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Strategic Energy and Water Annual Report Fiscal Year 2010

Prepared by: NC State University Energy Management October 8, 2010


Strategic Energy and Water Annual Report Fiscal Year 2010

Prepared by:

NC State University Energy Management For:

e North Carolina State Energy OďŹƒce October 8, 2010


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Energy Consumption

Background

200,000

162,500 BTU/GSF

Facilities Operations, through Energy Management, has been charged with the responsibility, together with the University Sustainability Office, to create energy conservation programs and to promote awareness through our Energy Campaign, by reaching out to students, faculty and staff. The Annual Energy and Water Plan Update is the roadmap used to monitor our progress to establish and guide objectives for the upcoming year. The Plan’s 5 focus areas are: Data Management, Energy Supply Management, Energy and Water Use in Facilities, Equipment Efficiency and Campus Integration.

125,000

87,500

Goals 14 20

11 20

08 20

05 20

20

02

50,000

Energy Baseline and 30% Reduction Goal Energy Consumption: BTU/GSF

Water Consumption 50.0

37.5 Gal/GSF

In 2007, the North Carolina General Assembly passed Session Law 2007-546 which states: • Energy consumption in all existing State buildings will be reduced by 20% by the year 2010 and 30% by 2015 relative to Fiscal Year 2003. • All new State buildings will be 30% more efficient that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. • All State agencies will develop a comprehensive plan to manage and report their utilities to the State Energy Office and Department of Administration each fiscal year. • New water systems shall be designed and constructed to use a minimum of 20% less potable water than the indoor water use baseline calculated for the building after meeting the fixture performance requirements by the 2006 NC Plumbing Code.

25.0

12.5

Water Baseline and 20% Reduction Goal Water Consumption: Gal/GSF

1

4 20 1

1 20 1

8 20 0

5 20 0

20 0

2

0


Metrics

Conclusions

During the course of each fiscal year, NC State Energy Management monitors, tracks, and trends energy performance in its facilities. Along with traditional KPIs (e.g., Cost per GSF, BTU per GSF, Consumption per GSF), NC State tracked several additional KPIs in this year’s Annual Report: Weather Normalized Energy Consumption (BTU/GSF/DD), Utility Cost per Student, MMBTU per Degree Conferred, and MMBTU per Credit Hour Earned. Since the NC State student population is a major indicator of energy use on campus, these metrics are relevant, and show a decrease in energy use per student and energy use per academic degree conferred.

During FY2010, energy consumption decreased by 2% while the campus GSF grew in size by 6%. Overall energy consumption trends show a reduction over time, and as the University gains more control over buildings’ energy performance through widespread metering, data management and outreach, the goal of 30% reduction compared to the 2003 Baseline is achievable. In fact, weather normalization shows a 10% decrease from FY2009 to FY2010. Water reduction goals mandated by SL 2007-546 have been achieved. Total water consumption since FY2002 has steadily dropped, fueled by water-efficiency programs, outreach efforts, and past drought management efforts by the City of Raleigh, which have caused residual conservation efforts in the public domain. In FY2010 NC State has exceeded the 2015 Water Goal by an additional 30%.

BTU/GSF

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

Energy Consumption per GSF per Degree Day Energy Consumption per GSF

10

50,000

09

30.0

08

87,500

07

32.5

06

125,000

05

35.0

04

162,500

03

37.5

02

200,000

20

BTU/GSF/Degree Day

Weather Normalized Energy Consumption 40.0

Weather Normalized Trend

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION .....................................................................................................................4 Mission Statement Vision Statement Public Policy Staff Progress in FY2010 GLOSSARY OF TERMS...........................................................................................................6 Definitions ABBREVIATIONS AND DEFINITIONS...............................................................................7 Abbreviations HIGHLIGHTS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FY2010..............................................8 Overview Data Management Energy Supply Management Energy Use in Facilities Equipment Efficiencies Energy Performance Contracting Campus Integration CHARTING NC STATE’S UTILITY CONSUMPTION ....................................................14 Tracking Campus Utility Consumption and Distribution ENERGY AND WATER CONSUMPTION .........................................................................15 Facility Energy and Water Consumption KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS.................................................................................16 Annual Report Data TRENDS IN ENERGY AND WATER CONSUMPTION..................................................17 Energy and Water Consumption Metrics TRENDS IN ENERGY AND WATER COSTS ....................................................................19 Energy and Water Consumption Metrics AVOIDED COSTS: RATE NEGOTIATIONS .....................................................................20 Annual Policies for Energy Supply Management

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LOOKING AHEAD TO FISCAL YEAR 2011 ....................................................................21 Projections for 2011 and Meeting Goals for 2015 Energy Data Management Energy Supply Management Energy Use in Facilities Equipment Efficiencies Campus Integration THE STRATEGIC ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN ......................................................26 Energy Management Charge DECLARATIONS....................................................................................................................27 Strategic Energy and Water Plan Commitment for NC State University APPENDIX 1: 2010 ENERGY CONSERVATION MEASURES......................................28 Table A1: Energy Data Management for Fiscal Year 2010 Table A2: Energy Data Management Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Table A3: Energy Supply Management for Fiscal Year 2010 Table A4: Energy Supply Management Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Table A5: Energy and Water Use in Facilities for Fiscal Year 2010 Table A6: Energy and Water Use in Facilities Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Table A7: Equipment Efficiency for Fiscal Year 2010 Table A8: Equipment Efficiency Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Table A9: Campus Integration for Fiscal Year 2010 Table A10: Campus Integration Projected for Fiscal Year 2011


INTRODUCTION Mission Statement

Facilities Operations, through Energy Management, has been charged with the responsibility to manage energy resources purchased and consumed by NC State in the most cost-effective manner. It is Energy Management’s responsibility, together with the University Sustainability Office, to promote energy conservation and awareness through our Energy Campaign, called Change Your State, and by reaching out to students, faculty and staff.

Vision Statement The deployment of existing energy-efficiency and renewable energy technology is the nearest-term and lowest cost option for managing our nation’s demand for energy, especially over the next decade. The potential energy savings available from the accelerated deployment of existing energyefficiency technologies in buildings, transportation and industrial sectors could more than offset projected increases in energy consumption through 2030. Accelerated deployment of these technologies in the buildings, transportation, and industrial sectors could reduce projected energy use by about 15 percent. National awareness of GHG emissions, most notably carbon emissions, has caused us to re-evaluate the future of energy supply by creating an increased demand for renewable and carbon-neutral energy solutions. For example, some of the energy supply methods include solar (active and passive), wind, hydro, nuclear, and biomass. The future depends on renewable energy, expansion and modernization of the Nation’s energy infrastructure and the ability to control our energy demand for efficient use of the power grid. All of these elements will work in tandem to provide a sustainable energy future and a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. The widespread implementation of energy-efficient and renewable technologies will also create substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. NC State understands the impact it has on the environment through the creation of the Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Climate Action Plan. NC State completed its first biannual Greenhouse Gas Inventory in 2008 and is currently using that inventory to determine strategies for carbon abatement and reduction of GHG. It has been determined that the primary source of GHG emissions is our electricity demand.

Energy management has emerged as one of the most critical fields of study and professions of the current era. There are many aspects of the profession, and many different ways to approach current energy problems. The University’s energy management professionals and facility managers are equipped with a diverse skill set: technical and creative with the ability to understand the complex energy grid.

Public Policy • UNC-GA Sustainability Policy 600.61 – “e University of North

Carolina General Administration is committed to leading the State of North Carolina as an environmental steward that endeavors to proactively and effectively manage its impact on energy, water, and other natural resources.” N.C. State Legislature passed Senate Bills 668, 1946, and Session Law 2007-546. - Energy consumption in all existing State buildings will be reduced by 20% by the year 2010, and 30% by the 2015 relative to fiscal year 2002-03. - All new State buildings will be 30% more efficient than ASHRAE standard 90.1-2004. - All State agencies will develop a comprehensive plan to manage and report their utilities each fiscal year to the State Energy Office and Department of Administration. - New water systems shall be designed and constructed to use a minimum of 20% less potable water than indoor water use baseline calculated for the building after meeting the fixture performance requirements by the 2006 North Carolina Plumbing Code. N.C. State Legislature passed Session Law 2010-196 mandating. that all UNC-system schools keep 60% of utility savings resulting from energy conservation measures. e realized savings must only be used on additional energy saving measures for the University. Continually, the projects must not require additional funding from the State of North Carolina.

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Staff In Fiscal Year 2010, NC State Energy Management added manpower to its ranks. Staff growth reached 9 full-time employees. The additional personnel has given Energy Management the opportunity to broaden its scope of services and to support its NC State partners’ strategies for data analysis and for implementation of ECMs. Energy Management has also applied for and received grant funding totaling $778,000 for ECMs on campus. This fall, Energy Management will also add ten energy fellowships sponsored by the State Energy Office. The $478,000 grant is provided through ARRA funding and creates a partnership among Energy Management, FREEDM Systems Center, Sustainability Office, Solar Center and Advanced Energy. The fellows will work on synergy projects among the 5 partners to help deploy energy programs throughout NC State and the State of North Carolina.

Progress in FY2010 FY2010 was a year of positive change for Energy Management. Highlights include: • e partnership between the University Sustainability Office and Energy Management was formalized. is partnership will support effective outreach programs. • Two Energy Program Coordinator positions were funded and filled. • Over $1.2 million in ARRA funding was awarded to NC State through Energy Management's grant writing efforts. • NC State was selected to participate in a selective field of 14 competitors in the Energy Star™ National Building Competition; thanks to Energy Management's leadership. • A comprehensive University strategic energy management planning process was initiated. These changes have laid the foundation for a brighter future for Energy Management at NC State.

