Page 1

NEFLCAI.COM

VOL. 4 | ISS. 1 Northeast Florida Chapter Community Associations Institute

THE THE COMMUNITY COMMUNITY CONNECTION CONNECTION IN THIS ISSUE Legislative Action Highlights

NEW

Volunteer, Committee and Board Leadership HOA Reserve Accounts: What Are You Missing? Association Records and Data Security How to Repay an Association Loan

A Quarterly Newsletter for Community Association Volunteer Leaders, Professional Managers and Business Partners


2 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


CONTENTS

Be sure to check out the new Legislative Action Highlights section beginning on page 14. Thank you to our article contributors this edition! DEPARTMENTS AND MORE

9

Patricia Truax Stewart CMCA, AMS, PCAM at Castle Group

11

5

Message from the President

6

Welcome New Members

6

Editorial Calendar Upcoming Events

14

Legislative Action Highlights

19

Association Records and Data Security ­ Protect Your Association and Yourself! Robert L. Tankel ­ Founder of Tankel Law Group

Event Recap

17 20

HOA Reserve Accounts: What Are You Missing? Patrick Howell, Esq. ­ Senior Attorney at Becker & Poliakoff

16 7

Volunteer, Committee and Board Leadership

How to Repay an Association Loan

Directory Josh Ormiston ­ Vice President of Alliance Association Bank

We welcome suggestions and comments. Address your comments to: Providing education, networking, resources and advocacy for Community NEFCCAI MISSION STATEMENT Associations in Northeast Florida and the professionals and volunteers who serve them.

The Community Connection  9802 Baymeadows Road #12, PMB 201 Jacksonville, FL 32256

We also welcome article submissions from our members. For guidelines, please contact Leslie Pragasam at leslie@aquaticsystems.com. Articles may be edited for length and clarity.

January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 3


2017 CHAPTER SPONSORS Platinum

Gold

Silver Aquatic Systems, Inc. BB&T Association Services Gunster Law

I

        am very excited to continue my term as          President  of the Northeast Florida Chapter of CAI. We had a great 2016 capped off by our tremen­ dous Gala themed to the Roaring 20s / Great Gatsby, with lots of dancing (and singing!) by our attendees who also did a great job getting into the theme of the event! Thanks to everyone involved, especially Donna Clawson, Stephanie Peluyera, and former chapter member Kevin Flanagan who helped make the event such a success. This year we are really looking to increase our reach to the Northeast Florida community by encouraging membership and participation from new members. While we have great networking events for all membership types, our main focus is education for our Community Association Volunteer Leaders (CAVLs) and managers, and we have some great events planned throughout the year. We’d love your help in getting the word out about our great chapter and how people can get involved. As we are a non­profit organization, we can only grow and offer better events through increased membership! To this end, if you’d like to help volunteer on our Membership Committee, please reach out to us and we would love to have your help. And if you’re interested in any other committees, please feel free to reach out as well! We have many opportunities to get involved, whether through our Programs and Education Committee, Social Committee, Expo Committee, Gala Committee, Newsletter Committee, Membership Committee, and Finance Committee, among others. Any help is greatly appreciated and really helps make our chapter that much better.

from the president

OFFICERS President ­ Ed Ronsman President­Elect ­ James Dycus Secretary ­ Sherry McNees Treasurer ­ Bob Chamberlain Director ­ Catie Marks Executive Director ­ in need of CED COMMITTEE CHAIRS Membership ­ Sherry McNees Financial ­ Bob Chamberlain Gala ­ Donna Clawson Expo ­ in need of Chair Social ­ Josh Madden Program/Education ­ Patricia Truax Stewart The Community Connection Editor ­ Leslie F. Pragasam

Thank you again for the opportunity to serve this Chapter as President – it truly has been a great experience and I look forward to making 2017, my last on the Board and as President, even better than 2016! Thanks for all you do, and please never hesitate to get in touch with any questions you have regarding our chapter and what it can do for you.

