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OBAL

SPHERE

S OF IN FLU EN CE

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A N O

O AT I N ,

, GL L A N

2011 ANNUAL REPORT


NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY The New England College of Optometry (NECO)

President

G lo bal

N ATIO N A L

R EG IO N A L

Clifford Scott, OD ’68, MPH

The innovative collaboration between

Paul Ajamian’s tireless commitment to

New England Eye’s On-Sight mobile

NECO and Wenzhou Medical School

optometry has had a far-ranging impact

clinic has exceeded expectations during

has transformed China’s perception of

on the profession, from the creation

its first year of operation, providing

eye care, introducing a new model of

of the co-managed eye care model to

access to comprehensive vision care for

Vice President of Institutional Advancement

optometry to the country and offering

online continuing education courses for

hundreds of children and older adults

Nancy Broude, EdM

students from both institutions a

eye care specialists worldwide.

throughout Massachusetts.

prepares the next generation of eye care providers,

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

teachers, and innovators. Located in the heart of

Bruce Bernier, MBA

Boston, the College is a small, independent graduate institution that currently enrolls students from 20 states and three countries. NECO graduates 10 percent of the country’s new optometrists each year and supervises 10 percent of the nation’s optometric residents.

cross-cultural education in optometry Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs

and ophthalmology.

Barry Fisch, OD ’71 Vice President of Clinical Affairs and

NEW ENGLAND EYE New England Eye (NEE) is the patient care and clinical

Chief Executive Officer of New England Eye

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10

12

Jody Fleit, MS

education subsidiary of the College. It is the largest

Vice President of Business Development

provider of optometric services in Massachusetts with

Robert Gordon, CPA, MST

nearly 85,000 patient visits annually in 44 locations – including 80 percent of Boston’s community health

Letter from the President

2

Letter from the Chair of the Board

3

Class of 2015 Profile

4

Spheres of Influence | Global

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centers. Using mobile vans, NEE clinicians and students

The New England College of Optometry

provide eye care to children and the elderly as well as to

Annual Report is published in December

Spheres of Influence | National

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disabled and homeless persons who are unable to travel

by the Office of the President.

Spheres of Influence | Regional

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www.neco.edu

NEE Network Map

17

Donor Report

18

Financials

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to a clinic.

NECO and NEE faculty and clinicians are committed to improving access to care, preventing blindness, enhancing quality of life, and developing innovative, economically viable, and reproducible models of eye care.

T

617.587.5647

F

617.587.5555

New England College of Optometry 424 Beacon Street Boston, Massachusetts 02115

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A N N U A L

R E P O R T

On the cover

The rings of a corneal topographer (detail, left), used during contact lens fittings to map the curvature of the cornea, are echoed in the arcs of the stained glass dome above the rotunda at 424 Beacon Street (right). Designed as a single-family dwelling by Boston architect J.A. Schweinforth, the 1904 building was first owned by Ralph B. Williams, a trustee and director of numerous ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

Boston organizations including National Union Bank and Park Square Trust. The skylight is original to the building.

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“NECO’s affiliations at the

“The fact that we have

regional, national, and

sustained fiscal stability

international levels position

in a challenging economy

us at the leading edge of

allows us to plan for

optometry worldwide.”

NECO’s future from a place of strength.”

G rowing

our

connection s

and

impact

Securing

our

future

During orientation, I advise incoming students at New England College of Optometry (NECO)

Thanks to prudent fiscal management and the willingness of faculty and staff to adopt

that the patient is more than a pair of eyeballs; in order to be an effective optometrist, you

leaner budgets, I’m happy to report that 2011 was one of the best financial years in NECO’s

need to understand the whole person and the breadth of factors – ocular and otherwise –

recent history.

that impact an individual’s eye health. I apply that same philosophy to optometric education.

extending NECO’s presence nationally as well as our

From this position of strength, the board of trustees

clinical missions. Creating a formal affiliation with a

As leaders in the profession, we at NECO need to

collaboration with practitioners in the development of

and other key stakeholders within the NECO

larger school would not only alleviate many of the

emphasize how the field of optometry fits into the

new clinical and educational approaches. Many of our

community continue to develop a plan for the College’s

issues that threaten small private colleges like ours,

broader healthcare system and work together with

alumni hold important leadership positions, such as Dr.

long-term sustainability and success.

but also increase our capacity for growth. Given that

other organizations and individuals to help frame

Paul Ajamian (profile on page 10), who serves as both

the discussion at the regional, national, and

director of educational programs at the Southeastern

As I reported last year, one of the challenges we face

on our physical plant, we must consider both issues

international level.

Educational Congress of Optometry and chairman of

as an institution is our physical plant and the high

simultaneously.

the American Board of Optometry.

costs associated with maintaining – not to mention

To that end, NECO fosters partnerships with other

such an affiliation would also have a direct impact

upgrading – our aging facilities. These costs constitute

Although the decisions we face are complex, the fact

leading optometry schools, clinical centers, research

Moving beyond America’s borders, NECO maintains

a significant portion of our annual operating budget,

that we have sustained fiscal stability in this challenging

organizations, and practitioners around the world.

active affiliations with institutions in six countries,

restricting the investments we can make in other

economy allows us to proactively and strategically

Starting in our own backyard, one of NECO’s longest

including the Wenzhou Medical College in China,

areas vital to our advancement, such as technology

plan for NECO’s future from a position of strength. As

standing and most important partners is our clinical

where NECO alums Drs. Guan-Ji Wang and Lu Fan have

and clinical outreach. Given this reality, we continue

always, the financial support of our alumni and friends

subsidiary, New England Eye (NEE). This past year,

been instrumental in shaping both optometry training

to investigate potential scenarios for addressing our

contributes considerably to that stability – this year

NECO and NEE took a major step toward eliminating

and eye care policy in China (story on page 5).

facilities-related challenges over the long term.

and every year. Together, we can navigate the changes

barriers to eye care in Massachusetts by launching

ahead and ensure that NECO maintains its position as

On-Sight, a mobile eye clinic that delivers high-quality,

Taken as a whole, these connections at the regional,

Another question related to our sustainability focuses

comprehensive care to underserved populations across

national, and international level help position NECO

on whether NECO should continue to function as an

the state (story on page 12).

at the leading edge of optometry and continue to

independent institution. As illustrated in this year’s

play an important role in our growth and impact as an

annual report, NECO has a long history of partnering

educational institution and pioneer.

with other leaders in optometry and the broader

Outside Massachusetts, our 4,000+ alumni are active in a wide variety of clinical positions across the country,

New England’s leading center of optometric excellence.

healthcare sector to further its educational and

Steven P. Manfredi

President

Chair of the Board

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

Clifford Scott, OD ’68, MPH

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

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Class of 2015

A cro s s - cultural approac h to eye care

With four boxes of outlines, notes, and curriculum plans among his checked baggage, Guang-Ji Wang, OD ’92, journeyed from Boston to Wenzhou, a city on the East China Sea. Along with the parcels, he carried a dream.

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Now, short months later, he was returning to China to establish and head Wenzhou’s

I N F L U E N C E

optometry program and make his dream a reality.

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Soon after graduating from NECO, Dr. Wang had traveled to China with then-president

S P H E R E S

Students who entered NECO last fall arrived from 20 states, Canada, and China, prepared to begin their pursuit of successful careers in optometry. Their dedication and commitment are reflected in their outstanding GPA and OAT scores – 3.4 and 330 respectively, according to Dr. Taline Farra, assistant dean and director of NECO’s office of admissions. They received their undergraduate degrees from leading schools including Smith College, McGill University, UCLA, Wesleyan University, Boston College, Brandeis University, College of the Holy Cross, College of William and Mary, Wellesley College, University of Waterloo, University of Toronto, and University of British Columbia. The 118 members of the Class of ’15 were selected from 922 applicants, a 4 percent increase over last year, demonstrating NECO’s position as a preeminent institution of eye care delivery, research, and education.