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS Definitions BTUs................................................British ermal Unit; a unit of heat equal to the amount of heat required to raise one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit at one atmosphere pressure; equivalent to 251.997 calories. CCF..................................................Measure of Volume, 100 cubic feet= 1CCF = 748.05 gallons, 1 CCF of natural gas produces slightly more than 1 therm or 100,000 BTUs of energy. CHW ................................................Chilled Water; Used as a medium for transfer of heat away from the building. Chilled Water use is measured in millions of BTUs, 1 MMBTU = 1 decatherm. CI .....................................................Capital Improvement. COP .................................................Certificate of Participation funds. DD ...................................................Degree Days; a unit of measure equal to a difference of one degree between the mean outdoor temperature on a certain day and a reference temperature (65° F). is term is used to estimate the energy for heating and cooling a building. Source: State Climate Office. DDC .................................................Direct Digital Controls; Used in Building Control Systems for self-adjusting response to conditions based on preset programs tuned to the building. ESCO ...............................................Energy Services Company; a business that develops, installs, and finances projects designed to improve the energy efficiency for facilities over a set time period. FTE ..................................................Full Time Equivalent Students; On-campus Total Headcount Enrollment: includes all on-campus students enrolled for one or more course in regular fall term with each person counted only once - excludes audit only and extension student. Website source: http:// www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/fastfacts/quick.htm. Detail: Student Data File as submitted to UNC-General Administration.

Gal ...................................................Measure of volume, gallon(s), 1 gallon of water weighs 8.3453 pounds. GSF ..................................................Gross Square Feet; total building square footage that we provide utilities, includes parking decks. Source: AERES –Architectural Engineering and Real Estate System. HHW................................................Heating Hot Water, Used as an alternative to steam for conditioning spaces. kW....................................................A measure of power required at any moment to operate electrical devices, Kilowatt. kWh .................................................A cumulative measure of total electric energy, Kilowatthour, 1 kWh = 3,413 BTUs. MMBTU ..........................................Measure of energy, 1,000,000 BTUs = 1 MMBTU. N/A ..................................................Not applicable, direct savings from these tasks is not quantifiable. N/E ..................................................Not estimated, direct savings from these tasks is quantifiable but not estimated due to insufficient supporting data. Operating ........................................Operating funds from department responsible for task. Sponsored Award Activities ...........Amount of Grant Proposals awarded, total dollar amount of grants awarded for organized research, extension, public service, and instruction activities funded through sources external to the University. Source: http://www.ncsu.edu/sparcs/sor/search.php Research Administration Data and Reporting System R.A.D.A.R. erm ..............................................Measure of energy, usually in reference to natural gas, 1 erm = 100,000 BTUs. R&R .................................................Repair and renovation funds, may be either CI or Recurring. TBD .................................................To be determined.

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ABBREVIATIONS AND DEFINITIONS Abbreviations ACUPCC .........American College & University President’s Climate Commitment

ECM ................Energy Conservation Measure

OIT .................NC State Office of Information Technology

eDNA ..............Extended Distributed Network Architecture

OUA ................NC State Office of the University Architect

ARRA ..............American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

ELCS ...............Enterprise Level Control System

PEC .................Progress Energy Carolinas

BAS .................Building Automation System

EM...................NC State Energy Management

PSNC ..............Public Service Company of North Carolina

BM&O.............NC State Building Maintenance & Operations

EPA .................Environmental Protection Agency

PV ...................Solar Photovoltaic (electric)

BTU.................British ermal Units

EPC .................Energy Performance Contract

R&R ................NC State Repair & Renovation

CAP .................Climate Action Plan

ESCO ..............Energy Services Company

RCX .................Retro-Commissioning

CBI...................Commercial Building Initiative

GHG................Greenhouse Gas

RE....................Renewable Energy

CCF .................100 Cubic Feet

HEEA ..............Higher Education Energy Alliance

REC .................Renewable Energy Credit

CEST ...............NC State Campus Environmental Sustainability Team

HHW...............Heating Hot Water

REPS ...............Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard

IT ....................Information Technology

ROI..................Return on Investment

KPI ..................Key Performance Indicator

SCADA ............Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition

kW(h)..............Kilowatt (Hour)

SEO .................State Energy Office

LCC .................Life-Cycle Costs

TCO.................Total Cost of Ownership

LDC .................Local Utility Distribution Company

UNC-GA..........University of North Carolina General Administration

CHP.................Combined Heat and Power CMMS.............Computerized Maintenance Management Systems CHW ...............Chilled Water Utility CW...................City Water DOE ................US Department of Energy DRA ................Demand Response Automation DSM................Demand Side Management EBS..................eDNA Billing System

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LEED ..............Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

USGBC ............US Green Building Council

MOD(s)...........Modifications

VAV .................Variable Air Volume

MSEA..............Metasys System Extended Architecture

VFD.................Variable Frequency Drive

O&M...............Operations and Maintenance


HIGHLIGHTS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FY2010 Overview

Energy Management is charged with the responsibility to actively manage energy resources purchased and consumed by NC State in the most costeffective manner. It is Energy Management’s responsibility, together with the University Sustainability Office, to promote energy conservation and awareness through our Energy Campaign by reaching out to students, faculty, and staff. The annual Strategic Energy and Water Plan is the metric used to track progress and establish and guide objectives for the upcoming year. The Plan’s 5 focus areas include: Data Management, Energy Supply Management, Energy and Water Use in Facilities, Equipment Efficiency, and Campus Integration.

• Data was provided to the Packpulse System, a student developed

interface, which used University data systems for web based monitoring capability of issues through the eyes of students. e Packpulse System was brought into the University intranet to provide added data and system security. e process to upgrade EBS billing software and the eDNA real-time web interface was completed early in the first quarter of FY 2011. - e EBS upgrade provided support for the new business model related to the new established Utility Trust and additional features to the end user. - e eDNA web upgrade provided the framework for an internal dashboard system to monitor available system data.

Data Management • Smart meters are devices capable of communicating real-time

consumption and demand data over the campus network for storage, analysis and billing. e integration of 20 additional smart meters into the University’s data systems enhances the ability to perform real-time assessment of metered areas. e interfaces provided by the smart meters is enabling the integration of other meters over the network that were previously unavailable for monitoring. e EBS database, the eDNA real-time database, and Crystal Reporting structures provide a base which enables the sharing of data to groups in the campus community and to provide support for campus data needs involving University resource use. - In coordination with OIT staff, a data interface is provided to allow the sharing of data with a graduate student group for an on-going plant efficiency study. - Billing data is provided to the ESCO responsible for the 13 Building Guaranteed Energy Savings Performance Contracting project to facilitate M&V for energy saving assurance. Data for the Intersession Setback Program is compiled and evaluated by the Building Committee to maximize potential energy savings while ensuring adherence to the University’s mission.

Tree Maps: A New Energy Analysis Tool The Tree Map at right illustrates relative energy use by building and building category. The tree maps are used to evaluate relative performance among buildings and to identify possible targets for energy conservation measures. In the diagram shown here, each block represents a building’s chilled water use, and the color represents a building type or category. Comparing relative sizes of the blocks enables Energy Management to help determine where efforts are most likely to have an effect on Chilled Water Utility Tree Map the overall campus energy use.

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Energy Supply Management The purchase of fuels for NC State is evaluated monthly. This evaluation compares purchasing transport natural gas monthly and in strip form against the purchase of Tariff natural gas. Monthly comparisons also include the advantage, if any, of using fuel oil in place of natural gas at locations where fuel oil is an alternative fuel. Natural gas is a fuel where the price varies significantly, particularly if interruptions in the natural gas supply occurs. Significant increase in price occurred during Hurricane Katrina, when certain natural gas supply points in the Gulf of Mexico were interrupted. During FY2010, NC State developed a plan to improve contracts for the purchase of natural gas. The proposed contract change permits purchasing strips of any size with delivery of up to 1 year beyond the contract expiration date. Acquiring long-term natural gas strips will help ensure stability in the cost of natural gas consumed by NC State in the event of supply emergencies. During FY2010, NC State successfully contracted the installation of a solar thermal system to heat domestic hot water and pool water at Carmichael Gym. The installation of this project, completed in November 2010, will be the first source of solar energy that will displace a portion of the natural gas consumed. The cost effectiveness of rate schedules for electric accounts are also monitored. Energy Management compared savings between Time of Use rates and standard rates. • e purchase of transport and strip natural gas, versus tariff natural gas and fuel oil, is evaluated monthly for interruptible and firm natural gas accounts. Historically, transport and strip natural gas is the most costeffective choice of fuels for the University. All of the larger accounts are on the interruptible rate; meaning that when PSNC exceeded capacity for firm accounts, NC State switched to fuel oil. is process saved NC State $332,958 in FY2010 and more than $2.7 million since the program started in FY2003. • In FY2010, the cost of fuel oil per British ermal Unit (BTU) was higher than natural gas. Additionally, fuel oil is corrosive to the interior of the boilers. For these reasons, it is not desirable to burn fuel oil, except during natural gas curtailments. PSNC realized capacity problems in January and February of 2010, and it became necessary for NC State to temporarily switch the interruptible accounts to fuel oil. • Since 2002, several PEC electrical accounts were switched to Time of Use rate structures. ese accounts are reviewed annually for the cost avoidance. is year alone, $389,068 in savings were realized, totaling more than $1.1 million.

