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PRELIMINARY PROGRAM AS OF MAY 24, 2019

Building towards the future... together

61

st

Annual Meeting August 4-7, 2019 Washington, DC

National Council of University Research Administrators


61st

Annual Meeting

Welcome

Dear Colleagues:

Your AM61 Program Committee has been busy finalizing the program, Building Towards the Future…together, August 4-7, 2019 at the Washington Hilton. This meeting will provide the opportunity to reconnect with your colleagues and enhance and expand your NCURA network. We have assembled a myriad of exciting offerings that will increase your knowledge, enhance your skills and work effectiveness, and also expand your potential career options. The conference will offer a plethora of concurrent sessions, discussion groups, forums, high-energy Ignite sessions and a Poster Session to showcase cutting-edge research and programs that impact Research Administration/ Management. All of our presenters are premiere subject matter experts from around the globe. The U.S. federal agencies will also be offering sessions on the most up-to-date opportunities and policies and procedures. Topical area certificate programs will be available and sessions will run the gamut of varying levels of expertise from the new to senior administrator. This year we have many special events – starting on Sunday evening hop on a bus, and join us to explore the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. The Museum cares for one of the world’s most expansive collections of Native American objects, photographs, and media, covering the entire Western Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego. The museum’s sweeping curvilinear architecture, its indigenous landscaping, and its exhibitions, all designed in collaboration with tribes and communities, combine to give visitors from around the world the sense and spirit of Native America. We will be welcomed with delicious food and amazing exhibits. Our Monday morning Keynote, Dr. Freeman Alphonsa Hrabowski III, President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County is a prominent African American educator, advocate, and mathematician. He has been called one of America’s Best Leaders, one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World, and one of America’s 10 Best College Presidents. Our Tuesday night fete will be a Carnevale theme replete with music, dance, festive vibe and food.

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This meeting is the result of the commitment, enthusiasm and hard work of many people including the program committee, NCURA staff, presenters and volunteers. On behalf of all we want to extend our thanks for making the time to join us at AM61! We are confident that this meeting will meet your needs and expectations. We welcome you back to the Washington Hilton and very much look forward to seeing you! Join us in Building Towards the Future…together. 2019 NCURA VP/President-Elect

AM61 Co-Chairs

Denise Wallen University of New Mexico

David Mayo

California Institute of Technology

NCURA Distinguished Educator

Michelle Vazin

Vanderbilt University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


Program Committee NCURA VICE PRESIDENT/ PRESIDENT-ELECT Denise A. Wallen University of New Mexico

CO-CHAIRS

EXECUTIVE LEVEL

David W. Richardson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, NCURA Distinguished Educator

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Annual Meeting

POST-AWARD

Robert C. Andresen University of Wisconsin-Madison, NCURA Distinguished Educator

Zachary Belton Huron

Diane Domanovics Case Western Reserve University

FEDERAL

PRE-AWARD

Michelle S. Vazin Vanderbilt University

Jean I. Feldman National Science Foundation

Dennis J. Paffrath University of Maryland, Baltimore

CLINICAL

Pamela A. Webb University of Minnesota, NCURA Distinguished Educator

Amanda C. Snyder University of Washington

David J. Mayo California Institute of Technology, NCURA Distinguished Educator

Ben A. Prince University of Massachusetts Medical School

COMPLIANCE

Denise M. Moody Harvard University Carrie Chesbro University of Oregon

FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

John W. Hanold The Pennsylvania State University

GLOBAL: U.S. AND NON-U.S. DATA MANAGEMENT/ IMPACT

Alex M. Albinak Johns Hopkins University Kat Szulc Kuali

Ara Tahmassian Harvard University

Agatha Keller ETH Zurich, University of Zurich

NEW PRESENTER LIAISON

DEPARTMENTAL Tanya Blackwell Children’s Healthcare at Atlanta

Glenda A. Bullock Washington University in St. Louis

Rosemary E. Madnick University of Alaska Fairbanks

NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR

Katherine V. Kissmann Texas A&M University

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together

PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS Laneika K. Musalini Tri County Tech College Jeffrey J. Ritchie Hamilton College

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Tolise C. Dailey Johns Hopkins University Jillian T. McIntosh University of Pennsylvania

RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT Kris A. Monahan Providence College

WORKSHOPS

Vicki Krell Arizona State University Michiko T. Pane Stanford University

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61st

Annual Meeting

Thank you

to the following sponsors for your generous support

NCURA GOLD PLUS MEMBER SPONSORS

NCURA GOLD MEMBER SPONSORS

NCURA SILVER PLUS CONTRIBUTING SPONSOR

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NCURA SILVER CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS

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FOLLOW US @NCURA

#ncuraannual NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


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Conference Overview GENERAL CONFERENCE INFORMATION AM61 CONCIERGE/REGISTRATION Saturday: 4:00 – 7:00 pm Sunday: 7:15 am – 6:30 pm Monday: 7:15 am – 5:00 pm Tuesday: 7:15 am – 5:00 pm Wednesday: 7:30 am – Noon NCURA MARKETPLACE and THE IMPACT OF NCURA MEMBERSHIP Sunday: 1:00 – 5:00 pm Monday: 9:45 am – 5:00 pm Tuesday: 7:15 am – 5:00 pm Wednesday: 7:30 – 10:30 am

Annual Meeting

PRE- AND POST-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS AND SENIOR LEVEL FORUM (ADDITIONAL FEE REQUIRED)

SUNDAY | AUGUST 4, 2019

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OVERVIEW

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SATURDAY | AUGUST 3, 2019 1:00 – 4:30 pm: Half Day Afternoon Workshops

7:00 – 10:00 pm: Networking Event: Night at The National Museum of the American Indian

9:00 pm: Regional Hospitality and The Netzone!

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SUNDAY | AUGUST 4, 2019 8:15 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshops

NETWORKING and EVENTS 52 6:00 – 6:30 pm: Board Buses

23 8:15 – 11:45 am:

Half Day Morning Workshops

34 1:00 – 4:30 pm:

6 OVERVIEW

Half Day Afternoon Workshops

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WEDNESDAY | AUGUST 7, 2019 1:00 – 4:30 pm: Half Day Afternoon Workshops

48 THURSDAY | AUGUST 8, 2019

8:30 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshop

MONDAY | AUGUST 5, 2019

TUESDAY | AUGUST 6, 2019

WEDNESDAY | AUGUST 7, 2019

FITNESS 54 6:15 – 7:15 am: NCURA Fun Run & Power Walk

FITNESS 87 6:15 – 7:00 am: Yoga Bliss

NETWORKING and EVENTS

NETWORKING and EVENTS

6:15 – 7:00 am: Bootcamp

NETWORKING and EVENTS

7:15 am – 5:00 pm: Exposition 2019

7:15 am – 5:00 pm: Exposition 2019

7:15 – 8:00 am: Continental Breakfast and Breakfast Roundtables

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7:15 – 8:00 am: Continental Breakfast and Breakfast Roundtables

8:15 – 9:45 am: Keynote Address and Presentation of Awards

106 11:30 am – 1:00 pm:

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11:30 am – 1:15 pm: Networking Luncheon with Entertainment by The Capitol Steps

75 85 85

2:45 – 3:45 pm: Regional Business Meetings

5:30 pm: Zoo Power Walk 6:00 pm: Monday Evening Dinner Groups 9:00 pm: Regional Hospitality and The Netzone!

1:30 – 2:30 pm 4:00 – 5:00 pm

NETWORKING and REFRESHMENT BREAKS 9:45 – 10:15 am 2:30 – 2:45 pm 3:45 – 4:00 pm

123 7:00 – 11:00 pm: Tuesday Night Event – Carnavale

EDUCATION SESSIONS and NCURA YEARLONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSIONS 55 10:15 – 11:30 am

66 75

Luncheon, Presentation of Awards and Volunteer Recognition

125 7:30 – 8:15 am: Annual Business Meeting and Continental Breakfast EDUCATION SESSIONS and NCURA YEARLONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION 125 8:30 – 10:00 am

133 10:30 am – Noon NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK 10:00 – 10:30 am NOON ADJOURNMENT­

9:00 pm: Regional Hospitality and The Netzone!

EDUCATION SESSIONS, IGNITE SESSIONS and NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSIONS 88 8:15 – 9:45 am

97 10:15 – 11:30 am 106 1:00 – 2:00 pm 107 2:15 – 3:30 pm 115 4:00 – 5:00 pm NETWORKING and REFRESHMENT BREAKS 9:45 – 10:15 am­ 2:00 – 2:15 pm 3:30 – 4:00 pm

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together

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61st

Annual Meeting

Events

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4 | 7:00 – 10:00 PM NIGHT AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN NCURA’s 61st Annual Meeting will commence at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. The museum cares for one of the world’s most expansive collections of Native American objects, photographs, and media, covering the entire Western Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego. The museum’s sweeping curvilinear architecture, its indigenous landscaping, and its exhibitions, all designed in collaboration with tribes and communities, combine to give visitors from around the world the sense and spirit of Native America. Enjoy an evening of delicious food and refreshments, while exploring the amazing exhibits for all ages and networking with your colleagues.

MONDAY, AUGUST 5 | 8:15 – 9:45 AM KEYNOTE ADDRESS

FREEMAN A. HRABOWSKI, III, has served as President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. His research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. He chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the 2011 report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. He was named in 2012 by President Obama to chair the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans.

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“Supporting research…together,” took on additional meaning when in 2017 our president assigned a volunteer member task force to assist us in finding ways to increase diversity and inclusion within our association’s programs and opportunities. Since that time, NCURA’s Board of Directors has made a commitment to live the words, “Respect, Access, and Opportunity,” in all activities, which includes volunteer committee assignments; board positions, leadership, and programming. The theme of this year’s Annual Meeting is Building Toward the Future…together. Dr. Hrabowski will address the importance of diversity and inclusion in supporting research.

MONDAY, AUGUST 5 | 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM NETWORKING LUNCHEON

Monday’s lunch is sure to be entertaining when the Capitol Steps take the stage to provide NCURA members with skits and song parodies to convey a special brand of satirical humor.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6 | 7:00 – 11:00 PM TUESDAY NIGHT CELEBRATION – CARNEVALE!

Carnevale is a huge festival celebrated in many places around the world. Our Tuesday Night fete theme is an NCURA version of Carnevale. Get ready for global food stations, masquerade, entertainment, music, and fun as we celebrate our global NCURA family!

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


Networking

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Annual Meeting

When two or more people begin to discuss topics on a deeper and personal level, the NCURA Annual Meeting moves from being successful…to irreplaceable! Participating in the NCURA 61st Annual Meeting gives you a unique opportunity to network with Research Administrators who face the same day-to-day issues as you. There are a number of benefits to networking with your colleagues at NCURA’s AM61! BRAINSTORMING. If two heads are better than one – just imagine how much better 20 or 30 heads will be. By networking with other people in your same situation you can uncover new solutions, new ideas and even new ways of looking at situations. PERSONAL CONTACT. Nothing can replace face-to-face contact. Personally acquainting yourself with your colleagues leaves a lasting impression that no website or phone call can replicate. RECHARGE. Comparing notes with other professionals helps to reinvigorate your enthusiasm. You are not alone! CONTACTS. Establishing a contact list of people you have personally met through networking at NCURA’s 61st Annual Meeting makes future communications more personal whether it’s a call for information or a question. RESOURCE SHARING. Connecting with other Research Administrators, on a first name basis, makes sharing resources easy and helps ideas flow! MAKE NEW FRIENDS. It is not an unusual phenomenon for long-lasting friendships to originate at NCURA Conferences!

NCURA’s 61st Annual Meeting creates an excellent platform to network, share stories and experiences, ask for advice and generally compare notes. You can learn new techniques and different ways to approach situations. We encourage you to take advantage of the social time away from the business agenda to mix and interact with colleagues and to put faces to names, which is just as important as all the information you will take away from the conference. Face-to-face meetings are more important than ever! The value in meetings comes from the human-to-human connections that occur. The serendipitous “hallway conversations” you will have with colleagues can be some of the most valuable parts of the NCURA experience. While these are not on the agenda, or mentioned in the breakout sessions’ learning objectives, when two or more people begin to discuss topics on a deeper and personal level, the NCURA Annual Meeting moves from being successful…to irreplaceable!

It is the people that bring the ROI to your NCURA Annual Meeting experience. Don’t miss it!

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together

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61st

Annual Meeting

Staying Fit while traveling

Changing time zones, networking, educational sessions, dinner groups…let’s face it—travel to the Annual Meeting could leave you with little opportunity for fitness. And while you may be tempted to “forget” your gym clothes altogether, consider this: staying active can give you the energy and stamina you need to help you through those full days in Washington, DC! In fact, recent studies suggest that business travelers who exercise while they travel can improve reaction and alertness by up to 61%. Moreover, exercise boosts immunity defenses, triggers the release of brain endorphins, and even helps you sleep better. Check out our fitness options for you! MONDAY: 6:15 – 7:15 am

FITNESS TRACK: FUN RUN AND POWER WALK Come and enjoy a morning of fitness, fun and friendship! Meet in the main lobby at 6:15 am for this burst of fresh air. MONDAY: 5:30 pm

ZOO POWER WALK

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Join your colleagues for an evening power walk to the Smithsonian’s National Zoo! A great way to end your busy day with fresh air and meet new colleagues. Members will be meeting at the terrace level entrance at 5:30 pm on Monday, walk to the zoo and enjoy a 1 hour power walk, leaving the zoo at 7 pm, returning back to the hotel at 7:30 pm. NCURA staff will meet you at the terrace level entrance to see you off with maps of the zoo to guide your Powerwalk! The Hilton is at 1919 Connecticut Avenue and the Zoo is at 3001 Connecticut Avenue, NW so it is a straight shot up Connecticut Avenue. Last admittance into the Zoo is at 6:00 pm, and Zoo closes at 7:00 pm. No sign up required...meet you on the terrace Monday at 5:30 pm! TUESDAY: 6:15 – 7:00 am

YOGA BLISS

Join NCURA’s own Tara Bishop for this restorative practice. We will bring ourselves back to our natural state of balance and tap into the bliss of body, mind and spirit. Namaste. TUESDAY: 6:15 – 7:00 am

BOOTCAMP

NCURA Member and Certified Personal Trainer, Teri Quill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will lead us for this awesome start to the day — a 45 minute Bootcamp that mixes traditional calisthenic and body weight exercises with interval training and strength training.!

FITNESS CENTER

Open Monday-Friday, 5:30 am-10:00 pm; Saturday/Sunday, 6:00 am-10:00 pm. Keep to your fitness regimen in Hilton’s fully appointed fitness center with cardio treadmills and a variety of body toning machines and free weights – all guests staying at the hotel enjoy complimentary access to the fitness center. All guests staying at the hotel also enjoy complimentary access to the pool from 6:00 am- 10:00 pm. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


Certificate Program

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Annual Meeting

NCURA is offering a certificate program during the NCURA 61st Annual Meeting, August 4-7, 2019. Registrants of the conference can pick one certificate to earn. You cannot earn multiple certificates during the conference. There are 10 time slots during the conference. Participants must participate in six sessions listed on the worksheet. The remaining four sessions are considered electives and can be from the certificate you are pursuing or from any track. Sponsor demonstrations and breakfast roundtable sessions do not apply. There is no additional fee to participate in the Certificate Program and pre-registration is not necessary. Final worksheets, including the link to submit your sessions, will be posted on July 26, 2019. ●

Please print out your certificate worksheet to help you plan and track your sessions onsite. ●

● Use the URL on the worksheet to complete your certificate request electronically by August 30, 2019.

The URL will open after the close of the meeting.

Certificates will be issued by September 6, 2019.

After July 26, you can review which sessions will be eligible for each certificate by clicking on each name below to see that certificate’s session list: Compliance

Departmental Research Administration

Global Research Management

Post-Award Research Administration

Pre-Award Research Administration

Note: Incomplete requests will not be eligible for certificates.

QUESTIONS? Please contact Susan McKenna, Senior Meetings Coordinator, mckenna@ncura.edu, (202) 466-3894.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together

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61st

Annual Meeting

Ignite Sessions

Tuesday, August 6, 2019, 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Ignite is a series of speedy presentations. NCURA is hosting our own version of Ignite sessions for the 61st Annual Meeting! During this time slot, different sessions will run, one after the other, in each meeting room. This is a high energy experience... make sure to join us! You can choose to stay in one topical room and hear different presentations or move between topic area rooms during the short break between each session. Each room will have a host to ensure the segments start and end on time, and to introduce the presenters. This is an opportunity to pick up those great nuggets of information that can change everything...join us for this fun and energizing offering! Clinical / Medical

Compliance

Data Management / Use

Departmental

Executive Level

Federal and Industry Contracting

Federal

Global for Non-U.S. Participants

Global for U.S. Participants

Post-Award

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Pre-Award

Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions

Professional Development

NCURA Resources

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


General Information REGISTRATION

Registration is available at www.ncura.edu and is open to any individual engaged in the administration of sponsored programs in a college, university, or teaching hospital. Please Note: Learning objectives for each session will be noted in the conference program. Please consult the session descriptions for program level details. The only prerequisite for meeting attendance is current involvement in university sponsored research programs. There is no advanced preparation required to attend sessions. This conference is a “group-live” offering. For information regarding administrative policies such as complaint resolution and refund, please contact our office at 202-466-3894.

CPE INFORMATION FOR CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

NCURA is accredited by the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. This program is administered by the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) to sponsor and award Continuing Professional Education Credits (CPEs) to accounting professionals. Certified Public Accountants will need to complete a CPE credit form in order to receive CPE credits. CPE forms are available at the NCURA AM61 Concierge Desk. Forms must be deposited in the CPE boxes located at the NCURA AM61 Concierge desk at the end of the conference. In accordance with the standards of the National Registry of CPE Sponsors, 50 minutes equals 1 CPE. Depending on the sessions and workshops you choose to attend a maximum of 30.5 CPE credits can be issued for NCURA’s AM61 Conference. Fields of study available are Specialized Knowledge and Applications (S) and Professional Development (PD). CPE Credits will be available for concurrent sessions, pre-conference workshops and senior level forums. Discussion groups, ignite sessions and the keynote address are not eligible for CPE credits. Maximum Credits Available: 13.5 CPEs: Conference Only 17.4 CPEs: Conference + 1/2 Day Workshop 21.2 CPEs: Conference + Full Day of Workshops 25.2 CPEs: Conference + 1 1/2 Days of Workshops 29.0 CPEs: Conference + 2 Days of Workshops 33.0 CPEs: Conference + 2 ½ Days of Workshops 36.8 CPEs: Conference + 3 Days of Workshops Please Note: All Continuing Professional Education Credits (CPEs) will be issued by September 6, 2019.

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Annual Meeting

OTHER INFORMATION

NCURA is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.learningmarket.org.

NCURA’s CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

NCURA’s Certificate Programs in the following areas will be available at the 61st Annual Meeting: Compliance, Departmental Research Administration, Global Research Management, Post-Award Research Administration and Pre-Award Research Administration.

CEU INFORMATION FOR ALL PARTICIPANTS

NCURA will be offering CEUs for the Annual Meeting and Pre-and Post-Conference Workshops. The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is a nationally recognized unit designed to provide a record of an individual’s continuing education accomplishments. Please note, CEUs are calculated based on the standard formula of 1 CEU = 10 contact hours. Maximum Credits Available: 15 Hours of Education – 1.5 CEUs: Conference Only 18.25 Hours of Education – 1.8 CEUs: Conference +1/2 Day Workshop 21.5 Hours of Education – 2.2 CEUs: Conference + Full Day of Workshops 24.75 Hours of Education – 2.5 CEUs: Conference + 1 1/2 Days of Workshops 28 Hours of Education – 2.8 CEUs: Conference + 2 Days of Workshops 31.25 Hours of Education – 3.1 CEUs: Conference + 2½ Days of Workshops 34.75 Hours of Education – 3.5 CEUs: Conference + 3 Days of Workshops Please note: All Continuing Education Units (CEUs) will automatically be sent to all registrants of the conference by September 6, 2019.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together

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61st

Annual Meeting

Session Definitions and Program levels

SESSION DEFINITIONS

PRE- AND POST-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (WS) are presentations, traditionally supported with PowerPoint and handouts that are taught by topic experts in a classroom style setting. These sessions have built-in question and answer time and have anywhere from 20 – 70 participants. SENIOR LEVEL FORUMS (SF) are intended for experienced participants in senior management positions. Current issues and basics are presumed known. No PowerPoint slides or handouts are used. Agenda topics should be known but discussion should dictate the length and depth of each topic. Session attendance is limited to encourage discussion and active participation by attendees. * Please note – The Workshops and the Senior Forum are the only sessions taking place on August 3 and 4, the afternoon of August 7, and August 8. There is an additional fee for Workshops and the Senior Forum.

SESSION PROGRAM LEVELS

BASIC LEVEL SESSIONS assume some fundamental Research Administration knowledge. INTERMEDIATE LEVEL SESSIONS assume basic knowledge, and the sessions introduce and develop topics that exceed basic knowledge. Sessions focus on building competency. ADVANCED LEVEL SESSIONS assume mastery of the subject and the sessions focus on in-depth knowledge or a broader range of topics. Sessions focus on mastering more difficult and complex scenarios. OVERVIEW LEVEL SESSIONS will provide a general review of a subject area from a broader perspective. UPDATE LEVEL SESSIONS will provide a general review of new developments.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS are formal presentations that have question and answer time built-in. These sessions will have anywhere from 30 – 150 participants.

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DISCUSSION GROUPS are facilitated sessions that are limited to 30 participants. Instead of formal presentations, the specific topics are discussed, and information is shared by the group’s participants. IGNITE SESSIONS are a series of speedy presentations. There will be a meeting room devoted to each topical area on Tuesday afternoon from 1:00 – 2:00 pm. Different sessions will run, one after another, during that time slot, in each room. You can choose to stay in one topical room and hear different presentations or move between topic area rooms during the short break between each session. NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION: Our partners provide educational opportunities to advance our knowledge-base, as well as consulting and solution services to support our institutions and the research enterprise. These sessions will provide our participants with insight, from each partner, regarding the services they provide and how they can assist you and your institution. Not a decision maker in this area? Take this opportunity to hear from our partners and bring the information back home.

OUR COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION We want to offer you: cutting-edge programs that meet your needs; know what volunteer opportunities you want; and enhance your professional network. Please take a moment to update your membership profile here. NCURA is committed to diversity and inclusion in all activities. The full Statement on Diversity and Inclusion can be found here.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


Workshops and Senior Level Forum Overview

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Annual Meeting

NCURA PRESENTS 4 DAYS OF WORKSHOPS AT THE 61ST ANNUAL MEETING! PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS  AND SENIOR LEVEL FORUM

POST-CONFERENCE  WORKSHOPS

Saturday, August 3, 2019 Sunday, August 4, 2019

Wednesday, August 7, 2019 Thursday, August 8, 2019

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS AND SENIOR LEVEL FORUM Saturday, August 3, 2019 1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshops WORKSHOP 1 WORKSHOP 2

REVIEWING AUDITS TO DEVELOP A COMPLIANCE PROGRAM Program Level: Intermediate ORGANIZING YOUR OFFICE FOR SUCCESS AND EFFICIENCY Program Level: Intermediate

Sunday, August 4, 2019 8:15 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshops WORKSHOP 3 WORKSHOP 4 WORKSHOP 5

MASTER CLASS: LEADERSHIP THAT GETS RESULTS Program Level: Overview CERTIFIED FINANCIAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR BODY OF KNOWLEDGE REVIEW SESSION Program Level: Intermediate SO YOU WANT TO BE AN ASTRONAUT: LESSONS IN TEAMWORK LEARNED FROM NASA SPACE FLIGHT MISSIONS Program Level: Advanced

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshops WORKSHOP 6 WORKSHOP 7

IT’S A RELATIONSHIP: COMMUNICATING WITH FACULTY Program Level: Intermediate FUNDAMENTAL BUILDING BLOCKS OF PRE-AWARD ADMINISTRATION Program Level: Basic

WORKSHOP 8 ALLOWABILITY MY DEAR WATSON: THE CASE OF THE COST DETERMINATION Program Level: Intermediate WORKSHOP 9 SLICING AND DICING: GETTING TO KNOW DOE/DOD: BEST PRACTICES TO NAVIGATE A LIFE CYCLE UNDER FEDERAL SPONSORS Program Level: Intermediate 10 WORKSHOP INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTING, COLLABORATION, AND PARTNERSHIP FROM THE U.S. PERSPECTIVE Program Level: Intermediate 11 WORKSHOP A UNIFORM GUIDANCE POST-AWARD DEEP DIVE Program Level: Intermediate 12 WORKSHOP MANAGING A LARGE VOLUME OF SUBAWARDS ON A MULTI-PROJECT PROGRAM AWARD Program Level: Intermediate WORKSHOP 13 WORKING WITH INDUSTRY: NEGOTIATING AGREEMENTS AND OTHER NUANCES Program Level: Basic WORKSHOP 14 LET’S DO THIS: A DEEP-DIVE, HANDS-ON APPLICATION OF THE FAR Program Level: Intermediate WORKSHOP 15 EMPOWERMENT THROUGH TRANSITIONS AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT Program Level: Intermediate

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together

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Workshops and Senior Level Forum Overview

Sunday, August 4, 2019

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshops

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshops

WORKSHOP 16 EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS: EXPLORING WAYS TO EXPAND FREE WORKSHOP YOUR SKILLS REGISTRATION REQUIRED Program Level: Overview WORKSHOP 17 EVIDENCE BASED CAREER DEVELOPMENT Program Level: Intermediate WORKSHOP 18 DECONSTRUCTING NIH FUNDING FROM PRE- TO POST-AWARD: THE UNIVERSITY PERSPECTIVE Program Level: Basic WORKSHOP 19 BUDGETS: BIRTH, BALANCING AND BURIAL Program Level: Intermediate 20 WORKSHOP SUBRECIPIENT MONITORING, A DEEP DIVE Program Level: Advanced 21 WORKSHOP RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES FOR PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS Program Level: Intermediate 22 WORKSHOP THE DRA FROM PROPOSAL TO PRODUCTION: MAKING THE RESEARCH WORK Program Level: Intermediate WORKSHOP 23 CLINICAL TRIAL ESSENTIALS – AN OPERATIONAL PERSPECTIVE Program Level: Intermediate WORKSHOP 24 GLOBAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES AND RESOURCES FROM THE GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Program Level: Overview SENIOR LEVEL LEADING PEOPLE AND MANAGING FORUM 25 MULTIPLE PROJECTS Program Level: Advanced

WORKSHOP 26 WORKSHOP 27

RULES AND REGULATIONS: WHERE DOES IT SAY WE HAVE TO DO THAT? Program Level: Intermediate NSF FUNDAMENTALS Program Level: Basic

Thursday, August 8, 2019 8:30 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshop WORKSHOP 28 NIH STAR FLEET ACADEMY: FROM SPACE CADET TO CAPTAIN OF YOUR SHIP - TREKKING INTO THE FUTURE WITH NIH POLICIES, PROCESSES & RESOURCES Program Level: Overview

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

PRE-CONFERENCE BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER WORKSHOPS BUILDING TOWARDS FUTURE... SATURDAY, THE AUGUST 3, 2019 TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER 1:00 –BUILDING 4:30 pm

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING HALF DAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 1 REVIEWING AUDITS TO DEVELOP A COMPLIANCE PROGRAM PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE Federal audits are a valuable tool to assist in the development of a sponsored projects compliance program. These audits can be used to inform risk assessment and focus areas. This workshop will explore leveraging readily available audit findings across the country to establish a basis for risk assessment activity and subsequent compliance program development. Compliance programs will include policy development, three lines of defense monitoring, process assessment, and resource strategies.

