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VOLUME 4 - ISSUE 4 ///// OCT/DEC 2015

CHIEF CLARENCE LOUIE SHARES PLANS FOR HIS NEW CONSULTING GROUP

ABORIGINAL ENTREPRENEURS A NATION’S DRIVE FOR CHANGE

NABOC OSOYOOS

A PERENNIAL CONFERENCE FAVOURITE

A B O R I G I N A L M A R K E T P L A C E . C O M


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///// CONTENTS

12

VOLUME 4 - ISSUE 4 ///// OCT/DEC 2015

CHIEF CLARENCE LOUIE SHARES PLANS FOR HIS NEW CONSULTING GROUP

ABORIGINAL ENTREPRENEURS A NATION’S DRIVE FOR CHANGE

NABOC OSOYOOS

A PERENNIAL CONFERENCE FAVOURITE

A B O R I G I N A L M A R K E T P L A C E . C O M

22

PUBLISHER Geoff Greenwell 2G Group of Companies geoff@2ggroup.ca MANAGING EDITOR Marlon Louis editor@aboriginalmarketplace.com DESIGN / PRODUCTION Tina Rodocker tina@2ggroup.ca ADVERTISING SALES Marlon Louis editor@aboriginalmarketplace.com CONTRIBUTORS Rob Miller, Ren Baskin, Norine Stewart, Bruce McIvor, Loa Fridfinnson, Tewanee Joseph and Merle Alexander 2015 PRODUCTION SCHEDULE Oct/Dec 2016 PRODUCTION SCHEDULE Jan/March DISTRIBUTION Aboriginal Marketplace is published by 2G Group of Companies ©2012 all rights reserved. The magazine is distributed globally online and in printed form in Canada. The views expressed in the Aboriginal Marketplace are those of the respective contributors and not necessarily those of the publisher or staff. WWW.ABORIGINALMARKETPLACE.COM

///// COVER STORY 22 CHIEF CLARENCE LOUIE SHARES PLANS FOR HIS NEW CONSULTING GROUP

///// IN THIS ISSUE

04 06

THE DOWNSIDE OF TAX EFFICIENCY

07

NEGOTIATE OR LITIGATE?

10 12 14 16 18 20 22 30

ABORIGINAL ENTREPRENEURS A NATION’S DRIVE FOR CHANGE

EXPANDING INSURANCE

///// FEATURES

27

LEGAL EAGLE

FOOTPRINT LOG HOMES: TREAD SOFTLY DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES MODEL

NABOC OSOYOOS A PERENNIAL CONFERENCE FAVOURITE ABORIGINAL INSURANCE FOR THE FUTURE #PAITC2015 ABORIGINAL STRATEGY GROUP LLP CONSULTING FIRM TARPON ENTERS INTO NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH COAST TSIMSHIAN ENTERPRISES L.P

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 3


///// ROB MILLER | LAWYER, MILLER TITERLE + COMPANY LLP | ROB@MILLERTITERLE.COM

Y ILIT IAB DL ITE ESS R LIM SIN LLE OF BU MI SE NED Y: ROB EU B TH -OW TO ND NG BA ATI IN REL SHIPS KS RIS TNER R PA

TAXNCY OF ICIE IDE EFF NS OW ED TH

TAX BENEFITS OF USING AN LLP

U

ntil recently, band-owned businesses in British Columbia tended to be structured in one of three forms: (i) owned directly by the band (also known as a band proprietorship); (ii) as a company (often called an economic development corporation); or (iii) as a limited partnership. Deciding between these options was generally a matter of balancing administrative simplicity, liability and tax efficiency. Recent tax guidance in British Columbia has suggested that a fourth type of ownership, the limited liability partnership (“LLP”), can be very efficient from a taxation perspective. When used correctly, LLPs can result in significant savings on provincial sales taxes (such as PST and fuel tax) for businesses owned wholly or in part by Indian bands. These savings are generally not available to corporations or limited partnerships. Many bands are now rushing to convert their existing businesses into LLPs in order to recognize savings on provincial sales taxes.

BUT WAIT – THERE ARE DOWNSIDES TO LLPS Tax efficiency is not the only consideration. Choosing the correct corporate vehicle for a band-owned business requires an analysis of a number of factors, including administrative simplicity, tax efficiency and liability. In many instances, LLPs do not offer the same degree of liability protection as corporations or limited partnerships. If you rush into an LLP for tax reasons, you may be putting your band’s assets at risk – including money earmarked for things like education, health and social development. Here are some of the LLP liability traps you need to keep an eye out for:

4 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015


LIABILITY FOR UNPAID WAGES AND TAXESUNDER THE BRITISH COLUMBIA EMPLOYMENT

Standards Act, a director of a corporation can be liable for unpaid wages to employees. Additionally, many tax laws (both federal and provincial) impose liability on directors for unpaid tax obligations. This can include unpaid source deductions (such as employee income tax, CPP, EI), withholding taxes or GST. If a band is a partner in an LLP, it faces these same liabilities.

“MANY BANDS ARE NOW RUSHING TO CONVERT THEIR EXISTING BUSINESSES INTO LLPS IN ORDER TO RECOGNIZE SAVINGS ON PROVINCIAL SALES TAXES.”

LIABILITY FOR NEGLIGENT AND WRONGFUL ACTS

A limited liability partner may be personally liable for negligent or wrongful acts if the partner knew of the act and did not take reasonable steps to prevent it. In many cases, this means the band could be on the hook for the business’ negligent or wrongful acts. Consider the example of an LLP with two owners: an established business and a band. Let’s say that these two owners open a gravel pit business, and the band is concerned about retaining some control over the business, so it appoints a band representative to jointly manage the business on a management committee. The business is not as profitable as planned, so the management committee decides to defer some maintenance on a piece of equipment for a few months until revenue from a large contract comes in. If the equipment malfunctions due to the deferred maintenance, an employee was injured, and the employee sued on the basis that it was negligent to defer the equipment maintenance, the band could potentially be liable for the damages.

