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NEFLCAI.COM

VOL. 5 | ISS. 3

Northeast Florida Chaper Community Association Institute

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

IN THIS ISSUE Hurricane Preparedness Financially Planning for Major Storms After the Storm - Checking for Property Damage Is It Time to Amend Your Condominium Declaration? Conducting an Effective Board Meeting Ignorance is Not Bliss - Why Are Volunteer Board Members Sued? Irrigation Trends for Landscape Maintenance


a message

contact information

4250 A1A South, F-32 St. Augustine, FL 32080 www.neflcai.com info@neflcai.com 904-907-7234

2018 board of directors Jimmy Dycus, President Catie Marks, President-elect Patricia Truax-Stewart, PCAM, Treasurer Pilar Willis-Dixon, Secretary Ed Ronsman, Esq., Immediate Past President Bob Chamberlain, Director David Robinson, Director Karen Foy - Chapter Executive Director

committees Membership - Patricia Stewart; Board Liaison: Pilar Willis-Dixon/Karen Foy Finance - Patricia Stewart; Board Liaison - Bob Chamberlain Expo - Cindy Dunlop; Board Liaison - Ed Ronsman Programs/Education - Ed Ronsman Gala - Donna Clawson Social - Melissa Rowe; Board Liaison David Robinson Legislative Action, Pilar Willis-Dixon & Robyn Severs, Esq.

newsletter Editor - Leslie F. Pragasam; Board Liasion - Jimmy Dycus/Karen Foy

from the president Dear NEFL CAI Family, So apparently I blinked too long and here we are…already into the 3rd quarter of 2018? The 2nd quarter had so much happening, both locally and nationally, that I’m sure you are still trying to catch your breath as I am. As always, I would be doing your team of board members a huge disservice if I didn’t take the time to recognize them and thank them for all their hard work so far! These men and women that you have elected to lead this amazing chapter have truly been working their tails off to make this the #1 CAI Chapter. From the bottom of my heart, THANK YOU David Robinson, Pilar Willis Dixon, Patricia Truax Stewart, Bob Chamberlain, Catie Marks, Ed Ronsman and of course, my right and left hands, Karen Foy, for volunteering their time and efforts to make this a great chapter. I can think of no other event to talk about first to recap this last quarter than our marquee educational event and Chapter Expo. With over 300+ attendees, 50+ exhibitors, every educational course packed to the brim and some of the best costumes and booth decorations I have seen at an Expo, this year’s Expo was nothing short of thrilling! I cannot thank Cindy Dunlop, Ed Ronsman and their team who made this whole day happen! In addition, several members of the leadership team had the pleasure of attending our National CAI Conference in Washington DC in May. This was a phenomenal educational opportunity for us and I would invite you to try to make it next year, as it will be just down the road in Orlando! As always, we were happy to offer additional educational events to our members with CEU credits. If you have any ideas for topics, or if you would like to teach a course, do not hesitate to contact Karen Foy, our Chapter Executive Director.

This quarter is shaping up to be just as busy. We have a couple of stellar social events planned, as well as additional educational events. Before you know it, we will be planning our end of the year gala and getting ready for our new elections for the board. This year we will have openings for one Community Association Volunteer Leader and either one Business Partner or Community Association Manager. If you are interested in becoming part of the 2019 board, please stay tuned for additional information or do not hesitate to contact me or Karen! Finally, none of this would be possible without the support from our loyal chapter sponsors, chapter breakfast sponsors, and educational event sponsors. Most importantly are the volunteers who work so hard on our different committees making this all come together. I’d like to challenge you to get more involved in this chapter. We need your talents on our different committees and we need your sponsorships at our different events! If you have any questions on how to become more involved or would like additional information on sponsorship opportunities, please do not hesitate to contact me or Karen. Enjoy this “award winning” newsletter! Shout out to Leslie, who spends more personal time working on this than she ever gets credit for! #bestnewsletterinthecountry Respectfully, Jimmy Dycus

President


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important event

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CONTENTS

Message from the President Important Event Welcome New Members Editorial Calendar Events Calendar Hurricane Planning for Community Associations Prepping for a Major Storm After the Storm - Checking for Property Damage Is it Time to Amend Your Condominium Declaration? Conducting an Effective Board Meeting Why are Community Association Volunteer Leaders Sued? Irrigation Trends Past Events Premier Directory Basic Directory

Providing education, networking, resources and advocacy for Community Associations in Northeast Florida and the professionals and volunteers who serve them. 4 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


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chapter news

Welcome New Members NEFL-CAI proudly welcomes the following members who have joined the chapter in April, May, June, and July! Homeowner Leaders Hugh O’Connell

Business Partners

Kimberly Hegg

Marianne Bailey - Inspections R Us Janice Brown - Lake Brown Williams CPA & Consultants Jeffrey Ducker - MBAF, CPAs & Advisors Jim McMurray - Florida Community Association Journal Edward Ronsman, Esq. - Garfinkel McCabe Shipwash & Ronsman P.A. Ken Maszy - Zenpura Pest Solutions Stefanie Ford - TOPS Software, LLC Constance Covert - Covert Appraiseal Services, Inc. Bill Wendell - Valley National Bank

Community Association Managers

Alberta Eve Briscoe - Leland Management Daniel Radcliffe - CMC Jacksonvile

Ricardo Smith

Thank you to all of our members who have rejoined or renewed their membership with the NE Florida Chapter! Thank you for your continued support!

