Page 1

NEFLCAI.COM

VOL. 3 | ISS. 2

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

PROVIDING EDUCATION, NETWORKING, RESOURCES AND ADVOCACY FOR COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA AND THE PROFESSIONALS AND VOLUNTEERS WHO SERVE THEM.

AQUATIC MIDGE FLIES Aquatic Systems. Inc.

SHOULD ASSOCIATIONS RESERVE FOR POND DREDGING? Community Advisors

10 STEPS TO PREVENT COSTLY STORM DAMAGE BrightView

WHAT TO DO AFTER A FIRE Servpro Mandarin, the Beach, Ponte Vedra & St. Augustine

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

2016 EDUCATION EXPO RECAP

Leslie F. Pragasam

JACKSONVILLE BEACH, FL PHOTOGRAPHED BY LESLIE F. PRAGASAM


CONTENTS Aquatic Midge Flies

4

By Aquatic Systems

What To Do After a Fire

7

By Servpro Mandarin, the Beach, Ponte Vedra & St. Augustine

10 Steps To Prevent Costly Storm Damage

DEPARTMENTS AND MORE

9

Message from the President

2

Upcoming Events

3

National Convention Recap 

9

By BrightView

Welcome New Members

10

Should Associations Reserve for 11 Pond Dredging?

Congratulations

14

Membership Drive

15

Expo Recap 

16

By Community Advisors

Hurricane Preparedness

12 OFFICERS President Ed Ronsman President­elect James Dycus Secretary Sherry McNees Treasurer Bob Chamberlain Director Mitchell Mattocks Executive Director Stephanie Peluyera

We welcome suggestions and comments. Address your comments to: The Community Connection  9802 Baymeadows Road #12, PMB 201 Jacksonville, FL 32256 We also welcome article submissions from our members. For guidelines, please contact Leslie Pragasam at leslie@aquaticsystems.com. Articles may be edited for length and clarity.

COMMITTEE CHAIRS Membership Marilyn Clayton Financial Bob Chamberlain Gala Kevin Flanagan Golf Kevin Flanagan Social David Robinson

The Community Connection Editor Leslie F. Pragasam The Community Connection Editorial Committee John Vick Valerie Bethea

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  1                                                                                                                                     www.neflcai.com


President's Message

A Quarterly Publication of

Fellow members, It’s been a great start to 2016 for our Chapter – I’m sure everybody else feels the same way I do when I say “Where has the time gone?”.  To date, our Chapter has put on a lot of great events ,including two chapter meetings, an education session on Fining and Enforcement, and an excellent Education Expo at UNF. We received tremendous feedback on this event and I really wanted to thank the members of our Expo Committee, specifically co­chairs Cindy Dunlop and Leslie Pragasam, and our Executive Director Stephanie Peluyera, for a job well done.

W: neflcai.com E: info@neflcai.com M: 9802 Baymeadows Rd #12, PMB 201 Jacksonville, FL 32256 S: Facebook |Twitter @NEFL_CAI

2016 CHAPTER SPONSORS Diamond

In addition to these educational events, we had a lot of fun at the February social at Whiskey Jax, and look forward to our next event at San Sebastian Winery in late June. Business partners, be on the lookout for a BP­only networking and happy hour session to be scheduled soon. I had the privilege of attending the CAI National Conference and Expo in Orlando the first week of May along with fellow Board members Mitch Mattocks and James Dycus, along with our Chapter Executive Director Stephanie. I came away from the event excited and with ideas to help better serve our Chapter and offer exciting educational and networking opportunities. While we are designated as a “Small” chapter, I think we’re capable of great things and really hope to continue with our positive momentum. Be on the lookout for an exciting (and rewarding!) chance to win prizes as we look to increase the size of our Chapter. CAI provides so many opportun­ ities for education to community leaders, managers, and business partners alike, and I hope we can continue to grow and show others all of the benefits we have received by being part of this organiza­ tion. Enjoy our excellent newsletter, and if there’s any way I can better help serve you as President of our Chapter, please do not hesitate to let me know.

