Page 1

Final Major Project


Project P For my Final Major project, I am going to design my own brand of Vodka. For this project, the outcomes I will be required to produce are the full identity for my brand, including a logo, business stationary, a website, packaging, labels, advertising and relevant additional items as necessary. As I feel I am yet to expand further within illustration and only briefly touched upon it during my book cover project, I would like to re-visit that to see what unique mixed media techniques I may develop. Firstly, for this project I will be producing a digital sketchbook. I feel I am able to annotate and depict images in greater detail and have a much cleaner outcome than that of a sketchbook. Also, if I’m to use illustrative techniques, these will be enhanced by digitally displaying them. I will create this using Adobe inDesign, and then transferring this to Issuu, where a more realistic and interactive book is formed. I decided to create a Vodka brand as I feel I could design and create a particularly unique outcome. I’m excited by the possibilities within this category, and feel there are little if no limits to my imagination. To begin with, I will research alcoholic spirits as a whole, gaining an overview on design within this industry. I will learn what the typical packaging is for different spirits and how to differentiate between them, and then I will figure out how to break these stereotypes to come up with a creative, unique brand identity. I will investigate which Vodka’s are doing particularly well within the industry and look at their packaging individually to gain an insight into the design of more popular beveragesdoes the design effect the popularity? If so, this is something I will also need to consider. I will also look at the stationary, packaging, advertisement and extras provided with a range of beverages to see what I will need to create to make my brand as practical as tpossible if it was to be produced. I will look at the likes of Absolut Vodka in particularly close detail, as their advertisement has gone back since the 1980’s and have some of the most iconic, memorable adverts in the world. I will look at older sources and see how they develop. Once I have a clear idea of the theme I want for my brand, I will then have a look for illustrators with a similar style and use this artist’s work to enable me to develop my own illustrations. I was to go ahead using illustrated pieces of work, I would scan the illustrations onto the computer, and then edit and enhance them accordingly.


Proposal I may decide to experiment with different mediums within illustration, so I could try ink drawing with watercolour paints, or biro drawings with inks to see a range of potential outcomes. I will also have to look closely at logos on existing items in the market. As much as I want my design to be unique, it still has to be in favour of the audience. I will therefore again need to see what’s successful in the industry and learn from this to create my logo. As I am creating an alcoholic beverage, I have to think about having a suitable target market. The legal age to purchase alcoholic substances in the UK is 18, therefore my minimum age my target audience can legally be is 18. Depending on the theme of my brand which is yet to be decided, I am unsure of my target audience. However, I do know I want to aim it around 18-40 year olds, as I want this to be affordable but enjoyable for young, sophisticated people. If I was to make a website, I would have to design a date of birth checker for entry to the website, as it is illegal to not have this. I will also research alcoholic beverages that appeal to the younger market, whilst still remaining classy and elegant. I also chose the younger target market so I could have fun in coming up with the design for this project, as I feel the slightly older market tend to have a little more generic, sophisticated designs and I wanted to come up with something totally different. I have until Friday 2nd May to complete this project. The date today is Thursday 13th March, meaning I have 23 sessions and 8 weeks left in order to complete this project. I will spend 3 weeks beginning my digital sketchbook and gathering a broad body of research expanding on the points I mentioned above. I will then begin to look at ideas for my brand, by drawing and further visual research to represent potential ideas towards my final piece. I will then dig deeper into what I feel is working, developing these points and expanding them further. By week 5 I expect to have my illustrations and bottle labelling completed. I will then take this branding and use it accordingly to create assisting items, such as a box, cocktail booklets, a website, advertising etc. By week 7, I will have everything together and working on final tweaks to ensure full satisfaction and suitability to the brief.


What Is VOdka? Vodka is a distilled beverage composed primarily of water and ethanol, sometimes with traces of impurities and flavorings. Vodka is made by the distillation of fermented substances such as grains, potatoes, or sometimes fruits or sugar. Traditionally prepared vodkas have an alcoholic content of 40 percent by volume. Today the standard Russian, Ukrainian, Estonian, Polish, Latvian, Lithuanian and Czech vodkas are 40 percent alcohol by volume or 80 percent proof. The European Union has established a minimum of 37.5 percent for any "European vodka to be named as such. Products sold as vodka in the United States must have an alcoholic content of 30 percent or more. Homemade vodkas and distilled beverages are referred to as moonshine. Vodka is traditionally drunk neat in the vodka belt countries of Eastern Europe and around the Baltic Sea. It is also commonly used in cocktails and mixed drinks, such as the Caesar, Bloody Mary, Screwdriver, Sex on the Beach, Moscow Mule, White Russian, Black Russian, vodka tonic, and in a vodka martini. The word vodka was recorded for the first time in 1405 in Akta Grodzkie,the court documents from the Palatinate of Sandomierz in Poland. At the time, the word vodka referred to chemical compounds such as medicines and cosmetics cleansers, while the popular beverage was called gorzalka (from the Old Polish gorzec meaning to burn), which is also the source of Ukrainian Vodka, Horilika. The word vodka written in Cyrillic appeared first in 1533, in relation to a medicinal drink brought from Poland to Russia.


CHRISTMAS ABSINTHE The packaging on Christmas Absinthe has a very luxury, higher class feel. The golden embellishmenttype work on the bottle not only resembles Christmas, but also has glimpses of Art Nouveau style work in there too. This is seen in the gentle illustration, decorating the bottle but not over-whelming it despite the fact that there’s a lot going on. There is a slightly religious, church vibe off the illustrations. The very detailed eye on the cork adds a sense of seriousness to the design, almost reminding you that this is still a bottle of Absinthe despite the kind exterior. The title ‘Absinthe’ is unmistakable, being the centre piece of the bottle. This font looks hand-drawn along with the rest of the bottle, yet elegantly slinked across the front of the bottle in a sophisticated manor. The bright green of the bottle, often associated with beer, works surprisingly well with the gold and white of the bottle, adding to the ‘Christmas’ feel. The catch line is contradicting, yet witty. “Beautiful, Hideous, Angelic, Devilish”. This is very cleverly done.