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION EDITORIAL CALENDAR

Month Article/Submissions Due Ads Due October 2018 September 3, 2018 September 17, 2018 January 2019 December 3, 2018 December 17, 2018 April 2019 March 1, 2019 March 18, 2019 July 2019 June 3, 2019 June 17, 2019

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August 21, 2018 Social Event

Baseball Ground 301 A Phillip Randolph Blvd Jacksonville, Florida Member Non-Member H/O Leader $15 $20 CAM $15 $20 Business Partner $30 $40 Business Partnered sponsorsored CAM $10 Child (10 & under) $15

6 PM for all you can eat buffet First pitch at 7:05 PM

This event is a yearly favorite! Business partners and CAMs - invite your coworkers, neighbors, and board members for an end of Summer celebration. The kids are back in school and it’s time to start

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calendar of events

For more information on NEFL-CAI meeting, upcoming events, or meeting sponsorship availability, please contact Karen Foy at info@neflcai.com or visit www.neflcai.com.


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Hurricane Planning for Community Associations

by Andrew Jackson, Esq. and Managing Partner at Jackson Law Group Is your condominium or homeowner’s association properly prepared for a natural disaster event such as a hurricane? The Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1st of this year and will continue until November 30th. The season began with a bang as tropical storm Alberto proves you need to be ready now. It is predicted for 2018 that we will have 12 named storms, 6 of which will become hurricanes. Florida condominium and homeowner associations are encouraged to take the following steps to ensure that they are properly prepared for an upcoming weather event and to put themselves in the best position to respond should damage to property occur. The list below is not all inclusive but should provide a solid basis for preparation. In addition to seeking advice of legal counsel, community associations should work carefully with their Community Association Manager (CAM), insurance advisors, property maintenance staff, and providers.

Insurance

Resident Information

Property Documentation

Confirm that you have up to date information for residents and guests, including phone numbers, email addresses, and emergency contact numbers. Consider developing emergency contact system to notify owners if mandatory evacuation is required.

Meet with your insurance agent to make sure that you have proper coverage.

Ensure that you have copies of your policies that are readily available. Ensure that you have emergency contact information for directors and officers available in case of a claim.

Financial Information Bank account information should be readily available, including institution name and account number.

Consider making arrangements with bank for line of credit depending on financial status of community.

Take pictures of existing structures, amenities, and other real and personal property prior to a significant weather event.

When possible, create a database or inventory of property and equipment with identifying information such as serial numbers, or product vendor and models.

Oficial Records Store electronically, if possible, with proper data backups and security. Ensure that documents are in a safe location with minimal risk of being damaged.

Disaster Committee While not required, it may be advisable to establish a committee authorized by the Board to make immediate decisions in case of emergency if the Board members are not available.

For condominium associations, Section 718.1625 of the Florida Statutes (2016) establishes emergency powers to be exercised by the Board of Directors. For homeowners associations, Section 720.316 of the Florida Statutes (2016) establishes emergency powers to be exercised by the Board of Directors.

Post Disaster After a substantial weather event,

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communities are encouraged to consult with their CAM, insurance agent, and legal counsel. Avoid the temptation to make quick decisions based on direct marketing at expense of valid quotes for services. Review your insurance contract regarding repairs and whether they are required to be made during the submission of a claim. Keep copies of all invoices, receipts, and any other documentation related to post-disaster services and products. Timely submit claims as required by insurance policies.

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Are You Prepared in the Event of a Major Storm?

by Georgia Miller - Vice President, Relationship Manager for BB&T Association Services Preparation is the hallmark of good management practices. The official hurricane season runs from June 1 through October 31. To prepare for storm related events it is best to have a plan in place prior to hurricane season for your communities. To help you take this import step, we have created a checklist of some preparation items you should include. Take the time now; if a disaster affects your community, you will be glad you did. Having a line of credit is one of the most important actions you can take to allow for available resources to make quick decisions on repairs and fund unplanned expenses. FINANCIAL Fund reserves at least partially; the absence of any cash reserves will hinder an association’s ability to make a deposit to an available contractor Consider a special reserve to fund insurance deductibles and/ or items not covered Consider making arrangements for a line of credit with your bank, so that you will have available cash to meet emergencies and secure contractors. Consider applying for an association credit card to allow managers

to purchase preparations or recovery items. Seek a loan from your bank for reconstruction or upgrades to property including storm proof windows and shutters. Review current investments in CDARS, ICS or Certificates of Deposit; know the maturities and consider shorter terms or non-renewals during recovery if funds might be needed to avoid early closing penalties.

and internet outage interruptions. • Bill Pay – Advise homeowners to use their bank or a bill-pay vendor to initiate payments online. Recognize that because of storm related damage including post office delays and power outages, you may receive fewer payments during this time or homeowners may be late on payments.