Gold

Silver Aquatic Systems, Inc. BB&T Association Services Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart, P.A. Jackson Law Group MAY Management Services UnionBank HOA Services Universal Protection Service

Ed Ronsman Chapter President THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  2                                                                                                                                     www.neflcai.com


upcoming events May 26

Golf Outing 5:30 pm tee time Royal St. Augustine Golf & Country Club 301 Royal St. Augustine Parkway St. Augustine, FL 32094 Registration Fees Member Guests

$30 $35

Join us before the Memorial Day long weekend for a golf outing. No experience is necessary. Registration includes a 9 hole 4 man scramble with golf cart rental. Club rentals fees are not included.

June 16

Service Animals and Community Associations Noon ­ 1:30 pm Location to be determined at a later date­ please check our website Registration Fees Member Nonmember

FREE $5

Is a "No Pet" Building a Thing of tfhe Past? This is an Educational Event specifically designed for Community Association Managers and includes lunch and a 1 credit hour Elective course presented by Becker & Poliakoff. Course # 9627609

June ­ TBD

Chapter Social Time to be determined at a later date. San Sebastian Winery 157 King Street St Augustine, FL 32084 Registration Fees Homeowner Manager Business Partner

Member $10 $20 $30

Get an early start to your weekend! Invite your board members & other CAMs for an evening of wine tasting and tour of the winery.

Nonmember $15 $25 $35

July 21

Chapter Luncheon

Details to be determined at a later date.

Please check the website for current schedule.

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  3                                                                                                                                     www.neflcai.com


Aquatic Midge Flies

Provided by Aquatic Systems, Inc. Are swarms of bugs keeping you inside? And exactly what is a midge fly? Order: Diptera Family: Chironomidae Genus & Species: 2000+ species in North America

Habitat Bodies of water 3'–30' deep Lakes with excess organic waste from landscaping, turf, reclaimed water, paved surfaces, septic tanks, and other watershed sources Ponds with low oxygen conditions that allow waste products to release ammonia, hydrogen sulfide gas, phosphorus and other nutrients Water with higher levels of muck accumulation, murky color, bad odors Ponds with excessive blue­ green algae and phytoplankton

Control Methods Increase oxygen in the lake with an aeration system to:                ­ Destratify lake bottom              ­ Increase beneficial                     bacteria                                    ­ Reduce nutrients Use larvacides as needed Treat algae quickly to avoid creating more problems Add fish that feed on midge larvae

Aquatic midge flies are non­biting insects found in lakes and ponds throughout Florida and are known by many common names including blind mosquito and fuzzy bill. They do not bite, suck blood, or carry disease like true mosquitoes do, so they are more of a nuisance than anything. Midge flies are a food source for other aquatic insects, such as dragon fly nymphs and several varieties of fish.  The goal is not to completely eliminate them but to keep them in proper balance within the ecosystem. Midge fly populations grow exponentially in water that is high in nutrients and bottom muck and low in oxygen, environments that don’t support fish. Can be a problem in Florida all year but swarms tend to be worse in the spring and early fall At night they are attracted to lights around houses and businesses Outdoor activity can be difficult as swarming midges can be inhaled into the mouth and nose and get into eyes and ears  Swarms fly to cool shady areas & stain paint, stucco, roofs, cars, etc.  Small & large pond and lakes, whether natural or man­made Larvae live on and in the lake 

bottom making them more difficult to control and to detect imminent adult swarming

What can be done about them? Shorter term control with fast results includes applying larvacides to the lake to prevent midge flies from developing into flying adults. For longer term control, you need to improve the water quality of the lake. As lakes age many develop layers of organic bottom muck that dramatic­ ally lowers dissolved oxygen levels favoring growth of midge fly larvae while preventing fish and other insect predators from feeding on them. Infested lakes can easily support populations of 2,000 larvae per square meter. Lakes low in oxygen and high in nutrients, pollution and algae are a perfect habitat for midges.   The most effective long term remedy for midge flies may be installing a diffused air aeration system to raise oxygen levels and improve overall water quality.  