Jackson Law Group MAY Management Services PPG Paints

Ed Ronsman, Esq. Jackson Law Group

January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 5


Welcome New Members

chapter news

NEFLCAI proudly welcomes the following members who joined the chapter or renewed their membership in November, December & January! Individual Managers Jennie­Lea Hays ­ CMC Jacksonville Cindy Chapman ­ Alliance Realty & Management Calvin Peck Tiffany Woodall Maria Martinez ­ Leland Management

Business Partners Benjamin Griggs ­ Ramco Protective of Orlando Sasa Popovic ­ Greenway Lawncare Jason Lewinski ­ Owens Corning (National Corporate Member)

Community Association Volunteer Leaders Alex Buechel Alex Huckins

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION  EDITORIAL CALENDAR

Month

Article/Submissions Due

Ads Due

April 2017 July 2017 October 2017 January 2018

March 1, 2017 June 1, 2017 September 1, 2017 December 1, 2017

March 17, 2017 June 17, 2017 September 17, 2017 December 17, 2017

6 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


For more information on NEFLCAI meetings or upcoming events, email the chapter at  info@neflcai.com or visit www.neflcai.com

February 16 Common Mistakes Made at Community Board Meetings

Education Event 11:30 am Mandarin Baptist Church 11244 San Jose Blvd. Jacksonville, Florida 32223

Did you know mistakes made during board meetings could cost the Association big bucks & many are pretty common? Join us for lunch & an interactive demonstration to make us experts & avoid these slip­ups! Visit www.neflcai.com for more information & to register.

events

March 16

Chapter Luncheon Maggiano's Little Italy 10367 Midtown Pkwy. Jacksonville, Florida 32246 Registration Fees

Check our website www.neflcai.com for the latest information & to register.

Member Nonmember TBD TBD

May 19

Chapter Expo

ALL DAY UNF University Center 12000 Alumni Drive Jacksonville, Florida, 32224

Join us at our fifth annual Chapter Expo and Education Event where Commuinty Association Board Members & Association Managers from NE Florida will gather to network with vendors & attend educational courses on various topics pertaining to community associations. Visit www.neflcai.com to register online. January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 9


Control Methods

January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 9


By Patricia Truax Stewart ­ General Manager  ­ CMCA, AMS, PCAM at Castle Group

Volunteer, Committee and Board Leadership Successful communities, whether an HOA, or a Condominium rely on the service and dedication of their volunteers. Although most communities are over­reliant on the work of their volunteers, they are truly the leaders of the community. “Leadership is the ability to establish standards and manage a creative climate where people are self­moti­ vated towards the mastery of long term constructive goals in a participatory environment of mutual respect compatible with personal values”. This is a great quote from Michael Vance which establishes the definition of “Leadership”. The primary responsibility of each board member is to come together to act as one leadership voice for the community, recognizing that their fiduciary duty is to preserve, maintain and enhance the value of the assets of the community, through enforcing the governing documents, levying and collecting assessments and conducting business with good judgment.

Board May Delegate all of its authority and none of its responsibility. Operational items should be facilitated by the community’s management company and board members should be more strategic in nature and esta­ blish policies to be implemented by the Management Company and Staff. Board sets the policy and staff implements policy. It is always a good example of “best practices” for one board member, usually the President, to direct staff or management, so that management does not get conflicting directives from the Board or committees. Best practices for committees are: 1) Serve at the pleasure of the Board; 2) cannot secure obligations on behalf of the corporation or spend funds – they are advisory in nature; 3) collaborate with, but do not direct, the staff. Best practices for Board Members are: 1) Be involved – seek your fellow members’ comments and direct them to the property staff/committee/ board members; 2) Be careful not to allow 3 – 10% to influence your opinion or decisions; 3) Be informed and remember that staff/management is your best resource; 4) com­ municate to the membership, openly supporting the “Board’s Decisions” – you are “one Board; 5) Be pre­ pared to be dedicated to the business of the community.

In order to recruit leader volunteers, as managers, we are their biggest cheerleader and need to educate the community on the importance of volunteering in the community. This may include drafting charters, creating forums to invite volunteers to participate. It is also en­ couraged when recruiting for either committee or board members, to provide volunteer education and training to As a community manager in the industry for many years, encourage the volunteers. one of the key ingredients to a successful community and What are some of the key responsibilities for Committee volunteer leadership is to effectively provide each of the and Board Members? boards an annual planning calendar and a management plan. The management plan will establish the goals and Establish a Charter for Committee Members. The directives for the coming year. charter will identify the strategic role of the commit­ tees, set the meeting dates, and the scope of tasks Staying on task is always a priority for committees and for the committee. For example, in a Welcome board members. Some useful guidelines are: 1) come to Committee Charter, the Charter would identify that meetings prepared. When your manager prepares the Committee would create a process for welcoming material for the committee and board, take the time to new residents. read and be prepared; 2) Ask Questions Ahead of Time; Board Members and Committee Members should 3) Be Open and Fair; 4) Keep a Healthy Perspective; always rely on the Business Judgment Rule and rely Have a Little Fun. on experts and don’t reinvent the wheel. 16 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 9