Communicate with your banker if your association or management company is closed.

Use online banking services to transfer funds, monitor account balances and retrieve bank statements – Be sure you know your online access information.

Know all of the available payment methods for your homeowners and remind them in the event one of the methods is unavailable:

Keep a printed copy of the banks contact information to use in the event you cannot obtain electronically.

• U S Mail – Local post offices may be closed or mail not delivered. • Local Branch – If power or internet is out in certain areas, does the local branch accept payments? • Online payments by credit or debit card or eCheck – Are you enrolled to allow your homeowners to pay online to avoid mail delays? • ACH – Encourage automatic payment to avoid mail delays

INSURANCE

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DO NOT UNDERINSURE; Request your insurance carrier to conduct an engineering review of your facilities. Gain a clear understanding of items not covered by insurance. Require an annual board review of the deductible amounts of all insurance policies and consider inform-


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ing all unit owners of the results. Remind owners of the limits of the association’s responsibilities. OPERATIONAL Develop an emergency plan to contact board members and managers immediately should a dangerous situation develop; remember, the first responsibility of the association board is to take the appropriate steps to secure the property.

annual inspection/maintenance program.

BUSINESS PARTNERS AND VENDORS

If your association is facing roof replacement in the near future, consider alternative style and materials.

Review your business partner and vendor contracts and know what to expect.

Consider an independent engineering study of your buildings, especially if the building is more than 10 years old; schedule updates on a recurring basis.

Prepare alternative means of communication; phone, text, email.

Pay attention to carports, which typically are not as stable as other structures.

Prepare staff.

Develop a building evacuation plan.

Monitor school closures for their impact on staffing levels.

Prune large trees and shrubs before hurricane season arrives.

Reassign staff from closed offices to assist other functions.

If your association has rules covering the allowable parking locations for boats, trailers, golf carts, etc., police rules regularly.

Secure important papers and sensitive information and back up records. Create a hurricane or storm preparedness guide for homeowners that includes reminders of insurance, evacuation, pet arrangements etc. Consider allowing board members emergency board powers in the event of a disaster. Know your bylaws and your state statues regarding rights and claims. PROPERTY Conduct regular roof inspections. Inquire if roofing contractor offers

Protect association machinery, equipment, and business records. Consider rules concerning personal property on lanais and decks. Prepare common areas such as club house or pool and secure items. Create an open lot to stockpile tree debris. Energy failures are one of the biggest results of a storm. Electrical power outages can compromise elevators, air conditioning and other critical systems. Take pictures or video of the facility and preparation conditions.

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Maintain a healthy business relationship with your service providers and vendors. Courteous behavior and prompt payment of their bills will go a long way to assure their timely response when you really need them. Engage a tree-trimming company with an agreement that the association would be its top response priority in the event of hurricane or storm related damage. Secure appropriate vendors that can aid immediately after a storm. Obtain bids if major reconstruction is necessary. This process could take months working with engineers and contractors before actual cost is determined. Being proactive is the best way to show an association you are working in their best interest. Don’t wait until there is no water, no electricity and trees are falling all around you.


After the Storm: How to Check Your Property for Damage Presented by Servpro of Mandarin, The Beaches, and Ponte Vedra The Importance of Conducting a Storm Damage Inspection As summer ushers in warmer temperatures, it can also bring with it heavy rains, strong winds and powerful storms. While your home protects you from the wrath of Mother Nature, it should also be thoroughly checked for problems after every storm. You may not have reason to suspect that your home has been damaged by a passing storm. However, once the inclement weather has safely passed, it’s important to look over the dwelling for any issues. This is also a great time to make emergency repairs and assess if an insurance claim is needed. The following is a handy storm checklist from the National Storm Damage Center:

Roof The roof is typically one of the most vulnerable areas during a storm. Hail, wind, rain and debris can adversely impact it. The following indicators can help in your assessment: • Holes or tears in the roof • Split seams • Lost or missing shingles • Ceiling or roof leaks

The Exterior of the Dwelling Materials such as brick, siding and stucco are usually heavy and durable. However, during a storm, they can withstand significant damage. In some cases, problems may not be noticed until it’s too late to file an insurance claim, so you need to be diligent in your determination: • Chipping, cracking, dents and dings are obvious signs that there is a problem. Even if your siding appears to be fine at first, you want to check it at varying times of the day. Different stages of lighting can showcase problems that you may have missed. • Small or large holes in the stucco. No matter if the hole is small or large, this is a serious issue for a homeowner. If you find a hole or blemish, a knowledgeable and trustworthy company such as SERVPRO can conduct a thorough inspection of the property. • Damaged tuck pointing and brick. Brick is a solid material when it comes to homes. However, it should be thoroughly checked for problems following a storm. • Detached or ruined gutters, trim, downspouts, etc. Gutters, trim, downspouts and other exterior materials on a home are instrumental in its protection. If anything is out of sorts, it should be immediately

repaired.