EVIL SPIRITS VODKA Evil Spirits Vodka is one of the cleverest forms of packaging design I’ve researched. The whole concept is clearly very well thought out, and the whole set flows perfectly. The whole thing has an incredibly dark feel to it, which I think adds a sense of mystery and curiosity for the consumer. This therefore makes it incredibly appealing. By adding a Ouija board, this enhances the curiosity element for the consumer, as this adds a sense of danger and adrenaline. Evil Spirits have very cleverly designed the brand to be more than ‘just vodka’, they’ve added another dimension of attraction to the brand, giving it that bit more desirable. I think the title of the brand is impeccably clever. There’s a play on words, is the spirit as in the Vodka evil, or the spirits as in ghosts? They also include a cocktail book, as well as information on how to use the Ouija board which continues with the consistency of the rest of the brand. The choice of words throughout such as ‘Painstakingly created to be Sinfully enjoyed’ and ‘Because dead people make the best drinking buddies’ keep up the act of the brand. The packaging for this is fairly simple however, again with a beautiful decorative font and simply a Ouija board design beneath, keeping it clean and memorable.


HENDRICK'S GIN Hendricks Gin is a beautifully illustrated brand. However, in comparison to other illustrated forms of packaging I’ve looked at which seem to have a younger target market, Hendrick’s seems to be targeting not only a more sophisticated older market but all markets. I wouldn’t say this would appeal to 18-25 year olds in general, but the packaging is all round very appealing. The gentle faded green background gives it just a dust of colour. There’s almost an ‘Alice In Wonderland’ feeling to the branding, with words such as “Unusual” and “Peculiar” popping up. I get a very mad hatters tea party reflection from this, however with a more sophisticated, modern twist. The randomness of the illustrations favors this odd style, with images of completely irrelevant objects and people on the packaging. Their use of typography on their packaging is a standout. Again, use of capitals seems significant. The large, elegant yet block font is placed central on the packaging, capturing the audiences attention and making it memorable along with their what can only be described as mascot, doodled in a vintage, retro manner and appearing here and there on their branding. What I like the most about Hendrick’s branding is there seems to be no limitations, anything goes.


JACK Jack D global brand men a the bl but it techn you co a mini any le white out ag


K DANIEL’S WHISKEY Daniel’s is one of the more popular brands I’ve researched. Jack Daniel’s is lly recognized and appreciated. I feel Jack Daniel’s have a very masculine d, as whiskey is stereotypically a men’s drink so the packaging is target at as they are presumed to be the majority consumer. In terms of design, I love lack and white illustrative approach. The actual label has a lot going on, still has a very clean, memorable feel. The bottle shape is another branding nique used by the company to make their drink more memorable, let’s face it ould spot a bottle of Jack Daniel’s from down an aisle. Decoration is kept to imum, which works really well. Anymore and it would have been too much, ess and there wouldn’t have been enough. The pitch black against the crisp e enhances their beautiful line work further, and makes the packaging stand gainst the amber glowing liqueur.


KRAKEN RUM Kraken Rum is a perfect example of a illustration based brand. They have evolved a strong brand identity following their character the Octopus, which is seen in almost every piece of identity they have. They have a very vintage, 60’s feel to their advertisement with the monochrome coloring with faded beige here and there on adverts. The box used on their logo represents elegance and class, and resembles that of the opening title of an old school 60’s movie. They use different fonts on their logo, which risky as it may sound, works very well. ‘The’ is written in a script, italics font, enhancing this old school Hollywood feeling, while the rest

is th ag illu in ca lus Th wh th of in illu


in block capital type, which is the polar opposite of he first font. This interesting use of type in contrast gainst the white background works effortlessly. The lustration of the octopus is constructed using an ncredibly intricate technique called dot shading. You an see almost every dot and bit of detail in that ilustration, which again steals the audience’s attention. he eyes of the octopus are somewhat penetrating, which are a huge feature within the packaging. Even he app advertisment continues with this crazy story this octopus taking over the world, with the trackng details either side of the hands, which are also lustrated.


ODDKA VODKA Oddka takes on a similar theme as Hendrick’s gin, however Oddka has a slightly younger feel. Whereas Hendrick’s Gin is traditionally flavoured gin (which tends to be aimed at an older target market due to the nature of gin), Oddka have taken Vodka and injected unusual flavour twists into it. This is appealing to the target audience as this is something new, something they’ve never tried before. Their design aesthetic is similar to that of Hendrick’s also, however there is a lot more use of bold, bright colours used. Oddka use a range of illustrations in a rough-doodle type way, again oddly placed and random themed objects. Their bottles are bright, vibrant and desirable. Their logo definitely aids this, as there is their upside down illustration of a man with random objects floating about him. The name Oddka is incredibly witty and sums up the brand to a T, odd vodka. Oddka are very well branded and marketed through social media and they also have their own website. Each bottle also has little images relating to the flavour of the drink, which is also colour coordinated. This drink has an overall younger feel due to this as the flavours are slightly more outgoing in comparison to the traditional flavours of Hendrick’s.


OUZO THOUKIS VODKA Ouzo Thoukis is very high-end, sophisticated and classy in appearance. The packaging gives it an expensive, luxury brand feel due to the minimalistic approach to d choice. This aids the expensive feel, using a ‘more is less’ approach. The imagery used on this packaging is interesting. They have used a dandelion with the seeds flyin broad, black line to break up the white space with the text on the packaging, breaking it up and drawing away from the mass of white space. The bottle itself is shap providing it assistance and again breaking up the blankness.


design. The all white colour scheme with the hint of black adds dimension to the design, drawing interest. The font is all in capitals, with a clean, narrow font ng off. A dandelion is something I would relate to childhood, or making wishes, not vodka. This is therefore use of imagery in an abstract way. They then use a ped very similarly to that of the Absolut bottle, risky perhaps since it’s an iconic, popular brand known for its identity mainly. However, the bottle hugs the design,


SAILOR JERRY SPICED RUM Sailor Jerry’s is a brand that revolves around the style of 1960’s pinup girls. These types of illustrations and typography are often associated with tattoos. The This gives an enhanced 1960’s pinup feel. This brand feels very targeted at men due to the excessive use of women which men would find more desirable than uses a signature style lettering, keeping it simple and memorable and leaving the illustrations to do the majority of the talking. The nature of the brand seems alcoholic drinks. The illustrations are signature to the brand, which are instantly recognizable as associated with Sailor Jerry. There is a modern version of the banners also enhance this old-school tattoo style as these too are very much associated with the 1960’s style of art and design.