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• Water consumption data continues to show considerable reduction in usage since the base year of FY2002. e continued use of water from Lake Raleigh for irrigation minimized the use of domestic water at NC State.

Water Saving Initiatives In 2009, Utilities & Engineering repaired the heating hot water system at Reynolds Coliseum. To date NC State has saved more than 1.5 millions of gallon of water directly related to this repair, a 23% savings. NC State has made a commitment to reduce its water consumption across campus, and part of this obligation is to use non-potable water for the cooling towers. Utilities & Engineering designed a system to capture two sources of nonpotable water, rainwater from the roof and process water from the plant’s vacuum separator. ese two sources of water are currently replacing more than 100,000 gallons of water per month that would have been supplied by the City of Raleigh.


Energy Use in Facilities

Programs include: Energy Star™ Procurement Policy, Incentives for Energy-Efficient Equipment, IT System Energy Equipment, Fume Hood Modernization, LCC for Equipment Upgrades, and O&M Best Practices. Table 1 shows the projects that BM&O staff focused on in FY2010 to reduce energy and operational cost.

Energy Use in Facilities applies to the efforts of Energy Management and its partners to reduce the University’s energy consumption by targeting campus buildings that illustrate a high energy usage. Senate Bill 688 sets a standard for all State-owned facilities, and the measures below are intended to help NC State meet or exceed these standards. This focus area is divided into key sections that Table 1: BM&O ECMs for FY2010 are described in detail in the Strategic Energy Management Plan document. The Plan includes ECM # Description topics from Performance Contracting to LCC and Repair and Renovation Grants for ECMs. The document is the roadmap that NC State will use 10-1 Computer Room Air Change Rate to reduce campus energy consumption. 10-2 Occupancy Schedules Some of the projects targeting facilities are 10-3 HVAC System Retro-commission listed below, others are listed in Table 1: 10-4 HVAC System Retro-commission • Coordinate building setbacks during the 10-5 Demand Side Electrical Peak Savings holiday break with an estimated $55,000 10-6 Lighting System Modifications in avoided costs compared to the baseline 10-7 Lighting Control System period of December 2004. 10-8 Lighting Upgrades CBC • Yarbrough Central Utility Plant uses a combination of rainwater and reclaimed 10-9 AHU Condensate Recovery water from the surface condenser vacuum 10-10 Boiler Replacement pumps provides 6,000 gallons of water per 10-11 Boiler Burner Replacement day to reduce the cooling tower make-up 10-12 Boiler Burner Replacement demand. 10-13 Replace Heating & Cooling Coils • e 13 Building Performance Contract is   underway, guaranteeing energy savings of more than $1.7 million per year.

Facility

Capital Cost $

Annual Savings $

Simple Payback (years)

Jordan Addition

$0

$18,000

0.0

Multiple

$0

$1,008

0.0

Schaub

$90,000

$14,206

6.3

Partners III

$90,000

$9,377

9.6

Multiple

$0

$21,777

0.0

Admin III

$5,763

$2,804

2.1

Admin II

$14,800

$4,172

3.5

CBC Main

$31,250

$8,140

3.8

David Clark Labs

$2,500

$800

3.1

Method Road #2

$119,830

$4,000

30.0

College of Textiles

$83,000

$10,500

7.9

Monteith Research Center

$93,256

$3,000

31.1

Mann Hall

$42,000

$0

0.0

TOTAL

$572,399

$97,784

5.9

Equipment Efficiencies North Carolina Executive Order 156 encourages all state agencies to maximize their efforts to develop and implement environmentally sustainable policies and practices to minimize its impact on the environment and reduce their overall utility operating cost. The University’s commitment to reduce its GHG emissions has set forth various initiatives to maximize and jumpstart programs that are geared to the reduction of the campus’s energy consumptions. The following programs are some of the many strategies that the University is deploying to make certain we are keeping our commitment to the various agencies.

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The following are projects performed during FY2010: • 934 steam traps were surveyed across campus and identified $207,917 yearly energy loss from steam leaks. e return on investment on the repair of the failed traps was less than 4 months. Defective Central Plant steam traps were replaced. • Lighting upgrades at Jordan Hall replaced T12/34 watt lamps with T8/25 watt lamps to provide similar lighting levels with lower energy consumption. • HID high-bay lighting fixtures in the Yarbrough Central Utility Plant were replaced with energy-efficient induction lighting. Induction lighting also provides an instant start, allowing the staff to use the lights within the mechanical room as-needed, increasing the energy savings.

e fixtures also lower maintenance costs due to an expected lamp life of more than 30 years. Energy-efficient lighting and occupancy sensors have been installed in the Butler Communications Building. e lower wattage lamps, coupled with occupancy sensors, increase energy savings in infrequently used corridors and common spaces. A pilot program for lighting upgrades was deployed in the stacks at DH Hill Library. e pilot program will help determine if lower wattage lamps provide acceptable light levels, visual comfort and energy savings to justify expanded deployment.

Energy Star™ National Building Competition - Tucker Residence Hall Tucker Residence Hall, a dormitory on the NC State Campus, was selected to participate in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA's) first national competition among commercial buildings to save energy and fight climate change. In the spirit of popular weight-loss competitions, Tucker Residence Hall will compete against 13 other buildings across the country to “work off the waste” through improvements in energy efficiency with help from EPA’s Energy Star™ program. e building that sheds the most energy waste, on a percentage basis, will be recognized as the winner of EPA’s National Building Competition in late October 2010. To add to the excitement, NC State’s rival UNC – Chapel Hill was selected for the competition as well. ”NC State University Housing is honored to be a part of the EPA National Building Competition,” said Barry Olson, Associate Director of University Housing Facilities. "We can’t wait to show how small changes can make a big difference when it comes to energy conservation. Our students are looking forward to winning the competition and continuing NC State’s dominance over Carolina on a national stage.” Nearly 200 buildings applied to participate in the National Building Competition, which will judge the energy performance of the 14 finalists from September 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. e energy use of each building is being monitored with EPA’s online measurement and tracking tool, Portfolio Manager. Contestants will receive technical assistance from EPA as well as energy fitness advice from celebrity trainer, Bob Harper. “Buildings of all shapes and sizes are saving money and energy with help from EPA and Energy Star™,” said Jean Lupinacci, Director of EPA’s Energy Star™ Commercial Buildings Program. “We applaud the contestants of EPA’s National Building Competition for taking action to protect the environment and fight climate change.” According to EPA, energy use in commercial buildings accounts for 17% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year. On average, 30% of the energy used in commercial buildings is wasted. ousands of businesses and organizations work with the EPA’s Energy Star™ program and are saving billions of dollars and preventing millions of tons of greenhouse gas emissions from entering our atmosphere each year.

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Energy Performance Contracting An EPC is a performance-based procurement method and financial mechanism for building renewal projects whereby utility bill savings that result from the installation of new building systems (reducing energy use) pay for the cost of the building renewal project. A Guaranteed Energy Savings Performance Contract includes language that obligates the contractor, a qualified ESCO, to pay the difference if at any time the savings fall short of the guarantee. Energy Security-EPC on a broad scale can make a significant contribution to the reduction of facilities energy demand state-wide and nation-wide. A recent engineering study concluded that a new NC State buildingbased performance contract investment of $18.3 million implemented over 5 years would achieve a simple payback of 6.1 years and save the University over $121 million over a 20 year term. NC State has engaged Schneider Electric, an ESCO, to renovate and to implement ECMs in 13 buildings on campus. The first phase is currently underway, and the project is scheduled to be complete by the end of FY2011. All of the design and construction costs for the projects are included within the scope of the ESCO, so there is very little funding required up front by the University. In addition, measurement and verification of the guaranteed energy savings are within the scope of the ESCO. Table 2 outlines the ECMs being installed in the 13 buildings on campus shows the facility, capital cost, annual savings, and simple payback.

Table 2: Energy Performance Contract ECMs for FY2010

Campus Integration FY2010 established a new partnership between Energy Management and the University Sustainability Office. The partnership's primary focus is to create a positive campus culture change. Activities include creating a network among existing campus sustainability-minded stakeholders to develop a social marketing and communications plan that promotes sustainability and energy conservation. Great progress was achieved through greater student, faculty, and staff collaboration and

ECM #

Description

Facility

Capital Cost $

Annual Savings $

Simple Payback (Years)

10-14

Lighting, AHUs/BAS Mods, Envelope, Steam, Water Conservation

Cox Hall

$446,255

$41,921

11

10-15

Lighting, AHUs/BAS Mods, Envelope, Steam, Water Conservation

Poe Hall

$2,071,850

$237,771

9

10-16

Lighting, AHUs/BAS Mods, Envelope, CHW Tompkins Hall $1,738,692 Pump VFD, Water Conservation

$51,098

34

10-17

Lighting, AHU, DDC Mods, Envelope, CHW Pump VFD, Steam Mods

Caldwell Hall

$302,370

$18,107

17

10-18

Lighting, AHUs/DDC Mods, Envelope, CHW Pump Mods, Water Conservation

Winston Hall

$386,750

$19,454

20

10-19

Lighting, BAS Mods, Envelope, CHW Pump Mod, Steam Mods

College of Textiles

$2,232,623

$216,885

10

10-20

Lighting, AHUs DDC Mods, Envelope, CHW Pump VFD, Water Conservation

McKimmon Center

$1,279,401

$133,778

10

10-21

AHUs/DDC Mods, CHW Pump Mod, Monteith $1,661,790 Envelope, Steam Mods, Water Conservation Research Center