Larry Clausen and board director Dr. Joseph Bickford, OD ’65, to ink an agreement to form a cooperative program between NECO and Wenzhou Medical College (WMC).

G L O B A L

Andrew Asgarpour

Stacy Hu

Jenna Willard

Calgary, Alberta, Canada Biological sciences major, University of Alberta

San Dimas, California BS, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles

Horseheads, New York BS, Health Sciences, Gettysburg College

“Eye health is not only about the eye, but the health of the entire body. I’m proud to be entering a field where I can help people with such an important part of their lives.”

Wenzhou Medical College, people in China now recognize the importance of seeing doctors not only for disease, but for health.” Guang-Ji Wang, OD ’92

“Before that time, eye care had not been part of health care in China,”

•Recipient of NECO’s Presidential Scholarship

Dr. Wang explains. The country’s large population made it difficult for

•A  s an undergraduate, researched the effects of human liver modifications on hepatitis C viral proteins

•Spent six weeks in a summer abroad program in Madrid, taking courses taught in Spanish

the few optometrists there to provide comprehensive care. “There

•B  alances academic life with working out at the gym and volunteering with community service organizations

•H  er hero: her father, who, knowing little English, came to the U.S., earned an associate degree, and established his own business

Ting Zhang

Kevin Cornwell

Caity Morrison

Melbourne, Florida BS, Marketing & Accounting, University of Central Florida

Tempe, Arizona BS, Physiology, University of Arizona

•Chose to attend NECO in part on the recommendation of his brother – also a NECO student – who holds the school in high regard

“NECO provides so many activities outside class. I’ve already begun my volunteer hours necessary to participate in a VOSH trip.” •Shadowing optometrists in their practices led to his decision to pursue optometry

“NECO students work hard, enjoy life, and help each other to do well. The Class of 2015 feels like a family.” •C  oordinates alumni relations and plans events as a work study student in NECO’s Office of Institutional Advancement •Favorite book: Gone with the Wind

Pueblo, Colorado BA, International Relations, University of Colorado Boulder

“NECO gives students the opportunity to administer screenings at area elementary schools. That practice will only culminate in greater passion for optometry and the confidence to be a good clinician.” •Participated in an ethnographic study of a farming village in Mexico through Hampshire College •Enjoys discovering live music acts in Boston’s subway stations

were also no regulations controlling the quality of primary eye care,” he continues. “High school graduates with little training could take jobs in an optical store, caring for people who needed glasses or contact lenses.” Consequently, eye disease in China was widespread – not only the number of cases, but the range of diseases. Patients with trachoma, retinitis pigmentosa, retinal detachment, cataracts, and closed-angle glaucoma too often weren’t diagnosed and sought care only when worsening symptoms led them to the hospital. ANNU AL RE POR T 2010 2011

•H  as participated in several triathlon races and enjoys biking and running along Boston’s Esplanade

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“As an optometrist, I can help increase access to eye care, especially for children. Eye health will have an effect on their learning and a positive impact on the world.”

“The diversity of NECO’s clinical rotation sites will prepare me to one day give the best possible care to any patient who walks through my door.”

“Because of the collaboration between NECO and

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S P H E R E S O F

Bridging the differences

Dr. Wang’s mission led to the establishment in 2000 of

From the outset, Dr. Wang and his team – including

I N F L U E N C E

China’s first modern optometry program, a joint effort

Dr. Qu Jia, now WMC president – worked closely with

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of WMC and NECO providing graduates with both

China’s minister of public health, minister of education,

master’s of science and doctor of optometry degrees.

and ophthalmology society to create an educational

Supported by China’s Ministry of Education and

framework that integrates traditional and modern

Ministry of Public Health, the collaboration has altered

optometry practices and philosophies. They also

the perception of optometry throughout the country.

launched a government-backed media campaign to

“Now, people in China recognize the importance of

G L O B A L

PARTNER ING FOR C HANG E

present optometry and ophthalmology as part of the

seeing doctors not only for disease, but for health,”

larger medical realm and encourage the Chinese public

says Dr. Wang.

to embrace the concept of primary eye care.

The realization of Dr. Wang’s dream is due in no small

Wenzhou students receive five years of medical training,

part to the dedication of his WMC students who assisted

based on the curriculum design and course content

him with initial planning and curriculum development –

of U.S. models, culminating in their becoming licensed

students whose careers were shaped by his vision. “He

doctors. “Students who have gone through this

is my mentor,” says Lu Fan, OD ’02, a former student of

program are physicians first,” explains Dr. Lu Fan. “As

Dr. Wang who today serves as WMC vice president and

optometrists, they are respected members of the

dean of ophthalmology and optometry.

medical community.” In 1998, an eye clinic was established at Wenzhou with

Guang-Ji Wang, OD ’92 and Lu Fan, OD ’02 were

funding from the Chinese government, and the impact was immediate. Patient volume has increased steadily

instrumental in creating

at 35 percent each year, and about 1,000 patients visit

the partnership between

the clinic daily. Outpatient visits number about 370,000

NECO and WMC,

per year, and inpatients receiving surgery for cataracts,

transforming the practice of optometry throughout China.

glaucoma, and other eye conditions account for another 30,000 visits annually. “The clinic is so successful that

6

the province capital,” says Dr. Lu Fan.

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

we are now building another eye hospital in Hangzhou,

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S P H E R E S

Dr. Scott welcomes optometry students to the 2011 National Symposium

O F

Dr. Guang-Ji Wang stands before the poster of his poem on display in the Wenzhou Medical College Museum

TH E ROAD AHEAD

I N F L U E N C E

NECO plans to expand and enhance the Wenzhou program, increasing the number of MS/OD students to 10 over the next few years. Dr. Guang-Ji Wang supervises U.S. students at the Wenzhou Medical College (WMC)

China’s Wenzhou Medical College offers optometry and ophthalmology programs at the undergraduate, masters, and PhD levels.

G L O B A L

Later in 2012, Dr. Lu Fan will embark on a neurological study in collaboration with r e s e a r c h e r s i n M I T ’s department of brain and cognitive science. The three-way effort between Drs. Guang-Ji Wang, Clifford Scott, Lu Fan, and Xu Dan at WMC

Former NECO President Dr. Larry Clausen and WMC President Dr. Qu Jia are joined by colleagues to celebrate 50 years of the college

NECO, MIT, and Wenzhou Medical School will examine areas of the brain responsible for losses in ocular perception. “MIT has documented these perceptual losses, but lacks a well-organized patient base,” says Dr. Thorn, who spent three weeks last

Embroidery from Wenzhou

A Pagoda in Wenzhon

June helping select that patient base in China. “This collaboration will maximize the strengths of the individual partners.”