colouring of the brand is all very sepia, from the colour of the alcohol to the packaging. n women, but also because rum is generally aimed more at men than women. The logo s to be a little bit cheeky and jokey, taking the seriousness sometimes associated with he logo, which includes a logo, enhancing the slightly nautical side of the name. Use of


SPINE VODKA Spine vodka was in my opinion one of the cleverest, innovative and modern use of branding of all the packaging I’ve researched. The contemporary approach to design is s ing publicity and drawing in appeal to the brand, by doing one small, yet very clever thing. The whole feel to the design is very clean, minimalistic and sleek, and without drink is vanilla flavoured, so that perhaps explains the use of yellow. The spine also makes the target audience look twice at the packaging, making it stand out from its co and interesting. This also suggests to me that the target audience is slightly younger than others I’ve researched. The feel of the brand is fairly expensive and upper market


shown here, and also hints of architecture are seen. There is not only a spine used on the logo, hut also a 3D spine inside the bottle. This is a very clever approach to gainthe aid of the 3D spine element there would be in fact too little. The spine is also coloured bright yellow, which adds more dimension and interest to the packaging. The ompetitors. Again there’s a touch of humour regarding the percentage of alcohol, where it states “Strong as hell�. This takes the seriousness off the brand, making it fun t due to the unusual approach to the branding. This brand is very memorable, making it on target for success.


ABSOLUT SUCCESS Making yourself known for something is a natural part of human existence, and marketing companies know this. They want you familiarized with their product, understanding what you are buying the minute you see an ad for your favourite beverage or candy bar or whatever. One of the most memorable, consistent, effective ad campaigns is for Absolut Vodka. You see those ads in a magazine and you immediately know what the ad is about. .......... SUCCESS IS SIMPLE Unlike the flashy commercials by many car companies, which are always over-the-top and usually quite forgettable, Absolut vodka has taken a simple concept and branded it effectively. Whoever is churning out those classic picture ads is doing a great job, because you can immediately recognize the product just by the font and style of the picture. In fact, many other incredibly successful companies are venturing towards the “simple is better” approach now, even though Absolut started their ad campaign nearly 20 years ago. Back in the ’80s, when the Absolut ads started popping up everywhere, they were already iconic. Now, after 20 years have passed, the classic Absolut (insert-clever-pun-here) style is synonymous with the company. .......... SUCCESS SPANS CULTURES Outside of the great simplicity of the Absolut ad campaign, the company has also focused on bridging cultural gaps with its campaigns. Unlike the crappy car commercials that are so forgettable, the Absolut brand is memorable. You can bet that, out of the thousands of ads, one of them has resonated with some part of your history, culture, family or interests. Absolut has managed to find a marketing device that works anywhere, in any setting, with almost any group. ..........


SUCCESS IS CREATIVEt Many other companies have tried to incorporate the arts and icons to enhance advertising. Sometimes it works great, like with many Pepsi or Coca-Cola ads. Absolut, from the induction of its ad campaign, has gone out of its way to recruit artists, musicians, comedians, and actors to help establish a brand that is both recognizable and hip. Not only has Absolut vodka dominated in icon recruiting, but they have managed to establish a near cult following of ad collectors. When you are selling a very simple product like vodka, establishing yourself as “the” vodka to have because of icons, artists, and musicians who are a part of that ad campaign is brilliant. In fact, it is so effective that many people, or some might consider fanatics, scour the Web looking for Absolut ads to collect. Some people would pay a hefty chunk of change for an Absolut ad. There are even entire fan websites dedicated to collecting and selling Absolut ads. The 20-year run of ads have created a worldwide recognition of the Absolut brand name, which is what marketing and branding is all about. .......... SUCCESS IS JUST…AWESOME Absolut made vodka cool, hip, and trendy. They established themselves as the only vodka to buy. They have an amazing website with loads of recipes. They have a coalition of ad collectors that look like a small cult following! Above all of those things, when you see that classic, simple bottle of clear liquid and the iconic “Absolut ______.” you just want to sit back, relax, and enjoy your favourite vodka-based drink and revel in how cool that last ad was that you saw. ..........


WHAT IS THERE IN AN ABSOLUTE WORLD? The Absolut Vodka campaign is selling an idea that allows you to appreciate and accept the affects of what Absolut Vodka can do for you. The Absolut Vodka campaign stresses the fact that with Absolut Vodka you can be taken into this ideal of a perfect world. This ad is effective because I am convinced that if you drink this Absolut Vodka no matter who you are your world will be changed and filled with purity and perfection. The campaign effectively persuades you by displaying a house that everyone would want and the colours of white which show perfection and purity. Absolut aim to convince their audience that with this Vodka your world can be altered. .......... The Absolute Vodka campaign makes the pregnant male the focus of the ad. This man is presented in a way that a regular man would not, which is pregnant. He is standing next to the woman with a stressful look on his face, he looks as if he is tired and needs help from his significant other.. He has on a green sweater with buttons that look as if it has been worn many times. The buttons seem to be coming off of the sweater. He looks as if he needs a shave. A woman’s hands are usually upon her waist; his hands are on his waist. He looks very tired. The woman is simply representing dominance. Her hair looks as if it is always well kept. Her dress looks fine; she is also wearing high heels. Her hand is also on her waist. The smile on her face says that she is fine and she has not one worry. .......... Dominance is portrayed through the man and the woman, as well as with the colour white. The color white is portrayed all throughout the house. That brings upon some point of power and dominance. The woman is portrayed as the dominate figure in this ad. This ad shows the woman as the dominate figure and her face displays not one worry. Opposed to the man’s face who is in distraught. The woman looks great and he doesn’t. His faced looks as if he is relying on her for help. She should be relying on him. Absolut Vodka says that in their world anything can happen. Even the cultural ideals don’t matter. That man wants the woman to feel his pain. That says that the dominance of a man is irrelevant. Absolute Vodka determines who can be dominant. ..........