DIRECTOR-LIKE LIABILITY Most business people are aware of the potential liabilities that come with being a director of a company. The same liabilities also attach to partners in a LLP, and include:

LIABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE OR CONTAMINATION

Under federal and provincial statutes, directors of a corporation are potentially liable for certain environmental impacts. For example, if a business causes environmental damage by polluting fish habitat or contaminating land, the directors could be liable under the Fisheries Act or the Environmental Management Act. Moreover, under provincial environmental legislation, if a company simply acquired an already contaminated piece of land, the directors could be considered “responsible persons” and liable for costs of remediation. Think of a gas station run by a band-owned LLP. Many gas stations are on land that has been contaminated by hydrocarbons as a result of decades of operation. If the gas station is owned or operated by a band-owned LLP, the band itself could be liable for the costs of remediation – which could be in the millions of dollars.

SHOULD BANDS AVOID USING LLPS?

Despite these liability drawbacks, there can be major advantages to using LLPs, especially for businesses that rely heavily on goods that attract PST or fuel tax. Sometimes it will make sense for a band-owned business to take advantage of these tax savings. However, it is critical to consider the liability trade-off for tax savings: prudent leaders and EDOs will ensure that they understand the liability risk, and make an informed decision about whether the tax benefits outweigh the risks.

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 5


E X PANDING INSURANCE

BY: REN BASKIN T: 1-250-869-1066 & NORINE STEWART T: 1-250-869-1027

CAPRI INSURANCE

B

ack in 1975 Capri Insurance started out as the little guy and today, Capri Insurance is the largest independent

insurance broker in the Okanagan with 300 employees spread across 14 offices in the Thompson Okanagan and Northern BC with affiliates in the Lower Mainland and Ontario. As our clients grow we recognized the need to expand insurance services across Canada and into USA and as such are members of Canadian Broker Network and Intersure respectively. Capri has expanded their product offerings to include Group Benefits, Mortgage Brokering and Wealth Management services.

Since the beginning, the founders of Capri recognized the way to provide the high-level customer experience that they envisioned was to take very good care of their people. As a result Capri has been named one of the Best Workplaces in Canada. Our Group Benefits Team has steadily expanded and most recently was honored with a nomination in the Canadian HR awards for “Best Industry Service Provider.” To be a finalist on the national stage is humbling however, being 6 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015

nominated by one of our First Nations clients is truly an honor. Our relationship with First Nations communities is very important to us and we are committed to developing unique products and services to best serve the Aboriginal market. That being said people do business with people so we’d like to introduce you to our Capri First Nations Benefits Division. Ren Baskin, originally from the Kispiox Band in Northern BC, now lives in Kelowna BC; however, travels frequently back to the Hazelton area for both business and pleasure. He has a teenage son who he spends countless hours with as his volleyball coach from middle school to the provincial level. Ren also runs volleyball camps for First Nation youth, mainly in the Hazelton area. Norine Stewart comes from a financial services background and is originally from North Caribou Lake in Northern Ontario; however for the past 25 years she,

her husband and four children have called Kelowna home. Norine enjoys being active in the sunny Okanagan with her family on the lake and on the ski hill. Working with Capri Insurance has allowed both Ren and Norine to continue their journey and live their dream of working with and travelling to First Nation communities throughout BC. Their knowledge in Group Benefits and Pensions has transferred to the First Nation market in the areas of: taxation, FNHA coordination with benefit plans and Federal funding. Their expertise also includes Chief & Council coverage, Band Member Plans and Wellness Programs. If you would like to work with a First Nations Group Benefits and Pension specialist who provides dedication to service, integrity and maximum insurance value, please contact Ren or Norine (See contact info above).


NEGOTIATE OR LITIGATE? ///// BRUCE MCIVOR | FIRST PEOPLES LAW CORPORATION | BMCIVOR@FIRSTPEOPLESLAW.COM

W

hile Indigenous Peoples across Canada vary widely in their challenges

and opportunities, they all have two fundamental objectives in common: to benefit from and exercise jurisdiction over their lands. Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 7


NEGOTIATE OR LITIGATE? ///// BRUCE MCIVOR | FIRST PEOPLES LAW CORPORATION

With governments often unwilling to address First Nations’ real concerns, achieving these objectives increasingly depends on making agreements with industry to share benefits from development and to participate in ongoing decision-making about how these developments will proceed. Certain proposed developments are simply beyond the pale and the affected First Nation is unlikely to ever consent to them proceeding, regardless of what benefits and decision-making powers are on offer. More often, however, a

First Nation will be open to discussing with a company how and on what terms a proposed development might proceed in its territory. Typically, a First Nation reviews the project with community members and hires consultants to advise them on the environmental, social and economic impacts of a proposed development. At the same time, they work on negotiating the best deal possible with the company, one that includes not just financial benefits but also many other provisions including processes for environmental monitoring and protection. If the negotiations are successful, leadership takes the tentative agreement, and all the other information that has been gathered, to the community. They explain how the project is likely to negatively affect the First Nation and its lands, how it will hopefully benefit current and future generations and how the First Nation will be involved in its ongoing operation. It is then up to the community to decide whether or not to give their consent for the project to proceed. But sometimes First Nations and industry are unable to reach a negotiated settlement. That’s when the question arises for many First Nations: negotiate or litigate? The decision to litigate is most often taken because government has failed to meet its

READ ONLINE ABORIGINALMARKETPLACE.COM

TO INQUIRE ABOUT ADVERTISING EMAIL EDITOR@ABORIGINALMARKETPLACE.COM

8 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015

obligations to respect Aboriginal title, rights and treaty rights and the First Nation and the company cannot agree on how to resolve the issues between themselves. First Nations are left with few options. They either grit their teeth and continue to accept the status quo or a subpar agreement, or they go to court. As much as war analogies proliferate in litigation circles, they are rarely applicable when a First Nation takes government or industry to court. This is because even when they win a legal battle, First Nations are not simply handed solutions by the court—as I often explain to my clients, judges are not Santa Claus. At best, and especially when First Nations are seeking to enforce their Aboriginal title, rights or treaty rights, the courts will make orders or declarations that will hopefully set the table for a negotiated agreement, but they do not mandate an agreement or its terms. For First Nations success in court usually leads to more negotiations. Ironically, its not just successful court challenges that result in negotiated settlements. When a First Nation loses at the first level of court they often appeal. Before the appeal is heard, the company and the First Nation sometimes reach a negotiated settlement and the appeal is dropped. This can happen for a variety of reasons. First, the company might worry that the appeal judges will disagree with the lower court’s decision. It might be better to reach a settlement and avoid the risk of a loss on the appeal. Second, even though the First Nation lost the first round, by pursuing the case to court and then filing an appeal it has demonstrated it is in the fight for the long haul. Many companies decide they do not want all the negatives that come along with drawn-out litigation, including uncertainty around their permits, difficulty raising capital and delays in construction. The reality is that negotiation and litigation are not mutually exclusive. While most First Nations prefer a negotiated agreement that allows them to consent to a project that will affect their Aboriginal title, rights and treaty rights, they also realize that the other side might simply have a different understanding of what is required. If the government response is unsatisfactory and they reach an impasse with the company, a First Nation hopefully has access to other options to defend their constitutional rights. Litigation is often the last recourse to achieving successful negotiations.