Cla ssroom s without border s Each quarter, up to two NECO final-year students

NECO professors visit China as well, to share their

are assigned to the three-month clinical rotation at

expertise and expose students there to the NECO

WMC that includes practice in the Wenzhou eye

approach. “At Wenzhou, undergraduates memorize

hospital. “Students learn not only about primary eye

facts,” says Dr. Wang. “But at the PhD level, they

care and surgery, but also gain valuable insights into

have the chance to learn methodologies and research

cultural differences in eye care practice and hospital

methods from NECO instructors.”

management,” says Dr. Lu Fan. “The involvement of our professors in the Wenzhou While in China, NECO students also participate in

program opens NECO to a world of new ideas

Wenzhou’s volunteer programs, traveling to remote

and interests,” says Frank Thorn, OD ’79, the first

regions of the countryside to provide screenings and

NECO professor to lecture at Wenzhou in 1992 and

arrange follow-up care for those requiring treatment.

recently named director of international research and

“They have the opportunity to observe a unique group

better teachers than before, with insights about ways

deal with a variety of eye diseases,” says Dr. Lu Fan.

to contribute to the future of the profession.”

In 2002, Dr. Lu Fan became the first MS/OD student

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

“We love this profession,” says Dr. Lu Fan, “and we’re

to take advantage of the newly established clinical

continually working together to make our college and

externship site at NECO. Since then, 16 Wenzhou

this program better.” Dr. Wang concurs. “Whatever our

students have taken their rotational turn in Boston. “In

ideas, we support and trust each other 100 percent. ”That shared commitment and mutual respect are what

a comprehensive eye exam. Here, they check everything

make the NECO-WMS collaboration a success – one

more thoroughly, and the Wenzhou students take that

with continued impact on the field of optometry and

knowledge back with them.”

the health of patients worldwide.

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

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Dr. Scott delivers keynote address at the joint China Optometry Academic Conference and Beijing/Hong Kong Medical Exchange, 2011

development. “When they come back, they’re even

of patients, immerse themselves in another culture, and

China,” explains Dr. Wang, “very few optometrists give Wenzhou city skyline

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A wedding reception in Wenzhou

9


a

v i s ionary

in

practice

“My NECO internship gave me a first-hand view of the inner workings of an ophthalmology program. That experience dramatically changed the direction of my career.”

Paul Ajamian, OD ’80 S P H E R E S

There aren’t many unfilled slots in Dr. Paul Ajamian’s appointment calendar. A typical week might include a meeting on optometric education, writing a piece for a national optometry journal, and delivering a lecture in the NECO classroom. “I enjoy being a preceptor at various schools of

O F

optometry,” he says, “but I especially enjoy working with NECO students. We put them through

I N F L U E N C E

their paces, but they’re quality students and motivated to learn.” Dr. Ajamian credits his own successful career to the inspiration of his NECO professors and the unique clinical experience offered by the school. It was through his NECO internship at Miami’s Bascom Palmer Eye Institute that he gained exposure to the treatment of eye disease, surgical co-management, and postoperative care – areas most

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optometrists weren’t involved in at the time. “I saw first-hand the inner workings of an ophthalmology program,”

N A T I O N A L

he says. “My experience there dramatically changed the direction of my career.” And what became Dr. Ajamian’s life work impacted not only the lives of his patients, but ultimately, the profession of optometry itself. THE WO RLD A S CLA SS RO O M

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After graduating from NECO in 1980, Dr. Ajamian was

Omni Eye Services shifted that dynamic, assembling

invited by a group of Georgia optometrists to join them

optometrists, ophthalmologists, and surgeons under

in establishing one of the nation’s first eye care referral

an umbrella of co-managed patient care. Patients

centers – a move that would forever alter the relationship

are treated by Omni surgeons and then returned to

between optometry and ophthalmology.

their optometrist for postoperative care.

Naming their practice Omni Eye Services, they included

Omni Eye was so successful in Atlanta that 14

the Latin word for “all” to emphasize the collaborative

more centers opened across the country. “Now

nature of the project. “The relationship between

it’s commonplace for ophthalmologists and

ophthalmology and optometry was one-way at that time,”

optometrists to work together,” says Dr. Ajamian.

explains Dr. Ajamian, who has served as Omni’s director

“They understand the value to patients in having

since its inception. “Optometrists would send patients

an integrated eye care team, and it gives both

to the ophthalmologist for a red eye or cataract surgery,

groups the chance to learn from each other and stay

and in all likelihood, the patient wouldn’t return to the

abreast of new procedures and treatments.”

optometrist for ongoing care. Optometrists were basically referring their practices away.”

process for optometrists. “Most other health

profession when he volunteered with Atlanta’s Southern

professionals are board certified,” he says. “Patients

Council of Optometrists (SECO), an organization

should expect that all their doctors, nurses, and dentists

committed to advancing optometric education. In

have met certain requirements and have maintained

2002, he was named general chair of SECO’s education

their certification by staying up-to-date on the latest

committee. Under his leadership, what began as a 12-

issues that affect health care.”

state regional council today sponsors one of the world’s most respected optometry conferences, annually attracting

Thanks in part to Dr. Ajamian’s tireless advocacy, the

as many as 10,000 attendees from across the globe.

ABO administered its first certification exam last fall. ”We’ll look back 10 years from now and know that this

Ajamian was also instrumental in extending SECO’s

was the right thing to do for the profession – and for

reach through a series of online courses available to

patients,” he says.

optometrists anywhere with an Internet connection. Now known as SECO International, the organization

His commitment to optometry is Dr. Ajamian’s nod

hosts conferences in countries around the world and has

to the NECO influences that set him on that career

sparked partnerships among optometrists from England

path. During even the most important of getaways,

to South Africa to Trinidad and Tobago.

he devotes what time he can to the advancement of optometric awareness and education. In celebration

Recently named chair of the American Board of

of their 25th wedding anniversary next year, he and

Optometry (ABO), Dr. Ajamian has been instrumental

his wife, Susan, plan to enjoy some well-earned R&R

in furthering the goals of that organization as well,

in Hawaii. “While we’re there,” he admits, “I’ll be

working to institute a board certification

speaking at an optometry conference.”

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

A FA R - RE AC H I NG I M PACT

Dr. Ajamian saw another opportunity to impact the

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O ptometry

in

M otion S P H E R E S

Over the years, she’d helped countless children learn to read. But for a long time, macular degeneration had kept the retired elementary teacher from enjoying a book or magazine or deciphering favorite family recipes. The closest low-vision doctor was miles away, and she was

about making comprehensive vision care

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unaware of treatments or devices that could help with her diminished vision.

Gary Chu, OD ’95 has long been passionate accessible to underserved populations. With the

But last April, all that changed. Gary Chu, OD ‘95, MPH guided her to an exam room in

I N F L U E N C E

launch of the On-Sight mobile clinic, his dream has become a reality throughout Massachusetts.

New England Eye’s new On-Sight mobile clinic and made sure she was comfortable before the desktop video magnifier. He adjusted colors and contrast until the images on the screen

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resolved themselves into the clear words and sentences of a newspaper story. She smiled. For

R E G I O N A L

the first time in a very long time - thanks to On-Sight’s visit to her Western Massachusetts neighborhood - she could read. A matter of acces s “Often, older adults think nothing can be done

we have so many hospitals and medical centers in our

to improve their vision,” says Dr. Chu. “We take

cities, yet thousands of people are members of high-risk

for granted cooking, reading a book, or going to a

populations for chronic diseases who, for various reasons,

restaurant and reading the menu – until those

fall through the health care net.”

abilities are lost. Those things can still happen if a person receives appropriate treatment, devices,

Staffed by NECO faculty members, a patient care

and rehabilitation.”

coordinator, a case manager with the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB), and NECO students,

Dr. Chu’s longtime dream had been a service that

the clinic operates four days a week and provides eye

would break down the geographic, economic, and

exams and low-vision rehabilitation to adults and children

social obstacles that prevent people from accessing eye

throughout Massachusetts – diagnosing eye diseases,

care by bringing vision screenings, comprehensive eye

prescribing glasses and low-vision aids, and educating

exams, and education programs to people in their own

patients in the correct use of low-vision devices.