Purity and perfection is conveyed within the ad through the way that the house looks. The house is all white, which represents perfection and pureness because of the fact that everything is perfect. The floors are all white. The walls are all white. There are not one but two white fireplaces. Their house is much more sophisticated than the normal. They are a sophisticated couple and in a higher class. They are rich. They live in a house which anyone would want to live and a are living a life that anyone would want. We are given hints to this because of how nice the house is. They are young adults living the American dream. The text “In a Absolut World” is also written in white. This also implies that everything surrounding it is pure and powerful. These words are next to the bottle of vodka. Drinking Absolut Vodka can make you feel perfect. Purity and perfection evokes a lot of emotions throughout this ad, which is dominance, pride and empathy. You can see pride in the couple’s stance. They are proudly standing in their brand new perfect home. They are ready to live a perfect life. On the other hand empathy can be portrayed even through all of the perfection, which is the vibe the male gives off. Even your emotions can be perfect, this is what the woman portrays. .......... This ad is geared toward an adult audience; a Younger adults who are able to drink and needs to escape reality at times. This ad is also for those young adults who want to live the ideal perfect life. Ages 25 to 30. Those are the ages in which you want to have a great time, have no worries and even settle down. This ad expresses that with this bottle of Absolut Vodka you are on the way to perfection and living the “American Dream”. .......... The Absolut vodka campaign effectively persuades their audience with this ad. This ad can be considered effective because of every visual message that this ad gives off; pregnant male, perfect house, perfect family and more so nothing less than perfection and pureness. This ad displays power. They make sure that you are aware that Absolut vodka can allow you to reach a place which is not reality; allow you to do different things, see a different way, think a different way and in all live a perfect way. If you want perfection, Absolute Vodka is the drink for you. ..........


Which Vodka Brand Has The Best Bottle? The packaging of any product is important, but in vodka, it may be most important of all. After all, vodka is clear, and it’s designed to be tasteless. The perfect sample is essentially an invisible product. So the bottle shape, labeling, and every other tiny packaging decision are what ultimately define and differentiate the product. (The same could be said for water, of course, but when is the last time a bottle of water went for £50 for 750ml? Recently, marketing firm Affinnova ran a “design audit” on 12 vodka brands we all know-Absolut, Belvedere, Ciroc, Grey Goose, Ketel One, New Amsterdam, Pinnacle, Skyy (limited-run bottle, Smirnoff, Stolichnaya, Svedka, and Titos. What they learned was fascinating. Absolut may have the best outright brand equity (and the second-highest U.S. sale behind Smirnoff, but its brand is actually bogged down by their packaging in almost every emotional descriptor you could apply to a bottle of vodka). Meanwhile, upstarts like Svedka and Pinnacle are gathering attention through unconventional designs. And Belvedere-well, they win it all, when consumers see their bottle; the perception of the Belvedere brand improves in almost every way. Affinnova ran its audit by setting up two grocery aisles. One was nothing but index cards with the brands written on them. The other was an actual shelf of the 12 vodka brands. This setup allowed Affinnova to compare what consumers thought about the brand in general and what consumers thought about the brand after seeing the bottle.

“With Svedka and Pinnacle, the packaging was really helping their brands,” explains Affinnova Product Manager Devon Kelly. “Older brands-they weren’t completely overlooked, but they weren’t performing as strongly.” Indeed, Svedka and Pinnacle, each poised in a broad-shouldered, amphora-shaped bottles, each popping clear white type off a blue background, sucked the most overall eye time from consumers. Of course, what the consumer thought about when looking at these bottles was a more difficult thing to quantify.


“Just because someone is looking at your pack isn’t necessarily a great thing,” cautions Kelly. “It could be your pack has some aspect of it that’s eye-catching but not helping. It might be more of a surprise element that people are trying to digest, or it might be that people really like it.” Interestingly enough, Absolut was also a top scorer in terms of attention, but in its case, the bottle hurt the brand in almost every way. After actually seeing the bottle, consumers ranked Absolut as less sophisticated, celebratory, sexy, fun, and modern than the control group who’d only been presented with Absolut written on an index card.

“Absolut had very strong brand equity. It’s very well established and did well. But on its pack design, it brought down their brand equity,” Kelly explains. “The big names have more to lose with the bottle.” Indeed, Absolut has 30 years of one of the most iconic marketing campaigns behind it, which has no doubt constructed an impression in our mind’s eye that the bottle on the shelf simply can’t compete with. If Absolut were to reconsider part of its bottle design, the best place to start might be its script type, which I personally feel lets the branding down. It doesn’t have a sophisticated, sexy characteristic and instead a little trashy, bad tattoo script feel instead.


Belvedere had much lower brand equity than Absolut, but when customers actually saw the bottle, feelings about the brand jumped around. Belvedere was the biggest overall winner when it came to packaging. The bottle didn’t stand out, but it held the attention of those who looked at it, and in a positive way. Just as Absolut’s packaging hurt its brand in almost every adjective under the sun, Belvedere’s packaging helped its brand across the same categories. “People resonated with the image of the mansion,” says Kelly. “They thought the bottle design was cool.” The image of the mansion could be seen as desirable, and the frosted bottles along with the white trees and icy font give a wintery feel. The colour blue is becoming a common occurrence among Vodka packaging and design, and it seems to be a signature Vodka colour. The colours used are important in design, as they are what people instantly relate to the drink. For example, the colour for Gin might be seen as green (seen in most popular Gin brands, such as Gordons, Greenall’s, well most brands except for Bombay Sapphire which is an exception for its fantastic reputation and design). Another interesting note is the fact that the writing on most Vodka bottles is in capital letters, or at least the titles. This could be to draw in the attention of the audience and make the brand more memorable.


Inspired by mythology and illustrated by hand, Archangels represent a new level of elegance in playing card design. The design was produced by theory11 and illustrated by Tom Lane in the United Kingdom. The design itself required six months of intricate, pen-and-ink illustration. The result: breathtaking. The back design is the crown jewel of the Archangel deck. The closer you look, the more detail you will find. Archangels showcase a juxtaposition of good and evil, darkness and light, night and day, angels and demons. Archangels contain original artwork on the Ace of Spades, Joker, back design, and box. On the box, debossed ridges provide a unique feel that accent majestic gold foil across each face. Made in the USA at The United States Playing Card Company on premium quality papers, stock, and finish.


Naming my brand

Black Magic What is black magic?