Driveways, Walkways, and Porches

Concrete can split, chip, and crack with continuous storm and rain. This can reduce the lifespan of your walkway, driveway, or porch. To alleviate a safety issue, you’ll want to assess it for any imperfections.

Trees and Fallen Limbs According to the National Storm Damage Center, fallen trees and branches can cause billions of dollars in damages every year. Most property owners would handle the removal of debris, even if the limbs or trees came from your neighbor’s property. Your insurance company may help in the retrieval of the costs, but it’s dependent on the type of policy and circumstances surrounding the incident.

Basic Tips • Severe storms may knock down power and electrical lines. If this occurs on your property, you’ll want to cordon off the area approximately 30 feet in various directions from the fallen line. It’s also important to call the power company and 911 immediately. • After a storm, you also want to assess the remainder of your

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property including fences, air-conditioning units, caps, vents etc. If your vehicle was left out of the garage, it would also need to be checked over for damage. • Crawl spaces and basements should be looked over for water or flooding. Document as much of the damage as possible by taking photos at various angles. Finally, it’s important to comprehend your homeowner’s coverage, limits, and deductibles before a problem occurs. In case something happens, you’ll be thoroughly prepared for any storm or disaster.

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Is It Time To Amend Your Condominium Declaration? Provided by Robyn M. Severs, Esq., of Becker, formerly known as Becker & Poliakoff Does your Declaration of Condominium still refer to Chapter 711 as the Florida Condominium Act? Well, maybe it is not that old, but perhaps it has been a decade since it has been revised. If that is the case, then it may be time to amend the governing documents of your condominium to ensure that they include the most recent amendments to Chapter 718, known as the Florida Condominium Act.

First, changing any appurtenances to the unit or changing an owner’s percentage share in the common expenses requires the approval of all owners and all lienholders, unless the original Declaration provides otherwise. Second, an association cannot amend a Declaration to create timeshares without the approval of the all owners and all lienholders, unless the original Declaration provides otherwise.

Section 718.110(1)(a), Florida Statute, provides that if a declaration fails to provide a method of amending the document, it may be amended, as to most matters, if the amendment is approved by owners of not less than twothirds of the units. There are two major exceptions to this statute.

Section 718.110 also address other amendment issues, such as enlarging the common elements of the condominium, merging

While condominiums are creatures of statutes, there have been several court decisions that have found that the provisions in a condominium’s Declaration may control over a statute that was adopted after the original Declaration was recorded. For that reason, and many others, it is helpful to review your Declaration periodically to determine if the association should amend its Declaration to incorporate any new statutory amendments into it.

Finally, Section 718.110(13) concerns rental amendments. This statute provides that any amendment prohibiting owners from renting their units, altering the duration of the rental term, or limiting the number of times owners are entitled to will only apply to owners who agree to the amendment and to owners who purchase their unit after the effective date of the amendment. Now that online vacation rental sites are gaining popularity, many condominiums are seeking to amend their documents to limit short term rentals. However, associations need to be aware that such an amendment may not be as easy to adopt as they think.

two or more condominiums into one condominium, and mortgagee approval of amendments. Accordingly, this statute, along with the association’s Declaration, should be thoroughly reviewed before an association considers any amendments. If an amendment is done incorrectly, it will be deemed void or invalid. As always, an Association must seek legal advice from an attorney before adopting any amendment.

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Conducting an Effective Board Meeting By Lea A. Stokes, LCAM & Vice President, NE Region of Vesta Property Services Life as a community association manager can be challenging on a good day! We are problem solvers. Our days are filled with issues requiring immediate attention that come with high expectations from our clents. One of our major responsibilities is to organize, and often chair, the board meetings that are part of the management services for community associations, residential and commercial. The key to conducting an effective board meeting is in the preparation. The better prepared the board members are, the better the results that will be achieved. Create a clear and concise agenda that lists all the items that will be addressed and get the agenda in the hands of the board members in advance of the meeting. A meeting packet should be included that provides back up documentation for each item on the agenda that requires a decision. The packet should be in appropriate order and each item tabbed to relate directly back to the agenda. Provide a management report that details the accomplishments since their last meeting. Include back up data, along with recommendations, for current agenda items that need their attention or a decision. In the event an item includes competitive bids make sure to

have a spreadsheet or overview comparing apples to apples for each bid, so the board members can “at a glance” make an informed decision. Board meetings should never be in excess of 2 hours unless there is a major or controversial issue to be addressed. Staying focused and having accurate and detailed material provided in advance is a must. • • • • •

Keep it simple clear and concise communication accurate documentation start on time end on time

Simple preparation prior to board meetings makes their job easier and you look like a hero!

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Ignorance is not Bliss: Why Are Community Association Volunteer Board Members Sued? By Joel W. Meskin, Esq., CIRMS, CCAL Fellow, MLIS Volunteer board members are often baffled and incredulous when someone challenges or complains about a decision that they have made, a rule that they have been changed, or a special assessment that they have issued. I have touched in one way or another between five and six thousand claims and/or lawsuits against community Associations and their volunteer board members. As I travel around the country, people ask me what I have been able to distill from all these claims. Without skipping a beat, I respond by telling them that “ignorance is not bliss”!

