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RECRUITING YOUNG PEOPLE: A BEST PRACTICE GUIDE FOR TRADITIONAL RECRUITMENT METHODS SAMPLE DOCUMENTS

For the electronic version please go to: www.neweconomymanchester.com/stories/1844-recruitment

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GUIDANCE NOTES ................................. .................................................2

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CAPABILITIES ..........................................................................................6

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GENERAL REMINDERS FOR INTERVIEWS ...........................................9

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INVITATION LETTER .............................................................................10

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LETTER OF REGRET .............................................................................11

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FEEDBACK LETTER ..............................................................................12

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FEEDBACK TIPS ....................................................................................13


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Guidance Notes for Capability Based Interviews Capability Based Interviews

Normal interviews (also called unstructured or CV interviews) are essentially a conversation where the interviewers ask a few questions that are relevant to what they are looking for but without any specific aim in mind other than getting an overall impression of the candidate as an individual. Questions are fairly random and can sometimes be quite open. For example, a question such as "What can you offer our company?" is meant to gather general information about the interviewee but does not test any specific capability or personal attribute. In an unstructured interview, the candidate is judged on the general impression that he/she leaves; the process is therefore likely to be more subjective. Capability/competency based interviews are more systematic, with each question targeting a specific skill or attribute. Candidates are asked questions relating to their behaviour in specific circumstances, which they then need to back up with concrete examples. The interviewer should then dig further into the examples by asking for specific explanations about the candidate's behaviour or skills. The list of capabilities that can be tested varies depending on the post that is being interviewed for. For example, for a Personal Assistant post, capabilities would include communication, making connections, flexibility and resilience. How to score your capability based interview. Before the interview, determine which type of answers would score positive points and which types of answers would count against the candidates. For example, a question to test emotional intelligence might be "Describe a time when you had to deal with pressure", the positive and negative indicators may be as follows: Positive indicators Negative indicators  Demonstrates a positive approach  Perceives challenges as problems towards the problem  Attempts unsuccessfully to deal with  Considers the wider need of the the situation alone situation  Uses inappropriate strategies to  Recognises his/her own limitations deal with pressure/stress 

Is able to compromise

Is willing to seek help when necessary

Uses effective strategies to deal with pressure/stress

Marks are then allocated depending on the extent to which the candidate's answer matches those negative and positive indicators. Here is an example of a marking schedule for the table above: 0

Poor

1

Good

2

Excellent

Little/No evidence, of positive indicators. Mostly negative indicators. Satisfactory display of positive indicators. Some negative indicators Strong display of positive indicators

New Economy Best Practice Guide for Interviewing Young People This Document highlights how the capabilities format can bring forth the best attributes of your candidate. For More info please Call 0161 237 4157


Page |3 If you feel that there are areas that the candidate has failed to address, you should help him/her along by probing appropriately. For example, in answering the question above “Describe an example of a time when you had to deal with pressure”, if the candidate focussed on how he dealt with the practical angle of the problem but he forgot to discuss how he managed his stress during and after the event, the interviewer should prompt him with a further question such as “How did you handle the stress at the time?”. This would give the candidate an opportunity to present a full picture of his behaviour. You will note from the scoring sheet that there is space to score candidates on all capabilities for each question. This is because a question (as above) might be designed to predominantly test one capability (emotional intelligence) but in the course of answering this question, the candidate also displays high levels of resilience, creative problem solving and thoughtful decision making.Candidates should be scored on all of the skills and attributes that they display Powerful prompting questions           

How did you do that? What/who helped? How did you find out more? What worked What did you learn What was the outcome/result? Who/what benefited? Tell me more about that? What else? What did you learn from that? If things were going better, what would happen?

Example Indicators Listed below are some sample indicators relating to the Personal Skills Capabilities. These are intended as a guide only and it should be noted that indicators should be tailored to the question that you are asking. Communication Positive indicators  Puts forward arguments confidently and convincingly

Negative indicators Demonstrates lack of confidence/awkwardness

Demonstrates enthusiasm and commitment

Is easily swayed by counter proposals

Influences others to reach agreement

Presents arguments with confusion and incoherence

Uses concise and clearly constructed communication

The needs of others are ignored

Listens to and considers the needs of others

Positive and appropriate body language

New Economy Best Practice Guide for Interviewing Young People This Document highlights how the capabilities format can bring forth the best attributes of your candidate. For More info please Call 0161 237 4157


Page |4 Making Connections Positive indicators  Displays sensitivity in working with others

