunday, December 8th 3:00 PM DANFORTH MUSIC HALL

‘Tis the Season for

imals

147 Danforth Ave.

Tickets $20

Show & Sale DEC 1 - JAN 2

Plus a non-perishable food donation

Tickets available at: The Big Carrot 348 Danforth Ave.

It’s My Party

423 Danforth Ave.

Ticketmaster www.ticketmaster.ca or 1-855-985-5000

732 Queen St. E.

www.riverdaleshare.com @RiverdaleShare

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stephimals.com

13-11-08 10:00 AM

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1515 Gerrard St. E.

Dimensions Custom Framing & Gallery

581 Danforth Ave.

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Laisy Daisy

260 King St. E.

Small Works Show (from DEC 15)

Treasure Island Toys

RS_NL_ad.indd 1

Mangia & Bevi

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Turn the winter blues green

with a tabletop garden

Your bulbs are planted for next spring, your garden has been cleaned and put to bed with a fresh covering of compost or mulch, and you and all the other avid city gardeners are being forced indoors for the winter. But that doesn’t mean you have to hibernate. Just turn your attention inwards ... and think small. Think tabletop! There are a multitude of containers – purchased and found – that you can use to create a tabletop garden, including wooden boxes, serving trays, oversized ceramic mugs, teacups and saucers, and antique or vintage planters and bowls. Add decorative stones, driftwood, shells, bark, seed pods and other accents to enhance your composition. And get creative with your plants – anything from tender annuals, to miniature roses and African violets, to ferns, grasses, ivy and moss, to exotics such as anthurium, ginger and heliconia, to long-lasting, minimummaintenance cacti and succulents. A variety of mushrooms, sprouts, kale, gourds and other vegetables (growing or harvested) can be employed as an unusual centrepiece for a special dinner party. A stunning Bonsai can be the basis of a reflective tabletop garden. Add stones, miniature ferns or moss to complete the theme. Perhaps the sound of water is your inspiration. Start with a miniature table top water feature and create your garden around it, being careful to match the scale of plants and accents to the size of the aqua feature. Love to cook? Line your sunniest window sill with pots of your favourite culinary herbs. You can even plant them in grandma’s Blue Mountain pottery! Don’t despair now that the cold weather is here. There is so much gardening to be done indoors...

Paula Deresti Landscape Design www.pauladeresti.com | paula@pauladeresti.com 416-270-0534 www.neighbourhoodliving.com

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New kitchen or kitchen makeover?

In these days of reduce, reuse, recycle – not to mention fiscal restraint – everything old can be new again. If the bones are good, master cabinet maker Kevin Karst is happier to revitalize than reinvent. In the case of this kitchen, the underlying structure was solid and the design was functional. Following a careful assessment, Kevin found that the existing hinges, drawers, slides and boxes were all fine. Instead of starting from scratch, he completely transformed the kitchen with: • new Shaker fronts and pulls, shop sprayed • new Shaker crown • microwave cubby • new dimmable LED under-cabinet lighting • painted gables and trim • new quartz counters, undermount sink porcelain backsplash The result: A stunning makeover on a budget! KK_Design_INC_Card_rev:KK_Design_INC_Card_final

1/7/12

CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Kevin Karst

Kevin Karst Design Inc. P.O. Box 9, 388 Carlaw Avenue, Unit W22 Toronto, ON M4M 2T4 647.206.9002

Before

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647.722.4165

www.kevinkarst.com

647.477.6048

design@kevinkarst.com

12:14


AETNA

Pest Control Limited

Do You have a Pest Problem?

Yoga For Vitality & Stress Relief Woodbine & Danforth Mondays 7-8:30pm Compassionate, heart centred, all-levels class that gives you permission to take your yoga practice to the level of challenge that is right for you. This class incorporates breathing exercises, postures, Somatic exercises, relaxation, meditation and more.

1828 Danforth Ave. • 416-469-4111 aetnapest.ca • info@aetnapest.ca

Susan Hirst Hatha and Kundalini Yoga Certified Instructor Suescape@hotmail.com 416-778-9074, cell 647-783-0881

R E S E R V E YO U R C O P Y !

“Insider’s Guide to the Neighbourhood” Contact or visit our advertisers today to reserve your ‘Insider’s Guide to the Neighbourhood’ Neighbourhood Living presents the ‘Insider’s Guide to the Neighbourhood,’ a limited edition, full-colour magazine with tips on shopping, dining out, having fun and enjoying life in the neighbourhood. Guides are available exclusively through our advertisers, and will be ready for pickup by January 2014.

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Is your car ready for winter?

We can help! Come in to Don Valley Auto Centre! Servicing domestic vehicles and imports, Don Valley Auto Centre offers: • regular maintenance • alignments • winter tune-ups and tires • NitroFillTM nitrogen for tires • off-season tire storage • premium parts • a large selection of Wagner parts in stock 54

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Don Valley Auto Centre 388 Carlaw Avenue, Unit S4 416-465-4191

www.neighbourhoodliving.com


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photo: Kristina Raimi

Unique, elegant, decorative pillows and home decor items at affordable prices Pillow Shoppe brand pillows are made in Canada. Markham Head Office and Showroom 10 Canfield Drive Markham, ON L3S 2J1

Toronto 1434 Danforth Avenue Toronto, ON M4J 1N3 (just east of Monarch Park)

647 748-8890 danforth@thepillowshoppe.ca

(at 14th Avenue west of Markham Rd.)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 10am - 6pm Thursday, Friday 10am - 8pm Sunday 12pm - 5pm

Monday-Friday 9am - 7pm Saturday 10am - 6pm Sunday 12pm - 5pm

Visit us on facebook

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647-888-3722 info@thepillowshoppe.ca

Neighbourhood Living East Issue 18  
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