10 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


By Patrick Howell, Esq. ­ Senior Attorney at Becker & Poliakoff

HOA Reserve Accounts: What Are You Missing? Maintenance repair and replacement of the common areas of a community can be quite costly, and reserve accounts can be a great planning tool for the forward­thinking HOA. Until somewhat recently, the Florida HOA Act did not address reserve accounts. However, in 2007, Section 720.303(6) of the Florida Statutes was added, establishing a number of procedures and rules related to reserves if a) they were originally established by the developer prior to turnover; or b) a majority of the homeowners vote to establish specific reserves.  Recent court cases have interpreted these provisions and give us guidance on what an HOA is entitled to from the developer at turnover. In one case that was handled by my firm, Meritage Homes of Florida, Inc. v. Lake Roberts Landing Homeowners Ass’n, Inc, the Fifth District Court of Appeal found that, if a reserve account is established by a developer, that account must be funded on an annual basis and the devel­ oper may not vote its interest to waive the funding of reserves. This is an important decision, because developers often attempt to waive the funding of these reserves, leaving the association with inade­ quate funds to make the necessary repairs or replacements of the common areas.

In a second case, MacKenzie v. Centex Homes, the developer attempted to rely on a provision in the declaration to excuse it from paying into the reserves when it was “deficit funding” while in control of the association. The court found that since the declaration required reserve accounts, and the statute required reserve accounts to be fully funded unless the members waived such funding, Centex was required to pay into the reserves while “deficit funding.” Centex had to reimburse the Association almost $1 million dollars that should have been put into the reserve account. Local governments have also gotten involved, and some are now requiring large reserves for gated communities. Orange County, as well as municipalities such as Winter Garden and the City of Ocoee, have passed ordinances requiring that developers establish and fund reserve accounts for the gated communities they develop and build within their jurisdiction. This is because gated communities have private roads and side­ walks, which are the maintenance responsibility of the HOA, and not the local government. Re­ pairing or replacing this infrastructure can be extraordinarily expensive, and a community that has failed to plan for these costs could otherwise find itself in a predicament that only a huge special assessment could rectify. These locally­required reserve funds include funds for roads, sidewalks, drainage areas, storm­debris cleanup, and similar anticipated expenses. They vary as to the amount that must                                Reserve continued next page January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 11


Reserve continued from previous page

be funded for each component, but for roads, typically the largest reserve fund by far, 1/12 of the total amount needed to resurface the community must be put into reserves every year.

Interestingly, the local ordinances referenced above have prevailing party attorneys’ fees clauses. As such, a shortchanged HOA is able to recoup the attorneys’ fees and costs expended, should they prevail in an action against a developer. Many communities that have turned over in the last few years have realized that, in fact, their developer did not adequately fund the association’s reserve accounts, either by paying too little into the reserve accounts, or by attempting to “waive” the funding of reserves prior to turnover.

The per­year deposits into the reserve funds must begin upon receipt of the “certificate of completion” for the community’s infrastructure, which is very early in the development of a community. Further, at least one locality, Orange County, requires that developers “superfund” the reserve accounts by placing a full extra year of funds into the An HOA that believes it has been shortchanged association's reserves prior to turnover. should immediately contact its community association law firm. 12 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 13