Respect

Inclusion

Sustainability

As a leader in the power infrastructure sector for over 33 years, Allteck Line Contractors Inc. aspires to also become the industry leader for Aboriginal inclusion by developing strong partnerships that provide economic prosperity, social well-being, and respect for the people and land where we work. We believe that responsible business activity involves meaningful inclusion and a deep respect for Indigenous cultures and values. Initiatives that focus on Aboriginal youth programming, education and skill development, through partnerships with Right to Play, Thompson Rivers University and BC’s First Nations Energy and Mining Council are among some of the ways we demonstrate our commitment to the communities where we work. The Allteck Aboriginal Advancement department is honoured to be collaborating and partnering with First Nations on their traditional territories across Western Canada.

Allteck Line Contractors: Leading Provider of Specialized Services for the Electric Power Industry.

Transmission - Distribution - Underground Cable - Substations - Energized Services - Emergency Restoration Alteck Line Contractors 5363 273 A St. Langley, B.C. V4W 3Z4 Phone: 604-857-6600 Email: info@allteck.ca

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ABORIGINAL ENTREPRENEURS A NATION’S DRIVE FOR CHANGE BY: LOA FRIDFINNSON ACTIV8 CORPORATE RELATIONS 604687-2004 WWW.ACTIV8INC.COM LOA@ACTIV8INC.COM

A

boriginals in Canada are extremely creative and talented people that care about creating a culturally vibrant, ethically sound and prosperous society for current and future generations. They make excellent entrepreneurs and leaders providing value to their customers, employment opportunities to job seekers, fuel to the local economy and they contribute greatly to the advancement of their communities. In fact, the number of Aboriginal business owners is growing at a rate that far exceeds that for self-employed Canadians overall. It’s an exciting time to be an aboriginal entrepreneur in our country!

DARLENE GARRICK PRESENTING COPPERKNOT’S EARING COLLECTION IN ACTIV8’S MARKETING CLASS.

Fast facts from the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business 2006 Census: •There are more than 37,000 First Nations, Métis andInuit persons in Canada who have their own businesses, a significant increase of 85 percent since 1996. • During this time period, the rate of growth of selfemployed Aboriginal people was five times that of self-employed Canadians overall (7%). •Most First Nations business owners indicated that their business was located on reserve (72%). •Aboriginal business industries range from construction (18%) and primary sectors (agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, mining, and oil and gas extraction; 13%) to knowledge and service-based sectors, such as education, scientific and technical services, and health and social services (28%). • Most Aboriginal-owned businesses focus on their local community (85%) or their home province or territory (73%) to sell their goods and services.

SOCIAL MEDIA CLASS OF 2013

10 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015


The movement toward self employment is the result of a progressive nation’s outlook to advancing its small business opportunities through execution of a strategic plan, including Economic Development Officer and Trust Administrator, Geena Jackson’s incredible efforts in engaging membership and garnering a full spectrum of resources that are generating returns and creating a climate of self-reliance and inspired action.

LOA FRIDFINNSON, ACTIV8 INSTRUCTOR AND

GEENA JACKSON TEACHING DIGITAL MEDIA AT TOTEM HALL IN SQUAMISH, SPRING 2015.

“With higher education that also has a “fun” learning component, business resources (human and financial) and mentoring, people see than anything is possible and instead of succumbing to the notion that operating a business is out of reach, our members are understanding the steps they can take to make their dreams of running a business a reality”, said Geena Jackson.

The success rate this nation has seen through its entrepreneurship has been nothing short of impressive. The Small Business Office and Trust has 280 business owners who have received funding and advanced education in the past 8 years, with 80% of them operating thriving businesses five or more years later. Two Squamish Nation members, Santana Walker of T’Sala Salon and Brenda Bain of Bizzie B’s Cleaning were winners at the BC Aboriginal Business Awards last fall. In summary, The Squamish Nation has the right people in place to drive change who have run successful businesses themselves in the past, understand the culture of aboriginal peoples and the challenges they face, provide membership with a place to go for advisory services, offer proven best

“BY PROVIDING THIS FULL SPECTRUM OF BUSINESS SERVICES THE SQUAMISH NATION PEOPLE ARE TAKING RESPONSIBILITY AND SHOWING UP TO LEARN AND GROW, MOTIVATED TO DO MORE IN THEIR LIVES, AND IN MANY CASES THIS INCLUDES SOCIAL IMPACT AS PART OF THEIR BUSINESS MODEL.”

In support of these impressive numbers, I’d like to share a case study on how one nation I’ve had the honor of working with, The Squamish Nation located in North Vancouver West Vancouver and Squamish, British Columbia is gaining accolades for the mounting number of entrepreneurs making news headlines, winning awards and recognition for innovation and social impact business. A recipe that has made the Squamish Nation a leader in advancing the number of small businesses in operation (on and off reserve) has come from it’s ambitious commitment to higher education and providing programs and resources that support and inspire its membership to reach for the stars. The Squamish Nation currently has 4,000 members with 60% of its people under the age of 30 years old, a true baby boom in the last few decades with a large number of youths now entering the workforce. Eight years ago only eighteen people applied to the Squamish Nation Trust to gain financial support for new businesses, and this year that number has soared to 145 applications. Businesses operating in the nation include architects, artists, florists, spa and health services, consulting, web development, information technology and many others.