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  4                                                                                                                                     www.neflcai.com


William Saunders 904.721.2230 William@spjax.com http://www.servproarlington.com/

Do you have a suggestion, article or picture you would like featured in an upcoming newsletter? Send your submission to Leslie@aquaticsystems.com THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  5                                                                                                                                     www.neflcai.com


What To Do After a FIRE Provided by Robin Braddock of Servpro Mandarin, the Beach, Ponte Vedra & St. Augustine

The aftermath of a fire is devastating. The most important thing after a fire is the safety of your family and pets. Once everyone is safe and secure, it’s time to work a plan for what to do after fire damages your home and property. The following is a checklist of safety precautions and more to begin recovery after fire damage. Call your insurance company immediately after a fire. Following ironing the details with your insurance company, contact a reputable company specializing in the cleanup and restoration process so the fire damage cleanup process can begin quickly. Make sure to notify your mortgage company of the fire as well. If you’re not sure that the home is structurally safe, have it inspected by a certified structural engineer or building inspector before going near. Take pictures of all exterior damage, noting broken windows or entrances that are no longer secure. Make arrangements to board­up broken windows and secure the property during the cleanup and restoration process. Shut off propane tank systems and make an appointment for it to be inspected for safety. Do not attempt to reconnect utilities on your own. Be aware that rodents, snakes, or other animals may have entered your home.

Inside the home Don’t flip on electrical switches in any room with standing water from firefighting efforts. Don’t enter any room if you hear popping or see sparking. Turn off the power at the main electrical panel. Try not to touch anything covered with soot; it’s easy to transfer it to other areas of the home, making the cleaning process more difficult.

Wear closed­toe shoes or boots, long sleeves, long pants and gloves to protect against soot and any other contaminants as you go through the home. Try to locate important papers and other documents that you’ll need. Handle burned money as little as possible. You can take its remains to a Regional Federal Reserve Bank for replacement. Begin taking inventory of the building damage and all damaged items. Begin saving receipts for any expenses incurred after the fire. These may be needed when filing insurance claims.

Fire Damage Cleanup and Remediation Professional cleaning companies have the expertise as well as the right products and equipment to safely and effectively clean and restore a home after a fire. Fire damage includes more than just items burned. There will be soot, smoke and water damage as well. A professional cleaning team will assess the damage to flooring, drywall, cabinets, furniture and more before developing a plan for thorough cleanup. Additionally, mold growth may be a concern after rooms and items have been saturated with water during the firefighting efforts.                                                 Fire cont'd on pg. 10 


10 Steps To Prevent Costly Storm Damage Provided by Chris Charbonneau of BrightView

Prepare for a Storm - Save Your Trees High winds and snowstorms can leave a dangerous trail of downed trees, debris and destruction. A proactive approach to tree management is a less costly and more effective way to lower your risk of personal and property damage. Don't rely on luck to make it through this year's storm season. Here are some tips on how to prevent damage on your property before, during and after storm season. Ask an ISA certified arborist to provide you with an assessment of dangerous trees on your property before storm season Be sure to look for trees with structural hazards like broken, dead or dying branches  Pay special attention to mature, heavily leaning trees  Identify safety issues around walkways, roadways, entrances and electrical lines Look for potential risk factors like large trees in areas predisposed to wet soil Brace newly established trees so that strong cables keep them in place  Obtain proof of insurance for higher­risk tree work from your tree company  Get a written proposal with a detailed scope of work Consider your long­range plan with your goals and budget mapped out for 3­5 years Pre­arrange with a company that can respond 24/ 7 with the necessary manpower and equipment when an emergency does strike. Look for potential risk factors like large trees in areas predisposed to wet soil.