communities. Over the past year, the On-Sight clinic has begun to realize that dream, delivering quality eye care

The solution to a vision problem may be as simple as

to older adults and children right in their own back yards.

a new pair of eyeglasses, and patients may choose

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Dr. Louis Frank, OD ’76, an associate professor at NECO,

condition requires follow-up treatment, the On-Sight

has spent time on On-Sight and witnessed the need for

staff refers them to the appropriate specialist, arranges

such a clinic across Massachusetts. “There are pockets of

transportation to the treatment location, and assists in

populations throughout the Commonwealth in serious

deciphering the ins and outs of insurance coverage.

need of eye care,” he says. “It’s hard to imagine because

Initial funding from the MCB and the Carl and Ruth

Such collaborations continue to be key to the clinic’s

Shapiro Family Foundation enabled the retrofitting of the

success. On-Sight schedules its visits in partnership

38-foot van to include a wheelchair lift and two exam

with local housing authorities, senior centers, schools,

rooms equipped with state-of-the-art technology.

and health centers in communities across the state. The mobile eye clinic staff welcomes on board

“The Mass Commission is concerned about the underserved populations in the Commonwealth who

community members who might not otherwise have access to vision care.

don’t receive regular eye care,” explains Richard Jamara, OD ’80, an MCB advisory board member and NECO professor. “When federal stimulus funds became available last year, we knew we could address the situation by partnering with NEE.”

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

from a wide selection available on the van. If their

Better together

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A PRESCRIPTION FOR ACHIE VE M E N T

anticipation of the new school year. For Massachusetts kindergartners, that preparation includes a state-required vision screening to make sure they can work with the books and art materials awaiting them and

that require a visit to an optometrist for more comprehensive tests or treatment. But because the closest eye care provider might be miles away or the family insurance plan lacks vision coverage, only about 10 percent of those children receive the care they need. That’s where New

I N F L U E N C E

Nearly 25 percent of those children are identified with visual issues

O F

accurately see what their teacher writes on the whiteboard.

S P H E R E S

Every autumn, students gather crayons, pencils, and backpacks in

England Eye’s mobile clinic comes in. |

care,” says Stacy Lyons, OD ’88, NECO professor and chief of NEE’s

NEE’s On-Sight mobile eye clinic provided services to more than 1,000 children

in its first year.

Pediatric Outreach Services. “One of the reasons the mobile clinic was implemented was to improve access and remove barriers to vision care

R E G I O N A L

“On-Sight’s goal is to close the gap between screening and comprehensive

for children.” During On-Sight’s first year of operation, more than 1,000 children across the Commonwealth received comprehensive eye exams that assessed visual acuity, depth perception, and binocular vision. “We also look at eye health,” says Dr. Lyons. “We examine the front of the eye and then dilate the pupils and make a thorough evaluation of the retina. Reports are prepared for parents and the school nurse so everyone understands the test outcomes. If a child needs glasses, we provide them.” Thanks to a partnership formed last September between NEE and Boston’s Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology (BFIT), the glasses are brought directly to the children. “Students in BFIT’s opticianry department fabricate the prescription glasses under the guidance of their faculty, deliver them to the school or preschool, and fit and adjust the spectacles for each child,” says Dr. Lyons. Parents are given a copy of the prescription so they can easily order an additional pair. “Approximately 80 percent of the learning material in school is visual,” says Dr. Lyons. “When a child’s vision improves, their performance

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become more self-confident. On-Sight helps optimize all learning by providing children with the complete spectrum of eye care.”

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

improves not only in the classroom but in athletics and play – and they

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F lag s h i P s Homele s s Ser v ice s

A clinical rotation site for NECO students, the mobile clinic is one more opportunity for tomorrow’s optometrists to gain hands-on experience. “On-Sight gives students a chance to learn practice management and delivery of patient education,” says Dr. Jamara. “We are training a new generation of doctors who see the possibilities of eye care in the future.”

Sc h ool P rogram s

A cla s s room on t h e mo v e

D i s a b ilitie s

needs of local residents. Several local optometrists have since expressed interest in providing low-vision services within their own

has not only met but exceeded our expectations for its first year, providing quality vision care to children and older adults across

Ho s pital s

practices to better serve the local population. “The value of On-Sight lies in its ability to restore hope for patients who have limited access to eye care,” says Dr. Frank. “The clinic

2. NE Eye Roslindale 4199 Washington St., Suite 2, Roslindale –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 3. Boston Healthcare for Homeless Program Jean Yawkey Place 780 Albany St., Boston 4. NE Eye at Pine Street Inn 444 Harrison Ave., Boston –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 5. NE Eye at Framingham Public Schools 31 Flagg Dr., Framingham 6. NE Eye at Boston Renaissance Charter School 250 Stuart St., Boston 7. Boston Public Schools | 26 Court St., Boston 8. Lynn Public Schools | 90 Commercial St., Lynn 9. Lowell Public Schools | 43 Highland St., Lowell

That education extends beyond the classroom, increasing the possibility of innovative eye care delivery models. During On-Sight’s inaugural visits to cities across the state, local optometrists were invited aboard the clinic to learn about NEE’s goals and the

1. NE Eye Commonwealth 940 Commonwealth Ave., Boston

the state.” Approximately 438 older adults and 700 children visited the clinic during its first nine months of operation, and 417

10. ABCD Head Start | 178 Tremont St., Boston –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 11. NE Eye at Perkins School for the Blind 175 North Beacon St., Watertown

New England Eye Network Our Growing Patient Care System

12. May Institute 794 Broadway St., Revere 13. Cotting School for Multi-handicapped Children 453 Concord Ave., Lexington 14. St. Coletta and Cardinal Cushing Schools of Mass. 405 Washington St., Hanover –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 15. Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Ophthalmology 720 Harrison Ave., Boston 16. Tufts Medical-Floating Hospital for Children 755 Washington St., Boston –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 17. Codman Square Health Center 637 Washington St., Dorchester 18. The Dimock Center 55 Dimock St., Boston

pairs of eyeglasses were distributed.

19. Dorchester House Multi-Service Center 1353 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester

“The patient is the most important person in the room during an eye exam,” says Dr. Chu. “When individuals receive the care they’ve needed, everything changes. Our providers see it in the smiles on their faces when they discover they can read again.”

20. East Boston Neighborhood Health Center 10 Gove St., East Boston C ommunity Healt h C enter s

The most tangible measure of On-Sight’s success, though, is the response of patients once they receive quality, local eye care.

21. Fenway Community Health Center 1340 Boylston St., Boston 22. Geiger-Gibson Community Health Center 250 Mt. Vernon St., Dorchester 23. Joseph P. Smith Community Health Center 300 Western Ave., Allston 24. Lynn Community Health Center 23 Central Ave., 5th Floor, Lynn 25. Martha Eliot Health Center 75 Bickford St., Jamaica Plain 26. North End Community Health Center 332 Hanover St., Boston 27. South Boston Community Health Center 386 W. Broadway, South Boston 28. South End Community Health Center 1601 Washington St., Boston 29. Upham’s Corner Health Center 500 Columbia Rd., Dorchester –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 30. Boston University Eye Associates, Brockton 22 Christy Dr., Brockton 31. NE Eye at MAB Worcester 799 W Boylston St., Worcester 32. Marian Manor 130 Dorchester St., South Boston 33. The Boston Home | 2049 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester

Massachusetts Commission for the Blind advisory board

Dr. Louis Frank, OD ’76 images a patient’s macula on board the

member and NECO professor Richard Jamara, OD ’80

On-Sight mobile clinic.