$239,214

7

10-22

AHUs/DDC Mods, CHW Pump Mod, Envelope, Steam Mods, Water Conservation

Research 1

$811,433

$150,290

5

10-23

Mechanical System Mods, Envelope, Steam Mods, Water Conservation

Dabney Hall

$2,796,144

$383,031

7

10-24

Lighting, Control System Mods, Solar Hot Carmichael Gym $2,391,918 Water, Water Conservation

$223,728

11

10-25

Envelope, Water Conservation

Structures Lab

$13,019

$1,612

8

10-26

LED Lighting

Monteith Parking Garage

$241,731

$10,666

23

10-27

Hazardous Material Abatement

Project Allowance

$100,023

-

-

 

 

 

Development, Design, and Services

 

Turnkey Project Price Total

Total

$16,473,997 $1,727,554 $3,226,706

 

 

$19,700,703 $1,727,554

10   11

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engagement across the campus community. This included a comprehensive student survey, a high profile energy conservation awareness program, participation in a national energy conservation competition, and the pending designation of 2 dorms that are worthy of the Energy Star™ designation. The outreach programs deployed in FY2010 include: • Energy Management and the Sustainability Office conducted a student survey to assess the students’ understanding of sustainability issues on campus. e results of the survey showed: - 85% think that it is important for NC State to be a leader in sustainability and the environment. - 86% think that it is important for Americans to conserve personal use of energy. - More than 85% think that it is important for NC State students to recycle the products they use. - 76% of the students agree with the statement: “When I conserve energy, I contribute fewer greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.” - 68% think that global climate change will be a major problem for future generations. • Energy Management, Waste Management and Recycling, and the Sustainability Office created outreach advertisements to promote energy savings on campus. ese ads were placed in the Technician and on electronic bulletin boards across campus. • Tucker Residence Hall was selected by the US EPA to compete in a National Energy Star™ Building Competition along with 13 other buildings across the country. e competition concludes this fall, and the residents of Tucker Hall are expected to be actively involved in an energy awareness campaign as the end of the competition approaches. Only one other university is in the competition. • Beginning with the residence halls, energy usage data was entered into the Energy Star™ Portfolio Manager, which allows Energy Management to compare our buildings’ energy consumption to others nationwide. Energy Star™ designations for 2 residence halls, Sullivan and Carroll, are expected in FY2011. Energy Star™ Buildings perform in the top 25% compared to similar building types. • e Energy Policy Act of 2005 provides a provision for non-taxpaying entities, like NC State, to take advantage of tax benefits for energyefficient projects. Teamed with University Housing, Energy Management pursued these benefits for LED lighting renovations completed at Bragaw Residence Hall in 2009.

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CHARTING NC STATE’S UTILITY CONSUMPTION Tracking Campus Utility Consumption and Distribution

Energy Management currently tracks utilities delivered to most buildings on campus including several research facilities. The department reports on utilities from vendors such as PEC and PSNC Energy as well as utilities provided to individual campus facilities from substations and thermal plants. • Purchased Utility Accounts (Total 474): - 136 Electric - 101 Natural Gas - 137 Domestic Water/Irrigation Figure 1: Energy Use and Utility Cost per GSF • NC State Utility Meters (Total 621): - 249 Electric - 84 Steam/Condensate - 193 City Water - 30 Domestic and Heating Hot Water - 65 Chilled Water Utility meter data is entered into EBS utility billing software monthly. Historical information is tracked through the Oracle database implemented for the EBS system. The NC State meters are used primarily to monitor consumption by receipt-funded entities. Energy Management also uses this information to benchmark utility consumption for different building types (i.e., classroom, office, and laboratory) where metering information is available. The report data is based mainly from supply side, or purchased utilities, by NC State. Data from sub-metering on the demand side is presented when available.

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ENERGY AND WATER CONSUMPTION Facility Energy and Water Consumption

NC State aggressively manages strategies to minimize energy use. As a result, the University used about 1% less electrical and natural gas energy related to FY2009. The organization accomplished this in the face of on going construction and extreme weather conditions. Specifically, the University increased 6% in total GSF and experienced a 9% increase in DD compared to FY2009.

Table 3: Energy and Water Consumption and Cost Utility

Consumption

Electricity

283,662,353 kWh

Natural Gas

11,683,165

Fuel Oil #6 Fuel Oil #2

Stormwater

Cost ($)

968,140

MMBTU

$21,394,614

erms

1,168,317

MMBTU

$7,136,228

603,116

Gallons

90,467

MMBTU

$1,437,411

74,441

Gallons

10,422

MMBTU

$170,492

2,237,345

MMBTU

$30,138,745

CCF

$2,229,095

Total Energy

Water

Consumption (MMBTU)

359,942,959 Gallons

481,175

$124,170

Total Energy and Water Cost (Excludes Stormwater): $32,367,840

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Steam Trap Survey In partnership with the State Energy Office, NC State performed a steam trap survey of the 5 Central Plants and many of the connected buildings. e goal of the survey was to determine the status of the steam distribution system, and to correct defects where they were identified. Out of 934 traps surveyed, 133 traps were found defective, a 14% failure rate. is defect rate represents a significant loss of steam from the distribution system, and an annual loss of $207,917 to the University. During the course of the survey additional traps were found plugged due to poor maintenance. e simple payback to replace or repair the defective traps is less than 6 months. As a result of the survey, the University launched a Steam Trap Maintenance Program that will reduce both the defect rates and the associated energy loss. e preventative maintenance program makes the steam distribution system more efficient, which reduces the up-front cost to produce quality steam.


KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Annual Report Data

Each year NC State, along with all other universities and community colleges across the State, provides an Annual Report showing status of energy usage and progress toward short and long-term goals. Along with traditional KPIs (e.g., Cost per GSF, BTU per GSF, Consumption per GSF), NC State provided several additional KPIs in this year’s Annual Report, including Energy

Consumption per 1,000 GSF per DD, Utility Cost per Student, MMBTU per Academic Degree Conferred, and MMBTU per Credit Hour Earned. Since the NC State student population is a major indicator of energy use on campus, these metrics are relevant, and show a decrease in energy use per student and energy use per academic degree conferred. The baseline for energy reduction and water are highlighted in Table 4 below. Baselines: Highlighted Cells

Table 4: Key Performance Indicators Fiscal Year

2002 Water Baseline

2003 Energy Baseline

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

% Change (1 Year)

% Change (Baseline)

Utility Cost: $/GSF

$1.73

$1.98

$2.10

$2.18

$2.50

$2.39

$2.70

$2.66

$2.51

-6%

27%

Energy Cost: $/1,000 GSF/DD

$0.341

$0.357

$0.386

$0.438

$0.474

$0.474

$0.523

$0.505

$0.430

-14%

21%

Energy Consumption: BTU/GSF

155,997

171,888

170,406

168,685

163,756

165,265

173,490

177,274

173,224

-2%

1%

32.8

33.6

36.1

32.9

34.9

35.4

35.8

32.2

-10%

-2%

Energy Consumption: BTU/GSF/DD Water Cost per GSF

$0.119

$0.106

$0.137

$0.135

$0.142

$0.150

$0.134

$0.157

$0.170

+10%

45%

Water Consumption: CCF/GSF

0.066

0.054

0.058

0.054

0.052

0.047

0.037

0.047

0.037

-20%

-44%

Gallons per Degree Conferred

1,739,057

1,467,812

1,626,404

1,508,534

1,527,325

1,375,912

1,028,884

1,338,376

1,140,796

-15%

-34%

Gallons per Credit Hour Earned

734

605

648

669

656

573

445

547

452

-17%

-38%

Heating and Cooling DD, Yearly

4,710

5,248

5,078

4,670

4,978

4,733

4,903

4,945

5,385

+9%

3%

Campus Area: GSF

9,796,638

9,910,619

+6%

30%

Sponsored Award Activity: Million $

$168.2

$169.5

$208.6

$199.5

$207.0

$192.4

$213.7

$206.2

$267.5

+30%

58%

Utility Cost per Student: $/FTE

$584

$701

$743

$857

$1,043

$989

$1,115

$1,075

$1,059

-2%

51%

MMBTUs per Acad. Degree Conferred

278.12

273.26

267.32

295.39

299.65

302.97

324.77

317.53

315.52

-1%

15%

MMBTUs per Credit Hour Earned

2.32

2.57

2.54

2.80

2.75

2.71

2.80

2.78

2.81

1%

9%

9,986,663 11,056,592 11,723,681 11,918,022 12,130,370 12,190,764 12,915,905

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TRENDS IN ENERGY AND WATER CONSUMPTION Energy and Water Consumption Metrics

The University made strides towards conservation goals by achieving a 2% reduction in energy use per square foot from FY2009. This reduction is noteworthy because new campus construction and renovation projects affected more than 1 million GSF in FY2010. The overall increase in energy use per GSF is less than 1% compared to the baseline. Considering weather and temperature conditions in FY2010, there was a 10% drop in energy use per GSF per DD from the previous year. Additionally, as seen in Figure 2, there was a 2% reduction in energy use per GSF compared to the FY2003 baseline year. Through continued commitment to the State of North Carolina’s reduction goals, the University achieved a 20% reduction in water use per square foot Figure 2: Campus Energy Consumption, by Fiscal Year

50.0

162,500

125,000

2015 Goal 87,500

37.5

2015 Goal 25.0

12.5

15

14

20

13

20

12

20

11

20

10

20

09

20

08

20

07

20

06

20

05

20

04

20

03

20

02

20

20

15

14

20

13

20

12

20

11

20

10

20

09

20

08

20

07

20

06

20

05

20

04

20

03

20

20

20

Energy Baseline and 30% Reduction Goal Energy Consumption: BTU/GSF

17

Figure 3: Campus Water Consumption, by Fiscal Year

0

02

50,000

Water Consumption (Gal/GSF)

Energy Consumption (BTU/GSF)

200,000

compared to the FY2009 water usage. In comparison with the baseline year, there was an overall reduction in water use per GSF of slightly more than 43%. Figure 2 shows NC State’s energy consumption compared to the State’s 2015 goal. Following several years of increased energy use, a decrease was achieved in FY2010. ECMs proposed for FY2011 will continue this trend. Figure 3 shows NC State’s continued downward trend for water consumption. The 2015 goal of 20% reduction compared to FY2002 has been achieved.