2016 National Conference Recap Four of our chapter board members had the privilege of attending the 2016 annual CAI conference in Orlando, Florida earlier this month. They attended training courses, networking events, educational courses and more. Next year's conference will be held in Las Vegas, Nevada from May 3rd ­ 5th. Mark your calendars and plan to attend this engaging and exciting event! Congratulations to our Chapter Executive Director who was awarded one of two CED Scholarships sponsored by UnionBank. The scholar­ ship money will help offset the cost of attendance and lodging, which will further help the chapter stay on budget for 2016 as well as redirect money toward networking and educational programs. Check out photos from the conference and other events on our website. THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  9                                                                                                                                       www.neflcai.com


Fire cont'd from pg. 7

Items that may need to be cleaned for soot and smoke removal include but are not limited to: • Carpets and area rugs • Flooring: hardwood, tile and vinyl • Woodwork and other hard surfaces like        countertops and cabinetry • Electronics and appliances • Furniture and upholstery • Draperies, linens and clothing • Books, artwork, papers and documents

WELCOME

Please our New Chapter Members Manager: Kyle Meager Manager: Shirley Smith Manager: Bjorn Gulbrandsen Manager: Dana Gulbrandsen Manager: Anne Marie Quinones

Management Company: Sentry Management CAVL: Melissa Lucille Talamo

Business Partner: Eugene Tibbs, Jr with HOA Capital Advisors Business Partner: Josh Madden with Davey Tree Expert Company Business Partner: Jennifer Lamolinara with FORSITE Business Partner: William Saunders with Servpro of Jacksonville South & Arlington Business Partner: Scott Washington of Custom Tree Surgeons Business Partner: Harold Matthews of Atlantic Powder Coating THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  10                                                                                                                                  www.neflcai.com


Should Associations Reserve for Pond

? g n i Dredg

Provided by Charlie Sheppard of Community Advisors We have all seen algal blooms & dying fish in our storm water ponds as the result of poor water quality.

Determine who is responsible for maintenance of the system Conduct a review of design drawings and check with the responsible utility to determine the Association’s portion of the system. You may not have any liability.

Have the Association’s portion of the system inspected

Resolving water quality problems is usually funded by the Operational Budget since this is a routine event tied to a vendor contract. But did you know pipes can settle causing leaks and silt build­up in ponds can impact water quality and pond capacity which is very important during a major storm? Where do the funds come from to replace pipes or dredge ponds? These expenditures are consider­ ed a capital expense and most Associations are not ready. While each community has different components and ability to fund projects they all need to understand the potential cost and timing of any major capital replacement in order to make a plan. We recommend conducting an Engineering study and update your reserve plan to prepare for the future using these simple steps.

Conducting an onsite inspection includes visual observations of ponds, pipes and structures and if necessary have suspect pipes internally viewed by video camera. Pipes may be repaired during the cam­ era inspection process or required replacement. Each pond should have a Bathymetric or underwater survey completed to determine silt accumulation and quantity of dredging that may be needed and an estimate of when that would be required.

Plan for the future Once the Engineering study is complete we can project if and when dredging will be required, the estimated quantity of  material and any replacement cost. While these estimates of future cost are allowances, we have good intelligence behind our decision making process and can help you plan for the future.

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  11                                                                                                                                    www.neflcai.com


Get Ready for 2016 Hurricane Season Information compiled by Leslie F. Pragasam, Editor, via the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration

Hurricane season officially begins June 1st and hurricane experts have predicted the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season to be near historical averages. Experts are predicting 12 named storms, five hurricanes and two major hurricanes this season. The time is upon us to check, replenish  or prepare your disaster supply kits before the season begins. It’s important to prepare your homes, families and communities for any impending storms before the threat of a storm. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOOA) National Hurricane Center webpage, it’s important to create a basic disaster supplies kit, prepare a family emergency plan or a business/workplace plan, a pet emergency plan  and a marine safety plan.

Have a look at these 5 things to include in your supply kit

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  12

Storm Surge Can Be Deadly!