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JEFFREY A. SILBER* Senior Director, Sponsored Financial Services, Cornell University

ASHLEY E. DEIHR Director, Baker Tilly

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how to understand federal audit reports and agency audit work plans. • Participants will discuss Federal compliance requirements. • Participants will learn how to develop audit corrective action plans. • Participants will review mechanisms to develop a framework to minimize non-compliance. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a basic understanding of financial compliance.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 2 ORGANIZING YOUR OFFICE FOR SUCCESS AND EFFICIENCY PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE The functions performed by a Research Administration office, broadly defined, are essentially the same the world over. As Research Administrators, we assist our faculty in finding new sources of funding, we ensure our institutional standards remain intact as our researchers submit new requests for funding, and we negotiate and manage awards through their lifecycle, among many other activities. What is different across institutions is how we structurally and organizationally manage our offices. This workshop will focus on several organizational structures, how these structures work, and the impact of the various structures on operational best practices. Specifically, we will address the benefits, efficiencies, and challenges of the traditional Pre-Award and Post-Award structures along with associated work allocation models, plus look at other functions that have been more clearly defined in recent years, i.e., research development and information technology functions. We will examine why one structure may work at one institution, but not at another. Be prepared to share your organizational structures as well as your organizational challenges.

DAVID W. RICHARDSON* Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, NCURA Distinguished Educator

DAN NORDQUIST Associate Vice President, Office of Research Support and Operations, Office of Grant and Research Development, Washington State University

ARA TAHMASSIAN Chief Research Compliance Officer, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Harvard University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain an understanding of the various operational structures and how these structures impact best practices. • Participants will hear how physical space, institutional culture, size of operation staff, and/or needs of your institutional researchers influence operational structures. • Participants will discuss how technology and support services can impact an office structure. • Participants will learn why it is important to review and revise your operational structure from time to time. PREREQUISITES Participants will need some experience in managing a team, or have involvement or interest in developing organizational models for the management of your Research Administrative operations.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

PRE-CONFERENCE BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER WORKSHOPS BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019 TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING 8:15 amBUILDING – 4:30TOWARDS pm THE FUTURE TOGETHER TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER.

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING FULL DAY WORKSHOPS

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


61st

Pre-Conference Workshops

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshop MASTER CLASS: WORKSHOP 3 LEADERSHIP THAT GETS RESULTS PROGRAM LEVEL: OVERVIEW To build effective and meaningful leadership, executives need AURA: Authenticity: Authentic behaviors build respect with stakeholders. Leaders must be consistent in actions based on core beliefs and values. When building leadership skills and brand, it is important to begin with a thorough self-assessment of the drivers of our own intrinsic motivators.

KIMBERLY PACE* Professor for the Practice of Communication, Vanderbilt University CEO and Co-founder of Executive Aura Master Educator, NCURA Executive Leadership Program

Uniqueness: A Unique leadership style attracts talented professionals. For leadership success, it is important that expertise, perspectives, history and knowledge are embodied in a personal brand – this combination of attributes makes each of us a one-of-a-kind leader. Reality: Reality checks are needed to receive honest feedback and maximize your strengths. How each leader desires to be seen – vs. how the leader is actually seen – creates a distortion of one’s brand and limits effectiveness. It is important to close this “perceived vs. actual” gap to become a leader that others trust and wish to follow. Authority: Be seen as an Authority within your chosen profession. Our greatest authority comes when leaders, present themselves with authenticity and high integrity. For this to occur, all communication must embrace values and decision-making must be grounded in facts – addressing both the emotional and logical basis for the decision. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how to adapt their leadership style. • Participants will learn how to build a positive work climate. • Participants will discuss how to advance their emotional intelligence. • Participants will learn how to lead creative motivating meetings. • Participants will know how to have difficult conversations. • Participants will discuss giving and receiving feedback. • Participants will have a better understanding of how to design a compelling vision of the future. PREREQUISITES None

NCURA’s Executive Leadership Program (ELP) is an immersion program for NCURA Leaders. To bring the benefits of this program to our broader membership, one of the Master Educators Kimberly Pace, Professor for the Practice of Communication in the Owen School of Business at Vanderbilt University and CEO and co-founder of Executive Aura is bringing this outstanding content to our 61st Annual Meeting! Kimberly’s work with the students of ELP is one of the highlights of the program with Kimberly receiving unanimous outstanding ratings from all students in all areas: program, facilitation and materials. Kimberly has also served as the Keynote Speaker for NCURA’s Financial Research Administration Conference and Pre-Award Research Administration Conference. Participated in the NCURA LDI or ELP program? This is your next step! Not a graduate of LDI or ELP? This is your opportunity to receive a career changing experience at the NCURA 61st Annual Meeting.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshop WORKSHOP 4 CERTIFIED FINANCIAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR BODY OF KNOWLEDGE REVIEW SESSION PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE This workshop will provide participants with a review of the CFRA Body of Knowledge, intended primarily for persons who plan to take the CFRA Exam and wish to have a better understanding of the exam in order to study effectively. This workshop is being offered by the Research Administrator’s Certification Council (RACC) in collaboration with NCURA, and is endorsed by RACC.

JEFFREY J. RITCHIE* Director of Sponsored Research, Office of Sponsored Programs, Hamilton College

ROBIN S. LEWIS Director, Office of Grants and Sponsored Projects, Georgia College & State University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand the major sections of the CFRA Exam. • Participants will be able to diagnose content areas of personal strength and weakness. • Participants will develop a personal study plan. 20

PREREQUISITES At least two years of experience are required for this workshop. Taking the exam requires a B.A./B.S. degree and three years of experience in Research Administration.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshop WORKSHOP 5 SO YOU WANT TO BE AN ASTRONAUT: LESSONS IN TEAMWORK LEARNED FROM NASA SPACE FLIGHT MISSIONS PROGRAM LEVEL: ADVANCED There couldn’t be a more critical situation demanding excellent teamwork than that needed between astronauts and mission control. This simulation training was developed to train flight controllers and astronauts to handle everything from mundane everyday operations to life threatening emergencies effectively. The training focuses on seven competencies known to improve individual and team effectiveness under diverse conditions. This simulation training will be delivered by the industrial/ organizational psychologists who developed the training and joined by a senior research administrator. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to recognize the seven competencies desirable for effective team members. • Participants will gain skills to improve teamwork. • Participants will learn tips to facilitate more effective team communication.

LACEY SCHMIDT* Executive Director of Faculty Engagement and Development, Office of the Provost, University of Houston and COO of Minerva Work Solutions, PLLC SUSAN SEDWICK Senior Consultant, Attain, LLC

KELLEY J. SLACK Chief Financial Officer and Managing Consultant, Minerva Work Solutions PPLC

PREREQUISITES This workshop is designed for those with supervisory experience.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

PRE-CONFERENCE BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER WORKSHOPS BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019 TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING 8:15 –BUILDING 11:45 am TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING HALF DAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 6 IT’S A RELATIONSHIP: COMMUNICATING WITH FACULTY PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE There are common traits among all faculty and among successful faculty. In this workshop, we will be exploring questions and answers that will enhance the participants in their roles as research administrators directly working with faculty members. We will talk about the changes in the life of the faculty member from early career, mid-career, long range planning, transitioning to administrative and executive roles, including going emeritus or retiring. We will also discuss the unique challenges faculty face whose field of study does not have as many funding opportunities as others. We will have exercises to help the participants in meeting and communicating with faculty, especially around talking about difficult subjects. Finally, we will include best practices throughout this workshop.

SAMANTHA J. WESTCOTT* Sponsored Research Manager, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology

KAY C. GILSTRAP Assistant Director, Business Operations, Georgia State University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain an understanding of the faculty member’s career track and how the research administrator can be an asset during that entire lifespan. • Participants will better understand institutional challenges as well as challenges in the different areas of study. We will explore the relationships and partnerships that enhance all involved. • Participants will practice addressing and managing these relationships. PREREQUISITES Participants will benefit from experience in working directly with faculty on a regular basis or a deep desire to know how to do so.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 7 FUNDAMENTAL BUILDING BLOCKS OF PRE-AWARD ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM LEVEL: BASIC Research administrators play a key supportive role in assisting principal investigators in navigating their research projects through the various phases of the sponsored projects lifecycle. The Pre-Award phase of the lifecycle includes the development, institutional review, and submission of proposals to sponsors, as well as the negotiation and acceptance of awards. Within the Pre-Award phase, research administrators are consistently challenged with ever changing rules and regulations related to a variety of topics that impact a sponsored project over the lifecycle. In this workshop, participants will walk through key Pre-Award processes while exploring regulations and best practices for Pre-Award administration.

24

TRICIA L. CALLAHAN* Senior Research Education and Information Officer, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University

LORI ANN M. SCHULTZ Senior Director, Research Partnership Services/ Sponsored Projects & Contracting Services Research, Discovery & Innovation, University of Arizona

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to recognize different sponsoring agency types and award mechanisms. • Participants will be able to identify basic regulations applicable to Federal award types, such as grants and contracts. • Participants will be able to describe various elements of a proposal, including purpose and importance. • Participants will be able to build a budget following Federal cost allowability principles. • Participants will be able to list critical steps in the review and submission of a sponsored project for funding. • Participants will be able to identify aspects of award negotiation key to institutions of higher education. PREREQUISITES None

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 8 ALLOWABILITY MY DEAR WATSON: THE CASE OF THE COST DETERMINATION PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE This workshop will use case studies to investigate the challenges of costing determinations by following the trail of clues from the funding announcement through the award documents. Armed with our cost principles, terms and conditions, and sleuthing skills, we will break down the process of determining allowable costs. We will also brainstorm methods of collecting information, communicating with project staff, and improving the process. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify applicable regulations and guidelines when making cost determinations. • Participants will be able to interpret regulations, guidelines and award terms as they pertain to costing. • Participants will be able to develop a standard approach to allowability determinations. • Participants will be able to identify keys to success for making and communicating determinations. PREREQUISITES • Participants will need a basic understanding of the award life-cycle. • Participants will want basic knowledge of the OMB Cost Principles.

MEGAN DIETRICH* Client Advocacy and Education Specialist, Office of Sponsored Research, Engineering Research Administrator, Stanford University

CARRIE CHESBRO Associate Director, PostAward, Sponsored Projects Services, University of Oregon

KARI VANDERGUST Sponsored Projects Administrator, Sponsored Projects Services, University of Oregon

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

25


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 9 SLICING AND DICING: GETTING TO KNOW DOE/DOD: BEST PRACTICES TO NAVIGATE A LIFE CYCLE UNDER FEDERAL SPONSORS

JOELINA PECK* Assistant Director, Research Advancement, Arizona State University

PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE This workshop will focus on unique challenges in working with the Department of Energy (DoE) and Department of Defense (DoD). Participants will learn best practices for proposal development and Post‐-Award management. Special attention will be paid to budget development, cost share, and invoicing. Participants will learn how to navigate these sponsors by gaining an understanding of issues and past shared learning experiences that come with these sponsors. This will be an interactive workshop aimed at answering questions and sharing information. This workshop is open to anyone applying for and managing DoE and DoD grants, from organizations inside the U.S. and globally.

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LISA ANAYA ESQUIBEL Senior Research Administrator, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn best practices for developing budgets and proposals for the DoE and the DoD. • Participants will gain insight into Post-Award management of DoE and DoD awards, such as cost share and invoicing. PREREQUISITES Participants will want basic experience working with proposal development and award management through the Department of Energy (DoE) and Department of Defense (DoD).

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 10 INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTING, COLLABORATION, AND PARTNERSHIP FROM THE U.S. PERSPECTIVE PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE Join us for a half day workshop devoted to international contracting and collaborations from the U.S. perspective. Come, explore the essentials of international contracting. Learn what is needed to successfully form, negotiate, and operate fruitful international collaborations and partnerships. International contracting experts will discuss the essentials of international collaborations and contracting. Participants will learn and discuss best practices and pitfalls in forming, negotiating, operating, and maintaining international collaborations. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will develop strategies for engaging in successful international collaborations. • Participants will develop an understanding of best practices and pitfalls in forming, negotiating, operating and maintaining international collaborations. • Participants will develop an understanding of contracting issues that arise when dealing with an international contract.

MARIANNE R. WOODS* Academic Program Director, Master of Science in Research Administration, Kreiger School of Arts and Sciences, Advanced Academic Programs, Johns Hopkins University and Emeritus Senior Associate Vice President for Research CINDY KIEL Executive Associate Vice Chancellor for Research Administration, Office of Research, University of California-Davis

PREREQUISITES Participants will need a basic understanding of contracts.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

27


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 11 A UNIFORM GUIDANCE POST-AWARD DEEP DIVE PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE Join us as we take a deep dive into Post-Award Administration and its complexities at the central and departmental level. This in-depth course will review three key components that affect award management and financial compliance. The workshop will use the Uniform Guidance (UG) as a guide for our studies on Post-Award Administration, cost principles, internal controls and audits. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain a deeper understanding of key financial issues in Research Administration. • Participants will learn how to problem-solve using the UG. • Participants will be able to identify where in the UG they can go to get information about their Post-Award issues. • Participants will review Notice of Awards (NOAs) and audit findings and learn how to apply lessons learned. 28

PREREQUISITES Participants will need general knowledge of the Uniform Guidance.

TOLISE DAILEY* Training Development Specialist, Office of Contracts and Grants, University of Colorado at Boulder

ROB G. BINGHAM-ROY Director of University System of Georgia Sponsored Operations, Georgia Institute of Technology

DAVID M. SCHULTZ, Assistant Vice President, Research Administration and Finance, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 12 MANAGING A LARGE VOLUME OF SUBAWARDS ON A MULTI-PROJECT PROGRAM AWARD PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE This workshop will review the roles and responsibilities from both the department and central office perspectives on managing a large number of new subawards and modifications issued from a large center grant. Topics will include how to stay organized and best practices for managing dozens of subs with a single prime award. We will also share tools and strategies for subrecipient monitoring, tracking progress and expenditures, and routing subaward invoices from sites to the PI for approval and payment. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Participants will gain tools and methods to organize and track outgoing subawards from inception through invoicing. PREREQUISITES Participants will need knowledge of clinical trial management or subawards from a coordinating center.

KIMBERLY KRUSE* Supervisor, Vice Chancellor of Health Sciences Research Service Core; University of California, San Diego

MARIANNA MEYER Senior Contract Officer, Office of Contracts and Grants Administration, University of California, San Diego

KARIM HUSSEIN Director, Sponsored Projects, University of Nevada, Reno

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

29


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 13 WORKING WITH INDUSTRY: NEGOTIATING AGREEMENTS AND OTHER NUANCES PROGRAM LEVEL: BASIC

30

Negotiating with industry sponsors presents unique challenges for research administrators at all levels, and can be as confusing as navigating to a different planet, especially if you’re not communicating the same way or using the same terminology. Come learn how to bridge that gap and form effective partnerships with industry sponsors while still protecting your institution. In this workshop, we will review the different styles of negotiation and help each participant discover their own style, as well as understand the best approaches for the other styles. We will also thoroughly review clauses that most industry partners find standard, but that most universities cannot accept. We will discuss tips for negotiating in a way that industry partners find familiar. Finally, we will apply these strategies to some hands-on industry agreements, allowing participants to respond using their own negotiation style. This is intended to be an interactive class with lively dialogue, and we welcome all perspectives and experiences as we learn and advance together.

ELIZABETH KINGSLEY* Senior Grant Analyst Regulatory, Denver Health and Hospital Authority

MELISSA KORF Associate Director, Grants & Contracts, Office of Research Administration, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn basic negotiating techniques and the theories behind them. • Participants will review and discuss common troublesome terms in university negotiation agreements. • Participants will explore and develop their own approaches to negotiating with industry sponsors. PREREQUISITES None

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 14 LET’S DO THIS: A DEEP-DIVE, HANDS-ON APPLICATION OF THE FAR PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE How many PowerPoint presentations on the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) have you attended? Presumably, you’ve seen many of the key clauses over the years and listened to presenters explain how they’re to be modified to suit University needs. The purpose of this workshop is to apply that basic knowledge to an actual negotiation environment. We’ve prepared a lengthy Guidebook outlining strategies for negotiating out many of the most problematic FAR clauses. But we’ll be spending little time reading through the Guidebook itself. Instead, we’ve prepared a series of sample contracts for you to review. After breaking into small groups, you’ll be encouraged to apply the contents of the Guidebook to the agreements in front of you. This is intended to be a collaborative effort: we will work together to identify and mitigate risks associated with certain clauses, and we’ll discuss strategies for negotiating out the most onerous provisions. Experienced FAR negotiators should come prepared to discuss approaches that have worked well for them. Research administrators new to the FAR should expect to engage in lively discussion and (possibly) debate regarding the best way of coping with the challenges we routinely face.

MINDY SOLIVAN* Assistant Director, Office of Research and Commercialization, University of Central Florida

ZACHARY GILL Director, Proposal and Award Management, Office of the Vice President for Research, Oregon State University

SARAH KRONENWETTER Contract Negotiator, Office of Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain greater familiarity with a number of key contractual clauses. • Participants will consider new arguments and tactics for negotiating out inappropriate clauses. • Participants will learn approaches for mitigating risks associated with accepting sub-optimal clauses. • Participants will gain confidence by participating in faux negotiations with their peers. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a basic familiarity with the FAR (how prescriptions work, how to look up clauses).

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

8:15 – 11:45 am: Morning Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 15 EMPOWERMENT THROUGH TRANSITIONS AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE Change is never easy. Ready or not, we all go through numerous transitions in our lives – changing jobs, career, going back to school or something personal. Navigating the gray area of transition can be stressful, difficult and demanding. This session will focus on things a research administrator can do to keep centered and grounded while moving forward. The transition should be a structured approach for ensuring that changes are thoroughly and smoothly implemented and the lasting benefits of change are realized. In addition, it will focus on the wider impacts of transition and change management and how research administrators can establish the framework for managing change systematically.

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ROSEMARY E. MADNICK* Executive Director, Office of Grants and Contracts, University of Alaska Fairbanks

ROBYN B. REMOTIGUE Director, Office of Research Services, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain an understanding of the purpose of transitioning and change management. ✦• Participants will learn problem solving strategies. ✦• Participants will discuss tips for work/life integration. PREREQUISITES Participants will need a basic understanding of change management.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

PRE-CONFERENCE BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER WORKSHOPS BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019 TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING 1:00 –BUILDING 4:30 pm TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING HALF DAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 16 FREE WORKSHOP REGISTRATION REQUIRED

EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS: EXPLORING WAYS TO EXPAND YOUR SKILLS

HEATHER M. OFFHAUS* Director, Medical School Grant Review & Analysis, University of MichiganAnn Arbor

PROGRAM LEVEL: OVERVIEW As a research administrator, you are often explaining issues surrounding sponsored research and the administration of grants and contracts. Yet making the transition from “explainer of facts” to “facilitator of knowledge” can be tricky. We will describe adult learning preferences, share teaching activities, and talk about approaches to presentation execution that may make the difference between attendees surfing the Web on their smart phones or being fully engaged. We also will spend time outlining the various modes of NCURA conference presentations as discussion leaders, panelists, or workshop faculty. We will also explore the complexities of team presentations; and actively writing descriptions to potentially submit for future NCURA meetings. 34

ROBYN B. REMOTIGUE Director, Office of Research Services, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify various types of NCURA presentations and identify strategies for each presentation type. • Participants will learn how to develop presentations employing adult learning techniques. • Participants will learn techniques for fielding questions and audience participation. PREREQUISITES None

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 17 EVIDENCE BASED CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE

SIMON KERRIDGE* Director, Research Services, University of Kent

Are you keen to advance in your career but don’t know where best to focus your energies? Should you increase your technical skills? Or pay more attention to softer skills? Are peer networks important? Drawing on the results of the “Research Administration as a Profession” survey and the personal experiences of the presenters, we will reveal the skills and attributes that are looked-for to advance in the profession. This interactive workshop is aimed at mid-level staff who know that they have found their calling in Research Administration and would like to develop strategies for advancing in their chosen profession. Similarly, it will be useful for those already in senior positions wishing to support advancement of their staff.

KERRY PELUSO Assistant Vice President for Research Administration and Finance, Office of Research, Florida State University

The session will be comprised of some presentation style lectures, interactive group work and time to develop and reflect on a personal career development plan to enhance career prospects. Topics covered will include: the scope of Research Administration, case studies of career development, skills needed to move up the career ladder in Research Administration, the value of networking, and the development of an outline for an individual career development action plan. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn which skills are most prized in Research Administration leadership. • Participants will appreciate the importance of softer skills and network development. • Participants will develop an action plan to enhance their professional prospects. PREREQUISITES Participants will need 5+ years of experience in Research Administration. Participants will currently work in a midmanagement position within central/department administration of a university or research institute.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 18 DECONSTRUCTING NIH FUNDING FROM PRE- TO POST-AWARD: THE UNIVERSITY PERSPECTIVE PROGRAM LEVEL: BASIC Presented by your university counterparts who have experienced it all, this workshop is designed to help those new to NIH awards navigate their way through this complex organization. Participants will first be introduced to NIH Centers, Institutes, and Mechanisms and then will discuss the ins and outs of detailed and modular budgets- the hows, when and why. The workshop will include how proposals are reviewed and awarded at the NIH, and will round out with a look at the NIH award process and award management. Designed to offer something for everyone, regardless of Pre- or Post-Award, Central or Departmental, this workshop will open up the NIH proposal and award processes for all to see.

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ASHLEY STAHLE* Senior Research Administrator, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University

VICKI KRELL Assistant Director, Research Advancement, Arizona State University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify critical components of an NIH Funding Opportunity Notice (FOA). • Participants will be able to select and create the appropriate budget mechanism, detailed or modular. • Participants will be able to describe the NIH review and award process. • Participants will be able to interpret an NIH Notice of Award (NOA). PREREQUISITES none

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 19 BUDGETS: BIRTH, BALANCING AND BURIAL PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE In this workshop, the participants will study the three main phases of the research budget. The Research Budget Creation process will be examined via collective problemsolving exercises. In these exercises, participants will identify budgetary constraints contained in the sponsor’s announcement, so as to accurately forecast the annual available direct budget. We will explore Research Budget Development to appropriately develop the budget in accordance with the sponsor’s guidelines and regulations. To execute budget balancing, we will practice reconciling the budgeted vs. actual reports, and studying budget variances, in relation to the sponsor’s guidelines and reporting requirements. Reallocation/re-budgeting cases will be explored based on award characteristics. Participants will learn to manage unobligated balances (UOB) through study cases involving unliquidated obligations, carryover, and offset for specific award types. We will explore strategies to mitigate risks of de-obligation or loss of funding.

FAITH THURMOND* Senior Research Administrator, Business Administrative Associate, College of Applied Health Sciences, Administration Research Office, University of Illinois at Chicago ETZER CANTAVE Assistant Director - Grants & Contracts, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research (OVCR), University of Illinois at Chicago

ZULFAT A. SUARA Assistant Controller – Restricted and Endowment, Meharry Medical College

Finally, in consideration of Budget Termination, we will use interactive exercises to practice reconciling the final expense report to the final approved budget, in adherence to sponsor’s guidelines. For each phase, we will discuss best practices, tips and tools. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Participants will learn tips and tools to navigate budgeting processes to insure against loss of funds. PREREQUISITES Participants will want basic familiarity with research budget development, basic research calculations, expenditure monitoring, and project close-outs.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

37


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 20 SUBRECIPIENT MONITORING, A DEEP DIVE PROGRAM LEVEL: ADVANCED Subrecipient monitoring is so much more than Uniform Guidance. This deep dive workshop will cover multiple strategies for meeting both federal and institutional requirements, assessing the risk appetite of your organization in conjunction with the risk posed by your subrecipients. We will also address contracting to mitigate risk, and implementing a monitoring program that meets the needs of institutions of varying size and organizational structures. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn to identify mandatory subrecipient monitoring requirements vs best practices. • Participants will gain tips for internal control and process/ procedure development, including subrecipient risk assessment, agreement construction, and comprehensive program creation.