Black magic has traditionally referred to the use of supernatural powers or magic for evil and selfish purposes.With respect to the left-hand path and right-hand path dichotomy, black magic is the malicious counterpart of benevolent white magic. In modern times, some find that the definition of "black magic" has been convoluted by people who define magic or ritualistic practices that they disapprove of as "black magic". Like its counterpart white magic, the origins of black magic can be traced to the primitive, ritualistic worship of spirits as outlined in Robert M. Place's 2009 book, Magic and Alchemy. Unlike white magic, in which Place sees parallels with primitive shamanistic efforts to achieve closeness with spiritual beings, the rituals that developed into modern "black magic" were designed to invoke those same spirits to produce beneficial outcomes for the practitioner. Place also provides a broad modern definition of both black and white magic, preferring instead to refer to them as "high magic" (white) and "low magic" (black) based primarily on intentions of the practitioner employing them. He acknowledges, though, that this broader definition of "high" and "low")suffers from prejudices as good-intentioned folk magic may be considered "low" while ceremonial magic involving expensive or exclusive components may be considered by some as "high magic", regar less of intent.


The influence of popular culture has allowed other practices to be drawn in under the broad banner of “black magic” including the concept of Satanism . While the invocation of demons or spirits is an accepted part of black magic, this practice is distinct from the worship or deification of such spiritual beings. Those lines, though, continue to be blurred by the inclusion of spirit rituals from otherwise “white magicians” in compilations of work related to Satanism. John Dee’s 17th century rituals, for example, were included in Anton LaVey’s The Satanic Bible (1969) and so some of his practises, otherwise considered white magic, have since been associated with black magic. Dee’s rituals themselves were designed to contact spirits in general and angels in particular, which he claimed to have been able to do with the assistance of colleague Edward Kelley. LaVey’s Bible, however, is a “complete contradiction” of Dee’s intentions but offers the same rituals as a means of contact with evil spirits and demons. Interestingly, LaVey’s Church of Satan (with LaVey’s Bible at its centre), “officially denies the efficacy of occult ritual” but “affirms the subjective, psychological value of ritual practice”, drawing a clear distinction between. Voodoo, too, has been associated with modern “black magic”; drawn together in popular culture and fiction. However, while hexing or cursing may be accepted black magic practices, Voodoo has its own distinct history and traditions that have little to do with the traditions of modern witchcraft that developed with European practitioners like Gerald Gardner and Aleister Crowley. In fact, Voodoo tradition makes its own distinction between black and white magic, with sorcerers like the Bokor known for using magic and rituals of both. But their penchant for magic associated with curses, poisons and zombies means they, and Voodoo in general, are regularly associated with black magic in particular.


Imagery

I like the idea of using a joker for the image of my brand. Firstly, using unusual or spontaneous feeling characters as the face of the brand seems to genera majority of modern, illustrated design brands. The use of the Joker as the face of a brand hasn’t been done yet, and I feel it would gain attention and be a memorable signature for the brand. The face of a good, successful brand needs to be instantly associated with the brand within a split second, which is w makes for good branding.


y Ideas

ate the strong, what

I am calling my brand Black Magic, and card games are often associated with magic. I like the fact that the Joker is a wild card, commonly associated with mischief and darkness. I feel this concept will work well with my brand. I also like the physical appearance of Joker cards. They have a slightly old-school, dark twang to them which makes them riddled with curiosity and gives an unpredictable feel. The joker is also a successful character from the film Batman, in which the Joker is a villain.


THE JOKER The ‘wild-card’, the card of opportunity ... The extra “Joker” card is believed to have been invented by American Euchre players who, when modifying the rules sometime during the 1860s, decided that an extra trump card was required. Originally he was called “The Best Bower” and then later “The Little Joker” or “The Jolly Joker”. It was around this time that other innovations and improvements started to appear, such as rounded corners replacing .square and various types of corner indices These Jokers, or extra cards, were first introduced into American packs around 1863, but took a little longer to reach English packs, in around 1880. One British manufacturer (Chas Goodall) was manufac.turing packs with Jokers for the American market in the 1870s

Above: early 'Bower' cards and Jokers by American manufacturers produced during the 1870s-1880s. Many of the images resemble !clowns or jesters, not always 'Jolly'; sometimes they appear slightly sinsiter


Above: early Jokers by the firm Charles Goodall & Son, London, (1821-1921) produced during the 1870s-1890s. Victor Mauger soon issued their own joker

The Joker card is capable of almost anything or almost nothing, depending on the rules of the game. It has been suggested (Dianne Longley, 1999) that “the Joker is the 'wild-card', or the card of opportunity, not unlike the ethos of opportunity and individuality that has been the driving force behind America's pursuit of greatness.� Some historians have seen the Joker as a descendant of the Fool of Italian tarot cards, and in some 19th century tarot sets the Fool was .depicted as a harlequin or buffoon


Imagery For

This piece was an initial visualization I created as an idea. This helped me to develop a concept for what I wanted my packaging to look like. Although this wasn’t an entirely accurate visualization, it helped me to start designing.

I then decided to add a texture to the background to see if that would add dimension or appeal. I decided that I didn’t like this effect, however I could experiment with this later on in the design process.


r The Brand

This was my initial drawing for my brand. I hand-drew this and scanned it in, and then subtly edited it using curves and brightness and contrast on Photoshop. I like the slightly evil undertone within this piece.

I then edited this piece further by live-tracing it on Illustrator and removing the details at the bottom. I feel this piece works better alone due to the heavy use of block colouring, and there is now more room to add in the brand i information for the packaging.


Colou

After live tracing my illustration, I needed to decide on a colour. Initially I wanted to use black and white, but after visualising this I was unsure on how it was. I felt it looks too harsh as there are a lot of sharp points on the design. I also tried to invert it, however the illustration becomes harder to make o I liked the pastel-toned images also, as they’re not so harsh on the eye and compliment the design nicely, giving a nice balance of sharp but still legible. using a navy blue in the end, as I feel it was a good balance of dark colour without being too harsh on the eye.


uring

w successful out this way. I decided on


Typogr


raphy

The next thing I had to think about within the design process was my use of font for my title. The title of my brand will work as my logo too, therefore my typography selection is critical. I wanted a good mix of old-school and Gothic with modern, as I don’t want my brand to look too religious, or not ‘evil’ enough. I picked out a wide range of fonts, from classical fonts to modern, however I decided to go with VTKS Classical Hit. I feel this font is the most decorative and dynamic, and I feel it works well alone as a logo as well as complimenting and setting the mood for the brand. To aid my decision, I decided to design mock-up’s of my packaging to help me get a feel of the fonts.


This mock-up was made using VTKS Classical Hit, the font I decided to use. I feel this font compliments the illustration and sets a dramatic, modern mood to the packaging. It also works successfully alone, making it perfect for the logo also. The typography itself is a perfect mix between Gothic and modern, with a dark edge. This is exactly the feeling I was hoping to capture within the font used. This typeface is also very easy to read and incredibly unique, allowing the audience to associate this font with the brand, a technique which has worked for the likes of Absolut and Smirnoff.