Negative indicators Dismisses or ignores the contributions of others

Builds rapport through encouraging others to express their views

Displays insensitivity through interrupting others

Shares knowledge, experience and opinions

Speaks at the expense of listening or responds without listening

Demonstrates openness through listening, asking questions and summarising

Only contributes when own ideas are being discussed

Conveys an over directive approach

Able to synthesise and draw conclusions

Negative indicators Fails to respond appropriately to opportunities

Creative Problem Solving Positive indicators  Recognises and responds to opportunities 

Seeks creative solutions within safe parameters

Gives up too soon and accepts a marginal solutions

Is resilient to obstacles and challenges

Displays ‘flair’ or entrepreneurship

Limited creativity in applying solutions and ignores alternative scenarios

Demonstrates creativity and experimentation in applying solutions

Thoughtful Decision Making Positive indicators  Anticipates risks and implications of decisions 

Rises above the detail to spot the key issues

Identifies pros and cons of alternative courses of action

Reaches logical unbiased safe conclusions

Analyses information logically and systematically

Demonstrates the balance of rights and responsibilities

Negative indicators Overlooks risks in decision making

Misses the key issues as “stuck” in the detail

Jumps to conclusions based on prejudices, historical solutions or narrow perspective

Goes first with quick solutions, conclusions and statements before analysis

New Economy Best Practice Guide for Interviewing Young People This Document highlights how the capabilities format can bring forth the best attributes of your candidate. For More info please Call 0161 237 4157


Page |5 Moneywise 

Positive indicators Understands the importance of financial management both personally and in society

Identifies areas of personal responsibility with regard to money

Is thoughtful in considering own financial responsibilities

Plans for the future

Uses available resources effectively

Seeing the Bigger Picture Positive indicators  Can see the impact of actions on people and places 

Able to examine wider relationships and interconnections

Looking beyond self / immediate environment in an assessment of need

Transferability Positive indicators  Applies prior knowledge to new problems and/or situations 

Is dedicated to meeting the expectations and requirements of the organisation

Exhibits clear understanding of knowledge and skills that can be applied to varying situations

Demonstrates speed of learning when faced with new problems

Emotional Intelligence Positive indicators  Can accept constructive criticism and feedback 

Can listen to other people’s points of view in a discussion or argument

Can get on well with a wide range of people

Can diffuse conflict and remain solution-focussed

Negative indicators Displays little consideration of money matters

 

Is inconsiderate of financial responsibilities

Does not manage resources effectively

Shows little regard for financial security

Negative indicators Is unable to demonstrate “big picture” understanding

 

Looks for simplest explanation too soon

Negative indicators Is slow to recognise how knowledge can be applied to new scenarios

 

Does not adapt to the expectations and requirements of an organisation

Does not recognise transferable skills or relevance

Negative indicators Fails to pick up and use new information

New Economy Best Practice Guide for Interviewing Young People This Document highlights how the capabilities format can bring forth the best attributes of your candidate. For More info please Call 0161 237 4157


P age |6

Capabilities Capability Personal Skills Communication Making Connections Creative problem solving Thoughtful Decision Making Moneywise Seeing the Bigger Picture Transferability Emotional Intelligence

Descriptor

Contributory Skills and Attributes

An ability that can be developed Young people can use language effectively through a variety of methods verbal and non verbal Young people can interact with others to build relationships and process information to make judgements Young people are enterprising - having the initiative and skills to recognise and respond to opportunity Young people consider the impact of their personal choices on people and places, now and in the future, (sustainability), in managing their rights and responsibilities Young people are able to manage financial matters with confidence, with a questioning and informed perspective Young people can consider the wider issues, relationships, needs, and concepts in relation to their thinking and actions Young people are able to effectively apply their knowledge and skills to a variety of situations Young people understand and are able to manage theirs and others’ emotions, channelling them effectively and positively

Explaining, expressing, presenting, listening, self Collaboration, negotiation, responsibility, research, analysis, decision making, networking Resourcefulness , planning, executing, reflection, participation, initiative, “stickability” Outward-looking, inclusive, integrity, cooperation Dependable, responsible, reliable, reflective Logic, planning, analysis, synthesis, citizenship, responsibility, thoughtfulness Versatility, adapting, comparing and contrasting, synthesising Interpreting self, managing self, interpreting others, managing others, health literacy

Personal Attributes

A personality trait that can be enhanced and utilised

Proactive

Having a ‘can do’ outlook, positive and optimistic drive to achieve goals

Self confidence, positive, willing, motivated, analytical

Resilient

Sustaining motivation and drive when stepping outside of one’s comfort zone. Being able to focus on seeking positive solutions in the face of adversity

Self esteem, emotional control, dependable, able to take constructive feedback, perseverance

Aspirational

Desiring and having the confidence to achieve and aim higher

Self aware, application (learn continuously, learn how to improve own performance, learn how to learn)

Flexible Empathetic

Being responsive and able to adapt to/ learn from diverse opportunities that may or may not have been planned Making progress whilst showing consideration for others; having an awareness of acting fairly, justly and morally

Self confidence, commitment, reflection Self aware, positive social behaviour

New Economy Best Practice Guide for Interviewing Young People This Document highlights how the capabilities format can bring forth the best attributes of your candidate. For More info please Call 0161 237 4157


P age |7

Interview Score Sheet Candidates Name

Date

Postion/Job Reference e.g. Can you give an example of a time when you needed to bring someone around to your point of view? How did you do this?