38

LAURA REGISTER* Assistant Director, Subaward Oversight & Compliance, Stanford University

LESLEY SCHMIDT SINDBERG Senior Grants & Contracts Administrator, Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Minnesota

PREREQUISITES • Participants will need knowledge of subaward requirements and agreement processing. • Participants will need a working understanding of Uniform Guidance requirements.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 21 RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES FOR PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE Beyond developing budgets, filling out sponsor forms, and submitting proposals, research administrators at predominantly undergraduate institutions support faculty in a number of other ways. This support includes identifying and disseminating funding opportunities, offering strategic advice to make applications more competitive, promoting intramural and extramural collaborations and facilitating sponsor interactions and site visits. The administrator likely also hosts grant writing workshops, and advises senior leadership on issues related to research. In essence, research administrators at PUIs are as much research developers as they are sponsored programs officers. In this workshop, the presenters will share research development strategies, ranging from big-picture infrastructure considerations to small-picture details, that are effective for stimulating the research enterprise at institutions with heavy teaching loads. You will gain insights on key elements in the areas of strategic research advancement, communication of research, enhancement of collaboration, and proposal support functions that can help build faculty capacity and enrich the institutional environment for extramurally funded innovative research, scholarship, and creative activity.

JEREMY MINER* Director of Grants and Contracts, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, University of WisconsinEau Claire

KATIE PLUM Director of Sponsored Programs, College of Graduate Studies and Research, Angelo State University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn specific writing strategies to share with faculty for increasing the persuasiveness of grant proposals. • Participants will understand four different types of collaborations and essential characteristics of grant leaders that contribute to success. • Participants will be able to identify institutional incentives, programs, and activities that can enhance faculty research development. PREREQUISITES Participants will need at least 3 years’ experience with proposal writing or have responsibility for faculty research development.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

39


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 22 THE DRA FROM PROPOSAL TO PRODUCTION: MAKING THE RESEARCH WORK PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE

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This workshop will provide an overview of the subject matter which Departmental research administrators (DRAs) need to know in order to effectively manage research. In the cradle to grave concept of research, it takes an experienced DRA to move a grant from proposal to production. This workshop will give intense training focused on the production (lifecycle) aspect of research. We will cover the role of a DRA, sponsored vs non-sponsored support for researchers, compliance Issues, space and facilities, on-boarding, and more. We will explain how to review research portfolios in terms of sustainability, Recognizing financial cliffs, planning for expansion of labs, how to supplement traditional methods of financial support. We will also discuss the fundamentals of working with faculty: helping them develop proposal plans, familiarizing them with the local and global research environments and helping them navigate the multitude of Compliance regulations associated with research as well as how to look plan for the long-term sustainability of a research program. We will also have a scenario-based discussion for application of common themes for the DRA in the production phase in order to properly bury a grant in closeout. This workshop is applicable for active DRA’s and central individuals who want a better understanding of what happens to the grant between proposal and closeout.

DERICK F. JONES* Program Manager, Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute

RASHONDA HARRIS Associate Director, Post-Award Operations, Emory University

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will receive intensive training on grant production and project management. • Participants will receive training on the complexities of managing a research enterprise. • Participants will gain a greater understanding of how the DRA’s role is pivotal to the success of research. PREREQUISITES Participants will want basic familiarity with the role of the DRA.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 23 CLINICAL TRIAL ESSENTIALS – AN OPERATIONAL PERSPECTIVE PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE This workshop will begin by covering the foundations of clinical research: stages of clinical trials, compliance aspects, budgeting, study management, and roles of those involved. We will then focus on the experience of our Center for Definitive and Curative Medicine at Stanford, which has a dedicated clinical trial office with experts in regulatory and study management and we will provide case studies of phase 1, phase 1/2 clinical trials. Additionally, best practices around larger phase 3 clinical trials will be introduced. The case studies will cover protocol development, budgeting, sponsor relationships and trial operations. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to explain the basics of clinical research. • Participants will be able to apply techniques for sponsor interactions and relationship building. • Participants will be able to build budgets that are realistic and sustainable.

JENNIFER CORY DOESCHOT* Director of Operations for the Center for Definitive and Curative Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University

RHONDA PISK Clinical Trial Program Director, Pediatrics Pediatrics Stem Cell Transplantation, Stanford University

ERIC SMITH Director, Clinical Research Services Office, Oregon Health and Science University

PREREQUISITES • Participants will need three or more years of Research Administration experience, preferably in a medical school/ clinical setting. • Participants will need basic knowledge of federal regulations.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

41


61st

Annual Meeting

Pre-Conference Workshops

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 24 GLOBAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES AND RESOURCES FROM THE GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE PROGRAM LEVEL: OVERVIEW

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Scientific research and innovation are powerful forces driving economic development and social changes. In order to reduce the high cost of complex projects and cutting-edge research, reduce risk, and to optimize multilateral synergies, international research collaboration has become a common approach and a hot topic. In this context, science diplomacy is a critical factor for international cooperation in tackling global challenges and a powerful tool for improving relations across regions and cultures. Science diplomacy can be particularly instrumental in strengthening resilience and the capacity to adapt when tackling shared societal challenges in all countries. For example, the Office of Science and Technology (S&T) at the Embassy of Italy has promoted initiatives for international cooperation and knowledge exchange at both bilateral and multilateral levels in the following four pillars: Physics and Astrophysics, Life Sciences (Oncology and Aging), Resilience to Natural Disaster, and ICT. And in China, to further encourage Chinese researchers to initiate international (regional) research cooperation, NSFC has developed a funding scheme for International (Regional) Joint Research Programs. This workshop is designed for research administrators and managers from organizations in the U.S. and globally, who seek to understand how to navigate the global proposal and negotiation process. This process is a key competence needed to effectively advise researchers on whether or not to apply for international funding, which strategies to use, and how to ensure a smooth and fruitful project.

SHAOFENG FAN* Division Chief for Overseas Projects, Office of Scientific Research, Peking University

STEFANO LAMI Science Counselor, Embassy of Italy, Washington, D.C.

This workshop will have a 2-part format, with two introductory presentations on the main funding schemes of EU and China, followed by an interactive session on submissions and negotiation. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain insight into the main funding schemes of EU and China. • Participants will acquire an understanding of international sponsors’ funding opportunities, selection criteria, and the review process for international research projects. • Participants will learn best practices for participating in international collaboration. PREREQUISITES None

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


Pre-Conference Senior Level Forum

61st

Annual Meeting

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop SENIOR LEVEL FORUM 25 LEADING PEOPLE AND MANAGING MULTIPLE PROJECTS PROGRAM LEVEL: ADVANCED

AMANDA SNYDER* Associate Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, University of Washington ●

It’s time for your office to head new initiative on campus. There are bound to be bumps along the way, even in the smallest, or the (seemingly) least controversial project. As a leader, you know that means extra work for you and your staff; managing people and expectations, some people will pull the project forward; others will try to hold onto status quo – all in addition to day-to-day operations and projects already in process. Being able to translate the lightning reaction skills honed during your Research Administration career comes in handy when you dive into managing multiple projects and leading others through those projects.

DIANE BARRETT Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University

This senior forum will use scenarios (some “imagined” and others from our own experiences) to explore how a leader can keep everyone working together and prevent your projects from running amok. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn about foundational behaviors to lead a project through various stages. • Participants will develop a greater understanding of communication and leadership skills as they apply to managing projects and those involved in the project. • Participants will learn how to ensure that project tasks are covered (without doing them all yourself) to include: ○ – Keeping track of information from a variety of sources, ○ – Making sure milestones are met, ○ – ○Managing groups of people who do not report to you (and who have a lot of other priorities), ○ – Soliciting feedback, ○ – Communicating with stakeholders, ○ – And, ensuring successful roll out of the end product. PREREQUISITES Participants will want prior experience leading activities such as policy development, business process development and implementation, system changes or implementations, or training program development.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

43


BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

POST-CONFERENCE BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER WORKSHOPS BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING 1:00 –BUILDING 4:30 pm TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING HALF DAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


Post-Conference Workshops

61st

Annual Meeting

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 26 RULES AND REGULATIONS: WHERE DOES IT SAY WE HAVE TO DO THAT? PROGRAM LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE Federal regulations often drive our institutional policies, particularly when it comes to the management of federal awards. But to what extent are our institution’s policies/ procedures required by federal regulation versus the institution choosing to go beyond what regulation may require? Are these choices deliberate, the result of a corrective action plan, a best practice of peer institutions, or simply institutional culture? Can you respond confidently when one of your researchers asks the question “where does it say we have to do that?”

DAVID MAYO* Director of Sponsored Research, California Institute of Technology, NCURA Distinguished Educator

This workshop will examine a variety of regulations that impact the day-to-day management of federal awards with the goal of helping participants answer these questions, and to better understand where regulations end and institutional policies begin. The workshop will cover essential federal award requirements, primarily drawing upon the Uniform Guidance, but with some references to the Federal Acquisition Regulation to demonstrate how federal requirements can impact an award differently based on whether it’s a grant or a contract. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be better able to determine the source (and interpretation) of federal regulation driving the policy. • Participants will be able to identify the “go to” resources used by Research Administrators to benchmark their University alongside other institutional “best” practices. ✦• Participants will be able to articulate an answer and the rationale in language faculty members can understand when they ask the question “where does it say we have to do that and what does it mean?” ✦• Participants will engage and share among colleagues the various ways to implement requirements and best practices with continued focus on reducing administrative burden. PREREQUISITES Participants will need a general familiarity and experience working under federal regulations as they apply to federal award management.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

Post-Conference Workshops

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm: Afternoon Half Day Workshop WORKSHOP 27 NSF FUNDAMENTALS PROGRAM LEVEL: BASIC This workshop will provide a primary basis of understanding of proposals to and awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The program is perfect for someone new to Research Administration, as well as for Research Administrators seeking to expand their knowledge of federal funding agencies. The curriculum provides an overview of the policies and procedures essential to preparing successful proposals to and managing grant awards from NSF. Major content areas to be covered include NSF overall structure, culture, and organization; developing NSF proposals; the merit review process; Post-Award Administration; and tips and tricks.

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JEAN FELDMAN* Head, Policy Office, Division of Institution and Award Support, Office of Budget, Finance & Award Management, National Science Foundation

JAMIE H. FRENCH Division Director, Grants & Agreements, Office of Budget, Finance & Award Management, National Science Foundation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand the policies and procedures that guide the preparation of proposals to NSF as well as those that guide the management of NSF awards. ✦• Participants will understand NSF organization, structure and culture and what that means for you and your organization. ✦• Participants will learn when it is appropriate to pose questions to an NSF program officer, grants officer or the Policy Office. ❯PREREQUISITES None

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

POST-CONFERENCE BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER WORKSHOPS BUILDING TOWARDS FUTURE... THURSDAY,THE AUGUST 8, 2019 TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING 8:30 amBUILDING – 4:30TOWARDS pm THE FUTURE TOGETHER TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER.

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING FULL DAY WORKSHOP

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

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61

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Annual Meeting

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Post-Conference Workshops

THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 2019

8:30 am – 4:30 pm: Full Day Workshop WORKSHOP 28 NIH STAR FLEET ACADEMY: FROM SPACE CADET TO CAPTAIN OF YOUR SHIP TREKKING INTO THE FUTURE WITH NIH POLICIES, PROCESSES & RESOURCES

CYNTHIA DWYER* Communications Specialist, Office of Extramural Research, National Institutes of Health

PROGRAM LEVEL: OVERVIEW Does understanding all the ins and outs of working with NIH and submitting your investigator’s grant application on time seem like something from out of this world? Does it leave you feeling like a space cadet instead of the captain of your ship? If so, then make plans to join NIH Star Fleet Personnel for this special intergalactic adventure! Their prime directive is to help you explore this strange “new” world of NIH grants, seek out useful resources, and boldly go where necessary to better understand and navigate the NIH grants process and policies.

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NIH Program, Review, Policy, and Grants Management officials are ready to take you on a fast-paced adventure like never before, filled with informative and interactive presentations, guidance, and an array of future NIH contacts. As a Trekkie, you’ll learn the fundamentals of the NIH grants process, understand how the NIH team works together for you, and obtain guidance on navigating application forms, the eRA Commons, and NIH websites to guide you on future voyages. Though it may feel like you’re traveling at warp speed, this unique adventure will provide you with the information and tools to help you take command of working with the NIH grants process and reach your destination with additional confidence. We hope you’ll join us on this memorable journey…building relationships and sharing knowledge…as we work to improve the extramural research enterprise to infinity and beyond. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to explain how NIH is organized, the roles of NIH extramural research staff, and how they work together in the grants process. • Participants will be able to describe the overall grants process from application submission to award management and the importance of policies and compliance along the way. • Participants will be able to navigate application forms, the eRA Commons, RePORT and other useful NIH websites with more skill.

MEGAN COLUMBUS Director, Division of Communication & Outreach (DCO), National Institutes of Health

SHERI CUMMINS Chief, Grants Information, Division of Communication & Outreach (DCO), National Institutes of Health

JOE SCHUMAKER Communication Specialist, eRA, Office of Extramural Research, National Institutes of Health

SALLY AMERO NIH Review Policy Officer (RPO) and Extramural Research Integrity Liaison Officer (ERILO), Office of Extramural Research (OER), National Institutes of Health

PREREQUISITES None

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter

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AGENDA BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 2019 SUNDAY, 2019 TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. AUGUST 4, BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

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BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 2019

1:00 – 4:30 pm

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (Additional Fee Required) 4:00 – 7:00 pm

REGISTRATION Pick up your badge!

WELCOME LOUNGE

Come visit and network with your peers. Pick up your badge to get a jump start on the conference.

PACKAGED EVENTS INCLUDED IN REGISTRATION Saturday, 8/3, 4:00 – 7:00 pm: Welcome Lounge

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Sunday, 8/4, 7:00 – 10:00 pm: Night at the Museum (includes bus transportation to and from event) > More information

Monday, 8/5, 8:15 – 9:45 am: Keynote Address by Freeman A. Hrabowski, III > More information

Monday, 8/5, 11:30 am – 1:15 pm: Networking Luncheon and entertainment with the Capitol Steps > More information

Tuesday, 8/6, 7:00 – 11:00 pm: Tuesday Night Celebration – Carnevale! (includes heavy hors d’oeuvres, 2 drink tickets, and DJ entertainment)

GUEST REGISTRATION

Guest registration is available for the following events, and can be pre-purchased online. Ticket pricing and pre-registration for events will be available by June 10, 2019 Registrations will need to be processed before arriving at the events. Onsite guest registration is available on Saturday, 4-7 pm and Sunday, 7:15 am-6:30 pm. Sunday, 8/4, 7:00 – 10:00 pm: Night at the Museum (includes bus transportation to and from event) Monday, 8/5, 8:15 – 9:45 am: Keynote Address by Freeman A. Hrabowski, III Monday, 8/5, 11:30 am – 1:15 pm: Networking Luncheon and entertainment with the Capitol Steps Tuesday, 8/6, 7:00 – 11:00 pm: Tuesday Night Celebration – Carnevale!

> More information

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


AGENDA

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

7:15 am – 6:30 pm

6:00 – 6:30 pm

REGISTRATION

BOARD BUSES FOR NETWORKING EVENT

Pick up your badge! 8:15 am – 4:30 pm

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS AND SENIOR LEVEL FORUM (Additional Fee Required) 1:00 – 5:00 pm

NCURA MARKETPLACE AND THE IMPACT OF NCURA MEMBERSHIP

61st

Annual Meeting

7:00 – 10:00 pm

NETWORKING EVENT: NIGHT AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN SEE NEXT PAGE FOR DETAILS!

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August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together


61

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AGENDA

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2019

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NIGHT AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

NCURA’s 61st Annual Meeting will commence at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. The museum cares for one of the world’s most expansive collections of Native American objects, photographs, and media, covering the entire Western Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego. The museum’s sweeping curvilinear architecture, its indigenous landscaping, and its exhibitions, all designed in collaboration with tribes and communities, combine to give visitors from around the world the sense and spirit of Native America.

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Enjoy an evening of delicious food and refreshments, while exploring the amazing exhibits for all ages and networking with your colleagues. This event is included in your conference registration. Guest registration is $50 and children under 13 are free. Bus transportation to and from the museum will be offered, along with a menu sure to delight.

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Based on guidelines provided by the Smithsonian, guest tickets must be purchased in advance. Guest tickets can be purchased starting June 10, 2019. Onsite, (at the Smithsonian), guest tickets for this event are not able to be processed.

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JOIN THE ACTIVITY! Board buses (Terrace Level of the Washington Hilton)

6:00 – 6:30 pm

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Buses depart Washington Hilton hotel for the museum 6:30 pm

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Reception

7:00 – 10:00 pm

1st set of buses to depart museum

8:30 – 9:00 pm

Last buses to depart museum

10:00 pm

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If you decide to take the metro, instructions below: Metro Stop: L’Enfant Plaza (Blue/Orange/Green/Yellow lines), exit Maryland Avenue/ Smithsonian Museums.

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Walking Directions once you get off the metro: Turn right on Maryland Avenue; Left on 6th Street; Cross the pedestrian cross walk to the far side of Independence Avenue, and take a right

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The National Museum of the American Indian will be on the left side, just past 4th street cross walk

9:00 pm | REGIONAL HOSPITALITY AND THE NETZONE!

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NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual

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BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

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AGENDA BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

6:15 – 7:15 am | NCURA FUN RUN AND POWER WALK Come and enjoy a morning of fitness, fun and friendship! Meet in the main lobby at 6:15 am for this burst of fresh air.

7:15 am – 5:00 pm | AM61 CONCIERGE/REGISTRATION AND EXPOSITION 2019 7:15 – 8:00 am | CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND BREAKFAST CONNECT Wish you could sit down for a cup of coffee with a group of colleagues who are interested in talking about the same things you are? Build you peer network while enjoying breakfast and discussion at the Breakfast Connect tables. Join the group of your choice, introduce yourself, and let them conversation begin!

8:15 – 9:45 am | KEYNOTE ADDRESS AND PRESENTATION OF AWARDS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS

> Outstanding Achievement in Research Administration Award > Joseph Carrabino Award > Julia Jacobsen Distinguished Service Award > The NCURA Distinguished Educator Designation

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 54

FREEMAN A. HRABOWSKI, III, has served as President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. His research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. He chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the 2011 report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. He was named in 2012 by President Obama to chair the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by TIME (2012) and one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report (2008), he also received TIAA-CREF’s Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence (2011), the Carnegie Corporation’s Academic Leadership Award (2011), and the Heinz Award (2012) for contributions to improving the “Human Condition.” UMBC has been recognized as

a model for inclusive excellence by such publications as U.S. News, which the past eight years has recognized UMBC as a national leader in academic innovation and undergraduate teaching. Dr. Hrabowski’s most recent book, Holding Fast to Dreams: Empowering Youth from the Civil Rights Crusade to STEM Achievement, describes the events and experiences that played a central role in his development as an educator and leader. Freeman Hrabowski, III serves as a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Academies, and universities and school systems nationally. He also serves on the boards of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, France-Merrick Foundation, Marguerite Casey Foundation (Chair), T. Rowe Price Group, The Urban Institute, McCormick & Company, and the Baltimore Equitable Society. He served previously on the boards of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Maryland Humanities Council (member and Chair). NCURA’s motto, “Supporting research…together,” took on additional meaning when in 2017 our president assigned a volunteer member task force to assist us in finding ways to increase diversity and inclusion within our association’s programs and opportunities. Since that time, NCURA’s Board of Directors has made a commitment to live the words, “Respect, Access, and Opportunity,” in all activities, which includes volunteer committee assignments; board positions, leadership, and programming. The theme of this year’s Annual Meeting is Building Toward the Future…together. Dr. Hrabowski will address the importance of diversity and inclusion in supporting research.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

9:45 am – 5:00 pm | NCURA MARKETPLACE AND THE IMPACT OF NCURA MEMBERSHIP 9:45 – 10:15 am | NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK 10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

INTERMEDIATE

INVESTIGATOR INITIATED CLINICAL TRIAL AGREEMENTS This session will discuss the differences between an investigator initiated clinical trial agreement and a commercial clinical trial agreement with industry partners. The major clauses of the agreements and how they differ will be discussed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify key differences between investigator initiated clinical trial agreements and commercial clinical trial agreements with industry partners. • Participants will review contract language for key clauses that are different in the agreements. PREREQUISITES Participants will want basic clinical trial agreement familiarity.

CHRISTINA STANGER*, Assistant Vice President of Research Administration, MedStar Health Research Institute COMPLIANCE

INTERMEDIATE

MITIGATING FCOI COMPLIANCE OVERSIGHT FOR SUBAWARDEES Public Health Service (PHS) policy allows for a subawardee or collaborator to rely upon the prime awardees’ Financial Conflict of Interest policy and oversight. As evidenced by the Federal Demonstration Partnership’s Risk Assessment Questionnaire, that comes with above average risk to the prime. Are you uncomfortable with increased risk for conflicts of interest associated with your subrecipients or research collaborators? This session will explore the considerations for accepting oversight compliance for subawardees, and identify improved ways to monitor and mitigate those risks.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to recognize the responsibility and risks inherent in assuming responsibility for subawardees’ financial conflict of interest oversight. • Participants will be able to identify solutions for mitigating those risks. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a basic understanding of PHS FCOI policy requirements.

SUSAN W. SEDWICK*, Senior Consulting Specialist, Attain

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued COMPLIANCE

ADVANCED

FINDING OUR BALANCE IN THE CHANGING WORLD OF HUMAN SUBJECTS RESEARCH The long anticipated changes to the HHS regulations for the protection of human subjects, 2018 Common Rule, were effective on January 21, 2019. In addition, NIH has implemented a number of new requirements related to human subjects research, particularly for clinical trials. This session will discuss the key elements of and strategies to manage these requirements from the perspective of IRB professionals and research administrators.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be provided with an overview of single IRB requirements NIH and 2018 Common Rule. • Participants will be able to identify other key components of the revised Common Rule and NIH requirements that pertain to research administrators. • Participants will discuss strategies for working with your IRB to successfully navigate the new requirements.

CYNTHIA SHINDLEDECKER*, Director, Health Sciences and Behavioral Sciences Institutional Review Board, University of Michigan CATHERINE LIEBOWITZ, Research Process Senior Manager, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor SANDRA MEADOWS, Program Manager - Educational Programming and Regulatory Support, The Ohio State University DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

BASIC

THE BASICS OF EXPORT CONTROLS IN DATA 56

Did you know that you could have an export without anything leaving your campus? One of the most challenging and important aspects of university compliance with the export control regulations is the management and protection of controlled data. In this session, we will cover the basics of the export control regulations and how they impact the release of data. While we may not make you export control experts, we aim to give the participants enough information to help keep your institutions out of regulatory trouble. Export control specialists are welcome, however the intended audience is research administrators who don’t oversee export control compliance day to day, but who may be well positioned to recognize and call attention to potential problems.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain a basic understanding of the key export control regulations. • Participants will learn how those regulations apply to data. • Participants will discuss how a research administrator can spot situations where university data may be subject to those regulations. PREREQUISITES None

MARY D. MILLSAPS*, Research Information Assurance Officer, Sponsored Program Services, Purdue University LAUREL DEAN, Export Compliance Officer, Office of Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

ADVANCED

DATA DRIVEN DECISION MAKING AND STRATEGIC PLANNING

How many of us are challenged when supporting the decision-making process or strategic planning by conversations which exist in an emotional space vs. one of focus which supports gaining strategic advantages while navigating the changes necessary. There are many tools and schools of thought around how best to inform the decision-making process to ensure strategic goals are achieved and there is not only organizational success, but also team success. This session will explore several options and educate on the pros and cons associated with each including some case examples of implementation. Numbers take the emotions out of the conversations but understanding how to best use numbers and the tools we must advantage the intended outcome is truly the trick.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain further insights into tools and techniques which can be employed in supporting leadership/organizations/teams through the decision-making process. • Participants will discuss the conversational patterns around the data. PREREQUISITES Participants will want an understanding of forecasting, electronic tools and balancing all levels of leadership. Strong communication skills and a change management understanding would also be beneficial.

RANDI E. WASIK*, Director Program in Molecular Medicine, Floyd College of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School FEDERAL

OVERVIEW

USDA UPDATE

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PREREQUISITES None

CYNTHIA MONTGOMERY*, Deputy Director, Office of Grants and Financial Management, United States Department of Agriculture

ARE YOU MAXIMIZING YOUR NCURA MEMBER BENEFITS? > CLICK HERE to find out. August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS ● OVERVIEW

THE IMPACT OF RESEARCH ON UNIVERSITY GLOBAL RANKINGS This session will present the findings of a research study that explored the relationship between an institution’s financial resources, including research funding and its global ranking. The session will start off with a comprehensive review of two global ranking systems and how much they value research. The session will also discuss some of the critiques of global rankings and their impact on universities. Lastly, the session will review the statistical findings on the relationship with an in-depth look at the impact of research funding on an institution’s ranking.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain an in-depth understanding of university global rankings. PREREQUISITES None

MATTHEW S. ANDERSON*, Assistant Vice President and Assistant Dean for Research, University of South Florida College of Medicine

NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR 58

BASIC

KEYS TO UNDERSTANDING DIFFERENT PATHS OF SPONSORED RESEARCH AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR CAREER

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand Pre-Award and Post-Award roles. • Participants will discuss the different models in sponsored research. • Participants will understand the Cradle-to-Grave research administrator role, as well as college and departmental, principal investigator and central sponsored program roles. • Participants will discuss the importance of mentor-mentee relationships. PREREQUISITES None

CYNTHIA ATKINS WOODS*, Grants & Contracts Officer III, Dean’s Office of Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University MARIE B. FIRESTONE, Associate Director of Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Georgia Gwinnett College DANIELLE S. MCELWAIN, Director of Research, Dean’s Office, College of Engineering & Computing, University of South Carolina

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued POST-AWARD

OVERVIEW

COMBINED EFFORT REPORTING ALTERNATIVES

PREREQUISITES None

DAVID O. SCHMIDT*, Assistant Director, Post-Award, Colorado State University ARYA SINGH, Director, Research Computing and Business Intelligence, University of Texas at San Antonio TRACEY VOLZ, Senior Director, Research Enterprise - Research Finance Operations, Office of Science & Research, NYU Langone Health STACY N. WILLIAMS, Director, Research Quality Assurance & Risk Management, Office of Sponsored Project Administration, University of Texas at San Antonio PRE-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

ENTER ONCE, REUSE OFTEN: OPEN RESEARCHER AND CONTRIBUTOR IDs (ORCID) IN RESEARCH MANAGEMENT WORKFLOWS Research administrators can ready their university to use Open Researcher and Contributor ID (orcid.org) as it becomes a common requirement in the research management systems of funders for submitting applications and of publishers for authoring in journals. ORCID iDs are unique identifiers for researchers, similar to Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for articles and data sets. For researchers, their iD is their digital name and their ORCID record is a hub storing connections to their activities. For research managers, ORCID can streamline data sharing between systems. For example, funder grants management systems (including ProposalCentral and eRA) use ORCID as a source from which to autopopulate application information and automate aspects of reporting. How? Researchers share their iD when interacting with funder, publisher, and employer systems, which in turn update ORCID with public information that researchers can easily share (via ORCID) as they interact with other research systems. The presenters will demonstrate ORCID use by funders and research institutions and discuss actions for research administrators to benefit.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to explain how ORCID is being used in research management systems by funding agencies, publishers, and research universities. • Participants will be able to identify system touchpoints and opportunities for research administrators to enable and benefit from ORCID integration.