What comes to mind each time this twofold dilemma comes up is a pearl of wisdom my father used to share with me. He would say “why do people never have time to do things right in the first place, but always have time to fix them”?

The “ignorance” I refer to is twofold. First, unit owners do not read the governing documents they have agreed to comply with prior to purchasing their home in a common interest association. In most cases, these unit owners probably do not read the governing documents until they have an issue with the board, the association, or their neighbors.

Practice Pointer 3: Each board should have an annual board training, even those who have been on the board. The value of an annual training far outweighs the cost, if any, as well as the effort. Both items will lead to both monetary and time savings when the board knows how to operate the board. The National CAI has great resources as well as on demand video courses on training. There is no excuse for not taking the time to prepare for a board position.

Practice Pointer 1: read the governing documents before you buy; ignorance of the governing documents is not a defense and an association member is presumed I tell boards and managers that in the normal course to have read the documents he or she has agreed to a board meeting should not take more than an hour. when they purchased their unit. Yes, certain issues create exceptions, but that should in fact be an “exception.” In response, I often hear “yah, Second, the volunteer board members turn their vol- right.” The key is for board members to understand unteer board position into something beyond its pur- their obligation, responsibility and treat the managepose and their authority. This is further exacerbated by ment of the association as the business it is. the fact that these volunteer board members are often the same unit owners that have not read the governing The board is a body comprised of individuals that is documents. charged to manage the association pursuant to the bylaws and relevant statutes. The board is a body that Practice Pointer 2: Each association member who makes decisions and policies and delegates to the indiwants to join the board should be required to confirm vidual who will carry out the delegated matter. When a that he or she has read the governing documents be- board member exits the properly noticed board meetfore agreeing to become a board member. ing, they have NO authority to act in their capacity as a board member except pursuant to the delegated 24 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


authority expressly given them by the board during a rules should include a limited time for speaking by properly noticed board meeting, or proper consent to unit owners at a board meeting. act without a meeting. Remember, each board mem- • Have a prepared agenda and stick to the agenda. ber has “one” vote whether he or she is also an officer If there are items that are not on the agenda, they of the association such as the president, Vice President should be tabled for another meeting. or other. • Do not tolerate a lack of civility or an individual who insists on disrupting a meeting. Do not enMost delegated tasks by the board are given to the gage that individual and adjourn the meeting to community association manager if there is one, or discuss further action with counsel. Counsel may employees. Sometimes, there is no CAM or employee, need to seek a court order. A court may require a and the action is delegated to a volunteer board memsecurity guard and put the cost on the disrupter. ber or other association member volunteer. In that • Just because someone asks a question does not case, the board member is carrying out the delegated mean an answer must be given. There may be action as a “volunteer” and not in his or her capacity questions out of order or otherwise inappropriate. as a board member. This is why an established set of rules are warranted. Practice Pointer 4: Remember, a board member is not • Whenever possible, even if an open meeting is not an employee, and apathy is not a defense. If the board required by the governing documents or statute, member says I have to do it, because no one else will. have an open meeting to avoid any appearance of However, if no one else will, there is a deeper issue secrecy or conspiracy. that must be addressed, because again the “volunteer • Prepare a short video regarding “life in our commuboard member or “other volunteer” is not an emnity.” This can identify the governing documents, ployee. If no one will step up, the board should hire a identify how the association is managed and who is management company or an employee. If the board eligible for the board and rules they may be unique is not willing to do that, then the board should go to to this association or to life in a common interest court and seek a receiver which will end up costing the development. board and the association the money they did not oth- Understanding the board’s duties and obligations and erwise want to spend. At the end of the day, the board making sure unit owners receive, read and ask quesis charged with protecting the association’s assets and tions about governing documents is the best risk manmust take the steps to do so. agement tool the association can use. In addition to understanding the role as a board member, the following are additional practice pointers that will help simplify and shorten a board meeting and mitigate claims. • The board members must open, read and prepare questions, if any, on the issues to be addressed on the agenda. The single biggest waste of time in board meetings are board members who come unprepared and spend time getting up to speed during the meeting. • Adopt a form of Roberts Rules of Order and stick to them. Even if the board are close friends and the use of rules seems awkward, the day a rogue unit owner or someone not playing with a full deck shows up, having in place a consistent set of rules will be worth its weight in gold. If rule are first used with respect to a specific individual, the door to discriminatory application of rules is opened. These 3RD QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 25


Use These Irrigation Trends for Landscape Maintenance Presented by Yellowstone Landscape Conserving water is a top priority for commercial landscape service providers. We are always looking for technologies that save water, while providing sufficient water to the landscape. Unpredictable weather conditions increase the need to conserve water, especially during periods of summer heat and drought.

be managed remotely, from anywhere in the world. Zones can be adjusted or turned off as needed, without having a technician dispatched to the property.