The Squamish Nation has multiple educational programs in place such as: the Aboriginal BEST Program, Activ8’s Marketing and Digital Media Training, and the Squamish Nation Trades Program where people learn the necessary skills required to work in a specific field, communicate their value effectively and take charge of operating their own companies. The nation is also “wired and fully connected” engaging three generations online (Boomers, Gen X & Gen Y) through popular social networks that most people use to communicate and share information today. This has been an especially beneficial strategy in attracting the attention of youths in the community, inviting their interest in the various opportunities that are available to them in business and trades. All business education programs are managed by the Small Business Office at The Squamish Nation which, in addition to training and funding, provides a wealth of other resources and mentoring services to its membership. It also administers The Squamish Nations Trust, that presents forgivable grants to entrepreneurs who have sound business plans, and utilizes the Authentic Indigenous Arts Resurgence Program promoting authentic aboriginal artists to the local tourism market.

practices, financing and most importantly, act as cheerleaders to those who simply need to believe it can be done. Sometimes all action requires is the faith of a mustard seed. By providing this full spectrum of business services the Squamish Nation people are taking responsibility and showing up to learn and grow, motivated to do more in their lives, and in many cases this includes social impact as part of their business model. Whether a nation has 4,000 members or 200, with enough inspiration, knowledge, accountability and support, people can do amazing things. Stats source: https://www.ccab.com/uploads/File/ Promise-and-Prosperity--The-AboriginalBusiness-Survey.pdf

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 11


FOOTPRINT LOG HOMES:

TREAD SOFTLY F

ootprint Log Homes is providing a turn-key business opportunity for First Nations interested in home sales and/or construction. Over the past 20 years, the factory in the Thompson-Okanagan has sold thousands of log home housing packages throughout the world, and is now focusing more attention locally. Footprint Log Homes is offering a unique opportunity that will help you create a viable business with on-going local employment opportunities while addressing housing needs. 

“OUR VISION IS TO ESTABLISH A NETWORK OF FIRST NATION LOG HOME DEALERS ACROSS CANADA. WE WILL PROVIDE DEALERS WITH THE SUPPORT AND TRAINING REQUIRED TO MARKET AND SELL UNIQUE AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING.” Our vision is to establish a network of First Nation Log Home Dealers across Canada.  We will provide Dealers with the support and training required to market and sell unique and affordable housing.  Our mission is to help establish a local sales office that will provide profit-sharing and employment opportunities for a dedicated sales team.   First Nation Dealers will be uniquely positioned to market Footprint Log Homes to develop other on and off-reserve projects such as 12 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015


single-family dwellings, developing recreational resorts or building commercial structures. First Nation Dealers that want to diversify into the construction phase can also become Builders. Regardless of the level of local expertise, Footprint will provide continuous training for any professional development or technical skills pertaining to business management, sales and marketing or log home construction. Footprint Log Homes can design and provide buildings to address all aspects of on-reserve housing including social housing, administration and health buildings, band-owned housing and individual home ownership. Footprint Log Homes wants to provide an opportunity to reconnect with natural living by partnering with a First Nations architect to develop home plans that incorporate local Aboriginal traditions.  At Footprint we ‘Tread Softly on the environment’.  Our philosophy starts with the stewardship of the forests that provide for our homes.  Our parent company, Ecora Engineering & Resource Group has 50+ engineering and environmental experts that work with many nations in BC to responsibly manage their forest and land resources. Footprint is heavily vested in maintaining a reliable supply of high quality wood used to manufacture our products by ensuring the forests remain a sustainable resource.  There are many considerations to address when building a home; project management, site selection, drafting, acquiring building permits, purchasing, shipping and finding qualified trades

people. Our team of in-house experts will work with you every step of the way including design, engineering, architecture, drafting, logistics, construction and customer support.  Whether you require a complicated estimate or the homeowner wants to make last-minute changes to the home plans or the builder has questions during construction, from design to completion our team of in-house experts will work with you to ensure the client’s dream home becomes a reality.  At Footprint Log Homes we have the passion and talent to get the job done!  The manufacturing facility has been a major producer of quality log homes for over 20 years in BC.  Well established procedures have been refined to easily ship the log homes anywhere in BC, Canada and the world.  Log homes are regularly shipped from the manufacturing facility throughout the USA and Canada as well as overseas destinations such as Japan and China.  The completeness and quality of the log home packages translates to a simplified, fast construction process for the Builder.  Time savings are cost savings for the Builder which increase profit margins.  Reliable, on-time delivery of products ensures no costly delays.  Material costs for stick-built homes can be volatile.  The package quote on our log homes is fixed which provides both the dealer and the builder peace of mind knowing they can stay on time and budget.  We acknowledge that your trust in Footprint Log Homes is required for our success.  Why

should you partner with us? Footprint is transparent and straightforward in the conduct of its business, in all respects. All the time.  We are respectful in all relationships, as demonstrated and insisted upon by our parent company, Ecora.  We are modern, relevant and yet old-fashioned - we understand that all business grows on the backbone of an impeccable reputation that is hard-earned and easily lost.  It also doesn’t hurt knowing that our parent corporation, Ecora Engineering and Resource Group has been fostering business relations with First Nations for many years in the forestry sector and beyond.  Footprint is excited to strengthen the existing business relationships with First Nation businesses that are familiar with Ecora and set the foundation for other new and long-lasting business relationships.  At Footprint Log Homes we hope that the turnkey business opportunity we have presented will provide a profitable business model that provides profit-sharing and long-term employment opportunities while meeting housing needs.  We are committed to maintaining First Nations culture and traditions through the use of local design, local materials and local labour.  Our Dealership and Builder programs will provide long-lasting profitable business models as well as employment opportunities for management, sales and marketing and construction positions.  Footprint would like to invite you to ‘Tread Softly’ with us.

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 13


DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES MODEL

E

nvironmental stewardship and the capacity to respond to, and effectively manage environmental challenges, is a priority for Aboriginal peoples and resonates at the core of leadership and communities. A key strategy to developing such capacity is a wellintegrated business model whereby an organization and community can provide a range of in-house services and solutions, while remaining focused on a core set of key service offerings to ensure safety, quality, cost effectiveness and profitability.