LORI ANN M. SCHULTZ*, Senior Director, Research Partnership Services, University of Arizona LAUREL L. HAAK, Executive Director, ORCiD JAMES MCKEE, Director of Business Development, Altum, Inc.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

PREREQUISITES None

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES (NEH) APPLICATIONS FOR THE PUI RUSSELL WYLAND*, Deputy Director, Division of Research Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) PATRICIA GERMANN, Administrative Officer, Research & Analysis, National Endowment of the Arts PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ADVANCED

STAYING ORGANIZED THROUGH CHAOS... MORE DESCRIPTIVE ASK TO ADD TOOLS

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We all have the opportunity to be leaders as Research Professionals. As leader, have you ever wondered how leaders stay organized and calm through the chaos? How do we keep it all together when there are heavy deadlines? How do we stay organized when there are competing priorities? How do we stay mindful and aware to get to the finish line? How do we maintain healthy partnerships through the chaos? How do we build and maintain our Research Administration competencies while maintaining such a high workload? So glad you asked! This session will give you the tools to have it all!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn to identify what is unimportant chaos and what is controlled chaos. • Participants will learn to stay mindful and present through the chaos. • Participants will be able to develop a system for organization and staying with the system. • Participants will learn to deal with competing priorities effectively. • Participants will be able to build and maintain healthy partnerships. • Participants will be able to build competencies. • Participants will learn to turn chaos into a positive. PREREQUISITES Participants will want to be currently employed in Research Administration.

BETTY A. MORGAN*, Research Administration Manager, Office of Sponsored Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill LORRIE ROBBINS, Research Administration Manager, Office of Sponsored Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

OVERVIEW

ENHANCING YOUR CAREER BY BECOMING A GENERALIST

PREREQUISITES None

Over the years, Research Administration and compliance have become more complex, requiring specialized knowledge leading to subject matter experts in the relevant fields. This specialization has, and continues, to serve the subject matters well. However, the Research Administration and compliance units require leaders with a knowledge of the entire field to coordinate and manage the entire Pre-Award, Post-Award, and regulatory compliance issues. These leadership positions require a general knowledge of award life cycle and their connectivity. In this session, a panel of senior administrators will share their experiences on how they made the transition from specialist to generalist and leadership positions. Please join the conversation on how you can move your career into a position of leadership. KATHLEEN M. LARMETT*, Executive Director, National Council of University Research Administrators ROBERT C. ANDRESEN, Director of Research Financial Services, Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Madison NCURA Distinguished Educator DAVID W. RICHARDSON, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, NCURA Distinguished Educator ARA TAHMASSIAN, Chief Research Compliance Officer, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Harvard University

DISCUSSION GROUPS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

REDUCING THE ADMINISTRATIVE BURDEN FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH INVESTIGATORS ASHLEY BAKER-LEE*, Senior Vice President, Research Operations, City of Hope

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued COMPLIANCE

DEVELOPING A RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH (RCR) COURSE KERI GODIN*, Director, Office of Research Integrity, Brown University DEPARTMENTAL

I’M A DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATOR: HOW DO I IMPROVE MY DEPARTMENT?

This discussion group will cover strategies that will assist the departmental administrator with the day-to-day administrative and financial processes. We’ll focus on short-term and long-term objectives that will create a win-win for the department, and help to improve the relationship with central administration. The participants will discuss effective techniques that will help them better manage their research empire. DENISE K. NOWLIN*, Senior Administrative Manager, Business & Finance Office, Johns Hopkins University EXECUTIVE LEVEL

UTILIZING DATA AND INDICATORS TO SUPPORT YOUR INSTITUTIONAL SPONSORED PORTFOLIO 62

O.k., o.k., what does this really mean? Are we talking about growing the research program at our institution with data? Are we talking about how we measure performance internally to support our research program? Who gets measured? What are we measuring? When should we measure? Are we measuring to help strategy and direction? Are we simply helping with decision making? What about measuring for faculty productivity and incentives? Program effectiveness? To communicate the good, bad, and ugly? Yes – let’s talk about all this stuff and share what we know, but also, what more we want to know. DAN NORDQUIST*, Associate Vice President, Office of Research Support and Operations, Office of Grant and Research Development, Washington State University JUDY L. FREDENBERG, Assistant Vice President for Research and Federal Relations, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP), University of Montana

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

SERVICE AGREEMENTS NICOLE CARLETON*, Project Manager, Service & Research Agreements, Office of Grants & Contracts, University of Colorado Boulder GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

EMERGING ROLE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS INTERNATIONALLY

As more and more countries increase their investment in academic research and development, the need for the research administrative support infrastructure is growing as well. While Research Administration in the U.S. has been an established profession for more than sixty years, it is an emerging career in many countries. In this discussion, you will hear a brief presentation from colleagues from China, Japan and Nigeria about their roles as research administrators and the status of Research Administration in their respective institutions. Please join the discussion of the opportunities and the challenges for the profession, and share your experiences. TADASHI SUGIHARA*, Research Grant Application Manager, Research Administration Office, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University ABIODUN AKINDELE, Principal Assistant Registrar, University of Ibadan SHAOFFENG FAN, Division Chief for Basic Research Programs, Office of Scientific Research, Peking University POST-AWARD

PI TRANSFERS MEGAN SCHOSKER*, Subcontract Officer, Office of Contracts & Grants, University of Colorado Boulder PRE-AWARD

APPLYING FOR A FEDERAL CONTRACT, WHAT TO DO? CHARLES T. BARTUNEK*, Director of Collaborative and Corporate Research Contracts, Division of Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

“CATCH EM AND KEEP EM”... RECRUITING, ENGAGING & RETAINING YOUNGER GENERATIONS

Join us in discussing how Universities might successfully market to younger generations for positions in the field of Research Administration. As many of us have “fallen” into this profession, we will discuss how managers and colleagues can engage with those younger generations new to the field to get them HOOKED in this rewarding profession. This discussion will also address barriers younger generations face in entering professional fields such as Research Administration, and ways to create career paths in order to retain them. ASHLEY STAHLE*, Interim Assistant Director of Sponsored Programs, Director of Post-Award, Colorado State University SAIQA ANNE QURESHI, Manager of Operations, Center for Digital Health Innovation (CDHI), University of CaliforniaSan Francisco RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

LESSONS LEARNED: BUILDING YOUR RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT TEAM/OFFICE

64

Relevant experience and lessons learned from having led the establishment of an Research Development (RD) office at a large research institution will be shared. A facilitated discussion of participants’ own experiences will follow. Participants will leave the discussion with some tools, models and a set of questions that can help guide them in starting an RD team at their institution or growing the function if it already exists. SUE C. PORTERFIELD*, Associate Vice Provost for Research, Johns Hopkins University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION KUALI RESEARCH: REDUCING ADMINISTRATIVE BURDEN AND IMPROVING OUTCOMES FOR RESEARCHERS Join us for a conversation about the real consequences of administrative burden in research, why technology hasn’t yet made an impact on reducing that burden despite all the time and attention given to the topic, and how Kuali is trying to change that through our innovative, modern SaaS technology. KACI FOSTER, General Manager, Enterprise Solutions, Kuali SUSAN SORENSEN, Product Manager, Research Sponsored Programs, Kuali

11:30 am – 1:15 pm | NETWORKING LUNCHEON Monday’s lunch is sure to be entertaining when the Capitol Steps take the stage to provide NCURA members with skits and song parodies to convey a special brand of satirical humor. Over 30 years ago, the Capitol Steps began as a group of Senate staffers who set out to satirize the very people and places that employed them. In the years that followed, many of the Steps ignored the conventional wisdom (“Don’t quit your day job!”), and although not all of the current members of the Steps are former Capitol Hill staffers, taken together the performers have worked in a total of eighteen Congressional offices and represent 62 years of collective House and Senate staff experience.

65

No matter who or what is in the headlines, you can bet the Capitol Steps will tackle both sides of the political spectrum and all things equally foolish. What more would you expect from the group that puts the “MOCK” in Democracy?!

NCURA ONLINE LEARNING Educating your staff today...and tomorrow! > CLICK HERE to learn more August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

INTERMEDIATE

MULTI-SITE CLINICAL TRIALS: IMPROVING COMPLIANCE AND QUALITY THOUGH EDUCATION Large, multi-site trials have unique challenges and the risk increases exponentially when dealing with remote and/or global sites. Training is critically important and the initial start-up training for sites sets the stage for ensuring compliance. The ability to assess situations and provide on-demand training when issues arise is also essential. How do you deal with access to technology, language barriers, and differences in cultural norms? This session will address effective ways to assess compliance and conformity with proven solutions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to recognize the importance of training in the launch of new studies. • Participants will understand the key elements of a good quality improvement program for clinical studies. • Participants will be able to identify key areas for assessment in ongoing trials. PREREQUISITES Participants are encouraged to be willing to discuss unique challenges and be ready to share creative solutions.

SUSAN W. SEDWICK*, Senior Consulting Specialist, Attain COMPLIANCE

BASIC

RESEARCH INTEGRITY (RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH, ETHICS/MISCONDUCT) 66

PREREQUISITES None

KERI GODIN*, Director, Office of Research Integrity, Brown University DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

ADVANCED

PRIVACY ISSUES IN THE BIG DATA/AI ENVIRONMENT PEGAH PARSI*, Contracts & Grants Officer, Research Administration, Stanford University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

INTERMEDIATE

BUDGETS & FINANCIAL FORECASTS FOR DEPARTMENTAL FINANCE This will be a hands-on demonstration of excel tools for budgeting and financial forecasting of sponsored projects. A budget is needed to plan the project, and forecast expenses are necessary to manage it. The session presents tools used to prepare budgets and indicate project status to principal investigators. Investigators need to know how much has been spent (where they are) and estimated cost at completion (where they will be). Reports can include both sponsored and non-sponsored accounts.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn the importance of financial planning in the research environment. Financial input is needed when planning the original budget and measuring performance during project.

JAY GRAHAM*, Associate Director, Finance & Administration, Stanford University ALFRED MACHICADO, Associate Director, Finance & Administration, Stanford University FEDERAL

OVERVIEW

EFFECTIVE PRACTICES FOR RIGOR AND REPRODUCIBILITY

PREREQUISITES None

LISA NICHOLS*, Director, Research and Regulatory Reform, Council on Governmental Relations (COGR) NAOMI SCHRAG, Associate Vice President, Research Compliance and Training, Columbia University in the City of New York

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

BASIC

HOLDING A TIGER BY THE TAIL: ESTABLISHING A CORPORATE-SPONSORED RESEARCH CENTER

68

Establishing a new research center is always exciting, but never so much as when your funding source is an industry partner. We will give a brief overview of the establishment of the Risk and Regulatory Services Innovation Center at Carnegie Mellon University, sponsored by PwC. Getting this center up and running required significant cooperation between our sponsored programs office, tech transfer, legal, departmental administrators, and college leadership. Keeping the research moving forward requires the Center director (managing the participating faculty and sponsor relationship) and the college finance office (working with research administrators in departments across campus and central administration) to communicate early and often. We will touch on the unique elements of working with industry, such as background IP, conflict of interest management, and breaking down cultural barriers between academia and industry. Participants will benefit from some knowledge of contracts and Post-Award management practices.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain a basic understanding of what an industry-academic partnership can look like. • Participants will discuss communication strategies for cross-campus collaboration. Participants will learn what to expect when industry wants to partner. • Participants will learn how to bridge the gap between academia and industry. PREREQUISITES None

OLIVIA WELLS*, Sponsored Project Administrator, Administrative Affairs, Carnegie Mellon University ALKA A. PATEL, Deputy Director, Risk and Regulatory Services Innovation Center, Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University FEDERAL

UPDATE

DOE/NASA UPDATE MIKE ZARKIN*, Director, Office of Grants and Contracts Support, Office of Science, Department of Energy

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS ● OVERVIEW

COLLABORATIONS WITH CHINA – EXPERIENCES, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES China’s government is increasing its investment in R&D at a much faster rate than the U.S. As a result, researchers in the U.S. have more and more reason to look to China for potential research collaborations. But such collaborations are associated with significant risks. NIH, DoD, the FBI, and other U.S. Federal agencies have been expressing alarm about illicit transfer of U.S. technology to China. In this session, we’ll discuss the developments of the last twelve months and consider strategies for protecting faculty and institutional interests when working with China.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will review concerns raised by the U.S. Government regarding research collaborations in China. • Participants will consider policies and procedures needed to ensure proper vetting and disclosure of foreign affiliations. PREREQUISITES None

JOHN W. HANOLD*, Associate Vice President for Research, Office of Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State University NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR

BASIC

AN OVERVIEW OF PRE-AWARD

PREREQUISITES None

DAVID K. SMELSER*, Assistant Director of Sponsored Programs, Office of Research, University of Tennessee JENNIFER HUSMO, Research Department Administrator, Molecular & Cellular Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued POST-AWARD

BASIC

AUDITING - FRIEND OR FOE? Auditors have been tarnished as the “foe” in terms of Research Administration. This session, run by experienced grant auditors, aims to dispel this myth, and will include why we do what we do, why we ask the questions we ask, and cover some funny (!) anecdotes about our many years in the audit field. After all, auditors are independent, but on your side.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain a better understanding of what grant auditors do and why they ask the questions they ask. • Participants will come away with a renewed perspective on auditors. PREREQUISITES None

JONATHAN GRAY*, Senior Manager, Grant Auditing Team, LEES Chartered Certified Accountants PRE-AWARD

ADVANCED

KNOWING YOUR INSTITUTION’S RISK DURING PRE-AWARD AND HOW TO MANAGE IT JILL FRANKENFIELD*, Associate Director, Office of Research Administration, University of Maryland, College Park PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW 70

PREREQUISITES None

ESTABLISHING AND EXPANDING A RESEARCH OFFICE AT A PUI JEFFREY J. RITCHIE*, Director of Sponsored Research, Office of Sponsored Programs, Hamilton College

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

OVERVIEW

THE SOUL OF LEADERSHIP What is leadership? Each of us believe we understand what it means to be a good leader. We know it when we see it. It can be harder to define the concept and create a practical and clear path for ourselves. In truth, the path to leadership is internal. Within is where the journey starts and lives. Leadership is a practice. It is a choice we make in each moment. Management is linked to our title and position. Leadership is a living, breathing, daily choice we make. With clear, practical steps, we will walk through the crucial skills outlined in the acronym L-E-A-D-E-R-S:

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will identify their soul profile and core values they want to develop. • Participants will learn the practical steps to enlightened leadership following the “Leaders” model. PREREQUISITES None

L = Look and Listen E = Emotional Bonding A = Awareness D = Doing E = Empowerment R = Responsibility S = Synchronicity Only from the level of the soul are great leaders created. Once that connection is made, you have unlimited access to the most vital qualities a leader can possess: creativity, intelligence, organizing power, and love. This presentation is based on The Soul of Leadership by Deepak Chopra. Tara Bishop, NCURA Deputy Chief Executive and Chopra Center Certified Vedic Educator will lead us through identifying your own soul profile and the core values you want to develop. You can then use these seven skills to allow your potential for greatness to emerge. The path to being an enlightened leader is open to you. The only requirement is that you learn to listen to your inner guide. In this session, we will share how to do just that, in words as practical as they are uplifting. The future is unfolding at this very minute, and the choice to lead it lies with each of us, here and now. TARA E. BISHOP*, Deputy Chief Executive, National Council of University Research Administrators

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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NCURA offers more than 20 WEBINARS for your continuing education. > CLICK HERE for topics


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS COMPLIANCE

VISITORS ON CAMPUS: COMPLIANCE BEST PRACTICES

Individuals worldwide contact our investigators in hopes of benefiting from the knowledge and expertise of the institution and its researchers. How can we facilitate these visits and collaborations while addressing potential compliance issues such as intellectual property, confidentiality, health and safety, visa status, and export controls? Come and discuss strategies for finding and welcoming our campus visitors while managing compliance oversight. JANET B. SIMONS*, Director, Research Policy and Export Officer, Sponsored Programs Administration, University of Maryland, Baltimore DEPARTMENTAL

RESTRUCTURING A DEPARTMENTAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

72

Have you been tasked with evaluating Research Administration support needs at your institution? Maybe you are creating a new service model or revamping your existing service structure? This discussion will provide insights and experiences with establishing or restructuring a research support office at the central and college levels. Instructors will discuss how to determine the mission and role of your unit, development of service expectations, communication, evaluation of progress, and how to navigate potential roadblocks. Participants will be encouraged to share questions and challenges that they are facing in service office structuring. CSILLA CSAPLÁR*, Director, Engineering Research Administration, Stanford University LINDSEY DEMERITT, Director, Sponsored Research, University of Texas at Austin EXECUTIVE LEVEL

EVERYTHING I NEEDED TO KNOW I LEARNED IN RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION KIM MORELAND*, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research & Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Madison, NCURA Distinguished Educator FEDERAL

FEDERAL AGENCY GRANTS MANAGEMENT AND INSTITUTIONAL SPONSORED PROJECTS OFFICES COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES CYNTHIA HOPE*, Assistant Vice President for Research & Director of Sponsored Programs, The University of Alabama, NCURA Distinguished Educator JEAN FELDMAN, Head, Policy Office, Division of Institution and Award Support, Office of Budget, Finance & Award Management, National Science Foundation

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

NCURA GLOBAL FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM - WHO - HOW - WHERE AND WHY?

The NCURA Global Fellowship program typically offers a $2,000 stipend for you to visit another institution in another country to enhance your knowledge and expand your horizons. There are huge benefits for both the fellow and the host! Come learn more about the program from three alumni. Hear about their experiences as an applicant, a participant, or as a host, and enhance your chances for a successful application. EDWARD WIEDEMANN*, Lead Research Finance Analyst, University of California-San Francisco OLIVE GIOVANNETTI, Assistant Team Manager, Contracts & Grants Office, University of California-San Francisco SIMON R. KERRIDGE, Director of Research Services, University of Kent POST-AWARD

MANAGING SPONSORED PROGRAMS PAYMENTS AND RECEIVABLES BRIDGET MONTOUR*, Revenue Manager, Office of Research & Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Madison PRE-AWARD

FINDING EFFICIENCIES WITHIN YOUR PRE-AWARD PROCESS DANIELLE BROWN*, Assistant Director, Sponsored Programs Administration, University of Maryland, Baltimore PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS

THE CURRENT TRENDS IN F&A NEGOTIATIONS FOR THE PUI

This discussion group will focus on the experiences that institutions have encountered as part of their recent F&A negotiations. The conversation will focus on strategies and changes that institutions have implemented to improve their review, audit and negotiations. MIRA L. LEVINE*, Senior Manager, MAXIMUS Higher Education, Inc.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

1:30 – 2:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

RETIREMENT TRANSITIONING AND REMAINING ENGAGED

Are you planning on retiring soon and transitioning onto an exciting new path? Does this new plan include possibly consulting and/or continued NCURA involvement? Questions you may ask yourself are: What are some things to be aware of? Is consulting for me? How do I remain engaged and continue the relationships with my colleagues and the network I’ve built over the years of my career? How can I pay it forward for future research administrators? Come share ideas with your colleagues on how you plan or planned the transition, options and employment opportunities and how to remain involved in the guidance of positive outcomes for current and future research administrators. JOSIE JIMENEZ*, Associate Director, Office of Grants And Contracts, New Mexico State University (Emeritus) RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

RUNNING TO CATCH UP: PROMOTING SPONSORED RESEARCH ACTIVITY IN THE BUSINESS SCHOOL

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In general, business faculty tend to be less oriented toward sponsored research than their colleagues in the natural sciences. Consequently, research administrators are less likely to interact with business school faculty, and perhaps less familiar with identifying appropriate funding opportunities for them and supporting their projects. Many business schools find themselves running to catch up with the expectation that they increase their sponsored funding portfolio, but without much of a history or tradition of seeking and managing external funding. What can we as research administrators do to advocate for and support our business faculty in their quest for funding success? This discussion will focus on challenges, opportunities, and best practices for promoting sponsored research development within a business school environment. LAURA LETBETTER*, Associate Director, Sponsored Research, Development, Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

61st

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

Annual Meeting

1:30 – 2:30 pm | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION HURON’S LANDSCAPE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION CONSULTING: THE WHO, HOW AND HOT TOPICS This overview will highlight how the shifting Research Administration environment has impacted the work we do as Huron consultants, while noting that some things never change. We will provide updates on how the trends are impacting our clients and how the work we do is still focused on their needs for efficiency, compliance and technology enablement – but with new approaches and changing outcomes. MARISA ZUSKAR*, Manager, Huron

2:30 – 2:45 pm | NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK 2:45 – 3:45 pm | REGIONAL BUSINESS MEETINGS Open to all Annual Meeting participants, and led by the Region’s chairperson, the Regional Business Meetings introduce current and incoming officers, describe ongoing initiatives and provide information on the regional meetings and how you can get involved in your region!

3:45 – 4:00 pm | NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK 75

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS COMPLIANCE

ADVANCED

RISK-BASED APPROACH TO BUILDING A RESEARCH COMPLIANCE OFFICE This session will provide participants with information on both Federal and private funding opportunities that are new or not well known. Background information on available funding opportunities will be provided. A panel of federal representatives will participate, answer questions and discuss new funding opportunities or little known opportunities that their respective sponsoring agency would like to highlight. JEFF M. SEO*, Assistant Vice-Provost for Research Compliance, Northeastern University

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

Don’t Miss One of NCURA’s Upcoming TRAVELING WORKSHOPS > CLICK HERE for the schedule


61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

BASIC

GETTING THE PERFECT PICTURE: BUILDING GREAT RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PI AND RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS Ever feel like you’ve been branded as “red tape” because your work is associated with policies and regulations? Building a strong relationship with your PI – one in which you are established as a teammate instead of a barrier – can provide opportunity to feel part of and rewarded by the research. Developing the relationship or “perfect picture” will improve your Research Administration outcomes and better equip you to navigate challenges together. Note, there is a follow-up Discussion Group on Tuesday at 8:15 am.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify common obstacles in building strong PI-administrator relationships. • Participants will explore strategies for successful partnerships and research outcomes including the impact of effective communication, positive psychology, resourcefulness, and advocacy. • Participants will draw upon case studies from real life scenarios to provide solution-driven material. PREREQUISITES None

JENNIFER CORY DOESCHOT*, Director of Operations, Center for Definitive and Curative Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University MAROLYN L. GENTLES, Business Manager II, Experimental Economics Center, Georgia State University EXECUTIVE LEVEL

ADVANCED

USING SYSTEMS AND TOOLS 76

ISABELLA A. PARKINSON*, Research Service Core Enterprise IT Program Manager, University of CaliforniaSan Diego

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

ADVANCED

NEGOTIATING OTHER TRANSACTION AUTHORITY (OTA) AGREEMENTS MICHAEL J. KUSIAK*, Policy Resource Coordinator, Office of the President, University of California FEDERAL

OVERVIEW

FEDERAL SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICIES

PREREQUISITES None

RHONDA DAVIS*, Office Head, Office of the Director, National Science Foundation GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS ● OVERVIEW

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON? CHALLENGES WE HAVE TO ADDRESS IN THE FUTURE IN RESEARCH MANAGEMENT Anyone who has enjoyed a sustained career in the profession of Research Administration will share that part of the secret to their success is always keeping an eye on the horizon. Regardless of where in the world you call home, the horizon shifts in accordance to your personal needs, the needs of your institution, the needs of the profession, or due to external factors. Join this session as we attempt to peer over the horizon to see the challenges we must address in the future of Research Management.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain tools and methods to see beyond the horizon of the profession. • Participants will hear perspectives on future challenges in the profession. • Participants will hear lessons learned on predicting future trends in the profession. PREREQUISITES None

EVA BJORNDAL*, Head of Post-Award, King’s College of London DAVID W. RICHARDSON, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, NCURA Distinguished Educator

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR

BASIC

TOP 10 THINGS YOU REALLY OUGHT TO KNOW ABOUT UNIFORM GUIDANCE While the Uniform Guidance may not be “new” (relatively speaking) in the ever changing world of Research Administration, you might be! If you are new to Research Administration and want to better understand what the Uniform Guidance is and when and how to use it, join us for this interactive session exploring the Top 10 Things You Really Ought to Know about Uniform Guidance. This session is appropriate for Pre- and Post-Award administrators alike.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify sections of the UG. • Participants will be able to find parts of the UG applicable to needs. • Participants will be able to illustrate to others when and how to use the UG. PREREQUISITES None

TRICIA L. CALLAHAN*, Senior Research Education and Information Officer, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University SHANNON M. SUTTON, Director, Sponsored Projects, Western Illinois University POST-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

ALTERNATES TO EFFORT REPORTING: THE DEPARTMENTAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR’S PERSPECTIVE 78

This session is designed to foster a discussion between departmental research administrators and other Research Administration professionals and leaders around the challenges to traditional effort reporting models. Further, there will be discussion on examples of the transition and a ‘lessons learned’ resource in both models for participants will be created.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will discuss the challenges of Traditional Effort Reporting practices and help participants understand current regulations. • Participants will discuss the opportunities of transition to the Alternates to Effort Reporting model with respect to Uniform Guidance. • Participants will be provided a resource for best practices in both models. • Participants will discuss the future state of effort reporting and how to try to get ahead of the curve.