10 Tips to Be Ready 1. Storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a hurricane. It poses a significant threat for drowning. A mere six inches of fast­moving flood water can knock over an adult. It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away most vehicles—including pickups and SUVs. 2. Storm surge can cause water levels to rise quickly and flood large areas—sometimes in just minutes, and you could be left with no time to take action if you haven’t already evacuated as instructed. 3. Storm surge values do not correspond well to the hurricane wind categories (of the Saffir­Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale) that range from 1 to 5. These categories are based only on winds and do not account for storm surge. 4. Tropical storms, category 1 or 2 hurricanes, major (category 3 to 5) hurricanes, and post­tropical cyclones can all cause life­threatening storm surge. 5. Storm surge can also occur with non­tropical storms like Nor’easters and other winter storms. 6. Many U.S. Gulf and East Coast areas are vulnerable to storm surge, including areas up to several miles inland from the coastline. Find out today, well before a hurricane ever approaches, if you live in a storm surge evacuation zone.                             continued next page


Hurricane cont'd from previous page 7. Storm surge can occur before, during, or after the center of a storm passes through an area. Storm surge can sometimes cut off evacuation routes, so do not delay leaving if an evacuation is ordered for your area. 8. During the peak of a storm surge event, it is unlikely that emergency responders will be able to reach you if you are in danger. 9. Even if your community is not directly affected by storm surge, it could experience other hazards from the storm and face dangerous conditions such as impassable roads, water and sewage problems, and power outages. If power remains on, downed electrical wires can pose an electrocution risk. 10. Weather conditions and the forecast can change. Local officials could issue evacuation or other instructions for many reasons. Always follow the instructions of local officials. The National Weather Service seeks feedback on the Potential Storm Surge Flooding map. For more information go to www.nhc.noaa.gov.

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  13                                                                                                                                          www.neflcai.com


Congratulations Congratulations are in order to our chapter's newest PCAM, Patty Truax Stewart! Patty earned this prestigious designation earlier this month while attending the CAI National Conference in Orlando.

We are Proud of Our PCAM Members David Burman, AMS, PCAM Joe Bunting, CMCA, AMS, LSM, PCAM Dee Belet, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Doug Harrier, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Terrence McIntyre CMCA, AMS, PCAM Patty Truax Stewart, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Kerry Van Pelt, CMCA, AMS, PCAM

The following CAMs earned the professional CMCA designation in April! Dan Brazzano, CMCA ­ Leland Management Jolita Brazzano, CMCA ­ Brazzano Real Estate & Management. Congratulations Dan & Jolita! Looking for a cost effective way to advertise your business or list a job posting? Look no further than your local Northeast Florida CAI chapter newsletter! Prices per issue are: Full page:  $300, half page: $200, quarter page: $100, Logo: $50. Job Postings are valid for 90 days and renewable for an additional 90 days. Prices per listing: $25 members, $50 non­ members. Renewal: $10 members, $20 non­ members THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION   |  14                                                                                                                                          www.neflcai.com


2016 Expo & Education Day Recap

Back Row left­right: Ed Ronsman, President; Jimmy Dycus, VP; Mitchell Mattocks, Director Front Row left­right: Stephanie Peluyera, Chapter Executive Director; Dawn Bauman, Senior VP, Gov. & Public Affairs at CAI; Sherry McNees, Secretary

Thank you to Dawn Bauman, our wonderful sponsors, volunteers, business partners & all in attendance. We could not have pulled off such a successful event without you! Our Expo sponsors include: Aquatic Systems, Inc., BB&T Association Services, Community Advisors, First Coast Mulch, Fletcher Stein, Jackson Law Group, Lake & Wetland Management, MAY Management Services, Reserve Advisors & Universal Protection Service! A special thank you to Previn Pragasam for donating his time & photographic services to the chapter!


General Session


Cindy Craft Dunlop Expo Committee co­Chair

Stephanie Peluyera Chapter Executive Director

Dawn Bauman Senior VP, Gov. & Public Affairs at CAI

Leslie F. Pragasam Expo Committee co­Chair

Profile for NE Florida CAI

NE Florida CAI chapter Vol 3 iss 2  

NE Florida CAI chapter Vol 3 iss 2  

Advertisement