Water Baseline and 20% Reduction Goal Water Consumption: Gal/GSF


350.00

Figure 4: Million BTUs per Academic Degree Conferred, by Fiscal Year

325.00 300.00 275.00

10 20

09 20

08 20

07 20

06 20

05 20

04 20

03 20

20

02

250.00

Million BTUs per Academic Degree Conferred

Figure 5: Energy Consumption per GSF per DD, by Fiscal Year

0 20 1

9 20 0

20 0

20 0

20 0

20 0

20 0

20 0

Energy Consumption per GSF per Degree Day Energy Consumption per GSF

8

50,000

7

30.0

6

87,500

5

32.5

4

125,000

3

35.0

2

162,500

Energy Use (BTU/GSF)

200,000

37.5

20 0

Energy Use (BTU/GSF/Degree Day)

40.0

MMBTU/Degree Conferred

Energy Management adopted additional KPIs for use in measuring progress. The metric in Figure 4 illustrates the relationship between energy use and academic mission. The metric for this KPI divides the total annual BTUs for the University by the number of degrees conferred by NC State. Since the BTUs used each year were substantial, the metric was derived by using units of millions of BTUs per academic degree conferred. Over the past 2 years the University has decreased energy consumption per academic degree conferred. NC State has reduced the total energy per academic degree conferred by nearly 3% from the peak value experienced in FY2008. The weather in FY2010 was extreme, both high temperatures in the summer cooling season and lower temperatures in the winter heating season. To normalize energy consumption for weather conditions, a KPI relating energy use per GSF per DD is shown in Figure 5. Based on this metric, the University decreased BTUs/GSF per DD showing a reduction of 10% versus FY2009 and 2% versus the baseline year.

Weather Normalized Trend

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TRENDS IN ENERGY AND WATER COSTS Energy and Water Consumption Metrics

Overall utility costs decreased during FY2010. Natural gas utility rates were the primary factor behind this cost reduction. Figure 6 depicts the overall utility cost per GSF. Figure 7 shows an additional KPI relating utility costs to students as $/student. The lower cost of natural gas also impacted the drop in utility cost per student.

Figure 6: Utility Cost per GSF, by Fiscal Year

$1,500

$2.50

Utility Cost ($/FTE)

$2.00

$1.50

$1,000

$750

Utility Cost per Student

10 20

09 20

08 20

07 20

06 20

05 20

04 20

03 20

02

10 20

09 20

08 20

07 20

06 20

05 20

04 20

03 20

20

Utility Cost/GSF

19

$1,250

$500

02

$1.00

Figure 7: Utility Cost per Student, by Fiscal Year

20

Utility Cost ($/GSF)

$3.00


AVOIDED COSTS: RATE NEGOTIATIONS Annual Policies for Energy Supply Management

Natural gas can be procured through the local supplier, PSNC (Tariff) or procured in bulk through energy marketers (Transport). The purchase of Tariff versus Transport is evaluated monthly for interruptible and firm natural gas accounts. Historically, procurement of bulk Transport natural gas is more economical than Tariff. The largest University natural gas accounts are on the PSNC interruptible rates. During periods of extreme cold weather, PSNC can interrupt the flow of natural gas, both Tariff and Transport sources. During

periods of natural gas curtailment, the campus switches to fuel oil to produce steam. The curtailment rate saved $332,958 in FY2010 and saved more than $2.7 million since the program started. Like natural gas, electricity can be procured through different rate structures. Since 2002, many PEC electrical accounts have been switched to Time of Use rate structures. Energy Management reviews these accounts annually for cost avoidance opportunities. In FY2010, the University realized a savings of $389,068, totaling more than $1.1 million since the program’s inception.

Table 5: Table of Avoided Costs

Year FY2002 to FY2005

Details of Avoided Costs

Leveraged Electric Rates Leveraged Natural Gas Rates Leveraged Fuel Oil Rates Avoided Costs Avoided Costs Avoided Costs

Detail of Savings Unavailable

$247,185

$549,303

$2,459,479

FY2006

PEC - 14 Time of Use Accounts Natural Gas - Transport vs. PSNC Tariff Rate Natural Gas - Alternate Fuels (Oil vs. NG) vs. Transport Rate

$112,021

-$16,097

$37,875

FY2007

PEC - 14 Time of Use Accounts Natural Gas - Transport vs. PSNC Tariff Rate

$105,754

$121,576

$0

FY2008

PEC - 14 Time of Use Accounts Natural Gas - Transport vs. PSNC Tariff Rate

$222,511

-$43,948

$0

FY2009

PEC - 38 Time of Use Accounts Natural Gas - Transport vs. PSNC Tariff Rate

$25,234

$1,789,249

$0

FY2010

PEC - 33 Time of Use Accounts Natural Gas - Transport vs. PSNC Tariff Rate

$389,068

$332,958

$0

$1,101,773

$2,733,041

$2,497,354

Totals

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LOOKING AHEAD TO FISCAL YEAR 2011 Projections for 2011 and Meeting Goals for 2015

NC State is committed to reducing energy and water consumption and improving efficiency. The University will accomplish these goals in a manner consistent with campus needs for a safe, secure, and inviting campus community. Looking ahead to 2015, Energy Management is directing efforts and identifying strategies to accomplish stated objectives: • Comply with legislative mandates for energy and water use reduction. • Meet the intent of the UNC System Sustainability Plan. • Support the NC State University Sustainability Plan and the NC State Climate Action Plan. • Establish organizational and financial structures that will enable the NC State Strategic Energy Management Plan implementation. • Evaluate required investments in capital and operating funds to realize the mandated reductions and campus commitments. • Identify legislation or budgetary changes necessary to produce results. • Affect culture change at NC State to exemplify leadership in campus energy-efficiency. By 2015, the University will produce reductions in energy and water consumption with efficiency improvements through defined measures. The 5 focus areas are: • Energy Data Management • Energy Supply Management • Energy Use in Facilities • Equipment in Facilities • Campus Energy Integration

Energy Data Management Energy Data Management encompasses the entire effort involved in GHG abatement and reducing the energy necessary to perform the daily operations of the University. Before changes can be made to any system, it is necessary to know what needs to be changed. As stated by International Quality Advisor,

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US EPA Energy Star™ Participation Building ratings and energy assessments are valuable tools to compare NC State campus’s building energy use to other comparable campuses. ese comparisons enable the University to learn from other participating organizations and also promote successes. NC State has made a commitment to become an US EPA Energy Star™ partner organization, and as such, is making an effort to participate in the Portfolio Manager, EPA’s online tool, to certify buildings and to award the Energy Star™ designation. An Energy Star™ facility meets strict energy performance standards set by the EPA and uses less energy, is less expensive to operate, and causes fewer GHG emissions than its peers. e EPA rating system accounts for differences in operating conditions, regional weather data, and other important considerations. To qualify for the Energy Star™ designation, a building or manufacturing plant must score in the top 25 percent based on EPA's National Energy Performance Rating System. A rating scale of 1-100 is used to compare energy use among similar type facilities. Buildings that achieve a score of 75 or higher may be eligible for the Energy Star™. At this time, residence halls are the only NC State campus building types specifically considered in the Portfolio Manager system. Most of the University’s residence halls’ energy information has been uploaded into the system, and two dorms are in the process of receiving the Energy Star™ designation. In FY2011 , NC State will expand its partnership with Energy Star™.


Dr. H. James Harrington, "Measurement is the first step that leads to control and eventually to improvement. If you can't measure something, you can't understand it. If you can't understand it, you can't control it. If you can't control it, you can't improve it." Energy Data Management aligns with the University goals of efficient management of resources while mitigating the related costs. This focus area is divided into 8 key sections which direct endeavors around the Energy Data Framework. The sections are described below: • Predict Impacts of Growth: Using key performance indicators, relevant data is used to provide a long range plan based on modeling to project forward factors that affect energy consumption and then frame actionable items accordingly. • Goals for Plan Sectors: Challenging benchmarks are set to prioritize energy reduction and carbon abatement strategies to further the University’s mission. • Building Assessments: Leveraging Energy Star™ as an additional analysis tool, buildings are evaluated against normalized models. By determining norms, key energy users are identified for projects to maximize efficiency and minimize energy use at the building level. • Campus Automation Master Plan: e expansion of monitoring and control capabilities produces the ability to take an approach from a system perspective. is provides Energy Managers with the tools to perform load shifting and shedding to benefit the University financially. • Energy Dashboard: is multi-faceted solution empowers all University groups with varying levels of ability to steer energy reduction and carbon abatement.