Evapotranspriation (ET) Based Sensors

Some controllers have evapotranspiration (ET) based Technologies for Water Preservation sensors that work by measuring the amount of rainfall the landscape has received, along with the The commercial irrigation industry is constantly work- moisture that has accumulated in the soil. The sening on new technologies that help preserve water sors detect the moisture level of the plants and alwithout impacting the service provider’s ability to keep locate water according to the nutrition they need our clients’ landscapes looking their best. Some of the to survive and thrive. The use of ET based sensors most popular trends in smart irrigation are listed here. have reduced water use for landscapes significantly, while still maintaining the health of the plants by measuring humidity, temperature, and moisture. Drip Irrigation The most convenient and relatively low-tech irrigation method for landscaping is drip irrigation. This method is simple and straightforward. It drips water slowly and directly onto the roots of the plants by using a system of pipes and hoses. Drip irrigation doesn’t require sprinkler heads and rotors, so there’s no water wasted in overspray.

Water Consumption Audits

While not a new technological innovation, it’s still very important to conduct regular water consumption audits to determine how well your property’s irrigation system is working. Conducting regular audits will allow your landscaping service provider to identify and isolate any potential issues, and gather information on the amount Drip irrigation is one of the most effective methods of water used by the irrigation system. Audits performed in conserving water, without affecting the watering at regular intervals help reduce the cost of water used needs of plants. This method helps avoid nutrient for irrigation more than any other tool or technology. loss and improves the efficiency of watering plants by targeting specific areas, directly on the ground.

Rain Sensors and Wi-Fi Controlled Sensors Rain sensors are useful when used in conjunction with new Wi-Fi sensor technology. Rain sensors collect data on how much rainfall your property has had recently and, when your system is setup correctly, your watering program will automatically adjust based on rainfall. This helps prevent overwatering and helps reduce your water bill. Wireless technology has made it easier than ever to control your irrigation system. Secure Wi-Fi access allows your irrigation system to 26 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


events The 2018 Chapter Education Day & Expo at the World Golf Village Renaissance Hotel was a huge success! This year’s “Be a Super Hero for Your Association” theme made the day even more interesting as vendors did not hold back in decorating their booths or dressing up as their favorite Super Hero. Attendees had a variety of educational courses to choose from throughout the day & a relaxing Happy Hour to end the day. Thanks to all of our Expo Sponsors for a successful event!

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events July’s Hurricane Preparedness meeting was held at Jacksonville Golf & Country Club. Our informative panel included Mike Buresh of Action News at WJAX TV, Patricia Truax Stewart of Castle Group, Robin Braddock of SERVPRO of Mandarin, The Beaches/Ponte Vedra, and St. Augustine, & Pilar Willis Dixon of Brown & Brown Insurance. Attendees learned how to prepare their homes, families, & communities, what to expect for this year’s hurricane season, a look at types of insurance, and what to consider during the clean up after your property is damaged from a storm.

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Directory PREMIER LISTING

AEGIS COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS, INC. DAVID BURMAN AMS, PCAM DAVIDB@AEGISCMS.COM AEGISCMS.COM

ALLIANCE ASSOCIATION BANK PAUL KNUTH PKNUTH@ALLIANCEASSOCIATIONBANK.COM ALLIANCEASSOCIATIONBANK.COM

PREMIER LISTING ANGIUS & TERRY, LLP LAURIE SHRADER LSHRADER@ANGIUS-TERRY.COM ANGIUS-TERRY.COM

ANSBACHER LAW BARRY B. ANSBACHER BBA@ANSBACHER.NET WWW.ANSBACHER.NET

ASPHALT RESTORATION TECHNOLOGY GEORGE RING GEORGE.RING@ASPHALTNEWS.COM ASPHALTNEWS.COM

ALLIED UNIVERSAL SECURITY SERVICES JIMMY DYCUS JAMES.DYCUS@AUS.COM AUS.COM

AQUATIC SYSTEMS, INC. MS. KATIE CABANILLAS KATIE.CABANILLAS@AQUATICSYSTEMS.COM AQUATICSYSTEMS.COM

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Disclaimer - Information listed reflects that provided from the CAI National Office. Any changes or updates to listed contact information may be made by logging into your account at www.caionline.org or through the National Office.