16

35. Elder Service Plan of the North Shore - Friend St. 37 Friend St., Lynn 36. Elder Service Plan of the North Shore - Buffum St. 9 Buffum St., Lynn 37. Elder Service Plan of the North Shore - Market St. 62 Market St., Lynn 38. Elder Service Plan of the North Shore - Cummings 100 Cummings Center, Beverley

On-Sight funding is provided by the Massachusetts Commission for

39. Elder Service Plan of Harbor Health 2216 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester

the Blind, the Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family Foundation, the Ludcke

40. Upham’s Elder Service Plan - Savin Hill | 1140 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester

Foundation, the Sunshine Lady Foundation, the Bank of America Trustee

41. Upham’s Elder Service Plan - Dudley Square | 36 Dearborn St., Roxbury

of the John W. Boynton Fund, and donations from NECO students,

42. Boston Housing Authority, Elder Housing | 125 Amory St., Jamaica Plain

alumni, and friends.

43. Mass. Commission for the Blind | 48 Boylston St., Boston 44. Riverbay Club | 99 Bracket St., Quincy = Patient Care System = Mobile Eye Clinic Location

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

FUNDING

G eriatric s / L ow Vi s ion

34. Boston Medical Center, Geriatric Service 88 E. Newton St., Boston

17


Annual Fund 2011 We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of our many supporters. The following list reflects gifts received between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. We apologize for any errors or exclusions.

The Philanthropist’s Society 2011

The Foster Namias Legacy Society 2011

(Cumulative giving of $50,000 or more)

The President’s Circle recognizes alumni and friends whose gifts to the 2011 Annual Fund totaled $1,000 or more. Members

Members of The Philanthropist’s Society are recognized

The Foster Namias Legacy Society honors individuals who

for their cumulative giving to the New England College of

have remembered the New England College of Optometry

Optometry and New England Eye. This distinguished group

in their estate plans. We recognize this esteemed group of

has demonstrated their exceptional commitment. We are

individuals with deep gratitude for their commitment to

pleased to express our gratitude for their philanthropic

the future success of the College.

leadership. Visionary

Leader

Arthur Baker, OD ’67

($500,000 and greater)

($50,000-$99,999)

Stella Beider*

Bausch & Lomb

Anonymous

Larry Clausen, OD

Lester Marcus, OD ’54*

Lester Marcus, OD ’54*

Allergan, Inc.

Carl Doughty, OD ’69

Joseph Molinari, OD ’74, MEd

B&R Foundation

Joseph Feldberg, OD ’52

Jean T. and Pasquale Palomba,

Blue Cross Blue Shield

Gerald Feldman, OD ’50

of Massachusetts

Marion and Dr. Eugene

Humanitarian ($250,000-$499,999) Alcon Laboratories

The Boston Foundation

Stella Beider*

Elizabeth Chen

CIBA VISION G. Burtt Holmes, OD ’52 Marco Family Foundation

Fischer, ’61*

Dr. Alton W. Lamont and Joan C. Lamont

OD ’38* Andrew Portoghese, OD ’60 Harvey Rappoport, OD ’75

David Helfman, OD ’69

Maurice Saval*

and Richard Edmiston

Edith Heymans*

Gilbert Sellars, OD ‘60*

Citizens Bank Charitable

Edith Hochstadt*

Norman Spector

G. Burtt Holmes, OD ’52

Timothy Tolford, OD ’79

Maurice Saval*

Friends of the Disabled

Arnold Katz, OD ‘50

William Tolford, OD ’55*

Vistakon®, Division of Johnson

Gould Family Charitable

Benjamin Lambert III, OD ’62

& Johnson Vision Care, Inc. Clinton Wilson, OD ’43*

Foundation

Foundation Edith Hochstadt* Juvenile Diabetes Research

Benefactor

Foundation

($100,000-$249,999)

Arnold Katz, OD ’50

American Diabetes Association

Monthe Kofos, OD ’43*

Edith Heymans*

Joseph Molinari, OD ’74, MEd

Donald Korb, OD ’57

Melvin Stack, OD ’53

and Joan Exford, OD Christine & Steven P. Manfredi Polymer Technology Carl & Ruth Shapiro Family Foundation State Street Foundation Vision Service Plan The Whitaker Foundation

Diamond ($100,000-$500,000) Jean T. and Pasquale Palomba, OD ’38* Massachusetts Commission for the Blind Emerald ($25,000-$49,999) Christine and Steven P. Manfredi Alcon Ludcke Foundation Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family Foundation Platinum ($10,000-$24,999) Boston Center for Blind Children Citizens Bank Charitable Foundation Community Foundation of Collier County Essilor of America Leader Mortgage Company Luxottica Group Marco Family Foundation OneSight Research Foundation Drs. Mary and Clifford Scott ’68

(*) Indicates that the donor is deceased.

Patron ($500-$999) Joseph W. Alger, OD ’57 Richard T. Bean David John Caban, OD ’77 Nancy B. Carlson, OD ’77 James A. Casazza, OD ’71 CBIZ Tofias John A. Child, OD ’82 Jason Robert Chin, OD ’04 Janis M. Cotter, OD ’85 Edward Fitch, OD Emily O. Garrison II Alan R. Gold, OD ’74, JD Tawara D. Goode

Jane E. Fisher Kristen Kay Griebel, OD ’97 Donald Korb, OD ’57 and Joan Exford, OD Timothy Watt Tolford, OD ’79 Vistakon®, Division of Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc. Walmart Silver ($2,500-$4,999) Allergan, Inc. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation Marcelline Alane Ciuffreda, OD ’04 Barry Michael Fisch, OD ’71 Michael J. Gorman, OD ’62 MetroWest Community Healthcare Foundation John William Rathjens, OD ’96 Theodore N. Voss Michael Williams Bronze ($1,000-$2,499) Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry Linda Bennett, OD ’80 Bruce Bernier Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Ryan York Hargreaves, OD ’97 Robert H. Honnors, OD ’63 James A. Hooley, MSW Lynette Kathleen Johns, OD ’04 Catherine A. Kennedy, OD ’78 Richard C. Laudon, OD ’75 Alan L. Lewis, OD ’65, PhD Kelly M. MacDonald, OD ’01 Norman A. MacLeod Jr. Frederick Allen Moffa, OD ’95 Joseph Molinari, OD ’74 Bruce D. Moore, OD ’75 Neighborhood Health Plan

Nancy Broude Burns & Levinson LLP Anthony Cavallerano, OD ’72 A. Robert Child Jr., OD ’78 Terry Chin, OD ’76 Yiu-Kin Gary Chu, OD ’95 Michael Cohn, OD ’77 James Comerford, OD ’78 Concordant Joseph D’Amico, OD ’63 and Zabelle D’Amico Frank DiMella, AIA Joseph Donatelle, OD ’61 Sylvio Dupuis, OD and Cecile Dupuis Matthew Elgart, OD ’66 Paul Elliott, OD ’85 Stephen Feltus, OD ’72 Ronald Ferrucci, OD ’74 Jody Fleit Robert Gordon Howard Greenberg Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Inc. David Helfman, OD ’69 Celia Hinrichs, OD ’79 Ann Hudson, CPA Laura Kain, OD ’97 Barbara Kamens Sarah Ann Klein, OD ’03 Brian Klinger, OD Sondra Levenson