NICOLE QUARTIERO*, Assistant Director, Indirect Cost Recovery (ICR) & Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP), Colorado State University-Pueblo

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued POST-AWARD

ADVANCED

DEPLOYING RESEARCH COMPLIANCE DATA ANALYTICS: TURNING AN AUDIT INTO AN ASSET Research compliance data analytics can enable an institution’s research compliance program, both reactively (in response to an audit notification) and proactively (as self-monitoring). Drawing upon insights gained through supporting top research institutions through the NSF Data Analytics Audit process, we will discuss how the use of data analytics can strengthen and fortify institutional research compliance programs, and can enable favorable audit results.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand the concept of data analytics and how analytics can serve as an indicator of research compliance. • Participants will review real data analytic examples and how systematic analysis can target risk mitigation efforts. • Participants will discuss approaches to broadly deploying these tactics to enhance internal controls at your institution. PREREQUISITES • Participants will want experience in managing sponsored awards and a baseline understanding of associated risks, including applying federal regulations, the cost principles, and award and sponsor specific terms and conditions. • Participants will want to be familiar with approaches to auditing sponsored award financial activity, such as post-audit sampling, transactional pre-review, etc.

MARISA ZUSKAR*, Manager, Huron

PRE-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

GRANT OPERATION (GO) CENTERS FOR PRE-AWARD: RE-ENVISIONING RESEARCH SUPPORT ON A UNIVERSITY CAMPUS The Office of the Vice President for Research at Saint Louis University is embarking on major organizational changes and re-envisioning the way research is supported on campus. Through the creation of centralized Grant Operation GO Centers, we brought together departmental and central research administrators into a single team to provide hands-on support to faculty applying for and managing their grants. With this new infrastructure, our goals are to raise the level of services offered to faculty, offer more specialized and personalized services, and ultimately submit higher quality proposals for funding. During this session we will discuss: the centralization process of combining departmental and central research administrators; advantages and challenges of this model; and how this model can create a more resilient research support infrastructure in an ever-changing research climate.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn opportunities and challenges in re-organizing research support. • Participants will learn how to create a resilient research support infrastructure to support faculty needs. • Participants will learn benefits of this model to research administrators.

LEXIS L. BRUCE-STAUDT*, Executive Director, College for Public Health & Social Justice, Saint Louis University

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

INTEGRATING RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT WITH PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT AT SMALL INSTITUTIONS AND DEPARTMENTS When institutions make a commitment to support faculty in an effort to increase the number of quality proposals submitted to external sponsors, they sometimes call this “research development” and assign the function to the sponsored programs office. Most Predominately Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) do not establish a research development office separate from the sponsored programs office, but rather formalize and expand functions in the Pre-Award office to focus more on research development.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to define the term “research development”. • Participants will be able to cite examples of positions that blend research development and proposal development. • Participants will be able to identify approaches, resources, and models within and beyond the sponsored programs office to enhance research development. • Participants will be able to list activities typically associated with research development. • Participants will be able to identify specific strategies or next steps to enhance research development at their home institutions. PREREQUISITES None

80

MICHELLE SCHOENECKER*, Senior Proposal Development Manager, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee PATIENCE GRAYBILL, Manager, Research Development and Administration, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Washington University in St. Louis KATIE M. PLUM, Director of Sponsored Projects, College of Graduate Studies & Research, Angelo State University PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

BASIC

NETWORKING: FOR INTROVERTS AND EXTROVERTS One of the most important career decisions you make is how much you network. The benefits you gain through effective networking are so numerous it will (not might) change the course of your life. You will gain infinite, long-term resources, solve problems faster and become more efficient at work, and likely find your next job. But, the benefits of networking do not come from meeting people. The benefits come from fostering relationships. Whether you are an introvert, extrovert, or somewhere in between, you can and should network. This session will discuss strategies and techniques for effective networking and accelerating your career.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain an understanding of what networking is and what it is not. • Participants will explore techniques for establishing connections (especially for individuals who are not normally comfortable doing so). • Participants will discuss techniques for developing and maintaining professional relationships. • Participants will discover the benefits of being professionally networked. PREREQUISITES None

DAVID K. SMELSER*, Assistant Director of Sponsored Programs, Office of Research, University of Tennessee LAURA LETBETTER, Associate Director, Sponsored Research Development, Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

OVERVIEW

NCURA MEMBERSHIP: ARE YOU MAXIMIZING YOUR BENEFITS?

PREREQUISITES None

EMILY AINSWORTH*, Manager, Regional and Membership Services, National Council of University Research Administrators MAGGIE McCOOL, Staff and Volunteer Services Associate, National Council of University Research Administrators RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

UNIDENTIFIED FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES (UFOs) AND DOWN THE PATH LESS TRAVELED: FINDING NOT SO WELL KNOWN FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES This session will provide participants with information on both Federal and private funding opportunities that are new or not well known. Background information on available funding opportunities will be provided. Come and learn from a panel including federal representatives who will answer questions and discuss new funding opportunities or little known opportunities that their respective sponsoring agency would like to highlight.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn about new funding opportunities or little known funding opportunities. • Participants will receive background and additional relevant information on these funding opportunities to determine if they are a good fit for their institution and faculty. • Participants will leave with a knowledge to provide to their faculty and know how to apply for these new or little known opportunities.

JENNIFER A. MOREHEAD FARMER*, Director, Grants and Contracts, Regenstrief Institute ERIKA Y. THOMPSON, Director, Grants Resource Center, American Association of State Colleges & Universities (AASCU) SHANDA L. WIRT, Director, Contracts and Grants, College of Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

DISCUSSION GROUPS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

MULTI-SITE CLINICAL TRIALS: IMPROVING COMPLIANCE AND QUALITY THOUGH EDUCATION (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT SESSION HELD MONDAY AT 1:30 PM) Large, multi-site trials have unique challenges and the risk increases exponentially when dealing with remote and/or global sites. Training is critically important and the initial start-up training for sites sets the stage for ensuring compliance. The ability to assess situations and provide on-demand training when issues arise is also essential. How do you deal with access to technology, language barriers, and differences in cultural norms? This follow-up discussion will further address effective ways to assess compliance and conformity with proven solutions. SUSAN W. SEDWICK*, Senior Consulting Specialist, Attain

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued COMPLIANCE

RISK-BASED APPROACH TO BUILDING A RESEARCH COMPLIANCE OFFICE (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT SESSION HELD MONDAY AT 4:00 PM)

The reality is that there are few, if any, awards for best research compliance programs and even fewer resources to commit to research compliance functions. For most, we must adapt and learn to serve multiple roles and be prepared to respond to any given emergency whether apparent or real. In this follow-up discussion, we invite you to further discuss real life examples to demonstrate how to identify risks and how to develop a compliance program around those risks. CYNTHIA SHINDLEDECKER*, Director, Health Sciences and Behavioral Sciences Institutional Review Board, University of Michigan DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

IMPLEMENTING CUI PROTECTIONS AT YOUR CAMPUS ELIZABETH D. PELOSO*, Associate Vice Provost/Associate Vice President, Research Services, Office of Research Services, University of Pennsylvania MARY D. MILLSAPS, Director, Research Information Assurance, Office of Research and Partnerships, Purdue University DEPARTMENTAL 82

DEPARTMENTAL DECISIONS: TO CHARGE OR NOT TO CHARGE? GLENDA A. BULLOCK*, Director of Research and Business Administration, Divisions of Hematology, Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

BEST PRACTICES FROM THE GLOBAL GRANTS AND INNOVATION OFFICE TINNA CARLSSON*, Financial Officer, University of Gothenburg MATHILDA SEGERSTAD, Legal Counsel, University of Gothenburg POST-AWARD

COST TRANSFERS DIANE DOMANOVICS*, Assistant Vice President for Sponsored Projects, Office of Research Administration, Case Western Reserve University PRE-AWARD

KNOWING YOUR INSTITUTION’S RISK DURING PRE-AWARD AND HOW TO MANAGE IT JILL FRANKENFIELD*, Associate Director, Office of Research Administration, University of Maryland, College Park PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS

INCENTIVES AND STRATEGIES FOR INCREASING PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS AT PUI

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KRIS A. MONAHAN*, Director, Sponsored Projects and Research Compliance, Providence College

NCURA IS COMMITTED TO DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION > CLICK HERE to read more about our policy August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

HOW TO CREATE A PATH IN RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION

You are a research administrator. Now what? You’ll want to define your career roadmap, and this discussion can help. This interactive group discussion will inspire and encourage you to think about Research Administration as your profession and illustrate the many paths you can take to create your own niche. This is a wonderfully diverse field across a wide spectrum of organizations to settle down in. Opportunity is around every corner to enrich your skills and find your area of passion that will lead to your destination. Come share your story, ask your questions and explore the breadth of opportunity that is Research Administration. ANNE ALBINAK*, Director of Research Administration Operations, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University ALLISON FISCHER, Proposal Analyst, Office of Grants & Contracts, University of Colorado Boulder JILLIAN MCINTOSH, Grant Manager B, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

RAAAP: LONGITUDINAL DATA ABOUT OUR PROFESSION

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The Research Administration as a Profession (RAAAP) project collected data from 2,691 individuals around the world and has been presented widely. The International Network of Research Management Societies (INORMS) has continued the initiative and has commissioned a second survey (expected to run in early 2019). This session will present and discuss some preliminary data and comparing the profession in 2016 and 2019. There will also be an opportunity to help shape potential future surveys in order to start creating a longitudinal data set. The 2016 data set allows individuals to help plan their careers by seeing which skills are important in order to progress in the profession. It is hoped that in combination the 2019 data set will provide further insights. SIMON R. KERRIDGE, Director of Research Services, University of Kent

4:00 – 5:00 pm | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE This interactive roundtable will provide a forum for Research Administration leadership to discuss the most meaningful and impactful opportunities and challenges facing their functions today. We will hold a facilitated discussion on hot topics, emerging and high risk areas and considerations to enable success. We encourage attendees to share concerns, challenges, best practices and lessons learned with peers in this open and collaborative environment. Potential discussion topics include: • • • •

Research integrity Concerns related to foreign influence on campus Conflicts of interest Recent trends in federal audit scrutiny

KIMBERLY GINN, Principal, Baker Tilly ASHLEY DEIHR, Director, Baker Tilly NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

5:30 pm | ZOO POWER WALK Join your colleagues for an evening power walk to the Smithsonian’s National Zoo! A great way to end your busy day with fresh air and meet new colleagues. Members will be meeting at the terrace level entrance at 5:30 pm on Monday, walk to the zoo and enjoy a 1 hour power walk, leaving the zoo at 7 pm, returning back to the hotel at 7:30 pm. NCURA staff will meet you at the terrace level entrance to see you off with maps of the zoo to guide your Powerwalk! The Hilton is at 1919 Connecticut Avenue and the Zoo is at 3001 Connecticut Avenue, NW so it is a straight shot up Connecticut Avenue. Last admittance into the Zoo is at 6:00 pm, and Zoo closes at 7:00 pm. No sign up required...meet you on the terrace Monday at 5:30 pm!

6:00 pm | DINNER GROUPS NCURA is committed to providing many opportunities for you to build and grow your network. Please join your colleagues to have a relaxed evening and continue your conversations while enjoying a meal outside of the hotel. Many restaurants are in walking distance from the hotel, or you can choose to share a cab with your companions. With a wide variety of cuisines and price points, there’s a dining option for everyone! NCURA staff will provide sign-up sheets for each restaurant, to include the restaurant information and menu. Come see us at the registration desk when you get to Washington, DC!

9:00 pm | REGIONAL HOSPITALITY AND THE NETZONE!

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August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

AGENDA BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

6:15 – 7:00 am | YOGA BLISS Yoga Bliss: Join NCURA’s own Tara Bishop for this restorative practice. We will bring ourselves back to our natural state of balance and tap into the bliss of body, mind and spirit. Namaste

6:15 – 7:00 am | BOOTCAMP Join us for this 45 minute Bootcamp that mixes traditional calisthenic (running, standing, grasping, pushing, etc. — often performed rhythmically and with minimal equipment, so essentially, bodyweight exercises) and body weight exercises with interval training and strength training. One underlying component of a good boot camp fitness class is creating a spirit of teamwork and group support and cohesion. NCURA Member and Certified Personal Trainer, Teri Quill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will lead us for this awesome start to the day!

7:15 am – 5:00 pm | AM61 CONCIERGE/REGISTRATION EXPOSITION 2019 NCURA MARKETPLACE THE IMPACT OF NCURA MEMBERSHIP 7:15 – 8:00 am | CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND BREAKFAST CONNECT Wish you could sit down for a cup of coffee with a group of colleagues who are interested in talking about the same things you are? Build you peer network while enjoying breakfast and discussion at the Breakfast Connect tables. Join the group of your choice, introduce yourself, and let them conversation begin!

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

BASIC

INDUSTRY-SPONSORED CLINICAL TRIALS: BUDGETING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Are industry funded clinical trials a mystery to you? This session will briefly introduce you to the world of industry-sponsored clinical trials. We will discuss how being thorough when budgeting and negotiating with industry pays off by making it easier to manage accounts receivable later. We will discuss the importance of billing compliance, payment terms, and tracking receivables. We will also discuss how managing clinical trial finances is different than managing grant finances, including reporting to PIs. We will also briefly discuss industry trends.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn the key differences between the “grant world” and industry-funded clinical trials (eg, why contracts are not worth what they say they are, payments by visits, procedures and milestones.) • Participants will be able to read protocols from a financial perspective (hard and soft costs) and recognize when people other than the PI’s team should be included in the budgeting process. • Participants will be able to determine what can be billed to insurance (“standard of care” or “routine care”) and what cannot. • Participants will learn to negotiate start up fees, budgets, and payment terms with industry. • Participants will learn how industry is crowdsourcing to find new markets for their drugs (PI initiated trials.) • Participants will learn about accounts receivable, how the budget and payment terms make collecting funds easier or harder, and tracking what is owed to you and when. PREREQUISITES None

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IAN STEVENSON*, Senior Financial Analyst, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center ANDREW WADDINGTON, Senior Clinical Research Financial Analyst, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute COMPLIANCE

INTERMEDIATE

EXPORT CONTROLS FOR THE DEPARTMENTAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR: WHAT’S NEW AND WHY DOES IT MATTER? This session will provide a brief overview of U.S. export controls as they apply to academia. Topics will include strategies to manage increasing scrutiny of how academia complies with these laws and how the departmental research administrator can assist with export compliance.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand recent changes to export control laws and their potential impact on academic institutions. • Participants will be able to identify common compliance challenges for export controls and risk mitigation strategies, including: – Proposals to place limits on emerging technologies; – Tightening of access to federal labs; – Funding agency scrutiny of foreign influence in research activities; – Knowing your institution’s international partners and activities PREREQUISITES Basic knowledge of U.S. export control laws is helpful, but not required.

ELIZABETH D. PELOSO*, Associate Vice Provost/Associate Vice President, Research Services, Office of Research Services, University of Pennsylvania JESSICA BUCHANAN, Director of Export Compliance, Research Services, University of Pennsylvania JOHN JENKINS, Assistant Director, Export Controls, Research Services, University of Pennsylvania NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

ADVANCED

BUILDING INFRASTRUCTURE OUTWARD: DEVELOPING DEPARTMENTAL/COLLEGE RESEARCH SERVICES Where do you start when hired to support faculty research in a college/school that previously did not have these services offered? This session will focus on the time expended and resources utilized to gather information in planning services. The various services developed to support faculty research will also be shared. Come hear the approach to hiring staff for research services, and the necessary training for them. How the transition occurred in providing these services to faculty, and building relationships with the central office will also be discussed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will focus on processes used to gather information to plan for services. • Participants will discuss development of specific research services for the faculty. • Participants will review a communication process with the central sponsored research office. • Participants will learn how to secure buy-in from Departmental Administration/Management and encourage Central Office Collaboration for training between College/School and Central.

ROBYN B. REMOTIGUE*, Director, Office of Research Services, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth LEANN S. FORSBERG, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, Texas Christian University FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

INTERMEDIATE

PREPARING INDUSTRY PROPOSALS AND BUDGETS This session will focus on the unique challenges (and opportunities!) of proposals and budgets for industry funded research. In addition, the presenters will provide a point/counterpoint discussion on fixed price versus cost reimbursable budget. Other issues of interest: 1) What indirect cost rate is applicable? 2) What Industry does and does not like about indirect costs. 3) Why is it important for your investigator to provide a specific statement of work (for IP other potential dispute matters.) 4) Why are milestone/deliverable requirements necessary? Come prepared to join in a discussion as we share the secrets of success with industry proposals and budgets.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will leave with a fundamental understanding of the challenges of industry proposals and budgets. • Participants will discuss the benefits or shortfalls of fixed price vs. cost reimbursable, depending on the project. • Participants will learn tips and practices to increase their efficiencies. PREREQUISITES Participants will want basic familiarity with industry proposals and budgets.

SCOTT B. DAVIS*, Associate Director, Research Administration Office, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center KATHERINE V. KISSMANN, Director of Research Contracts, Office of the Vice President for Research, Texas A & M University

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued FEDERAL

UPDATE

NIH UPDATE MICHELLE BULLS*, Director, Office of Policy for Extramural Research Administration, National Institutes of Health SAMUEL ASHE, Director, Division of Grants Policy, Office of Policy for Extramural Research Administration, National Institutes of Health FEDERAL ● OVERVIEW GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS ● OVERVIEW

DIVERSITY IN SCIENCE AND RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION: WHY IT IS ESSENTIAL FOR GLOBAL SUCCESS

90

Collaboration has been a recurring theme in science in recent years. The word “diversity” is shorthand for a vast effort to remake society to include everyone – not just those in privileged positions. People from all over the world and from all sorts of different cultures and backgrounds are a part of the Research community. The diversity of the scientific and research community helps facilitate specialization and provides different points of view that invigorate problem solving and balance biases. This session will discuss the need for more diversity and inclusion in research and how the changing demographics of our research demands a diversified community of researchers and administrators who are prepared for the cultural, generational and gender shifts to keep pace with scientific and technology advancements in a smaller world.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will discuss how diversity facilitates specialization. • Participants will discuss how diversity invigorates problem solving. • Participants will discuss how diversity balances biases. PREREQUISITES None

DERICK F. JONES*, Program Manager, Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute SAMANTHA J. WESTCOTT, Sponsored Research Manager, Division of Physics, California Institute of Technology THERESA R. CABAN, Grant & Contract Officer II, Kaiser Foundation Research

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued POST-AWARD

ADVANCED

POLICY DEVELOPMENT INCORPORATING FEDERAL AND NON-FEDERAL SPONSOR REQUIREMENTS Research Administrators are used to dealing with policies established by entities outside of their control (e.g., the federal government, other sponsors, state and universities). But what does it take to develop a policy? What if: • there is a need for a policy but sponsor or university policies do not exist? • your research is funded by both federal and nonfederal entities and their policies conflict? • sponsor policies conflict with university policies? Or maybe you really don’t need a policy and instead you just need a guideline? What is the difference between a policy and a guideline? How can I determine which one is best? This session will review all of these questions. The session will also cover:

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to describe the process for creating a policy. Participants will learn how to navigate between applicable federal, non-federal, university, and state policies and what to do when they conflict. • Participants will gain an understanding of the different risks involved in policy development and how to mitigate them. • Participants will explore the differences between policies and guidelines, and the pros and cons of each. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a basic understanding of federal regulations that apply to research awards.

• Process for policy creation • Tips and tricks for creating a policy • A discussion on the difference between a policy and guideline, and pros and cons of each. ANDRA SAWYER*, Assistant Director, Post-Award Fiscal Compliance, University of Washington POST-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

THE APPLE DOES FALL FAR FROM THE TREE: COMPLEXITIES OF SUBAWARDS/ SUBCONTRACTS AND SUBRECIPIENT MONITORING This session covers the administrative processes involved with subawards and subcontracts from initiation, negotiation, through fiscal monitoring and closeout. It will provide a step-by-step overview of the subrecipient monitoring details as described in Uniform Guidance 2 CFR 200.330, requirements for pass-through entities and 200.331 monitor and management. Presenters will share their experiences gained from implementing or strengthening policy and procedures on subrecipient monitoring from working at multiple institutions. TOLISE C. DAILEY*, Training Manager, Research Development Team, Johns Hopkins University DAVID M. SCHULTZ, Assistant Vice President, Research Administration and Finance, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PRE-AWARD

OVERVIEW

eRA AND YOU: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW As you know... Gone are the days of PureEdge. Gone are the days of using Adobe to submit to Grants.gov. Fastlane functions are migrating to Research.gov. But did you know... DUNS numbers will be phased out? What’s up with SciENcv? Who needs an ORCID? Blockchain isn’t just about Bitcoin, it’s coming to eRA! What other changes are in store for eRA? What could you be doing now to prepare?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES This session will look at the ever-changing landscape of eRA and emerging technologies and provide participants an update on new technologies and requirements that are currently being implemented and others that are on the horizon. PREREQUISITES None

STEPHEN D. DOWDY*, Director, Research Systems and Integration, Division of Research, University of Maryland, College Park LORI ANN M. SCHULTZ, Senior Director, Research Partnership Services. University of Arizona PRE-AWARD

ADVANCED

STRUCTURING AND DEVELOPING YOUR RESEARCH PRE-AWARD ADMINISTRATION OFFICE FOR SUCCESS 92

This session centers on structuring and developing a central Pre-Award office to maximize performance. The panelists will discuss the various issues that can negatively impact an office’s function and will focus on actions that could improve performance. The panel will examine consistency in practice, resource management, building relationships and managing communications with stakeholders, and change management. This session will support those contemplating structural changes to their offices to improve performance, especially in response to resource limitations, reorganizations or a need to provide expanded services or manage added responsibilities. The session will also be helpful to new directors, or directors who are new to their institutions. This session will benefit from significant audience input, and the panelists will encourage participation of the audience members.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand different structural models and pros and cons of each. • Participants will understand impacts of limited resources and actions that can alleviate the issues caused by limited resources. • Participants will learn the importance of good communication and various methods and practices that can improve communication between stakeholders. • Participants will gain tools to manage transitions and change. PREREQUISITES This session is geared to those who have a leadership role in a Pre-Award office and are responsible for improving office function and responding to change.

DIANE AMBROSE*, Director, Research and Sponsored Programs, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey Central Office DIANE BARRETT, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University TWILA F. REIGHLEY, Assistant Vice President for Research & Innovation, Sponsored Programs Administration, Michigan State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

PREREQUISITES None

NSF ATE AND MENTOR CONNECT FOR THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE/PUI ELAINE CRAFT*, Principal Investigator (PI) for the NSF ATE-funded Mentor-Connect: Leadership Development and Outreach, South Carolina Advanced Technological Education Center of Excellence, Florence - Darlington Technical College CELESTE CARTER, Lead Program Officer, Advanced Technological Education Program, National Science Foundation PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

12 RULES TO BE A SUCCESSFUL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR Research Administration is a newly recognized and emerging profession. While there is an advanced degree available to bolster the credibility of the field, there are no performance standards that mark an individual as a successful research administrator. What are the traits and skills needed to be successful in this field? Similar to Jordan Peterson’s book, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, this session will summarize through anecdotal stories and some research data, the 12 Rules to be a successful research administrator.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain a better understanding that success can sometimes be subjective. • Participants will gain a better understanding between technical skill and emotional intelligence and mental agility. • Participants will gain insight into recognizing their own strengths and the importance of matching them to the job.

93

LISA E. MOSLEY*, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects, Yale University PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ADVANCED

CREATING BEST-OUTCOME CONVERSATIONS IN RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION: HOW DO WE GET THERE? This session will discuss some of the common sources of stress when having important conversations and provide strategies to help anticipate and manage through challenges. Topics will include: identifying stress triggers, self-stories that help and hinder resilience, and having conversations and taking actions that move tasks and relationships forward. Scenarios will be presented and discussed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn signals and triggers that can potentially affect their ability to have effective conversations. • Participants will learn strategies for managing stress associated with challenging conversations and learn how to adapt to situations, people, and contexts. • Participants will learn strategies and tactics they can begin to use immediately to help create bestoutcome conversations.