legislative action Highlights At the chapter’s first Educational Event this year, our chapter’s LAC delegates, Robyn Severs, Esq of Becker & Poliakoff & Pilar Willis Dixon of Brown & Brown of Florida, educated attendees on the latest Bills being presented in the latest Legislative Session now underway in Tallaha­ ssee. The following information is current as of January 26, 2017. H.R. 3700 – The Housing Opportunity through Modernization Act became law in July 2016, which reforms the process used by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) to determine if condominium unit owners qualify for a mortgage with FHA insurance. Under the Act, FHA is required to make the following changes to the agency's condominium approval process: a) FHA must establish and implement a re­certification process that is substantially less burdensome than initial certification, b) FHA must cease and desist from rejecting condominiums that use transfer fees to fund association operations, c) FHA must lower the owner occupancy limitation from 50 percent to 35 percent, and d) FHA must provide additional flexibility for condominium projects with commercial space. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R­Illinois) reintroduced the ham radio bill on January 13, 2017, which failed to make it out of the Senate during the 2015­2016 session. CAI members advocated that compromise language be included in the Act to protect the best interest of community associations and it will receive consideration as H.R. 555 during the 115th Congress. Here is the language to H.R. 555 that passed the House. There are currently 8 Bills included in Florida’s CAI current Legislative Tracking Report. Number: FL [R] HB 49; Title: Ad Valorem Taxation, which requires property appraisers to reduce the assessed value on residential property damaged or destroyed by natural disaster under certain conditions.

                                             LAC continued on next page 14 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION 14 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


LAC continued from previous page

December 16, 2016 11:30 am ­ 1:30 pm Cost: $25

Number: FL [R] HB 89; Title: Homeowners’ Associations, which authorizes certain disputes to be submitted to mandatory binding arbitration with division; requires HOA to impose fees for certain purposes. Number: FL [R] HB 295; Title: Homeowners’ Associations, which revises uses of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, & Mobile Homes Trust Fund. Number: FL [R] HB 389; Title: Building Safety, which revises provisions requiring installation of carbon monoxide detectors in certain buildings. Number: FL [R] HB 483; Title: Estoppel Certificates, which revises requirements relating to issuance of estoppel certificate to specified persons. Number: FL [R] HB 294; Title: Condominium, Coop­ erative, and Homeowners’ Associations, which requires associations to meet specified financial reporting requirements if they fail to provide unit owners or members with requested financial information. Number: FL [R] HB 318; Title: Covenants and Restric­ tions of Property Owners’ Associations, which creates the ""Marketable Record Titles Act"". Number: FL [R] HB 394; Title: Estoppel Certificates, which revises requirements relating to the issuance of an estoppel certificate to specified persons; requiring a condominium, cooperative, or homeowners' association to designate a street or e­mail address on its website for estoppel certificate requests; prohibiting an association from charging a preparation and delivery fee or making certain claims if it fails to deliver an estoppel certificate within certain timeframes, etc.

For more information on these and other Legislative advocacy discussions affecting your Association, please visit www.caionline.org. January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 15 January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 15


By Robert L. Tankel ­ Founder at Tankel Law Group

Association Records and Data Security Protect Your Association and Yourself! In many associations, directors have a false sense of security about the records they are entrusted to keep, especially as we move to digitized files. This article will try to examine a few of the issues and point out some helpful tips. Deeper analysis needs to found elsewhere. Most businesses have private domains. All email that comes to and from private domains are kept and monitored for common issues such as viruses, malware, etc. However no system is perfect. It's amazing the vast majority of the people on boards have common unsecured email addresses such as Yahoo, Outlook, AOL and Gmail, etc. Their person­ al emails are mixed with potentially confidential information about their association, and worse yet when they leave the board that email sits in their "read mail"' waiting to be hacked. Best practice is to separate personal and business emails with a secure website. Absent that, at least enable 2 step notification, which takes only a few minutes and prevents someone from stealing your username and pass­ word and logging in. Requiring 2 step verification is easy; just search your provider and the results will take you to a page that explains how to do it. Once you do so, the service places a cookie on your computer so it recognizes you the next time you log in. If a hacker tries to sign in even with your credentials, it will alert you and require them to get a code on the cell phone you provided. If they don't have that phone they don't get in. Secure your passwords. They should be at least 12­16 letters, numbers and symbols. I use lastpass.com which uses a master password and 16 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION 16 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