Fran Lipson and John Carroll Ernest Loewenstein, OD ’77, PhD Lawrence Lupo, OD ’77 Lynch Associates Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers Massachusetts Society of Optometrists Barbara McGinley Robert Meenan, MD, MPH, MBA David Mills, OD ’80, MBA George R. Montminy, OD ’69 National Vision, Inc. Benjamin and Dora Pan Dennis Pardo, OD ’97, MPH John J. Pietrantonio, OD ’80 James Prince, OD ’57 Daniel R. Rea Jr. Roblin Insurance Agency, Inc. Joel Rosen, MBA Jeanette Sewell, OD ’81 Margaret and Peter Sherin Norman C. Spector, Esq. Kenneth Taylor, OD ’77 Kristie Lynn Teets, OD ’04 Ronald M. Tishler, OD ’67 Vision Service Plan Waber Fund Hal and Mitzi Witkin Kathleen J. Wrobel

Northeast Congress of Optometry Fund D. Suzi Osher Pacart Robert R. Palozej, OD ’81 Prathik Philip Kathleen A. Prucnal, OD Drs. Julianne Rapalus and Richard Gallerani, OD ’84 Alan M. Rapoport, OD ’86 Anthony Regonini, OD ’78 Laura Dake Roche, OD ’85 Susan G. Rodgin, OD ’84 David and Nina Rosen

Frances Rucker, PhD Donald Salmanson, OD ’46 Cathy Stern, OD, FCOVD Paul A. Torracca, DMD Timothy Wilson Lynn F. Wittman, OD ’76 Pano Yeracaris, MD, MPH Harry I. Zeltzer, OD ’52 Friend ($250-$499) Arthur W. Baker, OD ’67 Kayla Beth Baker, OD ’03 Douglas P. Benoit, OD ’83 Dr. Joseph F. Bentivegna

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

of this prestigious group are among the College’s most loyal supporters. They are recognized at the following giving levels.

Gold ($5,000-$9,999) CIBA VISION

William Tolford, OD ’55*

Ludcke Foundation

18

The President’s Circle 2011

19


20

Allyson Summers Kenneth G. Sydow Norman Young Ellen Zane ZEISS Meditec Sponsor (up to $250) Yves J. Alloucherie, OD ’79, PhD Myron Allukian Jr., DDS, MPH Benay S. Ames George Anastos Phyllis Andrejko, OD ’97 Daniel R. Appleton, OD ’69 John W. Archibald, OD ’66 Carole Aronson Baharak Asefzadeh, OD ’03 Carl F. Azzoto, OD ’74 Jacob C. Baboian, OD ’50 Cynthia L. Bailey David E. Baron, OD ’89 Marvin G. Baum, OD ’64 Florence Diane Bejian, OD ’86 Judy Belinfante Douglas P. Benoit, OD ’83 Andrew Lee Berger, OD ’96 Claire A. Bergus, OD ’88 George Daniel Bertherman, OD ’93 Ellen P. Bick Michael D. Billig, OD ’83 Peter Allen Bird, OD ’92 Joseph Y. Bistricer, OD ’80 Isreal Bloomfield, OD ’52 Alison Ann Boda, OD ’03 Henry J. Boroyan, OD ’69 Salvatore J. Bosco Boston Renaissance Charter School James A. Bourgeois, OD ’82, MD Lynn Brandes, OD ’75 Susan and Stuart Brenner Brookline Police Union Russell Broude Bruce William Bunker, OD ’79 Christopher Burbul Alan D. Burke Linda Tuyet Gawtry Cameron, OD ’97 Ina Carducci Kimberly D. Carleton Joanne Caruso, OD ’85 Ronald Cedrone, OD ’78 Jenny Yui-Young Cha, OD ’97 Karen Chang Kai-May Chen, OD ’03 Michael and Vita Cheung Chicopee Eyecare Reverend Steven and Nancy Chin Dr. Paul Chorney Kenneth J. Ciuffreda, OD ’73, PhD Coalition Of Public Safety (COPS)

Lt. Col. Charles Durant Coe, OD ’95, PhD Oscar and Barbara Cohen Phyllis Cohen Linda Cole Nancy Coletta, OD College of Optometrists in Vision Development Brian and Grace Concannon Connecticut Association of Optometrists Nyssa Aiden Connell, OD ’05 Robert A. Connors, OD ’81 Nathaniel Cooper Drs. Eric Cortell and Julia Wong Arthur J. Corvese, OD ’81 John S. Corvese, OD ’82, PhD Michael R. Cozzetta, OD ’87 Liza Arguello Creamer, OD ’93 Richard P. Crinigan, OD ’60 A. Rick Crolla, OD ’83 Barry and Milly Cuiffo Dr. Stuart Cushner Charles R. Cyr, OD ’86 Kelly Louise Cyr, OD ’09 Patricia Dahill Tina Sanford and Richard Dahill Sally H. Dang, OD ’94 Delta Dental of Massachusetts Li Deng Design Elements for Business Carolee Rose Detrick, OD ’94 Frank W. DiChiara, OD Ralph I. Dinin, OD ’50 Lanie Dommu Davin Dennis Dong, OD ’10 Robert J. Doty Jr., OD ’75 Jack and Rosalyn Dreyfus Debi Dulberg Heather Stone Edmonds George Joseph Ehlert, OD ’67 Peter T. Eudenbach, OD ’55 Claudia C. Evans, OD ’74 R. Craig Evans, OD ’85 Peter C. Everett, OD ’84 Frank and Anglela Famulari James H. Fantazian, OD ’62 Gerald and Rebekah Farber Taline Farra, OD Betsy Feldman David and Sydney Feldman Jerry Wayne Ferrell, OD ’78 Chester Scott Fichandler, OD ’73 Arthur Fields, OD ’60 Leon I. Fishlyn, OD ’80 Mary V. Fitzgerald Jane Fitzsimmons and Robert Fitzpatrick

Peter W. Fleming Michael G. Flynn Stephen F. Flynn, OD ’84 Irving A. Fradkin, OD ’43 Raymond Franzone, OD ’82 Brian Freedman Helene Fuchs Chris Fuller Fun Enterprises, Inc. Eva Fung, OD ’03 Amy J. Furman Harriett Gadson John Edward Gaetani, OD ’89 Gary A. Galante, OD ’84 C. Farrell Gallaway, OD ’49 Mary Ellen Gallick, OD ’85 Jaclyn Elizabeth Garlich, OD ’10 Gustavo Garmizo, OD ’82 Roland E. Gaudette, OD ’59 David B. Gaudreau, OD ’86 GE Foundation Rose Gilford Leon M. Ginsburg, OD ’49 Cynthia Catherine Giruzzi-Cahill, OD ’91 Alan J. Glickman, OD ’86 Thadd and Lyudmila Gnocchi Edward C. Godnig, OD ’76 Ina Goldberg Bruce Goldin, OD ’78 Diane S. Goldman Randy Kenneth Goldman, OD ’79 Carolyn Gordon Theodore B. Gordon, OD ’69 Harold Goren, OD ’48 Simon B. Gottlieb Ken and Margaret Grace Catherine Grant Carol L. Green Marcia Kay Green, OD ’74 Malcolm R. Greene, OD ’68 Merton Greenstein E. Robert Grossman, OD ’64 Carl F. Gruning, OD ’66 Robert Gurne Viktoriya Gutkevich, OD ’02 Anne Marie Hall, OD ’89 Tina Hall Elise Noel Harb, OD ’04 Harbor Beach Improvement Association David Eugene Harmon, OD ’89, PhD Mark Hassel Amy Nicole Hebert, OD ’00 Edward J. Helmstetter Marie Hill Jeanne M. Hines Paul J. Hoolahan, OD ’87