14 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015

Quantum Murray is a national environmental and industrial services provider with extensive experience working with Aboriginal peoples, communities and businesses across Canada; ranging from training in excess of 600 Aboriginal peoples, many of whom have been employed on numerous projects, to a range of ventures with Aboriginal businesses and communities. Some of these business ventures have evolved into ongoing and multi-year initiatives and include a diverse range of successful projects as illustrated in the joint venture with Kwikwetlem First Nation, others recently established with unique and promising initiatives underway as with the Malahat Nation as well as the Cheam First Nation. Each opportunity is unique but common to each is a shared set of goals and priorities, committed leadership, and a management and operations team that can deliver. Quantum Murray provides the expertise, resources and experience to partner in the fields of environmental remediation, demolition,

hazardous materials abatement, waste and water management and treatment, civil works, emergency response and specialized training; all of which comprise a well-integrated environmental services model. Each -Aboriginal partner, whether that be in the form of a formalized agreement or other, provides the local knowledge, resources, cultural and environmental awareness, and various levels of expertise either directly through the community or through Aboriginal owned businesses. As these relationships and business ventures develop and mature each partner helps develop the capacity of the other, and thereby developing an integrated environmental services model specific to each Nation or community. For example, Quantum Murray is currently working with the Cheam First Nation to develop a First Nation Emergency Response Community Preparedness Plan. Given the various modes of transport and goods that pass through the Nation, aside from the potential for natural events such as flooding, it is critical that the community


THE DESIGN AND DELIVERY OF THESE TRAINING PROGRAMS ARE BASED UPON THE BROADER INITIATIVES AND GOALS OF A GIVEN PROJECT, ORGANIZATION OR ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY.

be equipped to adequately respond and ensure the safety of its members in the event of a natural or man-made disaster. In working through this exercise the Cheam First Nation and Quantum Murray develop a relationship and framework that may lead to other opportunities within their traditional territory and along one or more of the environmental services lines. In so doing the Nation builds the capacity of individual members who one day may be engaged in an emergency response call, and the next working on a remediation project. It is capacity building through transferable skills development and a comprehensive and wide reaching business model that provides for enhanced opportunities for employment and revenue generation. At the same time Quantum Murray expands its’ workforce with local, knowledgeable members, access to resources and services, and at times may be provided access to opportunities that may not have otherwise been available. When designed and managed collaboratively it is a win-win situation for all involved.

An essential component to the success of these initiatives and their longevity lies within relevant and ongoing training that can range from project specific skill development through ongoing coaching and mentoring. A recent example is the Specialized Independent Competencies (SIC), a training program delivered in partnership with, and funded through the Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Management Board (NPAAMB). The 6 week intensive program was aimed at connecting urban Aboriginal youth with opportunities in the construction and environmental industries. Now in its’ third year the program has an 85% graduation rate, many of whom have achieved employment either with Quantum Murray or within industry. The design and delivery of these training programs are based upon the broader initiatives and goals of a given project, organization or Aboriginal community. In the case of the SIC program it was that of building capacity of the youth including a transferable set of skills crossing

numerous industry lines, in others, such as the recent demolition of the St Michael’s Residential School Demolition, it was to provide short term employment and skills development for members of the Namgis First Nation in Alert Bay, BC. In sum, the success of building environmental services capacity within an Aboriginal community is a function of strong and supportive leadership, sound partners, a well-integrated business model, , an effective management and operations team, timely and relevant training, meaningful and collaborative relationships, effective communication at all levels, and a willingness and dedication to continuous improvement.

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 15


NABOC OSOYOOS A PERENNIAL CONFERENCE FAVOURITE

F

or the last six years a regular event on many people’s calendars has been the annual National Aboriginal Business Opportunities Conference (NABOC) in Osoyoos hosted by Chief Clarence Louie. Started in 2009 NABOC Osoyoos is in its 7th year and has become one of the most popular Aboriginal/Private Sector business networking events in western Canada. All 6 previous years events have sold out and the feedback from delegates has been increasingly positive year-on-year. So why change an event that

NK’MIP DESERT CULTURAL CENTRE, IT’S SUCH A GREAT OUTDOOR VENUE FOR LISTENING TO MUSIC WHILE YOU’RE EATING UNDER THE STARS

is so successful? We asked 2G Group CEO Geoff Greenwell for his reasoning behind the change in format of the 2015 event? “We continually ask our delegates for feedback at all of our events and we take onboard as many of the good suggestions as we can; this helps us ensure that 16 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015

we are creating good value for our clients when they attend our events,” said Geoff. “People love coming to the Osoyoos Indian Band’s NK’MIP Resort anyway, it is such a special place and has a fantastic aura of positive energy, however as always we wanted to improve on previous years,” added Geoff. “For this September’s event we have added 10 business pitches which all present good partnership opportunities for the Aboriginal communities in the audience. We’ve done this kind of thing before in a smaller way, but this year these 10 offerings will really bring some added value to the conference,” said Geoff. “We’ve also added some excellent plenary sessions on day 1 and some very informative workshops on day 2. People want to do more networking and less listening so we’ve altered the format of the event to maximize the networking opportunities and slim down the plenary sessions to just one day,” explained Geoff. “We’re very pleased to announce that Brenda Baptiste is going to be one of MC’s at NABOC Osoyoos this year. Brenda recently left her job as CAO of Tsleil-Waututh Nation and has started to work as a facilitator and MC again, so we decided that her sharp wit and relaxed style of delivery would be a perfect fit for the atmosphere we like to create at our events,”


Bitterley Divine will perform live at NABOC

said Geoff. “We have 2 great Aboriginal musical acts with rockers Bitterley Divine playing the banquet dinner and the hip-hop sounds of Dani and Lizzy at the NK’MIP Desert Cultural Centre hospitality event, which is such a great outdoor venue for listening to music while you’re eating under the stars.” “The theme of this year’s event is ‘Collaborating for Success’ and to ensure we get the right mix of private sector people to network with our Aboriginal delegates we’ve been doing personal invitations; Private sector delegate space will be limited to 100 with another 80 or so spaces being held for Aboriginal delegates,” said Geoff. “It really is the right time for collaboration,” said Chief Clarence Louie when we talked with him recently. “It’s time for all business leaders in this country to help end the Aboriginal dependency cycle. We need to work together to create business opportunities and joint ventures that benefit both aboriginal communities and private sector businesses.”

Dani and Lizzy will perform live at NABOC

The conference is being held from September 15th – 17th for information and to register for the 2015 National Aboriginal Business Opportunities Conference in Osoyoos go to www.2ggroup.ca Book your travel through Aboriginal Travel Services and help support students bursaries. . www.aboriginaltravelservices.com

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 17


ABORIGINAL INSURANCE FOR THE FUTURE TEWANEE JOSEPH CEO SUSSEX INSURANCE FIRST PEOPLES TEWANEE CONSULTING GROUP INC. | TJOSEPH@TEWANEEGROUP.COM

I

have been fortunate enough to travel the country and have been introduced to many different communities; I have met some incredible people. I am convinced that the more that Aboriginal people are involved in every aspect of everyday life - from business, to sports, politics, and of course major events, we will be a better and stronger country. We are often on the outside looking in on large scale projects and now have the opportunities to create partnerships to be involved and share our own expertise. Moving forward, it is critical to ensure that our communities are full participants in the future growth of the economy.