Question Key Capabilities

e.g Communication, Making Connections, Creative Problem Solving

New Economy Best Practice Guide for Interviewing Young People This Document highlights how the capabilities format can bring forth the best attributes of your candidate. For More info please Call 0161 237 4157

TOTAL SCORE

Empathetic

Flexible

Aspirational

Resilient

Proactive

Emotional Intelligence

Transferabilit y

Seeing The Bigger Picture

Moneywise

Thoughtful Decision Making

Creative Problem Solving

Making Connections

Communicati on

Notes


P age |8

Capability: Personal Skills Communication, making connections, creative problem solving

Question Can you give an example of a time when you needed to bring someone around to your point of view?

Making Connections, communication

Can you give an example of when you have had to work as part of a team/with others to achieve a goal? Can you tell me how you managed when you had more than one demand on your time?

Creative Problem Solving, seeing the bigger picture, Thoughtful Decision Making

Can you describe a time when you have reached a decision which affected others?

Moneywise

What do you think are the most important things to spend your first wage on and why?

Seeing the bigger picture, emotional intelligence, resilience, flexibility

Have you ever done something that you didn’t want to because you knew that it was the right thing to do? Can you give an example of a time when you used something that you learned in school or college to help you in another area of your life? Can you give an example of a time when you have helped someone (or yourself) to feel better about themselves or a situation that was bothering them?

Transferability, emotional intelligence, seeing the bigger picture, empathy

Emotional Intelligence, making connections, communication,

Possible prompts How did you do this? How did others respond? How did you overcome objections? What was the outcome? What did you learn? Would you do anything differently next time? What were you trying to achieve? Did you achieve this? How? If not, what would you do differently next time? How did you prioritise the tasks? How did you decide which were most important? Most urgent? Did others agree? Who benefitted? How did you make a decision? Did you try to gather more information? How? Did you have any previous experience to draw on? Was the outcome as you expected? Are there things that you have committed to money wise? Is it important to save money? Are other people relying on you? Why was this the right thing to do? Who/what benefited? In what ways? Would you do the same thing next time? Was the situation exactly the same as it was described in school? What was different? What was similar? Who/what benefited? ` How did you find out about the situation? How did you learn more? Did you seek any help from anyone else? How did the person benefit?

New Economy Best Practice Guide for Interviewing Young People This Document highlights how the capabilities format can bring forth the best attributes of your candidate. For More info please Call 0161 237 4157


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General Reminders for Interviews If you or your colleagues are new to interviewing – the following tips might act as useful reminders – It is important to remember that, if you are interviewing a young person, it might be their first experience of an interview setting. It is an opportunity to introduce the applicant to working life whilst establishing their suitability for the role. They may require more guidance and support through the interview process. Create the right environment by way of room setting and method of questioning employed. It can be intimidating being faced across a table by people in business dress firing a succession of questions. Experience tells us that an informal approach can be the best method for relaxing younger candidates and extracting information. If the candidate seems nervous give them time to relax. It is possible to conduct the interview in the form of a discussion and still obtain the required information. Before commencing each interview ensure the candidate is offered a refreshment and explain what the post will involve, describe the team location etc, what will be expected of the applicant, and outline any particular requirements of the role. It is recommended that a list of questions be developed prior to scheduling any interviews and that all applicants be asked the same questions in order to provide structure and consistency of approach. It is best if you ask no more than 8-10 questions. It is also suggested that prior to the interview, applicants be supplied with the list of capabilities that they are expected to display so that they can ensure that they have good examples ready. The following general tips might be useful as reminders: DO 

Ensure the question being asked is capability related and prompt the candidate for more information if their answer doesn’t sufficiently answer the question. Try: ‘and what else’ or ‘and what happened then’; ‘and what was the outcome of that’; ‘and what did you learn from that’.

Rephrase the question if the applicant has misunderstood.

Keep questions clear and only ask one question at a time otherwise you will confuse the applicant.

Be aware of different styles of communication and differences in culture which can lead to misunderstanding.