GARRY R. SANDERS*, Principal and Founder, AssistLeadership, LLC JUDY L. FREDENBERG, Assistant Vice President for Research and Federal Relations, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP), University of Montana

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

> CLICK HERE to visit NCURA’s PUBLICATIONS STORE


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS COMPLIANCE

LESSONS LEARNED FROM SELF-DISCLOSURE

When accepting Federal funding there are a myriad of laws, regulations and guidelines that require awardees to disclose improper business practices, overpayments, fraud, bribery, or other violations that potentially affect a Federal award(s). We will discuss a real life case study of self-disclosure to the Office of Inspector General. The outcomes of the disclosure and the resulting aftermath might not be what you would expect for doing the “right thing.” DIANE BARRETT*, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University CHRISTA C. JOHNSON, Associate Vice President for Research Administration, Colorado State University COMPLIANCE

IRB: COMMON RULE IMPLEMENTATION (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT

SESSION HELD MONDAY AT 10:15 AM)

CYNTHIA SHINDLEDECKER*, Director, Health Sciences and Behavioral Sciences Institutional Review Board, University of Michigan DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

HOT TOPICS IN DATA MANAGEMENT 94

ALEXANDRA A. ALBINAK*, Associate Vice Provost for Research Administration, Johns Hopkins University DOUGLAS B. BACKMAN*, Director, Compliance, University of Central Florida DEPARTMENTAL

PI-RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR PARTNERSHIPS (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT SESSION HELD MONDAY AT 4:00 PM)

Why do PIs and administrators not always see eye to eye? Ever feel like many times you are up against a wall when the task is pretty simple? Ever feel like you’ve been branded as “red tape” because your work is associated with regulations? Understanding your PI through the establishment of an excellent work relationship is the key to successful research from cradle to grave. Research Administration in some ways is like capturing the perfect picture of an otherwise mundane but important monument. It takes, knowledge, skills, creativity and a passion for what you do. This discussions session aims to: provide an opportunity for attendees to share experiences. The leaders will provide 2 case studies of successful departmental/PI relationships with real life solutions and strategies; and, discuss the applicability of strategies in different environments. MAROLYN L. GENTLES*, Business Manager II, Experimental Economics Center, Georgia State University JENNIFER CORY DOESCHOT, Director of Operations, Center for Definitive and Curative Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued EXECUTIVE LEVEL

MANAGING THE FUTURE: STAYING IN FRONT AND REMAINING PROACTIVE

While it is a good start, it is simply not enough to be the first to do something if you are to remain proactive. The annals of history are chock full of institutions who were first to market with a new gizmo only to fall victim a few years later to complacency and/or newer technology. Today’s work pace expects readily available solutions to address past, present, and future challenges. Join this discussion group to hear the presenters share how they manage the future by remaining proactive. Be prepared to contribute by sharing your thoughts on staying in front! DAVID W. RICHARDSON*, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, NCURA Distinguished Educator ZACHARY BELTON, Senior Director, Huron GLOBAL FOR U.S. PARTICIPANTS

IMPACT YOU HAVE TO CONSIDER WHEN BEING INVOLVED IN AN PROPOSAL FOR HORIZON 2020

Handling the set-up of a multi-PI international project includes Impact as one of the main descriptive assessment areas for successful funding. Using common sense for making the PI aware which support structures can help to describe this bit can lighten your load as Research Manager, as well as the PI’s understanding of this important area. BRUNO K. WOERAN*, EU Affairs Manager & Innovation Networks, Merinova TechCenter, University of Vaasa ANNIKA GLAUNER, Senior Policy Advisor and Head of Research Development at EU GrantsAccess, Officer, ETH Zurich/University of Zurich

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

8:15 – 9:45 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued POST-AWARD

STUDENT COMPENSATION: WAGES, STIPENDS, FINANCIAL AID, AND OTHER WAYS BONNIEJEAN ZITSKE*, Assistant Director for Post-Award, University of Wisconsin-Madison PRE-AWARD

PRE-AWARD CONSIDERATIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL GLOBAL COLLABORATIONS JESSICA SMITH-KAPROSY*, Contracts Manager, Office of Research Support and Operations, Washington State University PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

An intentionally inclusive environment is one that thrives and produces amazing outcomes. In an ever-evolving, globally competitive market, it is important to accept all people and respect everyone’s differences. Faculty members and sponsor expectations are so diverse and are changing constantly. As professionals, our offices should reflect these same differences.

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LANEIKA MUSALINI*, Director, Office of Grants Development and Sponsored Programs, Tri-County Technical College RANDI E. WASIK, Director Program in Molecular Medicine, Floyd College of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

ENGAGING WITH SPONSORS AMY CARROLL*, Director of Research Development, Office of the Vice President of Research, Brown University

8:15 – 9:45 am | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

9:45 – 10:15 am | NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK 10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS COMPLIANCE

OVERVIEW

INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES WITH GDPR

PREREQUISITES None

PEGAH PARSI*, Contracts & Grants Officer, Research Administration, Stanford University DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

INTERMEDIATE

RESEARCH DATA MANAGEMENT LIFECYCLE MELISSA KORF*, Associate Director, Grants & Contracts, Office of Research Administration, Harvard Medical School DEPARTMENTAL

INTERMEDIATE

LET’S WORK TOGETHER! PRE- AND POST-AWARD ADMINISTRATOR INTERACTIONS & TOOLS FOR THE DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATOR Whether you oversee the grant process from beginning to end, or work with a counterpart or team, join us as we discuss best practices and the need to develop strong departmental and campus-wide relationships. Every department operates differently and each individual and situation brings a unique flair to the workplace. We will discuss tried and true methods of improving professional interactions between Pre- and Post-Award administrators, PI communication techniques, best practices every new administrator should know. We will also touch on job priorities and changing rolls. Led by Pre- and Post-Award administrators from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, this session is also beneficial to both Pre-Award Research Administrators and Financial Research Administrators.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain an understanding of the varying roles within the field of Research Administration and learn ways to mitigate difficult situations and changing job priorities through discussion and group participation. • Participants will learn the basics of both the Pre- and Post-Award administrator and find commonalities in an effort to improve relationships and administrative processes.

NATHAN HOLTSCLAW*, Business Officer, College of Health & Human Services, University of North Carolina at Wilmington ALTHEA T. LEWIS, Pre-Award Grant Specialist, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Wilmington CHARNEL BOHN, Assistant Director, Business Analysis and Quality, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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AGENDA

Annual Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued EXECUTIVE LEVEL

ADVANCED

NAVIGATING AND BALANCING ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE: LEADING, MOTIVATING, AND BEING EFFECTIVE

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In today’s environment, organizational change is a fact of life. As senior research administrators, we are looked upon to lead our organization through transformational changes; reorganization, systems implementation, and resource allocation, while sustaining the overall structure of the department. When the goals for the organizational change are not clearly defined, it produces an environment of uncertainty among the stakeholders. The session will focus on the wider impacts of leading and motivating during organizational change, while establishing the framework for managing change systematically. Lastly, the presenters will answer the following: What can we do as a leader to guide our institution through the desired transformation and create outcomes that produces a win-win for all involved? How to do I manage the project, while keeping the interested parties motivated to produce a successful transition of change?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will focus on identifying various types of organizational conflict that forms when change occurs. • Participants will learn how to positively impact productivity, morale and leadership during organizational change. • Participants will be able to recognize the importance of motivating the team and gaining buy in. • Participants will be able to identify and communicate innovative tactics for managing change. PREREQUISITES Participants will want at least 3 years of management experience.

ROSEMARY E. MADNICK*, Executive Director, Office of Grants and Contracts, University of Alaska Fairbanks AMANDA MIKHAIL, Administrator - Research, Mayo Clinic Rochester FEDERAL

UPDATE

LATEST IN FEDERAL AUDIT RESULTS

PREREQUISITES None

MARK BELL*, Assistant Inspector General for Audit, Office of Inspector General, National Science Foundation

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued GLOBAL FOR NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

OVERVIEW

WHEN YOU HAVE TO WEAR TWO HATS: LESSONS LEARNED FROM GRANTS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION IN AN INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) is an international branch campus of NYU located in the United Arab Emirates. NYUAD is a fully-fledged liberal arts undergraduate college and a research university. The external funding landscape in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has yet to develop when compared to the research hubs of North America, Europe, and East Asia. NYUAD instead relies on internal funding mechanisms to ensure appropriate financial support for its research activities. The institution is responsible for the policies and procedures that determine the allocation of funds to various projects. As such, NYUAD wears two hats: 1) the hat worn by an institution who applies for and manages research funding, and 2) the hat traditionally worn by an external sponsor who develops and promotes funding opportunities, reviews proposals and makes award decisions. This session discusses valuable lessons from NYUAD’s own implementation, for those seeking to implement or enhance an electronic Research Administration (eRA) system.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES From planning the project, to setting up a governance structure, designing, testing, and integrating systems, end-users training, and managing communication, the session provides tactical and practical insights from different angles and perspectives including that of the vendor/consultant. PREREQUISITES Participants will benefit from having a basic understanding of eRA systems and their general functions.

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NADA MESSAIKEH*, Associate Vice Provost for Research Administration and Financial Planning, New York University Abu Dhabi RYAN DODD, Associate Director, Research Administration & Grants Finance, New York University Abu Dhabi GLOBAL FOR NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

OVERVIEW

TIPS FROM NSF FOR GLOBAL APPLICANTS

PREREQUISITES None

REBECCA KEISER*, Office Head, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR

BASIC

RESEARCH COMPLIANCE: WHAT I NEED TO KNOW AS A NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR This session will include common compliance terms to be aware of, how to review budget categories from a compliance perspective, and a basic overview of the compliance approvals that have to be in place at different points throughout the award lifecycle. Topic examples include: human subjects, animals and biological research; export controls; conflict of interest; and responsible conduct of research. Presenters will bring perspectives from an R1, a comprehensive university, and a PUI that might have fewer training opportunities. Come join us as we review and clarify these topics and others!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain insight into the ways that the following types of research compliance regulations will affect Pre- and Post-Award responsibilities: Institutional Review Board (IRB), Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC), Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee (IACUC), Export Controls, Responsible Conduct of Research, and Conflict of Interest (COI). • Participants will be able to identify key terms and activities so they can better recognize them when research compliance regulations are involved. • This session lays the groundwork for new Research Administrators to collaborate successfully and confidently with their institution’s appropriate compliance unit, and know when and who to contact. PREREQUISITES None

DEANNA B. HENDRICKSON*, Research Education & Communication Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs, Georgia Institute of Technology KELLY MILLSAPS, Grant Specialist, Grants & Contracts Administration, University of North Georgia 100

POST-AWARD

ADVANCED

I NEED HOW MANY COST CENTERS FOR EACH SERVICE CENTER? During this advanced level session we will delve into some of the accounting concepts and practices surrounding service, a.k.a., recharge centers. Our panel of university experts will share their experience on service center accounting topics. Topics will include the following, Why would I set up more than one cost center a.k.a., fund, activity or project for each service or recharge center; How should I account for subsidies so that they can be identified and treated properly in my FA rate proposal; Why would setting up a separate cost center for external users benefit me; What should I consider when including depreciation in my service center rates; What goes into my reserve account?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how to use a separate cost center for billings to external users. • Participants will discuss three different systems that can be used for identifying subsidies to service centers. • Participants will review two ways to fund an equipment reserve. PREREQUISITES An understanding of service center compliance concepts is required for this session. A basic knowledge of the accounting practices and system at the participant’s own institution would be helpful.

CAROLINE M. BEEMAN*, Director, MAXIMUS Higher Education, Inc. CATHY L SNYDER, Director, Vanderbilt Costing Activities, Office of Contract & Grant Accounting, Vanderbilt University DAVID M. SCHULTZ, Assistant Vice President, Research Administration and Finance, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PRE-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

CASE STUDIES IN COST SHARE FAUX-PAS AND CORRECTNESS In this session, we will explore the different types of cost share on grants, and the tension arising from need to show institutional support while also avoiding institutional risk. The challenge of mitigating this tension can often lead teams to commit cost share faux pas in the proposal– leaving Post-Award administrators with the difficult task of correctly meeting and documenting the cost share. We will use case studies to explore blunders and gray areas in a proposal that can lead to difficult cost-share tracking during the Post-Award stage. We would like to hear from audience members about their best practices in documenting cost share. Our case studies will also explore the challenges and opportunities Pre-Award administrators face as they educate faculty members about leveraging institutional support.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to talk about the different kinds of cost share. • Participants will understand how cost share affects the Institution’s indirect cost rate. • Participants will understand why an institution would agree to the various types of cost share. • Participants will understand what documents auditors need for the various types of cost share. • Participants will discuss how discuss how different institutions handle the accounting/tracking for the various types of cost share. • Participants will understand strategies for discussing cost share with PIs and project directors. PREREQUISITES Participants will want at least 6 months of experience working with budgets and grant awards including cost share.

KATIE SCHORTGEN*, Manager, Sponsored Research Accounting, Eastern Michigan University PATIENCE GRAYBILL, Manager, Research Development and Administration, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Washington University in St. Louis

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

USDOE TITLE III APPLICATIONS AT A PUI

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In 2017, Columbus State Community College (CSCC) and Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) were two of 17 awardees from the USDOE Title III: Strengthening Institution competition. The CSCC Part A project is seeking to increase the number of degrees and certificates awarded by 48 over the five year project by improving student entry, progress, and completion activities. This includes expanded orientation and first-year experiences, a student planner dashboard, individualized completion plans, and professional development for faculty and staff, among other activities. SVSU Part F is using this award to update college-level math courses, develop online educational materials with instructional designer support, develop student analytics and business intelligence framework to improve student services, and expand scholarships with 1.2M endowment to retain students with financial burdens. In this presentation, grant professionals from the institutions will present a “how-to” plan for a Title III grant planning process and application.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how and when to apply for Title III eligibility: it’s a two-step process. • Participants will learn about Absolute Priority and Competitive Preference Priority. • Participants will learn how to take your institution’s Strategic Plan and write Title III objectives based on strengths, weaknesses, and significant problems. • Participants will learn how to write and report on Key Performance Indicators, Objectives, and GPRA Measures. • Participants will learn how many and which Title III allowable activities to choose, which impacts reporting. • Participants will learn how to include equipment and endowment funding in your budget that supports student retention. • Participants will learn what’s allowable to fund: Hiring students for project work? Buying books? Running student summer MELT experiences? • Participants will learn about project management and institutional commitment. • Participants will learn about data collection without paying an evaluator. • Participants will learn about how the institutions used planning tools to assist in the grant development process. PREREQUISITES None

SHANE S. KIRBY*, Director, Grants Office, Columbus State Community College JANET M. RENTSCH, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, Saginaw Valley State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

STRATEGIES FOR STRUCTURING RESEARCH SUPPORT TEAMS AS A RESULT OF CHANGE Transitions happen. Whether by internal decisions or external forces, how one prepares for these changes makes the difference between order and chaos. This session takes an in depth look at the various types of transitions and pitfalls we deal with and what steps we can take to make sure our organization is prepared for restructuring. The focus of this session is management of the realigning staff to make sure the day-to-day activities are progressing and making sure nothing and no one is lost in the change shuffle. We will look at methods to manage change and restructure. We will share resources to identify and implement tools for retention, reorganization and re-motivating staff through the change process.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn to develop tools to overcome change. Participants will learn to develop tools to reinvigorate staff after a restructure. • Participants will benefit from managerial experience or understanding of restructuring.

DERICK F. JONES*, Program Manager, Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute RASHONDA HARRIS, Associate Director of Post Award Operations, The Office of Finance Grants & Contracts, Emory University RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

BUILDING INTERDISCIPLINARY AND COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH TEAMS This panel will share their experiences identifying and assembling collaborative research teams to compete for external funding.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand the importance of collaborative teams in today’s research funding environment • Participants will explore various mechanisms for identifying and assembling collaborative teams • Participants will take away strategies and methods that can be applied in a variety of higher education environments.

MIKE MITCHELL*, Proposal Development Coordinator, Office of Proposal Development, Florida State University SUSAN CARTER, Research Development Director, Santa Fe Institute KARIN SCARPINATO, Executive Associate Vice President for Research, Florida Atlantic University NATHAN MEIER, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

ISSUES IN CLINICAL TRIAL SUBCONTRACTING ASHLEY BAKER-LEE*, Senior Vice President, Research Operations, City of Hope COMPLIANCE

SENIOR LEADER DISCUSSION ON INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSE TO FOREIGN INFLUENCE

U.S. academic institutions have become increasingly global in their activities and reach. Recently, there has been increased governmental focus on international collaborations and activities at universities and concern about foreign influence at U.S. universities. In this discussion, brainstorm with fellow leaders on ways institutions can manage the increased scrutiny, meet evolving sponsor expectations for the management and disclosure of international relationships, and provide meaningful institutional risk management of global activities. ELIZABETH D. PELOSO*, Associate Vice Provost/Associate Vice President, Research Services, Office of Research Services, University of Pennsylvania DEPARTMENTAL

ALTERNATES TO EFFORT REPORTING: THE DEPARTMENTAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR’S PERSPECTIVE 104

This topic is designed to foster a discussion between departmental research administrators and other Research Administration professionals and leaders around the challenges to traditional effort reporting models. Further, we will discuss an example of the transition and a ‘lessons learned’ resource in both models for participants will be created. NICOLE QUARTIERO*, Assistant Director, Indirect Cost Recovery (ICR) & Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP), Colorado State University-Pueblo FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

ETHICS OF CONTRACT NEGOTIATION

Most contract negotiators have had the misfortune of working with certain individuals who seem to believe that anything goes as long as they “win” their argument. University negotiators tend to be somewhat more constrained in their tactics, because of their overarching commitment to serve the public good. But what are the first principles of ethical contract negotiation? And how should our tactics change when working with someone who seems unconstrained by considerations of ethics? JOHN W. HANOLD*, Associate Vice President for Research, Office of Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State University ZACHARY GILL, Director, Proposal and Award Management, Office of the Vice President for Research, Oregon State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

61st

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

Annual Meeting

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued FEDERAL

SEXUAL HARASSMENT REPORTING JACQUELYN BENDALL*, Director, Council on Governmental Relations (COGR) GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

INTERNATIONAL APPROACHES TO EXPORT COMPLIANCE WAYNE MOWERY, JR.*, Senior Director of Compliance, University Export Compliance, Office of Ethics and Compliance, Penn State University Park POST-AWARD

BALANCING FACULTY’S NEEDS WITH SPONSOR REQUIREMENTS

The faculty member has a great idea, yet sponsor or institutional requirements make it hard to push a great idea forward. Grant administrators can face criticism because they are the ones that walk the fine line between making it work and following the rules. Attendees will share ideas on how to mitigate the sometimes complicated relationship between faculty, sponsor, and the institution. SANDRA L. FOWLER*, Assistant Dean, College of Agricultural & Life Sciences, Business Services – Administration, University of Wisconsin-Madison PRE-AWARD

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WORKLOAD BALANCING FOR PRE-AWARD ADMINISTRATION

On any Pre-Award team, there is a constant flow of proposals and agreements. Determining an appropriate workload for individual research administrators can be a moving target. We’ll discuss ideas to fluidly adjust workload of a fast-paced Research Administration office. How do you keep the work distributed across your team to maintain efficiency and quality? What things make it hard to keep a workload balanced across a team? How do metrics factor in? Come, discuss strategies for balancing workload to help a team function optimally. CAROLYN POERIO*, Director, Pre-Award, University of Pennsylvania KATHERINE HO, Executive Director and Deputy to the Associate Vice President, Office of Research Administration, Stanford University

> CLICK HERE for information about NCURA’s LIFECYCLE OF THE AWARD WEBINAR SERIES August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

10:15 – 11:30 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS

THE ROLE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION IN THE DATA-DRIVEN ACCREDITATION PROCESS AT A PUI

During the accreditation process, the Council for Higher Education Initiatives (CHEA) asks colleges and universities “Is the institution fulfilling its mission and achieving its goals?” The answer to this question lies within both academic and administrative units campus-wide. Goals must be related to the institution’s overall strategic plan and must be measurable. Sponsored Programs offices are no exception to this process and many research administrators are now being asked to present their yearly objectives in a strictly quantifiable manner. This is a change for many, and impacts everything from staff evaluations to application and award projections. This interactive discussion, intended for those who have and who will go through this process, will provide useful tips for successfully meeting institutional needs. DOMINIC ESPOSITO*, Director of Sponsored Programs Administration, Farmingdale State University

10:15 – 11:30 am | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION BE UPLIFTED WITH STREAMLYNE

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Come see a quick demo on the highlights of Streamlyne Research and learn about Streamlyne’s extensive experience with eRA implementations. See for yourself how Streamlyne Research empowers efficiency throughout the Research Administration lifecycle, making it easy for you to glide through your work, so you can get more done in less time. Let our team share their insight on how to address your challenges with some informal Q&A at the end of the session. MARY KATHRYN KARAFONDA, VP, Research Implementation Practices & Product; Development RANDY OZDEN, President & CEO

11:30 am – 1:00 pm | NETWORKING LUNCHEON, AWARDS AND RECOGNITION Join us for lunch and the presentation of the Catherine Core Travel Award, Annual Meeting Travel Award and recognition of our volunteers.

1:00 – 2:00 pm | IGNITE SESSIONS Ignite is a series of speedy presentations. NCURA is hosting our own version of Ignite sessions for the 61st Annual Meeting! Session topics to be announced. During this time slot, different sessions will run, one after the other, in each meeting room. This is a high energy experience... make sure to join us!

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

2:00 – 2:15 pm | NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK 2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

OVERVIEW

NEGOTIATING CLINICAL TRIAL AGREEMENTS Negotiating a clinical trial agreement, a.k.a. a CTA, is a special art. Come discover the most important elements of CTA negotiation from a 10,000 foot view, and discuss the important nuances with your peers!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will discover the steps involved in developing a foundation for a clinical trial agreement • Participants will learn how to develop an effective clinical trial contract that covers all elements, including a budget that sufficiently covers all potential institutional costs. • Participants will be able to identify potential negotiation points, and discuss approaches for finding the common ground. PREREQUISITES None

BETH KINGSLEY*, Senior Grant Analyst - Regulatory, Office of Contracts and Grants, Denver Health and Hospital Authority VALARIE WARNER, Project & Finance Coordinator, Computer Assisted Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center COMPLIANCE

ADVANCED

ETHICAL LEADERSHIP: CREATING AND SUSTAINING A CULTURE FOR THE FUTURE

PREREQUISITES • Participants will want a minimum of 2 years supervising experience.

Ethical leadership is a form of leadership in which individuals demonstrate conduct for the common good that is acceptable and appropriate in every area of their life, including professionally. Ethical leaders help establish a positive environment with productive relationships with the individual, team and organization, while fostering credibility, trust and respect. The leaders of the session will focus on the framework and the approach research administrators can integrate ethical leadership into their organizations. SHUNA H. MCMICHAEL*, Institutional Research Administrator, Grants & Sponsored Programs, Soka University of America ROSEMARY E. MADNICK, Executive Director, Office of Grants and Contracts, University of Alaska Fairbanks

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

INTERMEDIATE

COMPLIANCE AND BEYOND: THE QUEST FOR INSTITUTIONAL DATA SHARING EXCELLENCE All major federal funding agencies and many private funders require data management plans. Reviewed as part of the proposal, a standout data management plan will help your researchers receive more grant dollars and get your institution recognized as a leader with the infrastructure that supports 21st century research. But a written plan is just the first step for a project to fully realize best practices in managing, curating, and sharing research data. A well thought out and successfully implemented data management plan results in professionally curated and ethically shared data. This is important because data sharing minimizes institutional risk and reduces the potential for fraud. In this talk, we will explore the ways in which your institution can support and implement data management and data sharing best practices. We will use case studies to illustrate successful institutional data sharing services. 108

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain a full understanding of what data sharing is with real use cases. • Participants will gain knowledge of motivations for university researchers to share their data. • Participants will have an awareness of practical examples of policies and services around data sharing at several institutions. PREREQUISITES Participants will benefit from basic knowledge of the Holdren memo. http://obamawhitehouse.archives. gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/ostp_public_ access_memo_2013.pdf

MARA BLAKE*, Data Services Manager, Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Johns Hopkins University LISA JOHNSTON, Research Data Management/Curation Lead and Co-Director of the University Digital Conservancy, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

ADVANCED

MORE THAN THE SUM OF THE PARTS: DEVELOPING AND MANAGING CENTER GRANTS Center grants create new challenges for PIs and administrators alike. How does one lead and support a center, which is essentially a loose network of collaborators? If centers aim to realize the PIs’ research dreams, then administrators need a strong, wellplanned infrastructure supporting the center from the ground up! This session will review experiences and lessons learned in five primary areas: Proposal Development, Budgeting, Communication, Project Management, and Reporting. Presenters have experience developing large-scale center grant proposals e.g., NSF MRSEC, DOE EFRC as well as managing funded centers e.g., NSF STC, DOE EFRC.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will have an increased knowledge of proposal planning issues to discuss with PIs. • Participants will gain a basic understanding of center grant budgets, including cores and common cost elements. • Participants will review communication roadblocks and strategies to improve the center’s overall culture and sense of citizenship. • Participants will discuss lessons learned from reviewer comments after the first year. • Participants will learn to improve strategies for data and information-gathering across several sites. PREREQUISITES Participants will want Pre-Award and/or Post-Award experience. Project management experience a plus.