randomizes all of your passwords. The master pass­ word can be taken from a Bible verse or nursery rhyme. Example, By The Rivers Of Babylon we sat and wept when we remembered Zion Psalm 137! becomes BTROBwsawwwrZPsalm137!. 22 mixed numbers, symbols and letters. That is simple to remember and even a brute force attempt to crack it is very difficult. Combined with 2 step verification you will be much safer. Spear phishing. This is usually from a person who has been hacked and already has your email address in their system. A generalized message is usually sent, and usually says "Please see the attached for the important information on your retire­ ment account." If you click on it, your computer is compromised or subject to ransom­ware where you must pay several hundred dollars or purchase Bit­ coins and deliver them in a couple of hours or risk being locked out of your computer forever. Even military intelligence officers were tricked by such attacks, some multiple times. Moral? When in doubt, delete it. If it’s important they’ll contact you again. This only scratches the surface of the simple yet effective steps you can take to protect yourselves and secure your data. If you think you've been hacked all of the 3 major credit reporting agencies have a 90 day fraud alert you can sign up for and it's free. Equifax, Experian and Trans Union all cooperate in this (and try to sell you products). Finally use www.annualcreditreport.com, sponsored by the federal government, to get a free report from each of these agencies to look for problems. As Woody Allen once said: “Just because you think people are out to get you doesn’t mean they aren’t.”


By Josh Ormiston ­ Vice President Alliance Association Bank

How to Repay an Association Loan When an association decides to take a loan out to finance a capital improvement project, there are three main options in which the association can choose to generate funds for repayment of the loan. Allocate funds from the existing budget Raise regular assessments Implement a special assessment Each option has its own benefits and pitfalls. The option chosen may have an impact on the community support for the project and the general attitude towards the association’s board and/or manager. By choosing to finance a capital improvement rather than pay cash, the cost for the improvement is being allocated over a longer period of time. If an associa­ tion is already budgeting to contribute a certain dollar amount to their reserve fund each year, it may be possible to allocate a portion of this contribution to cover the loan payment. Similarly, if the capital im­ provement being made will reduce future operating costs, the savings may be enough to cover the loan payment. When going this route it is important to con­ sider what future reserve contributions will need to be in order to keep adequate funds available for future projects. This is a very attractive option for communi­ ties that are able to do this as there will generally be more support for projects that improve the community and don’t require a dues increase. Unfortunately, this may not be feasible and one of the other options would need to be considered.  The main factors that will most likely contribute to a community’s decision of whether to special assess or increase its regular assessments are the size of the increase and the voting requirements necessary to implement the increase. For loans that require smaller increases to the aggre­ gate assessment level, it may be appropriate to just increase the regular assessments. Typically it is less

onerous to implement a regular assessment increase, and it can be done with simple board approval rather than a mass homeowner vote. If the project the loan is for isn’t controversial and the financial impact to unit owners is negligible, increasing regular assessments is efficient and simple. However, if the assessment increase is large the governing documents may re­ quire a homeowner vote, and in the case they don't, there may be backlash from the community if an option to have input into the decision making process isn’t afforded to them. It is often prudent to have a homeowner vote even if one is not required. This may delay the process slightly on the front end, but it may also save lots of time and headache on the back­end. If a group of homeowners decides to file a lawsuit it may end up costing more time and money than it would have taken to simply have a homeowner vote, regardless of whether there was any merit to the law­ suit or not. As an added bonus, doing so can help with getting approved for a loan. Oftentimes special assessments require homeowner votes and are viewed as a burdensome task. Never­ theless, they offer some significant advantages over just doing a regular assessment increase. Firstly, as discussed previously, for large projects a vote can be the best course of action. Also, by utilizing a special assessment, it is easier to segregate what funds are for operating and non­operating expenses which can be helpful for general bookkeeping. Most importantly though, a special assessment allows a community to give homeowners the option of whether or not they want to participate in the lending program. A special assessment allows unit owners to prepay their share of the project cost upfront rather than having an in­ creased monthly assessment. Then those who wanted to avoid interest costs could, and those that couldn’t afford a large lump sum payment can pay for the pro­ ject over time. If this approach is used, all residents are given options that may make approving a large dollar project more palatable. January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 17