The font seen here is called Kenteken. I liked how basic and minimalist this font felt, however the line beneath the lowercase letters seemed to add so much more dimension. This font feels more suited to a fancy perfume bottle or a more simplistic design, however I don’t feel it would be memorable enough to stand alone as a logo. Since my illustration is fairly simplistic, using only two colours, I feel the font must therefore be slightly more decorative and over the top to create a statement. This font leaves the label with a little too much blank space, and feels a little boring for this concept anyway.

This font is called Burgoyne Initials. I loved how beautifully decorative this font is, and it definitely has the strength to stand alone and represent the brand as a logo. However, I didn’t feel this typeface worked with the rest of the theme as it felt too floral and girly, not dark, evil and mysterious as I’m going for. This was unfortunate, as I felt this was a really strong typeface. I put this typeface onto two lines as when it was all one line I didn’t feel that it filled up enough room, and all the small details became blurred and they weren’t as visible as I would have liked them to be.

Vespasian Caps is a fai Burgoyne Initials. Aga decorative feel to the f think that this theme c rest of the brand (as I n regards to the font Bur this font would be bes girly, upbeat and light dark, evil and mysterio had to use two lines fo when it was all on one the detail and intricacy I do like the fact that i though and adds more


irly similar typeface to ain, I loved the floral, font. However, I don’t corresponds with the noted previously in rgoyne Initials). I feel st suited to a more t brand as oppose to a ous brand. Again, I or this typeface as e line you couldn’t see y within the typeface. it takes up more room e visually.

This typeface is called Dampfplatz DemiBold. I liked the vintage storybook feel to this font, and I felt this might work well within my brand and the relation to card games and the joker. I like the modern twist on the Gothic style enriched within this typeface, and feel it has potential within a brand like mine. However, I don’t feel it’s enough to stand alone as a logo and be the trademark for the brand, the thing that people look at and instantly associate with the brand. Although this font represents a modern take on old school Gothic style, I feel it may come off too generic and predictable.

This piece was made using the font Army of Darkness. As if it’s not in the name, this font has a very subtle, dark twist. It’s cleverly made to look slightly evil, without being tacky or generic. That’s what I liked about this font, as well as the minimalism within the typeface complimented by just a simple twist. I would either have the option of choosing a very simplified font like this, or a more decorative, full on style, depending on which I think would work best with the brand. As it goes I think this font could work as a logo alone, as I feel it’s unique and easy to identify, which are properties critical for a logo to obtain.

My final font presentation is called Quiet the Thief. I think this typeface is interesting and unique, and was one of my favourite choices. Again, I like the simplicity behind the concept of this font, yet just the small detail of the expanded stroke outline, the extended arms on the characters and the points on the characters add dimension. This for me is Gothic simplicity. However, when I see this typeface I feel it resembles that of a band logo, which isn’t the look I want to go for. Trying to chance peoples perception on a font isn’t an easy thing to do, therefore would this typeface be too much of a risky choice?


Legal Requirements On Pack

Alcoholic strength by vo The labelling of beverages containing more than 1.2 % by volume

DRINK RESPONSIBLY UK Chief Medical Officers recommend adults do not regularly exceed:

Men

3-4 Units per day

Women

2-3 Units per day

drinkaware.co.uk

AC Commission Directive 87/250/EEC of 15 April 1987 on the in alcoholic beverages for sale

SUMM This Directive lays down specific provisions for the labellin These specific provisions supplement the general rules on t alcoholic beverages containing more than 1.2 % by volume of the figure corresponding to the alcoholic strength followed than one decimal place. In certain cases, the figure shall be

Alcoholic strength shall be determined at 20 째C. This Direc volume exceeding 1.2 %, other than grape must in ferment addition of alcohol (classified under heading 22.04 of the Co must with fermentation arrested by the addition of alcoho Tari

The tolerances allowed in respect of the indic 0.3 % for beverages n 0.5 % vol. for beers having an alcoholic strength not excee under subheading 22.07 B II of 1 % vol. for beers having an alcoholic strength exceeding 5 subheading 22.07 B I of the Common Customs Tariff, cider from fruits other than grapes, and be 1.5 % vol. for beverages containing Trade in beverages that do not comply with this Directive b are exh


kaging of Alcohlic Beverages

olume ‘% vol’ (until 2014) of alcohol must indicate the actual alcoholic strength by volume.

CT ndication of alcoholic strength by volume in the labelling of e to the ultimate consumer.

MARY ng of alcoholic beverages for sale to the ultimate consumer. the labelling and presentation of foodstuffs. The labelling of f alcohol must indicate the alcoholic strength by volume, i.e. by the symbol ‘% vol.’. The figure shall be given to not more e preceded by the word ‘alcohol’ or the abbreviation ‘alc.’.

ctive shall apply to beverages with an alcoholic strength by tation of with fermentation arrested otherwise than by the ommon Customs Tariff), and wine of fresh grapes and grape ol (classified under heading 22.05 of the Common Customs iff).

cation of the alcoholic strength by volume are: not mentioned below; eding 5.5 % vol. and beverages made from grapes classified f the Common Customs Tariff; 5.5 % vol. and beverages made from grapes classified under rs, perries and other similar fermented beverages produced everages based on fermented honey; g macerated fruit or parts of plants. but were labelled before 1 May 1989 is permitted until stocks hausted.