PATIENCE GRAYBILL*, Manager, Research Development and Administration, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Washington University in St. Louis NATALIE GOODWIN FRANK, Director, Research Development & Administration, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Washington University in St. Louis MICHELLE SCHOENECKER, Senior Proposal Development Manager, Office of Research & Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

INTERMEDIATE

NEGOTIATING INDUSTRY CONTRACTS ELAINE L. BROCK*, President and Senior Partner, C3Authority, LLC NICOLE CARLETON, Project Manager, Service & Research Agreements, Office of Grants & Contracts, University of Colorado Boulder CATHERINE INNES, Director, Policy and Strategic Initiatives, University of Washington (Emeritus) FEDERAL

OVERVIEW

COGR WASHINGTON UPDATE

PREREQUISITES None

WENDY STREITZ*, President, Council on Governmental Relations (COGR)

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS ● OVERVIEW

FUNDAMENTAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN EU AND U.S. SPONSORED RESEARCH AUDITING EU projects (H2020) and U.S. Single Audits, while basically undergoing the same principles, are very different in terms of when audits are undergone, and the testing procedures in place. This session will address these differences, and answer any specific questions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will know when each type of audit (EU and U.S.) is required, for both U.S. and Non-U.S. organizations. • Participants will understand what is required by the auditors prior to the audit. • Participants will learn how to prepare for the audit fieldwork. • Participants will understand how to put the finalization and completion procedures in place. PREREQUISITES None

JONATHAN GRAY*, Senior Manager, Grant Auditing Team, LEES Chartered Certified Accountants NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR

BASIC

AN OVERVIEW OF POST-AWARD

PREREQUISITES None

JAQUION L. GHOLSTON*, Assistant Director of Sponsored Accounting, Office of Sponsored Accounting & Cost Analysis, Stevens Institute of Technology LAMAR K. OGLESBY, Assistant Director, Post-Award Management, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 110

POST-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

EFFECTIVE FISCAL MANAGEMENT OF INDUSTRY CLINICAL TRIALS Many institutions struggle with appropriate fiscal management of clinical trial project accounts. Since payroll expenses are typically based on subject enrollment rather than committed effort, ensuring application of appropriate payroll expenses to accounts is difficult. Additionally, without centralized monitoring, it is challenging to ensure sponsors are invoiced for applicable expenses and accounts remain open long after studies have ended, incurring expenses that do not benefit the project for which the account was established. In this session, attendees will learn how Children’s Hospital Los Angeles successfully transferred clinical trial Post-Award functions from its Post-Award team to its clinical trials team. The team learned to better manage residual funds to ensure adherence to applicable accounting practices.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how to perform a close

out analysis to ensure all appropriate payroll is charged to the project. • Participants will learn how to increase revenue through better invoicing practices to ensure all applicable invoiceable expenses are requested and collected. • Participants will learn how to implement a residual funds policy. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a general understanding of clinical trial administration.

KAREN NIEMEIER*, Executive Director, Research Administration, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PRE-AWARD

BASIC

PRE-AWARD BUDGET FUNDAMENTALS The Pre-Award Budget Fundamentals session will provide attendees with an overview of NIH cost principles and an in-depth review of both direct and indirect cost elements. The presentation will focus on terminology and definitions, while explaining the process of developing grant budgets. The content will highlight the differences between modular and detailed budgets, allowable vs. unallowable costs, and provide examples of how to calculate salary over-thecap, fringe benefits, modified total direct costs, and F&A. Additionally, the session will include strategies to develop effective budget justifications along with a few budget case studies to reinforce the learning objectives.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn to develop a better understanding of direct and indirect costs, calculating faculty and staff salary with fringe benefits, modified total direct costs, allowable vs. unallowable costs, and creating effective budget justifications. PREREQUISITES None

MICHAEL KENNEDY*, Director of Finance, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

PREREQUISITES None

GETTING TO YES IN AN ERA OF COMPLIANCE AT A PUI: POINTS TO PONDER WHILE WORKING WITH FACULTY PANDA S. POWELL*, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research Compliance, University of North Carolina at Wilmington PAMELA B. WHITLOCK, Director, Office Of Sponsored Programs, University of North Carolina at Wilmington (Emeritus)

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

POWERPOINT SLIDES ARE NOT YOUR PRESENTATION’S POWER POINT Let’s breathe new life into your next presentation by letting go of the lecturing, wordy slides, and boring case studies. It’s time to move beyond the traditional training sessions of telling people what you want them to know, and embrace the future by teaching them how to grow. What happens when trainers share their experiences? Come find out!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be given tools and techniques to use with their next training session. PREREQUISITES Participants will want basic presentation experience.

TOLISE C. DAILEY*, Training Manager, Research Development Team, Johns Hopkins University MICHAEL C. MCGOUGH, Grants Coordinator, College of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Georgia

DISCUSSION GROUPS COMPLIANCE

INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES WITH GDPR (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT SESSION HELD TUESDAY AT 10:15 AM)

PEGAH PARSI*, Contracts & Grants Officer, Research Administration, Stanford University 112

DEPARTMENTAL

LET’S WORK TOGETHER! PRE- AND POST-AWARD ADMINISTRATOR INTERACTIONS & TOOLS FOR THE DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATOR (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT SESSION HELD TUESDAY AT 10:15 AM)

NATHAN HOLTSCLAW*, Business Officer, College of Health & Human Services, University of North Carolina at Wilmington ALTHEA T. LEWIS, Pre-Award Grant Specialist, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Wilmington EXECUTIVE LEVEL

INSPIRING STAFF FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE

In this discussion, we will discuss impediments to staff performance in Research Administration, opportunities to improve process, logistics and environment to facilitate staff efforts and ideas to assist staff in becoming the best they can be. Join us also to discuss ways to encourage communication, transparency and team building among staff and across campus. Ideas for different types of incentives and related pros and cons will be explored. DIANE AMBROSE*, Director, Research and Sponsored Programs, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey Central Office TWILA F. REIGHLEY, Assistant Vice President for Research & Innovation, Sponsored Programs Administration, Michigan State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued EXECUTIVE LEVEL

HOW TO SUCCESSFULLY MANAGE AND MITIGATE IRRESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH ARA TAHMASSIAN*, Chief Research Compliance Officer, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Harvard University FEDERAL

FOREIGN INFLUENCE ON FEDERAL GRANTS PAMELA A. WEBB*, Associate Vice President for Research, Sponsored Projects Administration, University of Minnesota, NCURA Distinguished Educator GLOBAL FOR NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

ORGANIZE YOUR GRANTS OFFICE IN A WAY THAT YOU CAN MANAGE U.S. GRANTS BELLA BLAHER*, Project Manager, University of Melbourne ANNIKA GLAUNER, Senior Policy Advisor and Head of Research Development at EU GrantsAccess, Officer, ETH Zurich/University of Zurich POST-AWARD

FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE: IS YOUR INSTITUTION AT RISK? DEBRA Y. MURRAY*, Assistant Director, Compliance, University of Maryland, College Park DAVID M. SCHULTZ, Assistant Vice President, Research Administration and Finance, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute   PRE-AWARD

THE EXPANDED ROLE OF THE RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR: BALANCING COMPLIANCE AND SERVICE DELIVERY

The Pre-Award administrator – we are in labs, departments and central offices. Many central Pre-Award operations take the sponsored projects lifecycle through award acceptance. Some do subaward issuance and look after non-financial Post-Award matters. We balance protecting the institution with delivering excellent service, and sometimes…the lines across various roles get blurred. Come join your colleagues in discussing roles and responsibilities of a Pre-Award administrator: How do your promote your value added to Pre-Award processes? To what extend should central offices be involved in sponsor compliance? How do you handle the blurred lines of responsibilities? How do you prevent an us-vs-them mentality? How do you achieve successful collaboration and communication among the folks supporting sponsored projects processes? MICHIKO T. PANE*, Director, Pre-Award Operations & Client Advocacy and Education, Stanford University NOAM PINES, Associate Director, Sponsored Projects Office, University of California-Berkeley

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

> CLICK HERE to read the latest NCURA MAGAZINE

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

2:15 – 3:30 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

LEADING COOPERATIVELY FROM THE GROUND UP

There is a growing trend in Research Administration to provide excellent customer service while volume and workload continue to increase, along with complexity, which takes time and can cause frustrations. How do you reconcile these different needs? Maintaining adherence to sponsor and university policies while providing great customer service is a balancing act. This discussion will provide short and long-term guidance and tools for helping your Research Administration office navigate an environment of multiple interests across the spectrum of customer service and compliance. EDWARD T. FEHSKENS*, Assistant Director, Office of Research Administration, Johns Hopkins University RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

STRATEGIES FOR RESEARCH MATCHMAKING KAREN M. MARKIN*, Director of Research Development, Center for the Humanities, University of Rhode Island

2:15 – 3:30 pm | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION 114

LEARN FROM THE BEST! JOHNS HOPKINS M.S. DEGREE IN RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION You are invited to participate in the journey of a lifetime. Come and learn about how you can get a Master of Science Degree in Research Administration from Johns Hopkins University. Johns Hopkins University is #1 in the world in Research with Research Expenditures of $2.5B. Learn from the best. MARIANNE R. WOODS, Faculty and Program Director, Master of Science in Research Administration, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences Advanced Academic Programs Johns Hopkins University

3:30 – 4:00 pm | NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

INTERMEDIATE

THE CLINICAL TRIAL BUSINESS PROCESS This session will provide an overview of the recent revisions to the Common Rule 45 CFR 46 and will focus on the applicability of the Common Rule in conducting research on large data sets that were originally collected for another purpose. CANDICE VANCE*, Senior Manager, Clinical Research Revenue Cycle, MedStar Health Research Institute COMPLIANCE

INTERMEDIATE

RESEARCH COMPLIANCE: HOW DOES IT AFFECT ME IN THE AWARD LIFECYCLE? This session will include common compliance terms to be aware of, how to review budget categories from a compliance perspective, and a discussion of the compliance approvals that have to be in place at different points throughout the award lifecycle. These topics will be addressed through mini case studies including: a project requiring the use of an external IRB or human subject incentive payments; I’ve been asked to order HMEC-1 or Aeromonas hydrophila; a vivarium is listed under equipment; the project country is Afghanistan and involves shipment of equipment; an NSF project that entails hiring of students; and the last name of the PI and one of the contractors is the same. Come join us as we review and clarify these topics and others!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain insight into the ways that the following types of research compliance regulations will affect both the Pre- and PostAward responsibilities: Institutional Review Board, Institutional Biosafety Committee, Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee, Export Controls, Responsible Conduct of Research, and Conflict of Interest. • Participants will be able to identify key terms and activities so they can better recognize when research compliance regulations are involved. • This session will provide regulatory compliance knowledge for research administrators to collaborate successfully and confidently with their institution’s appropriate compliance unit, and know when and who to contact. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a basic understanding of the award lifecycle.

DEANNA B. HENDRICKSON*, Research Education & Communication Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs, Georgia Institute of Technology CAROLYN ELLIOTT-FARINO, Executive Director, Office of Research, Kennesaw State University KELLY MILLSAPS, Grant Specialist, Grants & Contracts Administration, University of North Georgia

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

OVERVIEW

ONBOARDING AND TRAINING DEPARTMENTAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS (DRAs)

116

At many decentralized institutions, a departmental research administrator is often the closest administrator to a PI. This makes the DRA an indispensable ally for the responsible and compliant stewardship of sponsored projects, from pre-proposal through award close. Amongst other things, successful, value-add departmental research administrators are typically highly knowledgeable and resourceful. Developing and implementing a DRA onboarding and ongoing training program, complete with tools and resources to empower and educate DRAs [rather than cultivate dependence] is a win for everyone: from DRA career development and advancement, to customer service and central office partnerships. After all, it’s not about how much central office subject matter experts know. Rather, it’s about making the relevant information more accessible and digestible to others. This session will explore some approaches and considerations for implementing (or refreshing) a DRA onboarding and training program.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to recognize and utilize the value of having central office folks with departmental experience and vice versa. • Participants will learn how to enlist SMEs from a wide range of disciplines to contribute to and/or review training materials to increase accuracy, credibility, and buy in. • Participants will discuss taming technology - tech isn’t always the answer, but when it is to make sure to have it digestible for as broad a group as possible. • Participants will learn to teach [nearly] all learning styles and utilizing resources for maximum saturation – face-to-face, paper, email, social media, websites, system pop ups, newsletters, instant messaging etc. PREREQUISITES Participants will benefit from having an interest in Research Administration training and outreach.

MEGAN DIETRICH*, Client Advocacy and Education Specialist, Office of Sponsored Research, Stanford University KRISTA ROZNOVSKY, Senior Contract and Grant Officer, Office of Sponsored Research, Pre-Award, Stanford University DEPARTMENTAL

INTERMEDIATE

CLOSEOUTS HEATHER M. OFFHAUS*, Director, Medical School Grant Review & Analysis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor EXECUTIVE LEVEL

ADVANCED

BEST PRACTICES IN DEVELOPING, IMPLEMENTING, AND MANAGING INTERNAL CONTROLS ANDRES CHAN*, Director, Office of Financial Analysis, University of Southern California

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued FEDERAL

OVERVIEW

SCIENCE AND SECURITY : FEDERAL PERSPECTIVE

PREREQUISITES None

REBECCA KEISER*, Office Head, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation GLOBAL FOR U.S. PARTICIPANTS

OVERVIEW

MOUs AND TEAMING AGREEMENTS FOR GLOBAL COLLABORATIONS As universities expand their reach across the globe, agreements such as the Memorandum of Understanding and the Teaming Agreement have an impact on the success of international programs. Institutions and organizations, small and large, are recruited to play a part in organizing, managing, and/ or performing a project. This session will address the use of MOUs and Teaming Agreements for partnering, supporting international programs, and risk assessment.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain insight into risks and opportunities for global collaborations, including the process of risk assessment, regardless of the size of their institution. • Participants will understand common uses of the Memorandum of Understanding for high-level collaboration discussions. • Participants will recognize when a Teaming Agreement may be useful for proposal and/or program management. • Participants should have an understanding of the role of sponsored projects in international collaborations and the basic premise behind MOUs and Teaming Agreements. PREREQUISITES None

JANET B. SIMONS*, Director, Research Policy and Export Officer, Sponsored Programs Administration, University of Maryland, Baltimore EDWARD T. FEHSKENS, Assistant Director, Office of Research Administration, Johns Hopkins University JOHN EVERMANN, Associate Director, Office of Research Administration, Johns Hopkins University

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

117


61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued GLOBAL FOR NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

OVERVIEW

U.S. FEDERAL FUNDING: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW We live in a global society where collaboration is increasingly important. Research partnerships that range across country borders can provide opportunities for our faculty and strengthen the quality of the work that needs to be done. U.S. Federal funding is often available to support research with international partners, but there are unique rules and policies that apply. This session will offer an introduction to the funding process for Federal research funds – the story of Congressional appropriations, funding opportunities for research, kinds of funds that are available, and lessons learned from institutions that have received U.S. Federal research funds. The panel will offer insights into the sometimes mysterious world of Federal research and the mechanisms used to support research both inside the U.S. and with international collaborators.

118

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn the basics of the appropriations process that leads to research funding. • Participants will understand the funding opportunities approach used by Federal agencies. • Participants will gain insight into the benefits and concerns that come with U.S. Federal funding. PREREQUISITES None

KIM MORELAND*, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research & Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Madison, NCURA Distinguished Educator EVA BJÓRNDAL, Head of Post-Award, King’s College of London GAI DORAN, Director of Research, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University POST-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

INTERNAL CONTROLS: THE ROLE OF INFORMATION, COMMUNICATION AND TRAINING

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how best to communicate and provide training in your organization related to internal controls.

This session will review best practices for making information available to stakeholders within your organization, along with the importance communication and training can play in that endeavor. MIRA L. LEVINE*, Senior Manager, MAXIMUS Higher Education, Inc.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PRE-AWARD

ADVANCED

ACHIEVING ORDER FROM CHAOS WHEN WORKING WITHIN PRE-AWARD NANCY R. LEWIS*, Executive Director, Sponsored Projects, University of California-Irvine PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

INVENTIONS, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, AND EXPORT CONTROLS – A GENTLE INTRODUCTION Has a faculty member at your institution invented a better mousetrap, wants to patent it, and demonstrate it at the International Mousetrappers Association Conference? Questions about patents and other forms of intellectual property & export controls are daunting when it’s just two of the many hats we wear as research administrators. This session will introduce what intellectual property is with an emphasis on inventions, patentability, and patents and why we should care about it as research administrators. We’ll also provide an introduction to export controls with how’s and why’s they can sneak into our quiet and content Research Administration lives.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be provided with an overview of the various types of intellectual property with an emphasis on inventions, what constitutes a patentable invention and ways to protect the intellectual property. • Participants will also touch on export controls and the sometimes surprising ways they can show up in Research Administration. PREREQUISITES None

MARK D. LYNAM*, Senior Coordinator, Office of Research and Economic Development, Tennessee Technological University PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ADVANCED

DEALING WITH STAFF WHO ARE UNDERPERFORMING OR NOT FUNCTIONING WELL IN THE WORKPLACE DOROTHY J. JOHNSON*, Post-Award Supervisor, Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Madison BONNIEJEAN ZITSKE, Assistant Director for Post Award, University of Wisconsin-Madison

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

BASIC

NEW FACULTY GPS: CHARTING A COURSE FOR FUNDING SUCCESS The arrival of new faculty presents an opportunity to communicate expectations surrounding external grant submission. At the same time, the first year in a new position – especially for newly minted PhDs and recent postdocs – can be challenging for faculty, who must figure out how to balance research agendas with teaching responsibilities and professional development. In an effort both to establish an expectation for submitting competitive applications for external funding and to adequately support new faculty in meeting that expectation, Miami University has developed and piloted a program known as New Faculty Grant Planning and Support GPS. In addition to providing an overview of the program and its implementation, the presenters will offer perspectives from their various roles on the project and share lessons learned.

120

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will describe a model for encouraging and supporting grant-seeking among new faculty. • Participants will interpret the roles and responsibilities of project staff in the context of traditional Research Administration roles and responsibilities. • Participants will examine implications of lessons learned at Miami University for potential development and implementation of programs at other institutions. PREREQUISITES None

HEATHER JOHNSTON*, Associate Director of Research Communications, Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship, Miami University AMY COOPER, Assistant Director of Proposal Development, Miami University CARL BATT, Professor, Department of Food Science, Miami University

DISCUSSION GROUPS COMPLIANCE

FCOI MITIGATION - HOW DO YOU MAKE IT WORK AT YOUR INSTITUTION? SUSAN W. SEDWICK*, Senior Consulting Specialist, Attain DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

UNIVERSITY EFFORTS TO STREAMLINE DATA SHARING (INCLUDING DATA TRANSFER AND USE AGREEMENT) MELISSA KORF*, Associate Director, Grants & Contracts, Office of Research Administration, Harvard Medical School

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

61st

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued DEPARTMENTAL

STRENGTHENING INTERDEPARTMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS THROUGH EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

We will discuss characteristics and benefits of effective communication. We will also go over ways to build strong relationships with PIs and departmental staff through direct and open communication, benefits of providing and receiving feedback, and steering productive meetings. We will provide real-life success stories and what has worked for us. TIFFANY TAKADE*, Research Services Coordinator, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, University of California-San Francisco JULIA SAELEE, Research Services Coordinator, E-Research Management Services Administration, University of California-San Francisco EXECUTIVE LEVEL

DISCUSSING UG COMPENSATION COMPLIANCE WITH SENIOR LEADERSHIP AND INSTITUTIONAL STAKEHOLDERS

Many institutions are re-evaluating their approach to compensation compliance under the Uniform Guidance (2 CFR, 200.430 - Compensation), which allows for alternatives to traditional effort reporting. This panel session will focus on the many critical conversations that are needed in order to take advantage of the opportunity and the expectation to streamline compensation controls, which may reduce burden placed on faculty and institutions receiving federal funds. This panel will share examples of how to initiate conversations and anticipate roadblocks with senior leadership and institutional stakeholders. The presenters will also expose participants to options in answer to the following questions: How should our institution treat compensation costs? What are the key decision points? Do we have all the needed information to make a decision? Is an alternative to effort reporting more effective and efficient? If we want to explore an alternative to effort reporting, how do we organize to do so? LISA E. MOSLEY*, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects, Yale University JEREMY A. FORSBERG, Assistant Vice President of Research, Office of Research, The University of Texas at Arlington FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

HINTS FOR SUCCESSFUL INDUSTRY CONTRACT NEGOTIATION (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT SESSION HELD TUESDAY AT 2:15 PM)

ELAINE L. BROCK*, President and Senior Partner, C3Authority, LLC NICOLE CARLETON, Project Manager, Service & Research Agreements, Office of Grants & Contracts, University of Colorado Boulder CATHERINE INNES, Director, Policy and Strategic Initiatives, University of Washington (Emeritus)

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

> CLICK HERE to read about THE CHANGING LANSCAPE: Issues impacting the research community

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

GLOBAL DATA MANAGEMENT: WHEN PRIVACY LAWS ARE DIFFERENT AND HOW TO DEAL WITH OPEN ACCESS REQUIREMENTS ARA TAHMASSIAN*, Chief Research Compliance Officer, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Harvard University NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR

ORGANIZATION AND COMMUNICATION FOR THE NEW RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR

In this discussion group, we will discuss organizational tips for new research administrators. Learn how to organize your day, and stay on schedule with your PI. Discuss tips on how to organize your emails and how to plan your day with interruptions. Learn communication skills that will help bridge the gap between you and the PI. Explore how to foster the relationship between the PI and central administration, examine ways to marry science with administration, and best practices for connecting with PIs. RAVEN C. SIMPSON*, Department Program Manager, Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine APRIL N. WALTER-BROWN, Post-Award Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine & Science 122

POST-AWARD

INTERNAL CONTROLS, COSO AND AUDIT

What is “COSO” and how does it relate to internal controls and audits? At this discussion session, participants can share and ask others how different aspects of the COSO framework have been implemented at their institution and how that implementation has affected audit findings and other outcomes. NICOLE PILMAN*, Director, Sponsored Financial Reporting, Controller’s Office, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities RACHELVEENSTRA, Finance Professional 3, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities PRE-AWARD

PRE-AWARD BUDGET FUNDAMENTALS (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT

SESSION HELD TUESDAY AT 2:15 PM)

The Pre-Award Budget Fundamentals discussion group will allow attendees a forum to discuss specific direct and indirect cost categories and share knowledge from previous experiences. The group will discuss common pitfalls and mistakes encountered by Research Administrators and Principal Investigators during the Pre-Award budget phase, and offer advice on best practices when planning your next budget. The group will discuss calculating salary expense, fringe benefits, modified total direct costs, and F&A to ensure your next proposal is a success. MICHAEL KENNEDY*, Director of Finance, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

4:00 – 5:00 pm: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS

DEALING WITH “JOB CREEP” AT A PUI RESEARCH OFFICE CHRISTINE D. HEMPOWICZ*, Director, Office of Sponsored Research, University of Bridgeport

4:00 – 5:00 pm | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION

7:00 – 11:00 pm | TUESDAY NIGHT CELEBRATION – CARNEVALE! Carnevale is a huge festival celebrated in many places around the world. Our Tuesday Night fete theme is an NCURA version of Carnevale. Get ready for global food stations, masquerade, entertainment, music, and fun as we celebrate our global NCURA family! Dance the night away to the DJ’s tunes, while enjoying a bite from the various food stations. Bring the kids to join in on the fun from 7-9 pm. The DJ won’t stop then, as the dancing will continue from 9:00pm-11:00pm. Guest tickets will be available for purchase, and kids under 13 are free! Drink tickets will be provided at registration, and your badge is your entrance ticket. This event is included in your conference registration. Guest registration will be available in June.

9:00 pm | REGIONAL HOSPITALITY AND THE NETZONE!

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

AGENDA BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER. BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE TOGETHER

BUILDING TOWARDS THE FUTURE... TOGETHER


AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

7:30 am – Noon | AM61 CONCIERGE/REGISTRATION 7:30 – 8:15 am | ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING AND CONTINENTAL CONNECT Wish you could sit down for a cup of coffee with a group of colleagues who are interested in talking about the same things you are? Build you peer network while enjoying breakfast and discussion at the Breakfast Connect tables. Join the group of your choice, introduce yourself, and let them conversation begin!

7:30 – 10:30 am | NCURA MARKETPLACE THE IMPACT OF NCURA MEMBERSHIP 8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

ADVANCED

IMPLEMENTATION OF ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS DATA IN CLINICAL RESEARCH TESHEIA H. JOHNSON*, Associate Director of Clinical Research for Yale School of Medicine Chief Operating Officer, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation, Yale University COMPLIANCE

INTERMEDIATE

RESEARCH COMPLIANCE OVERSIGHT FOR MULTI-INSTITUTIONAL COLLABORATIONS (IRB/IACUC/IBC) ROSS HICKEY*, Assistant Provost, Office of Research Integrity and Outreach (ORIO), University of Southern Maine

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

ADVANCED

TURNOVER READINESS AND RESILIENCY FOR YOUR DEPARTMENT YOU’VE GOT THIS! A fun and fast paced presentation with tactics to address the reality of turnover and impacts on the department, both good and bad. Topics include how to incorporate turnover readiness plans into your departmental structure, the pros and cons of turnover and the importance of hiring on retention and departmental resiliency.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how to write effective job descriptions and interview to find the best fit for your department. • Participants will learn how to make sure that your team members can support each other. Participants will explore the importance of focusing on the person, intentionality and rigor as these concepts related specifically to hiring. • Participants will discuss what success looks like. PREREQUISITES Participants will want to be a manager or a manager in training.