It’s no secret that Americans love their pets. More than 43 million dogs and 36 million cats live in U.S. households—and many of them belong to the 68 million Americans who live in homeowners associations, condominiums, coopera­ tives, and common­interest communities. Even pets know that community associa­ tions are preferred places to call home! In honor of these community companions, CAI is featuring several upcoming events to highlight all things pets. Throughout the years, CAI has published numerous articles and publications about pets in community associations. From rules about pet waste, breed restrictions, and barking, to best practices for pet own­ ership, CAI offers important resources for pet owners who live in the more than 338,000 U.S. community associations. And we're adding one more! CAI proudly announces its first­ever pets­ only issue of Common Ground. In the May/June 2017 issue, you'll find all things pets—topics include service animals vs. comfort animals, doggie DNA testing, insurance coverage and leash laws, developer­planned dog parks and other animal amenities, communities that feature pets, and more. Your pet could star on the cover of the pets­only issue of Common Ground! If you're a pet owner and you live in a homeowners association, condominium, or cooperative, we want to see your community companions. Fur, fins, feathers, or scales—all are welcome! Photo submissions are due February 17. Are you a pet owner? Fur, fins, or feathers—we want to hear from you! In January, CAI kicks off #CAIPets, a new campaign designed to showcase the best pets of homeowners associations, condominiums, and cooperatives. Check your inbox on Jan. 23 for CAI’s first­ever pet survey and tell us why you love your pet. In addition to the pets­only issue of Common Ground, CAI will feature a special demonstration at the                           2017 CAI                                                          in Las Vegas, May 3–6: A Service Dog by Any Other Name. Annual Conference and Exposition 18 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


Event Recap The chapter's Great Gatsby themed Gala was the Cat's Meow thanks to our Social Committee! The juice joint was hopping with a live band & everyone looked keen in their glad rags to dance the night away!

Chapter Gala

Special thanks to the evening's sponsors: Allied Universal, Angius & Terry LLP, Becker & Poliakoff, Ramco Protective & Servpro of the Beaches/Ponte Vedra, Mandarin, St. Augustine.

Photo credit ­ Donna Clawson

Legislative Recap The chapter's first Educational Event of 2017 was held at Mimi's Cafe at the Town Center. Guests enjoyed a delicious breakfast as well as recent updates to the legislative sessions thanks to event sponsor, Ramco Protective! Pilar Willis Dixon with Brown & Brown of Florida & Robyn Severs, Esq with Becker & Poliakoff serve as our chap­ ter's Legislative Action Representa­ tives & led the discussion. For more information, please visit page 14 and the National CAI website.


Disclaimer ­ Information listed reflects that provided from the CAI National Office. Any changes or updates to contact information may be made by logging into your account at www.caionline.org or through the National Office.

PREMIER LISTINGS AEGIS COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS, INC. DAVID BURMAN AMS PCAM DAVIDB@AEGISCMS.COM AEGISCMS.COM ALLIANCE ASSOCIATION BANK PAUL KNUTH PKNUTH@ALLIANCEASSOCIATIONBANK.COM ALLIANCEASSOCIATIONBANK.COM ALLIED UNIVERSAL SECURITY SERVICES JAMES DYCUS JAMES.DYCUS@AUS.COM AUS.COM

Directory PREMIER LISTINGS

JACKSON LAW GROUP, LL.M., P.A. EDWARD RONSMAN ESQ. INFO@JACKSONLAWGROUP.COM JACKSONLAWGROUP.COM MAY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. GINGER MATLOCK GMATLOCK@MAYRESORT.COM MAYMGT.COM PPG PAINTS JAY RICHARDS JAY.RICHARDS@PPG.COM PPGPAINTS.COM

ANGIUS & TERRY, LLP MS. LAURIE SHRADER LSHRADER@ANGIUS­TERRY.COM ANGIUS­TERRY.COM

PUROCLEAN EMERGENCY RESTORATION SERVICES RUSSELL BENES RBENES@PUROCLEAN.COM PUROCLEAN.COM

AQUATIC SYSTEMS, INC. LESLIE PRAGASAM LESLIE.PRAGASAM@AQUATICSYSTEMS.COM AQUATICSYSTEMS.COM

VALLEY NATIONAL BANK CINDY CRAFT DUNLOP CDUNLOP@VALLEYNATIONALBANK.COM VALLEYFLORIDA.COM

BB&T ASSOCIATION SERVICES GEORGIA MILLER GGMILLER@BBANDT.COM BBT.COM GUNSTER, YOAKLOY & STEWART, P.A. THOMAS JENKS TJENKS@GUNSTER.COM GUNSTER.COM

20 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


BASIC LISTING

BASIC LISTING

BASIC LISTING

Bullard, Herndon & Brown, P.A. Mr. Randall Herndon rherndon@bhbjaxcpa.com www.bhbjaxcpa.com