Emil Robert Horowitz, OD ’77 Scott Hovsepian Janet Jacklin Richard J. Jamara, OD ’80 Baila A. Janock Larry A. Jebrock, OD ’69 Ian Milton Jones, OD ’97 Reginald H. Jones, OD ’81 Susan B. Kahn Paul J. Kantrowich, OD ’74 Harold J. Kaplan, DMD Steven M. Kaplan, OD ’75 Richard B. Kaskawits, OD ’78 Allan E. Katz Tracy A. Kelley Peter Keville Lynde H. Kimball, OD ’57 Holly F. Kirby Jim and Lillian Koo Marcel Korn, DMD Karen Lynne Koumjian, OD ’81 Barry M. Kowalik, OD ’89 Neil David Kozol, OD ’81 Jeffrey Kublin, OD ’83 Ken Philip Landesman, OD ’82 Cheryl Ann Landry, OD ’85 Patti A. Landry, OD ’83 Loran Lang Mark G. Lappin Steven P. Lary, OD ’82 Henry A. Lawrence III, OD ’79 Edward A. Lee Kenneth S. Lee, OD ’91 Mark A. Leipert, OD ’00 Lee D. Lerner, OD ’89 Wayne M. Levasseur, OD ’80 Joan I. Levine Joyce Libby Libretto, Inc. James M. Lombardi Mr. and Mrs. Myles Lopatin Steven McKay Lord, OD ’90 David Losier, Esq. Grigorly Losyev Nancy P. Loveland, OD ’90 James A. Luccio, OD ’75 Sivhour Ly, OD ’08 City of Lynn David Edward Magnus, OD ’81 Tracey Mangham Karen T. Manowitz Paula Manowitz Martin O. Mark, OD ’66 Steven A. Markow, OD ’81 Massachusetts Environmental Police Officers Association Massachusetts Parole Officers Association

Steven Glickel and Georgia Mattison Michael S. McAvoy, OD ’84 Kathleen M. McCabe Kathleen Therese McCarthy, OD ’93 William McCullough John McGinty Clinton Runnells McLean, OD ’79 Gordon McMurdo, OD ’54 John J. Meagher, OD ’49 Wally and Henrietta Mei Jesse Mermell Roxanne P. Metayer, OD ’85 Arthur and Paulette Milo Arnold Mishcon, OD ’74 David A. Mitchell, OD ’86 Anne Moskowitz, OD ’93, PhD Amy Song-En Moy, OD ’03 Sandy Moy Yee Moy Salvatore Musumeci, OD ’87 William M. Myers, OD ’52 Gail Nadzam Kierstyn Ann Napier-Dovorany, OD ’05 Tecleab G. Neguse Ina Neiman Michael and Catherine Newman Robert M. Nochimson, OD ’61 Robin Norman Novel Iron Works Adrienne Nys Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. O’Brien Doris Ochs Fred Osaretin Osayi, OD ’04 Jad Osmanski, OD ’08 Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Ouellette Robert Bennett Packer, OD ’55 Jane Palzere Hannah Pang Regina Ficchi Panzone, OD ’90 Harry E. Pass, OD ’65 Sandra M. Payton, OD ’08 Ann Peck Perkins School for the Blind Jodee A. Perretta, OD ’03 Marie Jean Perry Wendy Peterson Patrick Francis Phelan, OD ’72 Michael Lord Phillips, OD ’79 Donald R. Plum, OD ’71 Sebastian A. Polizzi, OD ’67 Walter Potaznick, OD ’76 Richard Stewart Price, OD ’03 Susan A. Primo, OD ’85 David W. Quartz, OD ’83 Nicole Boisvert Quinn, OD ’01 Galina Rabkin, OD ’03 Fatima Medeiros Raposo, OD ’97

Tal Reichert Peter Remeny, OD ’68 Valarie Ann Ricciardi-Thamel, OD ’88 Jack E. Richman, OD Richmond Products, Inc. Jerome Roberts, OD ’43 Charles W. Robertson, OD ’87 Doug Rose Frederic Rose, OD ’64 Jeffrey P. Rose, OD ’73 Judith Rosenberg Fay Rosenshein Robert N. Rosenstein, OD ’74 Nora and Larry Rosensweig Jan Carol Rosenthal Peter Rosenwald, OD ’71 Paula L. Roth Lisa Rothenberg Patricia Rothenberg Xin Ruan, OD ’05 Carol Rubel John Rumpakis, OD, MBA Rostislav Ryvkin, OD ’02 Patricia Ann Domingo Salazar, OD ’10 Barbara Salisbury Perry Savoy, OD ’42 Andrew D. Schmidt Victoria D. Schneiderman Neil I. Schram, OD ’71 Blair Gregory Seelhammer, OD ’03 Ann and Jerome Seigel Gerald J. Selvin, OD ’73 Anthony L. Seymour, OD ’86 Hank Shafran and Toni Delisi Charlotte Shapiro Ruth Shapiro Shirley Shapiro Anni Sharma, OD ’99 Donald Shee Pamela S. Sheffield, OD ’85 Robert M. Shulman, OD ’57 Sherry Shulman Stephen E. Shultz Irwin M. Shwom, OD ’80 Philip R. Sidran, OD ’65 Anna Silbey Michael Anthony Simeone, OD ’82 Brenda Simons William E. Sleight, OD ’82 Richard N. Small, CPA Harrison T. Smiley, OD ’68 David S. Smith, OD ’64 Richard M. Snow, OD ’49 Paul Louis Sonenblum, OD ’03 Cynthia L. Soper William St. Vincent, OD ’81 Stafford Seniors Association, Inc.

Bernard Stecher, OD ’52 Lawrence Stein Dr. Richard and Ilene Stellar Philip L. Sutherland, OD ’86 William Leonard Tanzer, OD ’79 Jiaqi Tao, MSc Keith Edward Taylor, OD ’81 Theodore Stone Thamel, OD ’60 Theatre Newington-OnStage James D. Tobin Kristen Cheryl Totonelly Ruth A. Trachimowicz, OD ’87, PhD Mark A. Traveis, OD ’93 Glenda Underwood David George Vanderloop, OD ’04 Thomas L. Vermes, OD ’52 David A. Vito, OD ’73 MingJun Wang, OD ’00 William Weinbaum Alan Weinstein Matt Weinstock Erik Weissberg, OD ’97 Lorraine Wheeler and Skip Stearns William F. White Jean Whitney Denise A. Thomas Wilcox, OD ’85, PhD Robert Martin Wilcox, OD ’86 James C. Williams, OD ’77 Adam and Karen Wong Lindsey Wong Rosalind Wright Dr. David and Grace Wu Winston W. Yao, OD ’99 Beverly Jean Young, OD ’88 Anne Zeldes Elizabeth Zeldes Steven G. Zeldes, OD ’83 Schania Zelvin Andrew D. Zodikoff, OD ’86 In Kind Alcon Carl Zeiss Vision EagleVision Essilor of America Good-lite Haag-Streit USA, Inc. Heine USA Ltd. Keeler Instruments, Inc. Oasis Odyssey Vision Service Plan Vision Showcase Volk Optical, Inc. Welch Allyn *Deceased