FAITH R. GOENNER*, Administration & Finance Director, Computer Science & Engineering, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities CYNTHIA SANCHEZ, Associate Director, Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials (GLAM), Stanford University FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

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OVERVIEW

UNDERSTANDING THE FAR: 3 LEADERS SHARE THEIR PERSPECTIVE In this session, participants will gain insight into resources and best practices other institutions use when navigating the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to address the panel to gain their perspectives on the FAR. • Participants will consider approaches the panel members and other institutions use for negotiating out inappropriate or unacceptable clauses. PREREQUISITES None

MINDY SOLIVAN*, Assistant Director, Office of Research and Commercialization, University of Central Florida SARAH M. KRONENWETTER, Contract Negotiator, Office of Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State University ZACHARY GILL, Director, Proposal and Award Management, Office of the Vice President for Research, Oregon State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

61st

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

Annual Meeting

8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued FEDERAL

UPDATE

NSF UPDATE JEAN I. FELDMAN*, Head, Policy Office, Division of Institution and Award Support, Office of Budget, Finance & Award Management, National Science Foundation GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS ● OVERVIEW

WHEN SAYING “NOW” ACTUALLY MEANS “LATER”: COMMUNICATION IN A GLOBAL RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT Succeeding in a global research environment is often driven by communication and collaboration. But sharing information across different cultures and social groups can pose unique challenges for university faculty and research administrators. In the words of noted anthropologist and cross-cultural researcher Edward T. Hall, “Culture hides more than it reveals, and strangely enough what it hides, it hides most effectively from its own participants.” Maybe while working with an international collaborator you realized that even though you’re both speaking English your words have very different meanings. Or perhaps you’re a non-U.S. Research Administrator who wonders why your U.S. collaborator asks for so many documents with strange and unfamiliar names. During this interactive session, participants will identify ways cultural differences may impact the effectiveness of communications and, ultimately, the success of global research endeavors.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will identify cultural differences that contribute to communication challenges. • Participants will learn about low context and high context cultures. PREREQUISITES None

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JEREMY MINER*, Director of Grants and Contracts, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire OLIVE GIOVANNETTI, Assistant Team Manager, and Contracts & Grants Office, University of California-San Francisco SIMON KERRIDGE, Director, Research Services, University of Kent

> CLICK HERE to check out NCURA’s ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued POST-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

POST-AWARD IS A PARTNERSHIP Post-Award has a pivotal role in the life cycle of a grant. Post-Award requires a partnership between Departmental and Pre-Award in order to successfully closeout an award. From cradle to grave, it all needs an interwoven fabric of collaboration to make Post-Award work. This session will outline the complexities of PostAward, and the advantages of collaboration from the Pre-Award, Departmental and Post-Award perspective with the understanding that closeout is the final goal.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn that Post-Award is a collaborative process. • Participants will learn the complexities of Post-Award and how partnering with others can demystify the challenges. • Participants will be given examples of when partnerships worked. • Participants will be given examples of challenges when partnering opportunities were missed. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a basic understanding of the life cycle of a grant.

JAQUION L. GHOLSTON*, Assistant Director of Sponsored Accounting, Office of Sponsored Accounting & Cost Analysis, Stevens Institute of Technology CARLOS SALINAS, Financial Accounting Manager, Office of Finance Grants & Contracts, Emory University PRE-AWARD

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INTERMEDIATE

BUILDING DYNAMIC AND COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION CHANNELS IN PRE-AWARD As research becomes more collaborative, so must Research Administration. With more stakeholders, it is imperative to develop effective communication and collaboration among research units. Presented collaboratively from the departmental and Sponsored Projects Office Pre-Award perspective, this session will focus on facilitation of communication, collaboration, and problem-solving/creative solutions between departmental units and the Sponsored Projects Office. We will discuss strategies for collaborating on large or complex projects as well as hot topics such as terms and conditions at proposal stage, limited submissions, white papers, changes in institutional/sponsor policies, institutional proposal deadline policies, and creating transparent workflow.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn strategies to effectively collaborate among stakeholders on large or complex projects. • Participants will share lessons learned and best practices in communicating and collaborating between research units. • Participants will understand and develop strategies to increase teamwork and creative solution capacity across the organization. PREREQUISITES Participants will benefit from having a basic understanding of how communication channels function at their university.

WENDY TURNER*, Principal Research Administrator, Engineering Research Administration Services, University of Arizona ALLISON HARTE, Senior Sponsored Projects Administrator, Sponsored Projects & Contracting Services, University of Arizona MICHELLE M. JARVIS, Senior Clinical Research Administrator, University of Pittsburgh

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PRE-AWARD

INTERMEDIATE

NEGOTIATING AGREEMENTS WITH NONPROFITS & FOUNDATIONS CHARLES T. BARTUNEK*, Director of Collaborative and Corporate Research Contracts, Division of Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

PREREQUISITES None

I’M ONLY HERE FOR THE SNACKS: ESTABLISHING AN OFFICE OF RESEARCH AT A PUI LINNEA MINNEMA*, Academic Grants Officer, Academic Grants and Sponsored Programs Office, Samford University AMY KAST, Associate Director of Grants and Contracts, Office of Research, Samford University ROBERT HATAWAY, Assistant Professor, Biological and Environmental Sciences, Samford University PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

MANAGING FLEXIBLE WORK ARRANGEMENTS Colorado and Maryland offer a wide variety of activities to enjoy outside of work, and the central sponsored projects office at the University of Colorado Boulder and University of Maryland Baltimore are committed to supporting our staff’s work-life balance. Flexible work arrangements – part-time schedules, telecommuting both part and full-time, and flex time – have become a normal part of our staff’s schedule. This session will explore the benefits of flexible work arrangements: what works well, challenges, and things to consider as a manager when implementing and managing flexible work arrangements. Time will be provided for discussion and questions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how to encourage sponsored projects offices to consider alternative work arrangements, if they don’t already. • Participants will discuss the benefits and challenges of these work arrangements, like how they can be a no-cost perk (if we can’t increase salary, we can have excellent work-life balance). • Participants will be provided with examples of successful alternative work arrangements, including part-time employees in proposal work. • Participants will be given tips for how to make these arrangements successful.

ALEXA VAN DALSEM*, Senior Manager - Proposal Development, Office of Grants & Contracts, University of Colorado Boulder

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

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61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS COMPLIANCE

RESEARCH COMPLIANCE: HOW DOES IT AFFECT ME IN THE AWARD LIFECYCLE? (FOLLOW-UP TO CONCURRENT SESSION HELD TUESDAY AT 4:00 PM)

Participants can share their compliance experiences in both Pre- and Post-Award projects, ways they have collaborated with their institutions’ appropriate compliance units and/or challenges they’ve encountered. Come join us as we share experiences and recommendations on how to collaborate and mitigate compliance issues! If you’re a New Research Administrator, join us to gain knowledge from other RA’s experiences. DEANNA B. HENDRICKSON*, Research Education & Communication Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs, Georgia Institute of Technology KELLY MILLSAPS, Grant Specialist, Grants & Contracts Administration, University of North Georgia DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

NIH DATA SHARING POLICY – LESSONS LEARNED AND PLANNING MELISSA KORF*, Associate Director, Grants & Contracts, Office of Research Administration, Harvard Medical School DEPARTMENTAL

CHECKLISTS – THE DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATOR’S LIFESAVER BETH MCCLENDON*, Senior Grants Specialist, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis 130 EXECUTIVE LEVEL

INNOVATIVE CONCEPTS FOR PRE- AND POST-AWARD RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION

UCSF will present innovative concepts employed by our Pre- and Post-Award leadership teams. Concepts will include: 1) OSR/CGA Exchange Pilot - exchange program for OSR/CGA experts/leaders; “sabbatical” for skilled Pre- and Post-Award experts/leaders to focus on research lifecycle services at UCSF. 2) Temporary Research Administration Coverage (TRAC) - short-term (“spot” and/or <3mos) coverage, long-term coverage (3-6mo), late notifications; beta environment to test OSR standard work; develop tools and processes; practice Lean. 3) Telecommuting and remote work for Research Administration. 4) Internal and external, including global mentorship programs implemented at UCSF (e.g. NCURA Global Mentorship grant; NIH G-11 Grant for research administrative infrastructure building in Kenya). WINONA WARD*, Director of Sponsored Research, Office of Research, University of California-San Francisco MARY CATHERINE “MC” GAISBAUER, Assistant Controller, Contracts & Grants Accounting, Contracts & Grants Accounting, University of California-San Francisco GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

NCURA: RESOURCES FOR INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION CLAIRE CHEN*, Manager, NCURA Global, National Council of University Research Administrators

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued POST-AWARD

INTERNATIONAL SUBRECIPIENT MONITORING GABBY LABAYEN*, Manager, Huron PRE-AWARD

PRE-AWARD COST SHARING THAT POST-AWARD CAN LIVE WITH REBECCA HUNSAKER*, Director of Research Administration, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park JANICE OAKLEY, Assistant Director, Sponsored Programs Accounting, University of Maryland, College Park DEBRA Y. MURRAY, Assistant Director, Compliance, University of Maryland, College Park PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

DEVELOPING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

“It depends” is the most common answer in Research Administration. When developing new staff, moving their approach from “it depends” to “here are some options” requires not only a solid understanding of regulatory and administrative fundamentals, but also the ability to apply critical thinking skills to make better decisions. This discussion group will explore how to develop staff skills to better assess risk; know when more information is needed; know when enough information is enough; and find alternate solutions. Come share successes and challenges you’ve overcome in developing the next generation of research administrators into critical thinkers.

131

CSILLA CSAPLÁR*, Director, Engineering Research Administration, Stanford University LISA E. MOSLEY, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects, Yale University RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

NONPROFIT FUNDER-RESEARCH INSTITUTION PARTNERSHIP (NFRIP)

A recent initiative that originated at the Council on Government Relations (COGR), has grown to become the (NFRIP) Nonprofit Funder-Research Institution Partnership. Over the last year, there have been three meetings in Washington attended by university and foundation administrators. At these meetings, considerable progress has been made toward consensus in the following areas: – Streamlining Administrative Requirements – IP Terms – Research Program Support costs (F&A issues, etc.) Within these Workgroups, numerous topics have been addressed, including proposal and portal issues, development of standard terms and conditions, standardizing of financial reporting, and of course direct and indirect costs, etc. Join us to learn more about this very progressive and productive group, and hear the significant progress made thus far. VIVIAN HOLMES*, Assistant Dean for Research Administration, School of Public Health, Boston University CYNTHIA HOPE, Assistant Vice President for Research & Director of Sponsored Programs, The University of Alabama, NCURA Distinguished Educator August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

> CLICK HERE to watch NCURA’s PODCASTS


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

8:30 – 10:00 am: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

INCREASING PRODUCTIVITY: ENCOURAGING PROPOSAL WRITING AND RESOURCING FOR SUCCESS

Faculty and staff have a long list of responsibilities that are often more pressing than proposal writing, no matter whether they are early career or more established investigators. However, grants are often essential for successful research and/or teaching, and in some cases for promotion and tenure. From the predominately undergraduate institution all the way to the R-1 environment, research administrators are increasingly asked to take on research development roles, providing assistance and coaching so investigators can increase and improve grantsmanship. Our discussion will focus on techniques and activities designed to encourage proposal writing, as well as helping current writers be more productive - and hopefully more successful - by identifying motivators, barriers, and resources. Discussion leaders, each representing different research environments, will center discussion on methods for engaging and assisting increased proposal writing. Leaders and participants will share best practices for facilitating proposal writing, as well as tools for crafting more successful proposals. SARAH ROBERTSON*, Director of the Office of Sponsored Projects and Research, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia TRICIA L. CALLAHAN, Senior Research Education and Information Officer, Office of Sponsored Programs, Colorado State University

8:30 – 10:00 am | NCURA YEAR-LONG SPONSOR INFORMATION SESSION 132

HELP YOUR RESEARCH SUPPORT TEAM BE HEROES TM

Come learn how your peers in Pre-Award Research Administration are cutting their busy work by up to 95%. Find out why 150 higher-ed institutions are taking advantage of InfoReady Review’s™ automated competition, review, and approvals processing solution. In this session you’ll learn: • Where in the review process InfoReady Review™ offers the most help and compliments other tools like Pivot™ and Cayuse™. • How having an automated, centralized research hub can actually lead to more funding opportunities by making everything easier to find and manage. • How you and your staff will have more time to support quality, highly competitive research instead of chasing missing documents. • How automating and streamlining the review process reduces stress for reviewers and lays the groundwork for them to be more engaged. • How powerful it is having oversight and insight into your reviewing and award-making processes, including automated Post-Award reporting. • How quickly you can get up and running with automated funding competitions, reviews, and approvals. (Onboarding is easy and intuitive – access to in-app video tutorials and live support means no university IT support is required.) It’s a matter of weeks, not months or years. DIANE SHELDON-KU*, Director of Customer Acquisition, InfoReady

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:00 – 10:30 am | NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK 10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS COMPLIANCE

ADVANCED

WHAT THE RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS The importance of identifying and accurately categorizing biological research materials is growing within the Research Administration community. Requirements for containment and safety have always been present, but the regulations are evolving to place emphasis on high-risk pathogens, specimens, and genetic materials. To ensure the success of your Research Administration team, a program can standardize information collection and bridge communications early. Learn why organizations need to utilize their available resources to create partnerships between Research Administration and investigators utilizing biological materials. This session is not just for regulatory compliance personnel! Teach your team to identify concerns before they occur by translating this session into effective practices. Presenters will provide a background on biological concepts and common regulatory framework affecting these materials. Through the use of a standardized tool, learn what questions are essential to ask when biologicals are identified in incoming and outgoing agreements.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will acquire useful strategies for establishing and maintaining an expertise pipeline to benefit their institution’s Research Administration in the long term. PREREQUISITES No prior biological expertise is required. However, participants must have a basic understanding of the roles of regulatory compliance committees IRB, IACUC, and IBC. Participants will want prior knowledge of contracts and agreements, likely 1-2 years.

IANTHE BRYANT-GAWTHROP*, Director, Research Regulatory Affairs and Human Research Protection Program, Purdue University Main Campus DAVID RIESE, Professor, Drug Discovery and Development, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University DATA MANAGEMENT/USE

INTERMEDIATE

FOREIGN INFLUENCE ON DATA MANAGEMENT DOUGLAS B. BACKMAN*, Director, Compliance, University of Central Florida

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

133


61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued DEPARTMENTAL

BASIC

NAVIGATING SPONSOR PROPOSAL GUIDELINES TO ENSURE A SUCCESSFUL PROPOSAL SUBMISSION Whether you’re in a departmental unit or central Research Administration office, if you are reviewing or assisting in the proposal preparation process, you are in a key position to guide the Principal Investigator and other project personnel through the application process. As a sponsor’s call is the road map for what they are wanting and willing to fund, it is essential that as research administrators, we are in position to assist and point out to our faculty the critical information needed for a successful submission. With so many sponsors rejecting proposals for non-conformity of their requirements, understanding how to review a sponsor’s announcement and how to effectively guide or instruct your faculty becomes a very important role.

134

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will gain a healthy awareness of standard sponsor requirements you will want to be aware of when preparing or reviewing proposal documents. • Participants will complete a hands-on learning exercise in effectively reviewing a call or announcement from a sponsor. PREREQUISITES None

CARON H. MILLER*, Assistant Director, Sponsored Programs Administration, Office of Research Administration, University of California-Riverside ROBERT CHAN, Principal Contract and Grant Officer, University of California-Riverside EXECUTIVE LEVEL

ADVANCED

THE IMPORTANCE OF F&A: COMMUNICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL RATES Facilities & Administrative cost recovery is a hot topic that usually receives a lukewarm reaction. We often have long discussions and debates about the importance of F&A recovery, even around the recognition that it is a recovery of real costs rather than a burdensome additional charge to projects. As a representative of your institution, you are protecting the interests of both your faculty and your employer, while having conversations with sponsors that sound more like defense arguments than pathways to partnerships. You also may experience regular feelings of dread when trying to explain to your own faculty why F&A is necessary. This session will explore the historical context of F&A recovery, work through case scenarios on how to talk about F&A, debate whether a waiver of F&A is ever the right answer, and send participants back to their institutions with courage and tools to take on the next wave of discussions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand the origins, background, and importance of Facility and Administrative rates. • Participants will be able to identify tools and best practices to guide research administrators when discussing and defending F&A. • Participants will be able to identify scenarios where waivers of F&A may be appropriate, and techniques to avoid having to waive F&A. PREREQUISITES Participants will want a need to protect your institutional F&A recovery!

HEATHER M. OFFHAUS*, Director, Medical School Grant Review & Analysis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor CSILLA CSAPLÁR, Director, Engineering Research Administration, School of Engineering, Stanford University NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued FEDERAL

UPDATE

OMB/OSTP UPDATE GILBERT TRAN*, Senior Policy Analyst, Office of Management and Budget BRETTE H. FISHMAN, Policy Analyst, Office of Management and Budget GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS ● OVERVIEW

PREREQUISITES None

MANAGING AWARDS FROM THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION (HORIZON2020) – MANAGING AWARDS FROM NIH – WHAT DO SAM AND THE PARTICIPANT PORTAL HAVE IN COMMON? BRUNO K. WOERAN*, EU Affairs Manager & Innovation Networks, Merinova TechCenter, University of Vaasa EDWARD T. FEHSKENS, Assistant Director, Office of Research Administration, Johns Hopkins University POST-AWARD

BASIC

BASICS OF F&A: A UNIVERSITY PERSPECTIVE Colleges and universities receiving direct federal awards are typically required to have a federally negotiated facilities and administrative (“F&A”) cost rate in order to receive reimbursement for indirect costs. For most people, however, the process of preparing, submitting, and negotiating the F&A rate proposal under the Uniform Guidance can appear overly technical and painfully detailed. This session is intended for anyone who is new to the F&A process or would simply like to better understand the basic requirements, inputs and objectives that make up this calculation. The discussion portion will include a high-level perspective regarding how the regulations, financial and other data inputs, and submission and negotiation processes work together. Participants will join practical insight into the application of the F&A rate to the organization’s awards. Participants are encouraged to share their role in, as well as their experience with the indirect rate process at their institution.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify what an F&A rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the F&A rate. • Participants will explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery. • Participants will understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance. PREREQUISITES None

ALEX P. WEEKES*, Principal, ML Weekes & Company, PC

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

135


61st

AGENDA

Annual Meeting

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PRE-AWARD

BASIC

EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT THE FDP SUBAWARD TEMPLATES In this session, we’ll review everything you wanted to know about the subaward templates. This session is ideal for subaward specialists who may not usually attend the Federal Demonstration Partnership FDP meetings. We’ll review the purpose of the templates, their structure, and how decisions are made as to what is allowed to be incorporated into the templates. We’ll demonstrate how they incorporate the Uniform Guidance, specific terms and conditions from federal agencies, and allow for institutional terms when necessary. We’ll then provide the history of the now huge list of FDP subaward FAQs, and discuss the hottest topics on the list. We’ll use examples to demonstrate proper use of the templates.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn about the proper use of the FDP subaward templates. • Participants will learn to de-mystify how, when, and why the templates get revised, and how FDP members are involved in making those decisions. • Participants will be able to explain the differences in how FDP member organizations vs. non-members are allowed to use them. • Participants will learn how the Uniform Guidance and other federal terms are included. PREREQUISITES None

STEPHANIE F. SCOTT*, Director of Policy and Research Development, Sponsored Projects Administration, Columbia University LAURA REGISTER, Assistant Director, Subaward Oversight & Compliance, Stanford University 136

PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS ● OVERVIEW

EMERGING RESEARCH MISSIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY DEVELOPMENT Is your predominantly teaching institution wanting to push for more research funding? Are you struggling with how to provide incentives for seeking external funding for your faculty who are already carrying full teaching loads? And if they are successful, do you have the requisite policies, procedures and resources to adequately address all of the regulatory requirements? If you are struggling with these questions, then come share your woes and your creative approaches. The facilitator will provide guidance on which policies are absolutely necessary for accepting U.S. Federal funding subject to the Uniform Guidance and answer your questions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will be able to identify the required policies that your institution needs to accept U.S. Federal funding. • Participants will understand how other institutions are using incentives other than released time from teaching. • Participants will gain insights on the challenges inherent with a growing research mission and how to quantify the need for additional resources to your senior leadership. PREREQUISITES None

SUSAN W. SEDWICK*, Senior Consulting Specialist, Attain

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

61st

Annual Meeting

10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS CONCURRENT SESSIONS continued PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

GETTING PEOPLE EXCITED ABOUT THEIR JOBS Have you ever struggled to get staff engaged and involved? Do you wonder why some people don’t engage and how you can change the behavior? Building a strong team can be challenging, but there are some key factors to staff engagement and satisfaction. In this session, we will provide advice on how to evaluate your own management and leadership style, what to look for during the hiring process, and how to keep staff excited about coming to work. We will provide examples of what our team has done, what has worked, and what has not.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will learn how to engage staff. • Participants will learn techniques for building and keeping a strong team. • Participants will learn tips to avoid mistakes leaders/ managers make. PREREQUISITES Participants will want experience managing staff/ a team.

JENNIFER CORY DOESCHOT*, Director of Operations, Center for Definitive and Curative Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University SAMANTHA J. WESTCOTT, Sponsored Research Manager, Division of Physics, California Institute of Technology RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

INTERMEDIATE

EARNING BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT POINTS: HELPING FACULTY DEVELOP COMPELLING BUDGET JUSTIFICATIONS Budget justifications have taken on increasing significance in recent years, moving from explaining to reviewers the basis of cost calculations, to persuading them that the items are critical to the success of the project. In this concurrent session, you will learn how to craft a budget justification that not only conforms to Uniform Guidance expectations but also effectively establishes the credibility of the proposed project. Inserting a few more specific details in targeted places in the narrative and budget justification can earn the essential benefit of the doubt points that elevate your projects into the “Funded” category.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Participants will understand the role of persuasion in developing compelling budget justifications. • Participants will recognize strategies for ensuring alignment between proposed costs and scope of work, thereby enhancing project credibility. PREREQUISITES This session is designed for individuals who have at least a couple years of experience with proposal writing or have responsibility for assisting faculty with proposal development.

JEREMY MINER*, Director of Grants and Contracts, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire KRIS A. MONAHAN, Director, Sponsored Projects and Research Compliance, Providence College

Mark your calendar for the FRA Conference in Puerto Rico – March 2-3, 2020! Pre-registration will be available mid-June.

August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter

137


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS CLINICAL/MEDICAL

CHALLENGES AND PITFALLS OF INVESTIGATOR INITIATED CLINICAL TRIALS

You will never forget the day when you received a phone call from one of your investigators stating, “I would like to initiate a clinical study. What do I need to do?” Well, your summer reading just became 21 CFR, Part 312. So many questions race through your head. What do you mean ‘I am now the Sponsor?’ What forms are required? Who completes the forms? Why won’t the pharma company indemnify us? What are the risks? Whether you are a veteran research administrator of investigator initiated studies or just received “the call”, come join us as we discuss our challenges, pitfalls and successes. SCOTT B. DAVIS*, Associate Director, Industry Research, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center COMPLIANCE

THE VETERANS AFFAIRS AND UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP – HOW TO (TRY TO) MANAGE EFFICIENTLY

This discussion group is designed to foster a discussion about the challenges and opportunities of the University and Veterans Affairs working model. NICOLE QUARTIERO*, Assistant Director, Indirect Cost Recovery (ICR) & Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP), Colorado State University-Pueblo 138

DEPARTMENTAL

BACK AND FORTH: MAKING THE BEST OF DEPARTMENTAL AND ENTRAL OFFICE CAREER MOVES

In this discussion group, we will look at how strategic career moves from the department to central office or vice versa can serve as a springboard for success. There is considerable value in gaining experience on both the departmental and central office levels; each experience provides insights that can be leveraged for the next position. Guided by personal experience and lessons learned, this discussion group will provide participants with tips and suggestions for how to make the best out of moving from one area to the other. TANYA BLACKWELL*, Senior Sponsored Research Analyst, Office of Sponsored Programs, Children’s Healthcare at Atlanta LAURA LETBETTER*, Associate Director, Sponsored Research, Development, Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University FEDERAL AND INDUSTRY CONTRACTING

LET’S TALK ABOUT THE FAR MINDY SOLIVAN*, Assistant Director, Office of Research and Commercialization, University of Central Florida SARAH M. KRONENWETTER, Contract Negotiator, Office of Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State University

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter


AGENDA

61st

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

Annual Meeting

10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued GLOBAL FOR U.S. AND NON-U.S. PARTICIPANTS

SITUATION OF UK UNIVERSITIES IN THE GLOBAL FUNDING LANDSCAPE: CONSEQUENCES OF BREXIT? EVA BJORNDAL*, Head of Post-Award, King’s College of London POST-AWARD

CAN I BUY THAT? THE ALLOWABILITY GAME

Are you looking to gain more experience in costing decisions? Have you always wanted to be on a game show? If yes, then you won’t want to miss this! We will use a game show format to discuss the process of determining the allowability of a variety costs in a variety of situations. Attention will be focused on the context of the cost, when sponsor prior approval is needed, compliance with cost principles, the process used to determine allowability, and fun! Come for the prizes, stay for the knowledge! MEGAN DIETRICH*, Client Advocacy and Education Specialist, Office of Sponsored Research, Stanford University CARRIE CHESBRO, Associate Director, Post-Award, Sponsored Projects Services, University of Oregon KARI VANDERGUST, Sponsored Projects Administrator, Sponsored Projects Services, University of Oregon POST-AWARD

ANNUAL REPORTS (TRACKING, MANAGING AND SUBMITTING NON-FINANCIAL REPORTS)

139

GLENDA A. BULLOCK*, Director of Research and Business Administration, Divisions of Hematology, Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis PRE-AWARD

HOW TO ONBOARD YOUR PRE-AWARD STAFF ROSEMARY E. MADNICK*, Executive Director, Office of Grants and Contracts, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Mark your calendar for the FRA Conference in Puerto Rico – March 5-6, 2020! Pre-registration will be available mid-June. August 4 – 7, 2019 | Washington, DC | Building towards the future... together | * Lead presenter


61st

Annual Meeting

AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2019

10:30 am – Noon: EDUCATION SESSIONS DISCUSSION GROUPS continued PRE-AWARD

SUBRECIPIENT RISK ASSESSMENT & MONITORING DURING THE PRE-AWARD PROCESS LAUREN PITE*, Grant & Contract Manager, Research Support, Yale University PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS

CREATING PARTNERSHIPS: FOR THE PUI

In times of sever budget crisis or pure survival it is imperative for PUI institutions to think outside the box to gain resources and support. Positioning yourself to matter both to faculty and administration can be a difficult thing in the research world. Creating partnerships and relationships around campus is essential to the survival of sponsored programs within a comprehensive campus. A case study example from UW Oshkosh shows that partnering Sponsored Programs with groups like Risk and Safety, Finance and Administration, Advancement, Economic Development, Marketing, and Events Planning can elevate all departments to the next level. By sharing stories from other institutions on how their partnerships work we can learn from each other to improve our organizations. RODNEY GRANEC *, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, The University of West Alabama

Noon | CONFERENCE ADJOURNS 140

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS | WWW.NCURA.EDU | #ncuraannual | * Lead presenter

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