“I AM CONVINCED THAT THE MORE THAT ABORIGINAL PEOPLE ARE INVOLVED IN EVERY ASPECT OF EVERYDAY LIFE - FROM BUSINESS, TO SPORTS, POLITICS, AND OF COURSE MAJOR EVENTS, WE WILL BE A BETTER AND STRONGER COUNTRY.” TEWANEE JOSEPH Let’s consider for a moment that as our communities grow, new structures are built, band and personal businesses start up, and workforce expands, the questions is “do you have adequate insurance coverage and do you need an Aboriginal owned insurance company to partner with?” With the Aboriginal economy in Canada representing in the tens of Billions of dollars the need for insurance is even greater now. Tewanee Consulting Group (TCG) has been evolving 18 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015


“WE RUN SUSSEX INSURANCE AS WE DID AT THE BEGINNING - ALL HANDS ON. WE STILL WANT TO MAINTAIN THAT. WE ARE A FAMILY OWNED BUSINESS AND ARE FRANCHISEES ARE A PART OF OUR FAMILY. WE ARE PROUD TO WELCOME RAE-ANN AND TEWANEE TO OUR FAMILY.” KEN ARMSTRONG, SUSSEX INSURANCE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER - AIIC, CAIB, CIP

to develop new business lines to support and strengthen Aboriginal communities and businesses. TCG continues to offer consulting services and now offers Insurance coverage. The new venture, Sussex Insurance First Peoples is a majority owned First Nations full service insurance agency under the Sussex Insurance Group. We bring unparallel experience, knowledge, and expertise of Aboriginal people and partnerships to the insurance industry. Since 1976, our parent company, Sussex Insurance has established itself as an innovative leader in the insurance industry. Sussex Insurance is British Columbia’s largest ICBC Agency network with more than 48 locations and over $418 million in premiums sold annually to over 500,000 customers. Sussex continues to expand its reach and now has 12 locations in Alberta. Our Principals and team of experts understand the unique needs of First Nation communities and businesses as well as the growing Industries who plan to partner and procure to First Nations. Sussex First Peoples Insurance is the first insurance brokerage to offer real partnership and profit sharing opportunities to Aboriginal businesses and communities. The Aboriginal insurance market in Canada is a

multi-billion dollar industry and our goal is to work with you to develop long-term meaningful partnerships that meet your needs. Sussex Insurance First Peoples wants to partner with you.

SUSSEX INSURANCE FIRST PEOPLES OFFERS THE FOLLOWING: Commercial • Property Liability • Building • General Liability • Full Range of ICBC • Private Auto General • Home • Rental Income • Marine • Tenants • Travel Specialty • First Nations Communities • Aboriginal Partnerships • Aboriginal Procurement Opportunities Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 19


#PAITC2015 Join us as we bring our hearts, minds and spirits together for the 2nd Annual Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism and Trade Conference.

T

he Aboriginal Tourism Association of BC, Host Partner for the second Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism & Trade Conference – taking place Sept. 12 – 14, 2015 in Vancouver, BC – is pleased to announce that the preliminary conference schedule and early registration have been confirmed with the World Indigenous Tourism Alliance.

Those interested in attending may register for the conference by visiting http://paitc2015.com Conference topics will include case studies for successful partnerships in Indigenous tourism, winning formulas in eco-cultural tourism, and best practices to work in the Pacific-Asia marketplace. The World Indigenous Tourism Alliance (WINTA) is the custodian of the Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism 20 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015

BEN SHERMAN, OGLALA LAKOTA, WINTA CHAIRPERSON

Conference (PAITC), hosted this year in the traditional territory of the Musqueam, Squamish, and TsleilWaututh Nations. WINTA is a global network of Indigenous and nonIndigenous peoples and organizations that seek to give practical expression to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, through tourism. “As global tourism continues its tremendous growth rates, Indigenous communities are increasingly engaged in developing and offering our own brand of authentic experiences,” says Ben Sherman, chair of WINTA. “These experiences provide visitors with a special view into ancient cultures, while demonstrating our close relationship with the natural environment.”

The Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism Conference will focus on the international opportunity for engagement and sharing by all peoples who have an interest in promoting, implementing and celebrating achievements in fostering Indigenous selfdetermination through participation in tourism. It represents the most important statement of commitment from the tourism sector that it intends to take on an active role in giving practical effect to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). “From coast to coast to coast, Canada has a rich Aboriginal history and culture that dates back millennia, providing a foundation for uniquely authentic tourism experiences” says Keith Henry, chair of the Aboriginal Tourism Association of Canada. “Authentic Aboriginal tourism stands to benefit greatly from the modern traveller’s appetite for immersive educational experiences, and, at the same time, has room to improve its market visibility, product quality, and coordination with other tourism agencies and organizations to realize its full potential.”


CONFERENCE LOCATION - THE PINNACLE HARBOURFRONT HOTEL, VANCOUVER BC

“We are pleased to be building on the success of the inaugural PAITC held in Darwin in 2012 by also providing a strong business trade and marketing component …The delivery of the conference in Vancouver is a welcomed opportunity to provide an international focus on Aboriginal tourism in Canada.” – Brenda Baptiste, AtBC Chairperson

BEAUTIFUL DETAIL OF COAST SALISH TOTEM POLE, VICTORIA, BC, CANADA

The host province of British Columbia is home to one third of Canada’s First Nations and the second largest Indigenous population and has experienced strong growth in Aboriginal tourism over the past decade. In 2010, 3.7 million visitors included Aboriginal experiences on their itineraries and spent $40 million learning about and experiencing First Nations culture. This represents nearly 100 per cent growth since 2006. Today, there are m ore than 200 Aboriginal tourism businesses in BC, an 85 per cent increase over 2006, which together contributes $561 million in value added GDP. For more information, visit http://paitc2015. com or follow the conversation on social media through: #PAITC2015. MEDIA CONTACTS: Brian Cant, Tartan Group: 250-592-3838, 250-888-8729 (cell) or brian@tartangroup. ca Paula Amos, Aboriginal Tourism BC: 604803-4494 or paula@aboriginalbc.com

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 21


ABORIGINAL STRATEGY GROUP LLP

CONSULTING FIRM ABORIGINAL STRATEGY GROUP - WWW.ASGLLP.COM TOLL FREE ON 1-866-284-8322 OR GEOFF@ASGLLP.COM

PHOTO: Clarence receiving a gift from Alex Janavicius of PetroCanada after hosting their recent Rezgas conference.