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

Kathryn M. Beveridge, OD ’89 Boston Private Bank & Trust Co. Robert L. Bourgault Joan Broude* Stephen P. Byrnes, OD ’77 Martha Casey, Esq. Cornelius Chapman, Esq. Leonard Contardo, OD ’80 John Curran Eileen M. Curtin, OD ’92 Brenda Lee DeForrest, OD ’90 Timothy F. Doran, MD Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Louis A. Frank, OD ’76 Stuart A. Friedman, OD ’81 Roger R. Gagnon, OD ’86 Kevin Michael Gasiorowski, OD ’90 David B. Gaudreau, OD ’86 Jo Ann Gershaw Lawrence T. Ginsberg, OD ’84 Edward M. Goldberg, OD ’70 Steven A. Goldstein, OD ’83 Ana Marie Gomes, OD ’90 Tammy Jean Gray, OD ’06 Greater Roslindale Medical and Dental Center Rodney K. Gutner, OD ’73 Amanda N. Hale, OD ’04 Jeffrey Heidt, Esq. Catherine Anne Johnson, OD ’06 Jennifer M. Kaldenberg Allen I. Kaplan, OD ’67 Neil William Kemp, OD ’95 Catherine A. Kennedy, OD ’78 Stephen Kirnon, MBA, EdD David A. Klibanoff, OD ’76 Steven Koevary, PhD Nicholas M. Kofos, OD ’85 Rosanne LaBollita Shelia Lawler Colin L. Leitch, MDiv Lockheed Martin Corporation Katherine Majzoub, RN, MBA Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Marlio Eileen C. McGill, OD ’78 John R. McIntyre, OD ’84 Nicole Metzger Peter Farnum Morse, OD ’79 Frank J. Myska, OD ’84 Michael A. Newman, OD ’67 Edward G. Pelham Eliezer Peli, OD ’83 John T. Petrowski III, OD ’87 James Pialtos, OD ’67 Susan and Norman Posner Gerard Roubichou Shapiro Fleishman Fund Herbert M. Shuer, OD ’73

21


New England College of Optometry Consolidated Statements of Financial Position

New England College of Optometry Consolidated Statements of Activities

June 30, 2011 and 2010

Years Ended June 30 2011

Assets

Operating revenues

Cash and cash equivalents

619,219

Tuition and fees

163,504

162,641

Less scholarships and grants

1,109,464

1,087,898

Prepayments and other assets  

401,626

389,131

Contributions receivable, net

147,929  

219,380

7,357,093  

7,156,511  

Investments, at market value

13,142,266  

Property, plant, and equipment, net  

12,018,105

$

Cash on deposit with trustee Accounts receivable, net   

Student loans, net  

Total assets

1,537,517

$

35,877,504  

$

16,071,818  

15,713,844  

Contributions

789,727  

444,741  

Patient care

3,282,989  

3,756,983  

11,135,994  

Grants and contracts

1,965,207

1,551,129  

12,835,314

Interest income

8,987

37,831

97,073  

118,022

22,215,802  

21,622,551  

Tuition and fees, net

Other sources, including auxiliary enterprises

Net assets released from restrictions

Liabilities: $

1,103,090

$

1,235,457

—    

Total operating revenues and net assets released from restrictions

Annuity obligations

148,933  

Interest rate swap, at fair value    

369,911

397,291

Operating expenses

Lines of credit    

323,103

839,716

—    

22,215,802

21,622,551  

154,626  

Clinical instruction and patient care

6,707,303  

6,831,886  

Deferred revenue

2,028,252

2,145,635

Instruction

4,935,117

4,642,766  

Bonds payable  

8,900,000  

9,235,000

Research

1,451,767

1,696,417

Refundable U.S. government grants

6,487,345

6,326,875  

Academic support

1,309,176  

1,450,516  

20,334,600  

Student services

1,231,910

1,279,575

Institutional support

5,025,702  

5,882,660  

Auxiliary enterprises

156,751  

153,808  

20,817,726  

21,937,630  

1,398,076

(315,079)

1,813,373

1,138,141

Change in value of annuity obligations

(20,077)

(137,862)

Change in value of life income funds

26,630

8,188

Total liabilities

19,360,634  

Net assets: Unrestricted  

9,852,245  

7,422,738

Temporarily restricted  

4,484,247

3,708,111

Permanently restricted  

2,180,378

2,140,639

Total net assets

Total liabilities and net assets

16,516,870   $

35,877,504

13,271,488 $

33,606,088

Total operating expenses Change in net assets from operating activities Non-operating activities Investment return

Change in fair value of interest rate swap 27,380 Reclassification of net assets

Net assets as of beginning of year Net assets as of end of year

(244,269) —

Change in net assets

$

3,245,382

449,119

13,271,488  

12,822,369  

16,516,870

$

13,271,488 ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

16,134,621   (420,777)

Liabilities and Net Assets Accounts payable and accrued expenses

$

16,434,994 (363,176)

33,606,088

$

$

Total operating revenues

22

2010

2011

2010

23


New England College of Optometry 2011-2012 Board of Trustees

Corporators

Steven P. Manfredi, Chair

William R. Baldwin, OD,

Ronald R. Ferrucci, OD ’74, Vice-Chair Clifford Scott, OD ’68, MPH, President

Credits: Design Dickinson Lab | Writing / Editorial Libretto | Photography Rodney Gutner and Richard Dickinson

Lester M. Brackley, OD ’68 David J. Caban, OD ’77 Con Chapman, JD

A. Robert Child, OD ’78

Michael Cohn, OD ’77

Francis L. DiMella, AIA

Howard Coleman, OD ’57

Joan M. Exford, OD

Matthew Elgart, OD ’66

Howard Greenberg

David W. Ferris, OD ’66, LHD

Kristen Griebel, OD ’97

Elmer Freeman

Ann Hudson, CPA

Philip E. Friedman, OD ’62

James Hunt Jr., MUA, CAE, LHD

Carl F. Gruning, OD ’66

Stephen N. Kirnon, MBA, EdD

Celia Anne Hinrichs, OD ’79

Brian S. Klinger, OD, FAAO

Robert H. Honnors, OD ’63

Colin L. Leitch, MDiv

Barbara Kamens

Kelly MacDonald, OD ’01

Farooq Khan, OD ‘02

Robert Meenan, MD, MPH, MBA

Senator Benjamin Lambert III, OD ’62

Joel B. Rosen, MBA

Cynthia P. Macdonald, JD

Richard N. Small, CPA

Norman A. MacLeod, LHD

Norman C. Spector, JD

David Miller, MD

Jiaqi Tao, MSc

Robert S. Miller, CFE, CPA

Pano Yeracaris, MD, MPH

Joseph F. Molinari, OD ’74, MEd

Joseph P. Zolner, EdD

George Montminy, OD ’69 Joseph F. Osmanski, OD ’74

Emeritus Members Joseph J.F. Bickford, OD ’65 Lester M. Brackley, OD ’68 G. Burtt Holmes, OD ’52, LHD Adelbert Parrot, OD ’34* Paul Taylor, OD ’55*

Gerard Phelan David A.V. Reynolds, DPH Fernando Hildago Santa Cruz, OD ’87 Ronald J. Serra, OD ’70 Thomas M. Sheehan, OD ’64 Solomon K. Slobins, OD ’50 John A. Stefanini, JD Jennifer L. Stewart, OD ’07 Irwin B. Suchoff, OD ’59, DOS Michael R. Taylor, MEd Thomas F. Terry, OD ’75 Timothy W. Tolford, OD ’79 Alison Bibbons Ward

* Deceased

ANNU AL RE POR T 2011

ANNUAL REP OR T 2011

Linda Bennett, OD ’80

Myron Allukian Jr., DDS, MPH

Charles F. Mullen, OD ’69

24

PhD, LHD

25


w w w.n eco .e du New England College of Optometry 424 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 617.587.5647

2011 NECO Annual Report  
2011 NECO Annual Report