PREMIER LISTING BB&T ASSOCIATION SERVICES GEORGIA MILLER GGMILLER@BBANDR.COM BBT.COM

BECKER ROBYN M. SEVERS, ESQ. RSEVERS@BECKERLAWYERS.COM BECKERLAWYERS.COM

BROWN & BROWN OF FLORIDA, INC. PILAR DIXON, CIC, CIRMS PWILLIS@BBJAX.COM BBJAX.COM

30 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

PREMIER LISTING CASTLE GROUP PATRICIA TRUAX STEWART, CMCA, AMS, PCAM PSTEWART@CASTLEGROUP.COM CASTLEGROUP.COM

COMMUNITY ADVISORS, LLC CHARLES SHEPPARD, RS CSHEPPARD@COMMUNITYADVISORS.COM COMMUNITYADVISORS.COM

FIDUS ROOFING CONSTRUCTION & PAVERS SHANE KOWALCHIK SHANE@THEFIDUSGROUP.COM THEFIDUSGROUP.COM


Directory PREMIER LISTING

GUNSTER, YOAKLOY & STEWART, P.A. THOMAS JENKS TJENKS@GUNSTER.COM GUNSTER.COM

PREMIER LISTING MAY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. CATIE MARKS CMARKS@MAYRESORTS.COM MAYMGT.COM

JACKSON LAW GROUP, LL.M., P.A. EDWARD RONSMAN, ESQ. INFO@JACKSONLAWGROUP.COM JACKSONLAWGROUP.COM

METRO PROPERTY SERVICES JOHN MOORE FRONTDESK@METROPROPERTYSERVICES.COM METROPROPERTYSERVICES.COM

LAKE & WETLAND ADAM GRAYSON ADAM.GRAYSON@LAKEANDWETLAND.COM LAKEANDWETLAND.COM

3RD QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 31


Disclaimer - Information listed reflects that provided from the CAI National Office. Any changes or updates to listed contact information may be made by logging into your account at www.caionline.org or through the National Office.

PREMIER LISTING

PREMIER LISTING

PPG PAINTS ELIZABETH PIKE ELIZABETH.PIKE@PPG.COM PPG.COM

VALLEY NATIONAL BANK BILL WENDELL BWENDELL@VALLEYNATIONALBANK.COM VALLEYFLORIDA.COM

PUROCLEAN EMERGENCY RESTORATION SERVICES MELISSA ROWE MROWE@PUROCLEAN.COM PUROCLEAN.COM

VERDEGO BEAU BARNETT BBARNETT@VERDEGO.COM VERDEGO.COM

SOLITUDE LAKE MANAGEMENT TRACY FLEMING INFO@SOLITUDELAKE.COM SOLITUDELAKEMANAGEMENT.COM

32 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


Directory BASIC LISTING

Alliance C.A.S. Collections Ms. Chelsea Emons chelsea@alliancecas.com

Amelia Island Management Mr. Nick Lambiase, Jr., CPM, LCAM nick.lambiase@omnihotels.com Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Mr. David Dawson david_dawson@ajg.com

ASAP Towing and Storage Mr. Thomas Wimsatt thomas@towingasap.com

Association Dues Assurance Corp. Mrs. Lynn Manion lmanion@adac.us.com

Axiom Resources Mr. Ben Hippeli ben@associationcapital.com BCM Services, Inc. Mrs. L. Denise Wallace denisew@bcmservices.net

Brightview Landscape Services Mr. George Rugen george.rugen@brightview.com Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine PC Ms. Michelle Ybarra mybarra@burgsimpson.com

BASIC LISTING

BASIC LISTING

Cache Co LLC Ms. Cynthia Paquet cindy@cacheroofing.com

Custom Tree Surgeons Mr. Scott Washington scottatcts@yahoo.com

CertaPro Painters Mr. Jeff Lee jlee@certapro.com

Driveway Maintenance, Inc. Mr. Kerry Barnes kbarnes@driveway.net

Carr, Riggs & Ingram, LLC Mr. Timothy D. Fulmer tfulmer@cricpa.com

CINC Systems Ms. Vickie Johnson, CMCA, AMS vickie@cincsystems.com Clark Simson Miller Mr. Jason Miller sales@csmhoa.com

CMC-Jacksonville Ms. Colleen Michelle Griggs cgriggs@cmcjax.com

Coastal Construction Products Mr. Ron Mans rmans@coastalone.com

Coastal Insurance Underwriters, Inc. Mr. Chuck Bushong cbushong@ciuins.com Community Solutions Management, LLC Ms. Melodye Pitts mail@communitysm.com

D. Armstrong Contracting, LLC Mr. Dennis Armstrong dennis@darmstrong.net

Duval Asphalt Ms. Jennifer Garrett jgarrett@duvalasphalt.com

Envera Ms. Shar Caballero SCaballero@Enverasystems.com Enverasystems.com EverBank Ms. Terri Anderson terri.anderson@everbank.com Evergreen Lifestyles Management Mr. Kraig Carmickle Fidelity Bank Ms. Mary E. Price mary.price@lionbank.com

First Coast Association Management Ms. Alice Hubbard alice@firstcoastam.com

First Coast Mulch Covert Appraisal Services, Inc. Mr. David Robinson davidr@firstcoastmulch.com Ms. Constance Covert Connie@covertappraisal.com 3RD QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 33


Disclaimer - Information listed reflects that provided from the CAI National Office. Any changes or updates to listed contact information may be made by logging into your account at www.caionline.org or through the National Office.