Combined Heat and Power System When electricity is generated by burning fuel or gas, one of the byproducts is heat. In a conventional system, waste heat is vented to the atmosphere. Using a more modern generation system, the waste heat can be captured and used for space heating and hot water. Because of its ability to utilize the waste heat, a CHP system offers a greater efficiency over standard electricity and heating systems. NC State is studying the economic feasibility of installing a CHP system within the Cates Central Utility Plant on Main Campus. When commissioned, the CHP system will generate 11.5 MW of power, approximately one third of the University’s base electric load. e captured waste heat will be used to produce steam to be distributed throughout Main Campus within the existing steam system.

• Metering Long Range Plan: Standards are set forth to provide metering • •

with real-time capabilities to support monitoring, analysis, and enterprise billing needs. Trend Reporting: Strategies are developed for the production of intuitive reporting to facilitate management decisions towards exceeding existing and future reduction goals. Annual ROI Tracking: Yearly reporting strategies are provided to demonstrate savings realized from Energy Conservation Measures. is will act as a catalyst to promote additional energy conservation projects.

Energy Supply Management The energy types used by NC State to heat and cool buildings are electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Natural gas and electricity are the major energy sources. Energy Supply Management refers to how NC State procures these energy types by the most efficient means possible. • Combined Heat and Power Program: Combined heat and power, also known as cogeneration, is a way to increase the efficiency of power plants. A 11.5 megawatt natural gas combustion cogeneration facility is planned for NC State. • Utility Enterprise: A University Utility Enterprise, Wolf Energy, is a recharge cost center that sells energy and services to the campus to fund a utility trust account. Under the Utility Enterprise, all campus entities would be metered and receive a monthly bill for utilities consumed. • Central Plant Optimization: Central Plant Optimization addresses the relation between the energy consumed by a piece of equipment to the chilled water and steam produced. Efficiency can also be measured by the ratio of operational cost to the utilities supplied by the plants. • Electrical Demand Management: Electrical Demand Management entails actions that influence the quantity, or patterns, of energy consumed by NC State. DSM actions target specific activities to reduce the peak demand when energy supply is constrained and kW cost is high, which saves money. • Energy Purchase Optimization: NC State has programs in place to acquire energy, electricity, natural gas and fuel oil at the lowest costs possible. Energy professionals review electrical rates, or tariffs, to ensure electricity is supplied at the lowest cost. • Renewable Portfolio: Renewable energy sources are those which come from natural resources such as sunlight, wind and geothermal heat, which are rapidly and naturally replenished. NC State currently has

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several small-scale solar thermal and solar PV systems on campus, and have several larger systems in the planning stages. Industry Best Practices: Best practices can be defined as the most efficient (least amount of effort) and effective (best results) way of accomplishing a task, based on repeatable procedures that have proven themselves over time for large numbers of people. Innovative Arrangements: NC State relies upon traditional utility firms for energy. Currently, alternative energy sources require tax incentives, carbon credits, accelerated depreciation, or renewable energy credits to be cost-effective. Reinvestment Legislation: In the Summer 2010 Session of the North Carolina General Assembly, House Bill 1292 was ratified and became Session Law 2010-196. is Session Law allows all UNC system schools to keep 60% of savings resulting from energy conservation measures to be used solely for future energy saving measures.

Energy Use in Facilities Energy Use in Facilities applies to the efforts of Energy Management to reduce campus energy consumption by targeting campus buildings and the way that they are designed, built, and occupied. Senate Bill 688 sets a standard for all State-owned facilities, and the measures below are intended to help NC State meet or exceed these standards. This focus area is divided into 12 key sections which allow Energy Management to support its mission to reduce campus energy consumption. • Organization for Success: e Energy Management Plan is the roadmap to establish objectives and guide activities. e proper utilization of this

• • • • • •

plan allows NC State, to accomplish the far-reaching goals of energy efficiency and carbon neutrality. Energy Performance Contracting: Performance Contracting allows NC State to perform ECMs with minimal cost up-front. An ESCO finances these projects which provide guaranteed energy savings. Retro-Commissioning: Retro-commissioning projects are completed in existing buildings to ensure that all building systems are operating as they should considering their current use. Building Conservation Incentives: Occupant behavior change is the primary target of Conservation Incentives. ese can take the form of a bonus for conservation or a penalty for wasting resources. Space Utilization and Scheduling: Space Utilization and Scheduling optimizes occupancy rates so that unoccupied buildings can be “shut down” to conserve energy. Intersession Energy Savings Initiative: During breaks, unoccupied buildings will have setpoints adjusted to provide energy savings. LEED Silver Design Standard: e LEED Silver Design Standard is a certification provided by the United States Green Building Council and rewards the achievement of design and construction of an energyefficient building or renovation. LCC for Capital Decisions: Incorporation of ECMs and energy efficiency into the decision-making process for capital decisions helps to gain a full understanding of total cost of ownership for a building or renovation project. Building Automation Master Plan: NC State integrates campus BAS systems into a single system.

Reinvestment Legislation - Session Law 2010-196 In the most recent session of the North Carolina General Assembly, House Bill 1292 was ratified by the assembly and became Session Law 2010-196. Sponsored by Representatives Price, Womble, Jeffus, and Lucas SL2010-196 mandates that all UNC-system schools keep 60% of savings resulting from energy conservation measures. e realized savings must only be used on additional energy saving measures for the University. Continually, the projects must not require additional funding from the State of North Carolina. In one prime example, a savings guaranteed to the University through the 13-building performance contract is roughly $20 million over 20 years. Potentially, the University could retain $12 million over that period of time. Needless to say, the impact of this legislation has not yet been fully discovered. When considering the Climate Action Plan, Session Law 2010-196 impacts green power purchasing and all energy conservation measures.

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• Public Utility Incentives: Public utilities are required to provide

incentives for renewable energy and energy-efficient projects for their customers. e incentives (or penalties) are assessed based upon usage. e incentives address overall energy efficiency programs, as well as programs that reduce peak demand during high load times of the year. Repair and Renovation and Grants for ECMs: Energy Management and BM&O pursue funding opportunities for ECMs.

Fuel Oil Consumption in FY2010 During FY2010, PSNC mandated NC State burn fuel oil to operate natural gas equipment for producing distributed steam. The increase in fuel oil consumption was due to cost mitigation strategies through NC State’s interruptible PSNC natural gas accounts. PSNC requires NC State to maintain an alternate fuel source on site to operate natural gas equipment during high demand periods for lower rate eligibility. While the University secured substantial avoided costs through the use of this method, using fuel oil increased the energy “overhead.” Because of the dramatic increase in DD, the University experienced a record-setting two weeks of natural gas curtailment. Fuel oil procurement increased tenfold due to the curtailment periods.

infrastructure. OIT is developing programs and performing energy data analysis to help reduce its energy consumption. Virtual computing is one of the many programs that OIT is implementing to reduce the number of servers and computers in use on campus. Equipment Energy Awareness Programs: e University has scores of fume hoods that support the scientists in their quest for answers through research. Fume hoods consume large amounts of energy, and the University addresses that problem via a fume hood modernization program. e program will help to replace the existing constant air volume fume hoods with variable air volume fume hoods. LCC for Equipment Upgrades: e LCC is the total cost of ownership of machinery and equipment. e University is studying LCC to choose the most cost effective machinery and equipment from a list of alternatives to achieve the lowest long-term cost of ownership. O&M Best Practices: O&M Best Practices are a set of standardized operating procedures that focus on safety and minimize unnecessary waste. O&M Best Practices is unique to each organization, yet similar in nature. Each entity uses its own Computerized Maintenance Management Systems. NC State uses Facility Focus to track and maintain its inventory, which is in excess of 15,000 pieces of equipment.

Equipment Efficiencies

Campus Integration

North Carolina Executive Order 156 encourages all state agencies to maximize their efforts to develop and implement sustainable policies and practices to minimize their impact on the environment and reduce their overall utility operating cost. The University’s commitment to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions has set forth various initiatives to maximize and jump start programs that are geared to the reduction of the campus’s energy consumptions. The following are snapshots of programs and policies that are being implemented by the University. • Energy Star™ Procurement Policy: e University is developing policies to guide departments to invest in energy-efficient equipment and demanding suppliers to provide the University with Energy Star™ Certified equipment. • Incentives for Energy-Efficient Equipment: e University is providing incentives to the campus community to replace old and energy inefficient equipment. e goal is to reduce its electrical demand and operational cost. • Energy-Efficient IT Systems: e information hardware system consumes a great deal of energy to maintain and operate its

Saving energy and reducing the University’s carbon footprint requires the buy-in of the entire campus community. By and large, building occupants drive building energy consumption. By establishing an energy policy and implementing effective outreach programs, NC State will achieve its aggressive energy reduction and GHG goals. Through the following strategies, Energy Management will lead the University toward its goal to reach 30% energy reduction by 2015. • Comprehensive Energy Policy: An Energy Policy will enable NC State to address issues of energy development and use, including energy production, distribution and consumption. It institutionalizes energy goals and authorizes actions so that programs achieve campus-wide compliance. • Sustainability/Energy Outreach: An effective outreach program called Change Your State will yield a high rate of ROI for

Change your

State

24


25

energy and sustainability. is component outlines a campus-wide outreach program that will lower energy costs and reduce NC State’s carbon footprint. Student Conservation Fee: NC State is one of the few large campuses in the UNC system without some type of student fee for sustainability. Students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Appalachian State University, and University of North Carolina at Wilmington have an approved green fee. Student Work/Learn Opportunities: e college educational experience is evolving to become more closely tied to the real-world experiences. From energy awareness to green building best practices, students are seeking opportunities for engagement in learning more about the campus infrastructure. Student Work/Learn Opportunities explore how NC State can link the operations of the University with learning opportunities. Living Laboratories: Many universities use living laboratory opportunities to learn about infrastructure development and operation. Peer institutions often use infrastructure upgrades and renewable energy installations to educate their students, recruit faculty, and attract research grants. Similar opportunities exist at NC State. is component provides a roadmap to leverage these backyard learning opportunities. Centennial Partner Engagement: e Centennial partnership offers a special opportunity to find common ground between the University and businesses. By engaging public-private partnership by adopting sustainable and energy minded practices, the Centennial Community will benefit as a whole, including the financial bottom line. e Centennial partnership engagement initiative presents a way forward.