FINAL Label design

This is my final label design. It contains many different elements, so I’ll begin with the most obvious, the illustration. I hand-drew this piece and scanned it onto my mac. I then opened up the image in Photoshop and adjusted the brightness and contrast, as the piece was difficult to see and wasn’t awfully defined. I also didn’t like the swirl work I had done at the bottom of the drawing, and therefore removed that as it looked incredibly messy and I didn’t feel it worked. Once I was satisfied with this, I opened it up into Illustrator. From there I live-traced the image and turned it into a vector. I then had to correct the wonky lines and clean up the drawing, as it looked very messy and pixelated. I therefore had to use the pen tool to go around the piece removing excess colour and sharpening lines to give a cleaner, sharper appearance to my illustration. From there I experimented with colours, trying to decide which I felt worked best. I tried black which I initially thought would work best, but I felt this was too harsh on the eye. I therefore tried dark greys and dark blues, which I liked more and weren’t as strong on the eye. I then looked at pastel colours just out of curiosity, which I liked but wouldn’t correspond with the brand and the theme for obvious reasons. The colour definitely needed to be as dark as possible. Therefore, I settled with a navy blue, the html colour of this is #13022B. Satisfied with the imagery, my next battle was choosing a typeface. I knew that my font would realistically have to be white. As I am using such a dark background colour white it the only colour that would really be legiable. I wasn’t sure on a title font, but I knew that I wanted to use Copperplate for the majority of the piece. I feel Copperplate is an easy to read and incredibly underated for a default font. I feel this works perfectly against the backdrop of my illustration, and compliments it well. I like the fact that it’s all in a short, blocky uppercase yet is still sophisticated and thin. I feel this font doesn’t overpower my design and does the job well, while still looking official and professional. My title font took me a while to get to, but I found it eventually. I think this font worked best out of all of my choices, and I’m pleased with the appearance of it on the final outcome. I did go on to edit the font slightly, changing the default drop shadow colour from white to a grey. I felt the grey was a little more subtle and looked better than the white. Again, this involved live-tracing the font and changing each segment individually. I then had to get to grips with the law. On the back of the packaging you legally have to have a drink responsibly label, a UK customs sticker, a barcode and the percentage. I added all of these on as well as an alluring written piece to set the mood, if you like. I then added a satanic symbol to break up the space, and added the lines again to break up the space and make the whole thing easier on the eye.


A cocktail book must be fun, informative, easy to read and bold. I began by looking at layouts for my booklet so I knew where to begin in terms of layout and went from there. I decided to go for the layout seen on the bottom right hand corner. This booklet works well, it’s a good size and I feel it would work best with my brand. After deciding on this, I then went on to look for insipiration for my cocktail book. I found the image on the left, which I thought was incredibly interesting. I loved the way this interpretation of a cocktail book was fun, modern, quirky, and most importantly it filled its purpose. It’s very simple yet decorative, which I loved. I decided that I would aim for a darker, signature version of this with a slightly more infographic feel. I then had to decide on drinks to include in my booklet. There’s only 8 pages in the booklet, so enough for 3 cocktails on double page spreads. I therefore decided that I wanted three very different concotions. I decided to of course begin with a Bloody Mary, as it’s a classic and I don’t think it could have fitted in any better with my theme. I then decided on a classic bond style vodka martini, yet again a classic. And finally I decided on a citrus mojito, for those who aren’t so daring with their choices of drink prehaps. I feel these three drinks provide something that everybody would like and reach out . to all audiences, as well as adding sophistication and class to the brand


classic, evil, deadly, wicked

Bloody

Mary

the original collection of spells and potions

THE WORLDS MOST COMPLEX COCKTAIL for only the bravest of souls

Blood

Ingre

1.5 OZ Blac 4OZ Tom 5Tsp Ho 1/2 tsp Worce 3 Drops Tabasco.. O Dash o Sprinkle of s

Preparat

Place the ice into a tal vodka. Add the lemon j Tabasco sauce and Adjust the season and pepper and

Refreshing, sweet, delicious

Citron

Mojito

A citrus twist on a

Sophisticated classic ONE FOR THE FEARFUL

Citron

Ingre

3 Oz Black 2 Oz L 1 Oz Syru 6 Leave 1 Slice

Preparat

Muddle mint leaf and glass. Fill with ice Vodka and lime juice


dy Mary

edients

ck Magic Vodka mato Juice orseradish estershire Sauce Or more for the brave of lemon salt and pepper

tion method

ll glass and add Black Magic juice, Worcestershire sauce, tomato juice. Stir well. ning to taste with salt serve straight away.

light, classy, elegant, chic

Vodka the killer cocktail

for every party

d syrup de gomme in a rocks e cubes. Add Black Magic e. Stir. Garnish with lime.

Pour the vermouth and Black Magic vodka into a mixing glass and fill with ice cubes. Stir well and then strain into a small Martini glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon peel and serve.

Licenced to thrill, and kill

edients

tion method

Ingredients

3 OZ Black Magic Vodka 1 OZ Vermouth Lemon Peel to garnish

Preparation method

n Mojito

k Magic Vodka Lime Juice up de Gomme es of Mint e of Lime

Vodka Martini

Please Drink Responsibly

Website down, I then went onto a slightly more creative tangent. I decided to create a cocktail booklet. I found this part especially fun as I was able to be a little more flamboyant and creative with my design. I used an infographic type technique for the left pages of each cocktail, stating the name of the cocktail with a cheeky, slightly dark catch line beneath it, again keeping up the brand identity. I think the use of typography as imagery works really well here, and you can still relate these pages to the brand despite the fact that the illustration isn’t there. On the right hand page I created a simple recipe in the font I used on everything but the titles, Copperplate. I think this works really well and the contrast between the over-decorative yet simplistic title pages in comparison to the simple, easy to read instruction pages is exactly how I visualised it. This will be displayed as a booklet, hence the unuaual layout. I will also have these in the form of cards to give a different visual perspective.


PAINSTAKINGLY CRAFTED, TO BE SINFULLY ENJOYED

PAINSTAKINGLY CRAFTED, TO BE SINFULLY ENJOYED

To go along with the label design, I’ve come up w brand and business. After the completion of the l These are simple and effective, clearly stating the imagery used on the bottle to ensure consistency tant when designing the image of a successful br illustration of the joker on the one side, and then feel this works well to its purpose, as well as bein brand.


Please Drink Responsibly

PAINSTAKINGLY CRAFTED, TO BE SINFULLY ENJOYED

with extra necessities essential for a successful label design, I moved on to business cards. e company name and an address. I used the y within the brand, again something very imporrand, or any brand for that matter. I used the n kept it simple and informative on the other. I ng a good representation of the theme of the


Home Social networking

After I had completed my business cards, I moved onto yet another necessity; the website. There are a few legal requirements following the format and information on alcoholic drink websites. The first thing you must have is a page requesting the date of birth of the viewer, ensuring they are 18+ as you must be 18+ to view any alcohol related pages. I designed this fairly simply, again sticking with the memorable theme I chose. Here I used the illustration very subtly which I think works particularly well, as it almost makes the viewer look twice. I dropped the opacity on the box so the statement navy blue I’ve consistently used can be seen, even with-


g About Store Recipes

www.blackmagicdistillery.com Tweet or follow us- @Blackmagicdistillery Like Us on Facebook- Black Magic Distillery

subscribe to our mail list for updates Email Address-

Home Social networking About Store Recipes

content above it. I then created drop-down boxes to enter the information, or gave an alternative to sign in and verify with either Facebook or Google+, again a popular marketing technique for a mailing list or for promotional material. I then designed the rest of the website along these lines, keeping each page fairly consistent. I wanted the website to be fairly simplistic, therefore there’s not an over-whelming amount of information on there. I also added links to the Drink Aware website, also a legal requirement. This promotes the dangers of drinking and knowing your limits.