Remember candidates should do most of the talking – at least 75%

Use open and friendly body language, head nods, smiles and eye contact.

DON’T

Ask multiple questions i.e. what do you feel are your strengths? Are there any areas you feel you have weaknesses in? How could you improve? It is much better to split these into separate questions and ask each one after the previous has been answered.

Ask candidates about their marital status, their dependents, religion, sexual orientation, age

Use unfocused behaviour e.g. lack of eye contact, looking disinterested, yawning, distracting body language as this can be discouraging for the applicant

Use jargon and acronyms

Ask questions of only one group of candidates

Apply stereotypes


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Invitation Letter [Date] Your Address Your Tel Number

Dear [Name] Re: Vacancy for [position title] Thank you for your application for the above position. I would be grateful if you could attend an interview: At [Address]. On [Date]. At [Time]. The interview will be with [name and job title of interviewer(s)]. Upon arrival at reception please ask for [name of interviewer or other person] The interview is scheduled to last approximately [state duration] and will take the form of [Five questions relating to the enclosed list of capabilities. It is advisable to prepare by thinking of examples of times when you have displayed these personal skills and attributes – either at work or in your personal life. It is fine for you to bring notes into the interview if you wish]. Please can you bring along the following documentation to the interview: [state what documents you want the candidate to bring e.g. proof of ID, certificates etc] Please contact [name of contact] on [telephone number] to confirm your attendance at the interview. If you have a disability and require any special arrangements to assist you at the interview, please let [me/name of contact] know. A map showing the location of the interview venue is included. [I/We] look forward to meeting you. Yours sincerely

[Name] [Position / Job Title]


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Letter of Regret Your Address Your Tel Number

[Date] Dear [Name] Re: Vacancy for [Position title] Thank you for attending the recent interview on [date of interview] for the position of [position title]. I very much enjoyed meeting you to discuss the role. I have now had the opportunity to consider all of the candidates against the criteria we have specified for the job. The decision has been a difficult one, as the overall standard of candidates was high. After careful consideration I regret to inform you that on this occasion we have decided not to progress your application any further. If you would like feedback from the interview, please don’t hesitate to contact me on the number above. Thank you for your interest in [company name]. I wish you every success in your future career. Yours sincerely

[Name] [Position / Job Title]


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Feedback Letter Your Address Your Tel Number

Date] Dear [Name] Re: Vacancy for [Position title] I am writing in response to your request for feedback after you attended the recent interview on [date of interview] for the position of [position title]. Firstly I would like to thank you for your interest in our organisation and for the time that you took to attend the interview. I would also like to reiterate that the decision has been a difficult one, as the overall standard of candidates was high. [Start positively - Examples: Delete as appropriate]   

During the course of the interview, it was obvious that you had prepared thoroughly. I would like to commend you on your [knowledge of the company/obvious interest in this area of work/well thought out examples] I was particularly impressed with your [knowledge of X/ experience in…./training with…/ability to….] You scored very highly on the question relating to [Capability] and I particularly liked that you [gave lots of detail about…./demonstrated a willingness/ability to…]

[Lower scoring questions - Examples: Delete as appropriate]   

The question that you scored lowest on was [question and capability] I would have liked to hear more about [actions relating to the capability] and evidence of [skills and attributes] High scoring candidates [went into more detail about/gave examples of/described their ability to/showed their ability to]

Thank you again for your interest in [company name]. I wish you every success in your future career.

Yours sincerely

[Name] [Position / Job Title]


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Feedback Tips 

 

Acknowledge their interest in your company. A simple acknowledgement from you that they’ve taken time to visit your website and read up about your products and services can go a long way. Who knows, next time someone wants a recommendation for your product or service, your unsuccessful jobseeker may just remember you. Favourably, that is. Make sure you say thank you. Not enough companies recognise that travel expenses can be difficult to meet for jobseekers. Employed candidates might have to take time off work.

Start with a positive. Focus on the areas of the interview that went well.

Constructive feedback alerts an individual to an area in which his performance could improve.

Constructive feedback is not criticism; it is descriptive and should always be directed to the action, not the person. Remember that Successful feedback describes actions or behavior that the individual can do something about.

Tell them something useful. If they lack experience in a certain area or if they could take another qualification to improve their skill set, they’re never going to know if you don’t tell them.

Effective feedback is specific, not general.

Don’t make false promises. If it’s a “no for now” then it’s fine to say you’ll keep their CV on file and get in touch if anything suitable comes up. If it’s an outright “no” then make sure you don’t promise to keep in touch with them.


Recruiting Young People : A Best Practice Guide For Traditonal Recruitment Methods  
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