THE STRATEGIC ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN Energy Management Charge

The current and continuing economic downturn facing North Carolina and NC State will continue to challenge us financially for the next several years. It is essential that NC State continues to explore every possible action to reduce operating costs, especially in the University’s non-core areas. Facilities Operations and Energy Management need to look toward new and different methods for conserving energy and reducing utility costs; therefore, this Strategic Energy Management Plan is required to provide a roadmap to achieve our goals. The purpose of the Strategic Energy Management Plan is to reduce energy consumption and improve energy efficiency on the NC State campus consistent with the needs for a safe, secure, and inviting campus community. This is to be accomplished by developing 41 methodical and aggressive approaches for efficient energy use. Each of the 41 Strategic Energy Management components follow the same format: • General Description – What is proposed? • Business Case – Why are we doing this? • Primary Task Breakdown – How will it be accomplished? • Interactions Required – Who needs to be involved? • Resources Required – What is the cost? • CAP – How does this help the campus achieve climate neutrality?

The general goals of the Energy Management Strategic Plan are to: • Implement strategies to comply with legislative mandates for energy and water use reduction. • Meet and exceed the intent of the UNC System Sustainability Plan. • Support and complement the campus Sustainability Strategic Plan and the campus Climate Action Plan. • Establish organizational and financial structures that will enable the Plan. • Evaluate required investments in capital and operating funds to realize the mandated reductions and campus commitments. • Identify enabling legislation or budgetary changes necessary to produce results. • Modify the culture at NC State to exemplify leadership in campus energy efficiency. The 41 components of the plan are divided across 5 program areas: • Energy Data Management • Energy Supply Management • Energy Use in Facilities • Equipment Efficiency • Campus Energy Integration Each plan component will be further developed and prioritized to help aid implementation. The plan will be updated each year to mark progress and adjust priorities.

26


DECLARATIONS Strategic Energy and Water Plan Commitment for NC State University Recognizing that energy and water as controllable expenses wherein savings result in reducing overall operating cost. Energy and water management is a responsibility of the staff, faculty, and students at each facility, guided and supported by the Energy Manager. • North Carolina State University will develop a Strategic Energy and Water Plan. • e Director for Utilities Services is responsible for the success of the Program at the campus facilities. • e Energy Program Manager is responsible for implementation of North Carolina State University’s Strategic Energy and Water Plan. • e Assistant Vice Chancellor for Facilities Operations will review progress and results quarterly. Strategic Energy and Water Plan Commitment - Goals Recognizing that North Carolina State University is experiencing significant growth in facilities and utilization rates, the University will establish a goal to reduce the Aggregate Annual Energy Consumption per Gross Square Foot, adjusted for weather, by a minimum of 4% over a 10-year period based on the Key Performance Indicators listed below, using Fiscal Year 2002/2003 as a baseline. The University will reduce Annual Water Consumption Per Gross Square Foot by a minimum of 10% over the baseline year 2001-2002. Strategic Energy and Water Plan Commitment- Measures University tracking measures include the following State Key Performance Indicators (KPI): • Total Utilities Cost per Gross Square Feet • Total Water Cost per Gross Square Foot • Total Energy Cost per ousand Gross Square Feet per • Water Consumption in Hundred Cubic Feet (CCF) per Gross Square Foot • Degree Day • Total Heating and Cooling Degree Days (DD) • Total Energy Consumption in BTU’s per Gross Square Feet • Campus Area (GSF) • Total Energy Consumption in BTU’s per Gross Square Feet per Degree • Growth in Research Programs ($) Day • Utility Cost per Student ($/FTE) Strategic Energy and Water Plan - Commitment Implemented this 8th day of October, 2010.

Energy Program Manager

27

Director of Utilities Services

Assistant Vice-Chancellor for Facilities Operations

Associate Vice-Chancellor for Facilities


APPENDIX 1: 2010 ENERGY CONSERVATION MEASURES Table A1: Energy Data Management for Fiscal Year 2010 Energy Data Management Activities During FY2010

Measurement

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

Capture realtime data on 20 meters

EM is capturing realtime data on 20 meters

Reduce man hours in reading

Reduce man hours in reading

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary/ Operating Costs

Evaluate Energy Star capabilities for building performance benchmarking.

Determine usefulness

Entered data for 17 housing buildings

Evaluate building based on analysis

Found problem with one building’s condensate system

FTEs Energy Star

N/E

EM

Salary

Began software upgrades to the EBS billing system (cost of software upgrades included in the annual maintenance fee by Instep, Chicago, IL).

Add features to enhance user eďŹƒciency

EM provided user access to new features

Reduce man hours performing billing operations

Reduce man hours performing billing operations

$28,000 FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary/ Operating Costs

Initiated upgrades with eDNA web system.

Enhance web system for dashboard capabilities

EM provides dashboard capabilities.

Enhance communicatio n to campus entities

N/A

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Began using JMP 8.0 software to analyze data from EBS database.

Trend reports are used to identify actionable repair lists for utility distribution

Found data outliers and investigated problems

University avoided cost for utilities

N/A

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary/ Operating Costs

Integrate 20 smart meters into eDNA system.

28


Table A2: Energy Data Management Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Energy Data Management Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

Measurement Expected

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

TBD

Instep FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

TBD

Instep FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Actual

Expected

Actual

TBD

Provide management with tools for better business decisions

Test the custom reporting feature for the EBS Client and the EBS Web Portal to provide specialized reports to EBS users.

Develop custom reports and confirm data integrity

Begin implementation of custom reporting and archival of machine specific user files.

Prepare custom reports and store related user custom files

TBD

Minimize downtime for users experience hardware issues

Create custom system reports to enhance and improve validation for data and billing processes.

Validation reports improve billing processes

TBD

Reduce man hours on billing errors

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Develop Predictive Modeling for data driven business decisions.

Data sets are compiled, analyzed, and predictive models are established

TBD

University avoids cost for utilities

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Develop Trend Reporting to provide insight into patterns for utility sources.

Trend reports are provided to management for high level decision making

TBD

University avoids cost for utilities

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Upgrade to JMP 9.0 software to analyze data from EBS database.

Trend reports are used to identify actionable repair lists for utility distribution

TBD

University avoids cost for utilities

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

29


Energy Data Management Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

Measurement

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

TBD

5% Savings projected from outreach eorts

TBD

N/E

N/E

EM

Operating Funds

TBD

$500,000 Estimated

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

Set goals for Energy Conservation Measures.

M&V critical to success

TBD

Dependent upon ECMs

Create an energy dashboard.

Energy Awareness Conservation

ROI Tracking - SL 2010-196 Energy Savings Account.

Measurement of Utility Cost Savings

Table A3: Energy Supply Management for Fiscal Year 2010 Energy Supply Management Activities During FY2010

Measurement

Annual Savings

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

Avoided costs

EM tracked avoided costs for natural gas purchases

Avoided costs

$332,958

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Avoided costs

EM tracked avoided costs for electric rate optimization

Avoided costs

$389,068

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Update program for the purchase of strip natural gas.

Avoided costs

EM developed plan for extended strip gas purchases

Avoided costs plus budget protection

Included in $332,958 reconciliation.

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Update the natural gas,electricity, and water rates in EBS billing system.

Streamline process

EM updated rates

Permits payment for legitimate bills only

N/A

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Evaluate/reconcile the purchase of Transport-type gas volumes monthly.

Reconcile savings on electrical accounts from standard service to Time of Use.

30


Table A4: Energy Supply Management Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Energy Supply Management Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

Measurement

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

Evaluate/reconcile the purchase of strip & transport type gas volumes monthly.

Avoided costs

TBD

Avoided costs

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Amend the contract for long-strip purchases.

Avoided costs plus budget protection

Included in the above reconciliation

Avoided costs plus budget protection

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Reconcile savings on electrical accounts: Standard Service Vs. Time of Use.

Avoided costs

TBD

Avoided costs

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

TBD

Permits payment for legitimate bills only

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

TBD

Savings realized by creating a more eďŹƒcient distribution system

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

TBD

Savings realized through management of electric demand during peak rate time of use

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM/ Power Systems

Salary

Permits Update the natural gas, electricity, and water payment for rates in the EBS billing system. legitimate bills only

Central Plant Optimization.

Expanded Load Shedding Capability.

31

Measure steam and chilled water supplied vs. actual volume consumed by building systems

Reduction of Demand Charges from PEC


Table A5: Energy and Water Use in Facilities for Fiscal Year 2010 Energy and Water Use Activities During FY2010

Winter break setback.