A

fter over twenty five years as Chief and CEO of the Osoyoos Indian Band, Chief Clarence Louie decided to step into the consulting world by launching his own firm in partnership with Geoff Greenwell, CEO of the 2G Group.

“I’ve been working in the Indian industry my whole life and I’ve learned a lot about how to start businesses and make them successful,” said Chief Louie when we interviewed him. “I decided last year that I should share my knowledge and experience with other Aboriginal and private sector groups and help them create businesses that will succeed.”

“OUR GOAL IN THE FIRST YEAR WAS TO ASSEMBLE AN “A TEAM” OF ASSOCIATES WHO COULD HELP US BRING A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO OUR PROJECTS AND OFFER OUR CLIENTS A “ONE STOP SHOP” APPROACH TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.” 22 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015


PHOTO: Geoff Greenwell, CEO of the 2G Group and Chief and CEO of the Osoyoos Indian Band, Chief Clarence Louie in Osoyoos.

“Clarence and I have been talking about doing this for a while and it seemed that 2015 would be the year we would actually be able to devote the time to make it happen,” added Geoff. “We see a lot of Aboriginal communities that are still struggling to get going in business and an increasing amount of private sector groups that need guidance on how to properly structure their joint ventures and partnerships.” Aboriginal Strategy Group LLP (ASG) has already added some high profile associate partners with various skill sets to ensure the firm has the capacity to fully service its clients. Initially in 2015 Clarence and Geoff have been focusing on working with Aboriginal communities seeking to develop their land and create community owned development corporations. “From the outset we intended to take a multidisciplinary approach to building the firm,” said

PHOTO: a 40 acre parcel of reserve land being developed for residential housing in partnership with ASG LLP

Geoff, “we’ve been working with a number of private sector groups who wanted to structure partnership models that would ensure success with their Aboriginal partners. Our goal in the first year was to assemble an “A Team” of associates who could help us bring a holistic approach to our projects and offer our clients a “one stop shop” approach to economic development. We guarantee our clients that any individuals or groups we allow to join us as partners will be excellent at what they do and have lots of experience in the Aboriginal business sector.” “Over the last ten years I’ve lost count of how many Native groups have come to visit the Osoyoos Indian Band to go to school on us and understand why we’ve become successful,” said Clarence. “Unfortunately I’ve never been able to give them as much of my time as I would have liked as my schedule has always been really hectic and full,” he added, “by creating ASG I’ll now be able to help those communities more directly and spend time making sure they get their business efforts on track.” “From years of running our business conferences we’ve seen how many groups still need help and guidance from people they can trust,” said Geoff, “ASG will act as a business advisory group that clients can come to and be guaranteed that their needs will be met.” Clarence and Geoff have been very busy this year working on some land development projects, assisting with negotiations on pipeline projects, leading strategic planning sessions and board retreats, and are just beginning discussions to put together a program to assist First Nations communities to improve their credit ratings and gain better access to affordable financing. For more information on Aboriginal Strategy Group go to www.asgllp.com or contact Geoff Greenwell Toll free on 1-866-284-8322 or geoff@asgllp.com

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 23


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LEGAL EAGLE ///// MERLE ALEXANDER - PARTNER, GOWLINGS LLP MERLE.ALEXANDER@GOWLINGS.COM

PRIOR INFORMED CONSENT:

PROMISE AND PERILS?

O

n the land, in our Territories, in Canadian Courts and in the United Nations, we fight for our collective and human right to free, prior and informed consent (herein “Consent”). From first contact to today, Aboriginal Peoples have always said “we have the right to say Yes and No”. This fundamental right served as our basis and achievement in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. And, most importantly, the Supreme Court of Canada finally agreed in absolute and clear terms in June 2014 that when it comes to Aboriginal Title lands, the legal standard for the duty to consult is at the highest standard: Consent.

IF YOU WANT YOUR PROJECT TO LAST GENERATIONS UNOPPOSED, BE EQUITABLE OR RISK UNCERTAINTY. So, with all of the legal victories, why is there any debate about consent? Why do I fear that my son Elijah will be carrying the Consent torch in memorial of generations of our Peoples? The answer is that Canadian Governments too often do not comply with Canadian law. They want us to “do as they say, not as they do”. The Rule of Law seems meant to be broken. We must give Consent teeth by revitalizing our Aboriginal Rule of Law and rejecting the bastardization of consent (intentionally small “c” consent). Consent may have Promise and Perils.

THE PROMISE

First Nations in BC are operationalizing Consent-based self-governance on many fronts. I note three immediate examples: (1) the Tsleil Wau-tuth Nation’s (“TWN”) comprehensive environmental assessment of the proposed Kinder Morgan TransMountain

Expansion project; (2) the Carrier Sekani First Nations (“CSTC”) establishment of consentbased decision-making working group for major projects in their Territories; and, (3) the creation of a Tsimshian Environmental Stewardship Authority (“TESA”)to review LNG projects. All of these examples are of First Nations embracing the retro Nike logo “Just Do It”. TWN’s environmental assessment serves as a testament to self-government over title territory. Based on extensive expert commissioned reports and their own comprehensive traditional use studies, the TWN was able to conduct a environmental assessment of all documents submitted to the National Energy Board by Kinder Morgan for their prospective Trans Mountain Expansion project. With thorough review, the Nation assessed the Project to not be in the best interests of the TWN and gave definite meaning and substance to prior informed consent. It is living example of Title governance in application. The CSTC recently negotiated with the Province of BC a Collaborative Agreement that will seek to apply consent-based, Tsilhqot’in

Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 27


compliant decision-making to LNG pipelines and all other major projects in the Carrier Sekani territories. Details will be disclosed fully following ratification of the Agreement by each respective First Nation. This substantive achievement appears to be an incremental government-to-government progression towards Tsilhqot’in implementation by negotiation instead of litigation. Finally, Metlakatla, Gitxaala, Gitga’at, Kitselas and Kitsumkalum First Nations have established the Tsimshian Environmental Stewardship Authority to provide a way for all of the Nations to address common environmental stewardship issues including project development proposals and cumulative impact considerations. TESA will establish baseline monitoring programs; provide information to the communities about project impacts and potential mitigation measures; develop conditions to address environmental concerns for proposed projects in the territory; support the engagement of First Nations in the environmental assessment process; and, maintain a regional forum

“SO, WITH ALL OF THE LEGAL VICTORIES, WHY IS THERE ANY DEBATE ABOUT CONSENT? WHY DO I FEAR THAT MY SON ELIJAH WILL BE CARRYING THE CONSENT TORCH IN MEMORIAL OF GENERATIONS OF OUR PEOPLES?”

to discuss projects and mitigation measures. TESA is a collective example of First Nations fulfilling the judicial affirmation that we have a right to control and management over our Territories and resources.