D. Armstrong Contracting, LLC Mr. Dennis Armstrong dennis@darmstrong.net www.Darmstrong.Net

CertaPro Painters Mr. Jeff Lee jlee@certapro.com www.certapro.com

Davey Tree Expert Company Mr. Josh Madden josh.madden@davey.com www.davey.com

Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Mr. David Dawson david_dawson@ajg.com www.ajg.com COLLECTIONS

CINC Systems Ms. Vickie Johnson, CMCA, AMS vickie@cincsystems.com www.cincsystems.com

Dragonfly Pond Works Mr. Tom Willson www.dragonflypondworks.com

ASAP Towing and Storage Mr. Thomas Wimsatt thomas@towingasap.com www.asaptowing.com

Clark Simson Miller Mr. Jason Miller sales@csmhoa.com www.csmhoa.com

Amelia Island Management Mr. Nicholas Lambiase nick.lambiase@omnihotels.com Ansbacher Law Mr. Barry B. Ansbacher bba@ansbacher.net www.ansbacher.net/

Atlantic Powder Coating Mr. Harold Matthews harold@atlanticpowder.net www.powdercoatingjacksonville.com

CMC­Jacksonville Ms. Jennifer Presson, LCAM, CMCA jpresson@cmcjaxfla.com www.cmcjaxfla.com

Driveway Maintenance, Inc. Mr. Kerry Barnes kbarnes@driveway.net www.driveway.net/ Duval Asphalt Ms. Jennifer Ragsdale jragsdale@duvalasphalt.com www.duvalasphalt.com Envera www.enverasystems.com

Axiom Resources Mr. Ben Hippeli ben@associationcapital.com www.associationcapital.com 

Coastal Construction Products Mr. Ron Mans rmans@coastalone.com www.coastal­fla.com

BCM Services, Inc. Mrs. L. Denise Wallace denisew@bcmservices.net www.bcmservices.net

Coastal Insurance Underwriters, Inc. Mr. Chuck Bushong cbushong@ciuins.com www.ciuins.com

Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Ms. Robyn M. Severs, Esq. rsevers@bplegal.com www.bplegal.com

Community Advisors, LLC Mr. Charlie Sheppard, RS csheppard@communityadvisors.com www.communityadvise.com

Brightview Landscape Services Mr. George Rugen george.rugen@brightview.com www.brightview.com

Community Solutions Management, LLC Ms. Melodye Pitts mail@communitysm.com www.melodyepitts.com

FirstService Residential Mr. William V Genovese william.genovese@fsresidential.com www.fsresidential.com/florida/home

Custom Tree Surgeons Mr. Scott Washington scottatcts@yahoo.com www.customtreesurgeons.com

Fletcher Stein Insurance Agency Ms. Carie Whitcomb cwhitcomb@fletcherstein.com www.fletcherstein.com

Brown & Brown of FL Ms. Pilar Willis pwillis@bbjax.com

Evergreen Lifestyles Management Mr. Kraig Carmickle kcarmickle@evergreen­lm.com www.evergreen­lm.com Fidelity Bank Ms. Mary E. Price mary.price@lionbank.com www.lionbank.com First Coast Association Management Ms. Alice Hubbard alice@firstcoastam.com

January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 21


BASIC LISTING FORSITE ­ Mailboxes, Signs & Site Amenities Ms. Jennifer Lamolinara jenniferl@forsite.us www.mailboxesandsigns.com Global Solution Partners Mr. Keith Ruehl, RS kruehl@globalsolutionpartners.com www.GlobalSolutionPartners.com Greenway Lawncare Mr. Sasa Popovic contact@greenway­lawncare.com COLLECTIONS www.greenway­lawncare.com Herbie Wiles Insurance Mr. Wayne Howell whowell@herbiewiles.com www.herbiewiles.com HomeTeam Pest Defense Mr. Dan Eckman dan.eckman@pestdefense.com www.pestdefense.com/woodbridge Ian H. Graham Insurance Ms. Sylvia Tagle sylvia.tagle@aon.com www.ihginsurance.com IBERIABANK Ms. Felicia Cox felicia.cox@iberiabank.com www.iberiabank.com Jimerson & Cobb, P.A. Mr. Hans Wahl hwahl@jimersoncobb.com www.jimersoncobb.com Kings III Emergency Communications Ms. Candace Harrison charrison@kingsiii.com www.kingsiii.com Kipcon, Inc. Mr. Ed Pazden epazden@kipcon.com www.kipconengineering.com 22 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