Measurement Expected

Conservation

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

$55,000 compared to baseline FY 2004

FTEs

N/E

EM BM&O

Salary

$16,000

FTEs

N/E

Dining

Salary

Actual

Expected

Actual

Conservation

Reduction in energy required for operation and related avoided costs

Dining Hall tray elimination.

Conservation

Dining conserved water

Reduction in water usage and cost savings in Dining facilities

Recommend energy and water best practices to the University Building Specification Standards Committee.

Conservation

Conservation

Avoided costs for water and energy

$71,000

FTEs

N/E

EM BM&O

Salary

Conservation

EM began process to expand program and improve on existing applications

Supplement city water usage with recovery application

$7,400

FTEs

N/E

BM&O U&E Services

Salary

N/E

Savings associated with energyefficient equipment

N/E

$600,000

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

N/E

Reduction in M&O costs for stand-alone chilled water system

N/E

$430,000

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

Evaluate applications where rainwater or condensate water reuse.

HVAC Renovations - Robertson, Biltmore, Pulp and Paper Labs.

Reduction in energy use

Chilled Water Utility Loop - Jordan Hall.

Efficiency of central utility distribution

32


Energy and Water Use Activities During FY2010

Measurement

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

N/E

$200,000

N/E

BM&O

Operating Funds

N/E

Ability to automate building schedules and setbacks

TBD

$290,000

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

Chilled Water Utility Loop - Scott Hall.

Efficiency of central utility distribution

N/E

Reduction in M&O costs for stand-alone chilled water system

N/E

$433,800

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

Misc. Projects to meet SB 668.

Increased energyefficiency

N/E

Increased energyefficiency

N/E

$100,000

N/E

BM&O

Operating Funds

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

Boiler Replacement - McKimmon Center.

Replaced with energyefficient equipment

N/E

Reduced energy costs

Campus Automation Upgrades.

Ability to connect to building BAS

Table A6: Energy and Water Use in Facilities Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Energy and Water Use Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

Intersession Setback Initiative

Evaluate new applications for rainwater or condensate water reuse

33

Measurement Expected

Annual Savings

Actual

Expected

Actual

Conservation

Conservation

Reduction in energy required for operation and related avoided costs

$55,000 compared to baseline FY 2004

FTEs

N/E

EM BM&O

Salary

Conservation

EM began process to expand program and improve on existing applications

Supplement city water usage with recovery application

$7,400

FTEs

N/E

BM&O U&E Services

Salary


Energy and Water Use Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

Measurement

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

TBD

FTEs

N/E

BM&O EM

Salary/ Grant Funds

N/E

TBD

$750,000 estimated

N/E

BM&O EM

Operating Funds

N/E

Reduction in M&O costs for stand-alone chilled water system

N/E

$850,000 estimated

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

N/E

Reduction in M&O costs

N/E

$3,500,00 0 estimated

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

BAS Replacement

Ability to connect to building BAS

N/E

Ability to automate building schedules and setbacks

TBD

$4,828,00 0 estimated

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

Chilled Water and Steam Building Connections - Winslow, Kamphoefner, Brooks

Reliability, Energyefficiency

N/E

Reduction in M&O costs

N/E

$3,900,00 0 estimated

N/E

CPM

Capital Funds

TBD

Reduction in energy required for operation and related avoided costs

TBD

$438,800 estimated

N/E

BM&O

Operating Funds

TBD

Reduction in energy required for operation and related avoided costs

TBD

$675,000 estimated

N/E

BM&O

Operating Funds

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

Building Retro-commissioning Programs

Reduce energy use

Measure reduction in energy use compared to historical data

10%-15% Efficiency improvement

Metering repair and replacement

More reliable data

TBD

Cooling Tower Repairs and Replacement College of Textiles, McKimmon Center, Partners II

Efficiency of central utility distribution

Chiller Replacements - Scott Hall, Environmental Health and Safety, Brooks Hall, College of Textiles, Patterson Hall, MRC, Research II

Reliability, Energyefficiency

Lighting Upgrades - Mann Hall, Dabney, Hall, Gardner Hall, Williams

High EďŹƒciency motor replacements

Reduce energy use

Reduce energy use

34


Energy and Water Use Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

SCADA Monitoring System - Phase II

Measurement Expected

Annual Savings

Actual

Expected

Actual

TBD

Savings realized through management of electric demand during peak rate time of use

TBD

Reduction of Demand Charges from PEC

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

$750,000 estimated

N/E

BM&O/ Power Systems

Operating Funds

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

Table A7: Equipment EďŹƒciency for Fiscal Year 2010 Measurement

Annual Savings

Equipment EďŹƒciency Activities During FY2010

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

DH Hill upgrade lighting to T8- 25 watt & install occupancy sensors

Reduce energy use

EM facilitated lighting install and reduced energy usage

Avoided costs and energy savings

$667 calculated

$12,907

N/E

EM

Lapse Salary

Jordan Hall: upgrade lighting to T8 25 watt & install occupancy sensors

Reduce energy use

EM facilitated lighting install and reduced energy usage

Avoided costs and energy savings

$843 calculated

$4,022

N/E

EM

Lapse Salary

Butler Building: Upgrade lighting & install occupancy sensors

Reduce energy use

EM facilitated lighting install and reduced energy usage

Avoided costs and energy savings

$2,356 calculated

$11,534

N/E

EM

Lapse Salary

Yarbrough: Induction Lighting

Reduce energy use

EM facilitated lighting install and reduced energy usage

Avoided costs and energy savings

$6,718 calculated

$33,720

N/E

EM

Lapsed Salary

35


Equipment Efficiency Activities During FY2010

Steam Trap Survey 80% funded by SEO

Method Road #2: Boiler Replacement

CBC Large Animal; Upgrades to Lighting

Measurement Expected

Annual Savings

Actual

Expected

EM facilitated Identify survey by Avoided costs problematic Enercheck and associated with steam traps to provided loss of steam reduce steam results to Zone within leakage within managers. distribution distribution Actionable system. system items complete

Actual

Investment

Funding Source

Jobs

Assigned To

EM/ Enercheck/ Utility Operating Zone Funds Shops/ SEO

$207,917 calculated

$70,000 estimated

N/E

BM&O replaced failed Reduce energy boiler with two use more efficient models

Avoided costs and energy savings

$4,000

$119,830

N/E

BM&O

Lapsed Salary

Reduce energy use

Avoided costs and energy savings

$8,140

$32,250

N/E

BM&O

Operating Funds

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

N/E

EM

Operating Funds

N/E

EM

Operating Funds

TBD

Table A8: Equipment Efficiency Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Equipment Efficiency Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

Measurement Expected

Annual Savings

Actual

Expected

Actual

Incentive program for freezer/coolers in lab environments

Measure energy use of existing equipment vs. More modern equipment

TBD

Dependent upon scope of Incentives

TBD

Dependent upon scope of Incentives

Equipment Energy Awareness for Fume Hoods

Determine reduction of energy use within lab environment

TBD

5% of Energy Use

TBD

$1,000

36


Table A9: Campus Integration for Fiscal Year 2010 Campus Integration Activities During FY2010

Measurement

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

N/E

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

$1,000

TBD

$1,000

N/E

EM

Salary

On going

N/E

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

N/E

On going

N/E

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Student Sustainability Survey

Energy Awareness

300 respondents

N/A

N/A

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

MBA Student Teams

Energy Awareness

Created Student Team Reports

5%

N/E

FTEs

N/E

EM

Operating Funds

Expected

Actual

Expected

Actual

Label buildings “Just Switch it Off” after renovation, etc.

Conservation

EM placed labeling in Winslow Hall

Increased awareness and participation from occupants

Coordinate regular Conservation Action Team meetings; educate in accord with Session Law 2007-546.

Conservation

On going

Planning

Monitor and provide response to the email site Save Energy @NCSU.edu.

N/E

On going

Produce and print annual energy and water report.

N/E

In process

Evaluate cost for design and implementation of energy and water dashboards on website for selected buildings.

Energy Awareness Conservation

Produce, print and distribute Strategic Energy Management Plan

37

Sustainability


Table A10: Campus Integration Projected for Fiscal Year 2011 Campus Integration Activities Looking Ahead to FY2011

Measurement

Annual Savings

Investment

Jobs

Assigned To

Funding Source

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Operating / Salary

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

$1,000

TBD

$1,000

N/E

EM

Salary

On going

N/E

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

N/E

On going

N/E

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Fee directly funds sustainable energy projects and ECMs on campus

TBD

$100,000

TBD

FTEs

N/E

EM

Salary

Fellows will Energy Fellowships - Partnership with participate in Advanced Energy, FREEDM Systems Center, synergy Solar Center, and Sustainability OďŹƒce projects among partners

TBD

$475,488

TBD

FTEs

10

EM

Salary

Expected

Actual

Change Your State Energy Outreach Program

Energy Awareness Conservation

TBD

Monitor and provide response to the email site Save Energy @NCSU.edu.

N/E

On going

Produce and print annual energy and water report.

N/E

In process

Evaluate cost for design and implementation of energy and water dashboards on website for selected buildings.

Energy Awareness Conservation

Produce, print and distribute Strategic Energy Management Plan

Student Conservation Fee

Expected

Actual

38


Prepared by: NC State University, Facilities Operations, Utilities and Engineering Services, Energy Management


NC State Annual Energy and Water Report