Yes

1 2 3 4

GOO


4 5 6 7 89

ODBYE

No

To add extras to the branding, I then decided to design a Ouija board, also known as a spirit board or talking board. This is a flat board marked with the letters of the alphabet, the numbers 0–9, the words “yes”, “no”, “hello” and “goodbye”, along with various symbols and graphics. It uses a planchette (small heart-shaped piece of wood) or movable indicator to indicate the spirit’s message by spelling it out on the board during a séance. Participants place their fingers on the planchette, and it is moved about the board to spell out words. “Ouija” has become a trademark that is often used generically to refer to any talking board. I designed this again to be consistent with the brand, using the typeface used for the logo and the illustration from the packaging on either side. I think this is a great selling point and would be a great extra statement touch to the brand.


Please enter your date of birth

yyyy mm

dd enter

Warning! enter at your own risk You must be 18+ to enter this application

Or verify your age using one of the following

www.blackmagic

By clicking the buttons you agree to the terms and conditions found here. Read the Black Magic responsibility statement here. Black Magic endorses responsible and moderate drinking. For this reason, we would like to recommend the following reading: Distilled Spirits Council of the United Kingdom, and the spirits EUROPE Guidelines for the Development of Responsible Marketing Communications. Enjoy Black Magic Responsibly.All Black Magic Bottle Designs are trademarks owned by The Black Magic Company AB. Š2000-2012. All rights reserved. Imported in the US by Black Magic Distillery. London.

Home Social networking About Store Recipes

FROM A DARK PLACE, an unnaturally smooth vodka is born. A distilling craft so spectacular that it could only have come in exchange for diabolical favours - transforms the finest ingredients and invokes the presence of this tempting spirit. It's time to succumb to the guilty pleasure of Black Magic. Please enjoy responsibly. For the facts about alcohol visit Drinkaware.co.uk

Tweet or follow us- @ Like Us on Facebook- B

subscribe to our ma Email Address-

Home Social networkin

I then went onto designing an appli be informative and sell the brand an works well, as I managed to encorpo which is the face of my brand. I incl as the social networking page to pro informative and draws interest to th the information. I also included the is a legal requirement, as seen on my


cdistillery.com

@Blackmagicdistillery Black Magic Distillery

ail list for updates

ng About Store Recipes

classic, evil, deadly, wicked

light, classy, elegant, chic

Refreshing, sweet, delicious

Bloody

Vodka

Citron

THE WORLDS MOST COMPLEX COCKTAIL

the killer cocktail

Mary

for only the bravest of souls

Bloody Mary Ingredients

1.5 OZ Black Magic Vodka 4OZ Tomato Juice 5Tsp Horseradish 1/2 tsp Worcestershire Sauce

3 Drops Tabasco.. Or more for the brave

Dash of lemon Sprinkle of salt and pepper

Preparation method

Place the ice into a tall glass and add Black Magic vodka. Add the lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce and tomato juice. Stir well. Adjust the seasoning to taste with salt and pepper and serve straight away.

Home Social networking About Store Recipes

ication. I wanted the application to nd its unique identity. I feel this orate the illustration throughout luded my cocktail recipies as well omote the brand. The application is he audience through the visuals and age check on the first page which y website.

for every party

Licenced to thrill, and kill

Vodka Martini

Mojito

A citrus twist on a

Sophisticated classic ONE FOR THE FEARFUL

Citron Mojito

Ingredients

Ingredients

3 OZ Black Magic Vodka 1 OZ Vermouth Lemon Peel to garnish

3 Oz Black Magic Vodka 2 Oz Lime Juice 1 Oz Syrup de Gomme 6 Leaves of Mint 1 Slice of Lime

Preparation method Pour the vermouth and Black Magic vodka into a mixing glass and fill with ice cubes. Stir well and then strain into a small Martini glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon peel and serve.

Home Social networking About Store Recipes

Preparation method

Muddle mint leaf and syrup de gomme in a rocks glass. Fill with ice cubes. Add Black Magic Vodka and lime juice. Stir. Garnish with lime.

Home Social networking About Store Recipes


ONE FOR THE FEARFUL

Sophisticated classic

A citrus twist on a

Mojito

Citron

Muddle mint leaf and syrup de gomme in a rocks glass. Fill with ice cubes. Add Black Magic Vodka and lime juice. Stir. Garnish with lime.

the original collection of spells and potions

Preparation method 3 Oz Black Magic Vodka 2 Oz Lime Juice 1 Oz Syrup de Gomme 6 Leaves of Mint 1 Slice of Lime

Please Drink Responsibly

Ingredients

Citron Mojito

Refreshing, sweet, delicious

classic, evil, deadly, wicked

Bloody

Mary

THE WORLDS MOST COMPLEX COCKTAIL for only the bravest of souls

Bloody Mary Ingredients

1.5 OZ Black Magic Vodka 4OZ Tomato Juice 5Tsp Horseradish 1/2 tsp Worcestershire Sauce 3 Drops Tabasco.. Or more for the brave Dash of lemon Sprinkle of salt and pepper

Preparation method Place the ice into a tall glass and add Black Magic vodka. Add the lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce and tomato juice. Stir well. Adjust the seasoning to taste with salt and pepper and serve straight away.

light, classy, elegant, chic

Vodka

Vodka Martini Ingredients

3 OZ Black Magic Vodka 1 OZ Vermouth Lemon Peel to garnish

Preparation method

the killer cocktail

for every party

Pour the vermouth and Black Magic vodka into a mixing glass and fill with ice cubes. Stir well and then strain into a small Martini glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon peel and serve.

Licenced to thrill, and kill


FMP SKETCHBOOK  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you