BASIC LISTING Krystal Klean Mr. Anthony Lewis Morgan tmorgan@krystalklean.com www.krystalklean.com Larsen & Associates, P.L. Mr. Mark King www.larsenandassociates.com Lake and Wetlands Management, Inc. Mr. Adam Grayson adam.grayson@lakeandwetland.com www.lakeandwetland.com

BASIC LISTING Pacific Premier Bank Ms. Alicia Granados, CMCA, AMS, PCAM agranados@ppbi.com www.ppbi.com Performance Painting Contractors, Inc Mr. Kevin Hughes Kevin@performance­painting.com www.performance­painting.com

Popular Association Banking Ms. Molly Hime Landscape Maintenance Professionals mhime@popular.com www.associationbankers.com www.lmppro.com Massey Services, Inc. Mrs. Tami Swanson tswanson@masseyservices.com http://www.masseyservices.com

Property Management Systems, Inc. Mr. Scott William Steffen, CMCA ssteffen@pmsiofflorida.com www.pmsiofflorida.com

McCabe Law Group, P.A. Mr. Michael John McCabe mccabe@jaxlandlaw.com www.jaxlandlaw.com

Pursiano Barry Bruce Lavelle, LLP Mr. Jason Bruce, Esq. jbruce@pblbh.com www.pbblawoffices.com

McCall Services, Inc. Mr. Jerry Hall jhall@mccallservice.com www.mccallservice.com

Ramco Protective of Orlando, Inc. Mr. Benjamin Griggs b.griggs@ramcoprotective.com www.ramcoprotective.com

McGowan Program Administrators Mr. Joel W. Meskin, Esq., CIRMS jmeskin@mcgowanins.com www.mcgowanins.com

Reserve Study Group, LLC Mr. Stuart Wilkinson, RS stuart@reservestudygroup.com www.reservestudygroup.com

Metro Property Services Mr. John Moore john@metropropertyservices.com www.metropropertyservices.com

Rizzetta & Company, Inc. Ms. Valerie Bethea

Mutual of Omaha Bank Mr. Keith Collopy keith.collopy@mutualofomahabank.com www.mutualofomahabank.com Norman Insurance Advisors, LLC Mr. Andy Norman anorman@normaninsuranceadvisors.com www.vandykenorman.com

Sentry Management, Inc. Mr. Gordon Wolfram Servpro of Jacksonville South & Arlington Ms. Kristy Ondrey Kristy@spjax.com www.servprojacksonvillesouth.com


BASIC LISTING Servpro of Mandarin, the Beaches/ Ponte Vedra & St. Augustine Ms. Robin Braddock robin@servpromandarin.com servpromandarin.com servprothebeachespontevedra.com Sherwin­Williams Mr. Linsey Ritch swrep5784@sherwin.com Shimp Sign and Design, Inc. Mr. Roy Luster Shimp, Jr. rlshimp@comcast.net COLLECTIONS shimpsigns.com Southeast Pipe Survey, Inc. Ms. Traci Abel traci@southeastpipe.com www.southeastpipe.com Sovereign & Jacobs Property Management Companies Mrs. Ellen Lumpkin elumpkin@sovereign­jacobs.com Tankel Law Group Mr. Bob Tankel condolawyer@gmail.com www.TankelLawGroup.com Union Bank Homeowners Association Services Ms. Amanda Orlando, CMCA amanda.orlando@unionbank.com www.hoabankservices.com Williams Law Association, P.A. Mr. K.C. Williams III, Esq. kcw@williamspa.com www.WilliamsPA.com Yellowstone Landscapes Mr. Blaine Peterson bpeterson@austinoutdoor.com www.yellowstonelandscape.com

January 2017 | www.neflcai.com | 23

Profile for NE Florida CAI

Vol 4 iss 1  

NE Florida chapter of CAI - A Quarterly Newsletter for Community Association Volunteer Leaders, Professional Managers and Business Partners

Vol 4 iss 1  

NE Florida chapter of CAI - A Quarterly Newsletter for Community Association Volunteer Leaders, Professional Managers and Business Partners

Advertisement