THE PERIL

Consent itself is NOT perilous. But when Industry and Crown exploit Aboriginal Peoples that do not have equal bargaining power into providing consent when there has only been “beads and trinkets” accommodations, we must be wary. It is happening right now. I see it in Agreement after Agreement put forward by the Crown and Industry, where they offer minimal accommodation and make consent a precondition to $$$. With each of these agreements, we are defining “consent” as a lesser consent. It is sad that after such incredible sacrifice and advocacy, consent is being provided for a few dollars and short term benefits. 28 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015

It is my opinion that in some circumstances there is not only exploitation of unequal bargaining power, but bad faith negotiations. When a Party with a fiduciary duty knows that a First Nation has strong evidence of Aboriginal title, but offers accommodation that is appropriate to the lower range of the consultation spectrum and the First Nation accepts it, is this actually equitable at law? If I knew my Son was entitled to $100, but pressured him to accept $10 knowing that he had only $.50 and he accepted it, would the law enforce the deal? I am in a fiduciary duty to my Son. I can say that many companies are accepting

that consent is the new standard, but they are asking for it with unfair trades. Closing Remarks So, at the infancy of Prior Informed Consent implementation, there are some polarizing situations occurring. Some First Nations are setting a new international standard by demonstrating the concrete application of Title governance. Some are undermining the value of consent with inequitable offers. Let wisdom prevail that inequity will never create legacies. If you want your Project to last generations unopposed, be equitable or risk uncertainty. We all want equitable and legal certainty.


TARPON ENTERS INTO NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH COAST TSIMSHIAN ENTERPRISES L.P. Tarpon continues to recognize the importance of environmental protection in all areas of our business. We have adopted industry best practices and adhere to government legislation in all of our operations.

T

arpon Energy Services Ltd. is excited to announce its newly formed partnership with Coast

Tsimshian Enterprises. The partnership, CT Tarpon Electrical Services Limited, will pursue electrical, instrumentation, construction and fabrication opportunities in the port, utility, mining and oil and gas sectors in northwestern B.C.

“CT Tarpon Electrical Services is strategically positioned in an area of tremendous potential economic growth. It is also an excellent complement to The Electrician, who was involved in the construction of the original port at Prince Rupert,” said Rick Wickland, president of Tarpon Energy Services Ltd. “We have a long history of participation in the local economy through The Electrician. Through our new partnership with CTE, we can enjoy a good and beneficial relationship well into the future that will continue to support the local economies and the

communities of Metlakatla and Lax Kw’alaams.” “Improving the quality of life for our members is a continually evolving process. Having served our community in varied capacities and sitting on a number of boards for different businesses helps me to be able to recognize quality,” Chief Harold Leighton of Metlakatla said. “I appreciate the opportunity that our partnership with Tarpon Energy Services represents. I look forward to many successful years of moving the bar ever higher in our mutual goals to improve our economic

circumstances in a good way.” “The leadership at Lax Kw’alaams continually stresses how critical it is for our future to continue to leverage employment and business development within our community,” said Mayor Gary Reece of Lax Kw’alaams. “Partnerships with well-recognized organizations like Tarpon Energy Services, who have a proven reputation and a solid local presence, offer beneficial economic opportunities for all of us. We are confident that this new partnership will continue

“IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR OUR MEMBERS IS A CONTINUALLY EVOLVING PROCESS. HAVING SERVED OUR COMMUNITY IN VARIED CAPACITIES AND SITTING ON A NUMBER OF BOARDS FOR DIFFERENT BUSINESSES HELPS ME TO BE ABLE TO RECOGNIZE QUALITY.” Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015 29


Local Managers of the newly formed partnership at a recent trade show

to create long term sustainable benefits for our community members.” Over the last four years, Tarpon has expanded its commitment to its core values of community and people by developing lasting partnerships with Aboriginal businesses. This is the third formal Aboriginal partnership that Tarpon has entered into. Through this partnership, Tarpon will have the opportunity to participate in sustainable economic ventures that will have lasting benefits for all partnership stakeholders for seven generations and longer. Coast Tsimshian Enterprises is a partnership which is jointly and equally owned by the Metlakatla and Lax Kw’alaams First Nations. Formed in 2011, the partnership works to pursue opportunities that benefit both First Nations. For more information about the Lax Kw’alaams and Metlakatla First Nations, please visit http://laxkwalaams.ca and www. metlakatla.com. Tarpon Energy Services Ltd. is a privately held company headquartered in Calgary, AB. Founded in 2003, Tarpon is a leading supplier of electrical and instrumentation services, control systems and integrated modular solutions with operations throughout Western Canada, the United States and overseas. For eight consecutive years, Tarpon has been recognized as one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies for having implemented worldclass business practices and created value in innovative ways. For more information, visit www.tarponenergy.com.

30 Aboriginal Marketplace - Oct/Dec 2015

Tarpon was contracted to supply a turnkey solution including controls, electrical and instrumentation, emergency power generation and total power distribution on a mobile production unit (MOPU) capable of sea water injection, gas lift, produced water treatment and receiving drilling formation fluids.


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Aboriginal Marketplace Magazine/Fall 2015  

Aboriginal Marketplace Magazine is designed to assist with "relationship building" and our goal is to report on existing Aboriginal/private...

Aboriginal Marketplace Magazine/Fall 2015  

Aboriginal Marketplace Magazine is designed to assist with "relationship building" and our goal is to report on existing Aboriginal/private...

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