BASIC LISTING

First Federal Bank of Florida Mr. Mike Mickler micklerm@ffbf.com

FirstService Residential Ms. Lillian Guerrero lillian.guerrero@fsresidential. com

Fletcher Stein Insurance Agency Ms. Carie Whitcomb cwhitcomb@fletcherstein.com Florida Certified Contractors Mr. Adam Russo

Florida Community Association Journal Mr. Jim McMurry jmcmurry@adpub.com

Garfinkel McCabe Shipwash Ronsman P.A. Mr. Edward Ronsman, Esq. eronsman@flcalaw.com Global Solution Partners Mr. Keith Ruehl, RS kruehl@globalsolutionpartners. com

BASIC LISTING

HomeTeam Pest Defense Mr. Dan Eckman dan.eckman@pestdefense.com Ian H. Graham Insurance Ms. Sylvia Tagle sylvia.tagle@aon.com

Inspections R Us Ms. Marianne E. Bailey marianne@inspectionsr.us Jimerson & Cobb, P.A. Mr. Hans Wahl hwahl@jimersoncobb.com

Kings III Emergency Communications Ms. Candace Harrison charrison@kingsiii.com Kipcon, Inc. Mr. Ed Pazden epazden@kipcon.com

Krystal Klean Mr. Anthony Lewis Morgan tmorgan@krystalklean.com

Landscape Maintenance Professionals

Greenway Lawncare Mr. Sasa Popovic Larsen & Associates, P.L. contact@greenway-lawncare.com Mr. Mark King www.larsenandassociates.com Herbie Wiles Insurance Mr. Wayne Howell Malarkey Roofing Products whowell@herbiewiles.com Ms. Rachel Garcia rgarcia@malarkeyroofing.com Heritage Insurance Mr. Randy Jones heritagepci.com

34 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

BASIC LISTING

Martin Home Exteriors Mr. Chris Lentzke chrisl@mhejax.com

MBAF, CPAS & ADVISORS CONDOMINIUM AND ASSOCIATION DIVISION Mr. Jeffrey L. Ducker jducker@mbafcpa.com McCabe Law Group, P.A. Mr. Michael John McCabe mccabe@jaxlandlaw.com McCall Services, Inc. Mr. Jerry Hall jhall@mccallservice.com

McGowan Program Administrators Mr. Joel W. Meskin, Esq., CIRMS jmeskin@mcgowanins.com Mutual of Omaha Bank Mr. Keith Collopy keith.collopy@mutualofomahabank.com

Nabr Network Mr. James Garner james.garner@nabrnetwork.com Norman Insurance Advisors, LLC Mr. Andy Norman anorman@normaninsuranceadvisors.com North Florida Emulsions Mr. Jeffrey King northflemulsions@bellsouth.net


Directory BASIC LISTING

Owens Corning Ms. Zack Farris zack.farris@owenscorning.com

Pacific Premier Bank Ms. Alicia Granados, CMCA, AMS, PCAM agranados@ppbi.com Popular Association Banking Ms. Molly Hime mhime@popular.com

Property Management Systems, Inc. Mr. Scott William Steffen, CMCA ssteffen@pmsiofflorida.com Pursiano Barry Bruce Lavelle, LLP Mr. Jason Bruce, Esq. jbruce@pblbh.com Reserve Advisors Mr. Nick Brenneman nick@reserveadvisors.com Rizzetta & Company, Inc. Ms. Valerie Bethea Rockaway Inc. Mr. Greg Burghardt laurab@rgcjax.com

Sentry Management, Inc. Mr. Gordon Wolfram

Servpro of Mandarin, the Beaches/Ponte Vedra & St. Augustine Ms. Robin Braddock robin@servpromandarin.com

BASIC LISTING

BASIC LISTING

Sherwin-Williams Mr. Linsey Ritch swrep5784@sherwin.com

Vesta Property Services, Inc. Ms. Lea Stokes lstokes@preferredmanagementservices.net

Shimp Sign and Design, Inc. Mr. Roy Luster Shimp, Jr. rlshimp@comcast.net

Vote-now.com LLC Mr. James Claiborne jclaiborne@vote-now.com

Southeast Pipe Survey, Inc. Ms. Traci Abel traci@southeastpipe.com

Sovereign & Jacobs Property Management Companies Mrs. Ellen Lumpkin elumpkin@sovereign-jacobs.com Sperlonga Data & Analytics Mr. Scott Swanson s.swanson@sperlongadata.com Tankel Law Group Mr. Bob Tankel Bob@TankelLawGroup.com

Williams Law Association, P.A. Mr. K.C. Williams III, Esq. kcw@williamspa.com

Yellowstone Landscapes Mr. Blaine Peterson bpeterson@austinoutdoor.com Zenpura Pest Solutions Me. Ken Maszy ken@zenpura.com

The Lake Doctors, Inc. Mr. Eric Williams eric.williams@lakedoctors.com TOPS Software, LLC Ms. Stefanie Ford stafanief@topssoft.com

Union Bank Homeowners Association Services Ms. Amanda Orlando, CMCA amanda.orlando@unionbank. com

3RD QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 35

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NE Florida CAI Chapter Vol. 5 Iss. 3  

NE Florida CAI The Community Connection - Providing education, networking, resources and advocacy for Community Associations in Northeast Fl...

NE Florida CAI Chapter Vol. 5 Iss. 3  

NE Florida CAI The Community Connection - Providing education, networking, resources and advocacy for Community Associations in Northeast Fl...

Profile for neflcai