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Art-making to Peacemaking – Lesson 6: Conflict Resolution Styles Curriculum for Middle School Student Art Classes Lesson 6 (of eight lessons) in the Arts4Peace Themed Curriculum focuses on students learning about the various ways people resolve conflict, including a reflection of their own preferred style, the positives and negatives of that style and how they might need to change to be “peacemakers”. As with all 8 lessons in Art-making to Peacemaking, students will explore and learn Lesson 6 content through visual arts, music, theater or dance classes. Below is the visual arts lesson plan. As with all BuildaBridge learning projects, the Art-making to Peacemaking curriculum and lesson plans follow The BuildaBridge Classroom℠ , a multi-layered model consisting of a) academic & social theme curriculum content (peacemaking & conflict resolution in this case), b) art skills instruction meeting PA and/or National Standards; art-as-metaphor to teach life lessons from what happens in the process of art-making; and d) classroom pedagogy and structure that fosters resilience through trauma-informed, hope-infused and child-centered elements.

Visual Arts Curriculum for Lesson 6. Teacher & Lesson Developer: Leah Samuelson. Leah Samuelson is a decorative mural and faux-finish painter by trade. Since 2004, her painting has shifted to community mural projectsinspired by getting to know world neighbors and their struggles and strengths. Leah has served as lead teacher for community arts projects on behalf of BuildaBridge in poverty-stricken areas of the Caribbean Islands, has written curriculum for, and led collaborative art experiences for BaB Philadelphia projects, and serves as faculty for the Institute. Having completed her Master’s degree in Urban Studies: Arts in Transformation at Eastern University, Leah currently lives in Illinois and teaches community art-making at Wheaton University. Leah returns to Philadelphia to participate in BuildaBridge projects and the Institute. Curriculum Project Title: Rattlesnake Day – Art-making to Peacemaking National Arts Standards to be met by this series of lessons: Content Standard 1: Understanding & applying media, techniques, and processes Content Standard 3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas Content Standard 5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others Content Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines Measurable Outcomes: 1. 90% of students will meet at least the first level achievement standards for each of the four content national art standards listed above. More specifically, • 90% of students will use tools and cooperation to create canvases and be able to demonstrate their process and techniques. • 90% of students will participate constructively in the armature mask preparation steps and articulate the ideas, symbols and materials used for the intended development of the mask´s identity • 70% of students will give an example of an opportunity for collaborative problem solving


that arose in their construction process • 75% of the students will be able to verbally articulate their own conflict resolution style as indicated by their choosing the mask representative of that style and descirbing its aesthetic characteristics that correspond to the “style” characteristics. • 80 % of students will be able to correctly answer additional questions related to specific art knowledge, vocabulary and technique as measured by pre-post survey SEE RUBRIC IN ASSESSMENT APPENDIX Lesson Title: PREPARE FOR YOUR PROJECT Lesson No. 1 (6-9 teaching hours) Lesson Description/Overview: Class will learn and execute the construction of frames for large canvases and mask armatures. Class will also stretch and prime canvases so they are prepared for artistic painting the next day. These will be used as integrated scenery and costume in the production of the Rattlesnake Day story at the end of the program. Goal: Students will learn the importance of and confidence in laying the groundwork for a successful arts project, using basic and power tools. Message/Theme/Metaphor: In creative construction, frameworks need to be built and often left to dry or settle overnight before the next step can begin. Realizing ideas takes planning, and a successful project needs a solid foundation. This is like life. Our relationships, jobs, and homes must be thought through and creatively prepared for sturdy living. This tells us to be smart and intentional about how we begin to handle conflicts because we want our lives to be based on relationships with progressive conflict management, not chaotic or harmful relationships. Lesson Objectives: (Artistic)-Students will learn the first steps in creating a mask armature using trial and error shaping and envisioning techniques (Artistic)-Students will learn the first steps in preparing a canvas for a mural- stretching and priming (Academic)-Students will work with geometry to construct square cornered frames and measured canvas sizes (Social)-Students will collaborate and problem solve to secure wood in frame building processes and stretch canvas (Character/Virtues)-Students will embrace conflict as natural expression of human interaction and practice translating it into problem solving.

Vocabulary: project prep, canvas, frame, right angle, power drill, staple gun, armature Lesson Breakdown: Welcome (THIS IS SUBJECT TO REVIEW AND SYNCHRONIZATION WITH OTHER MODALITY CLASSES) Sing Welcome Song as a group Recite Build-a-Bridge motto together Review Rules and Classroom Management (Earn system and consequences) Welcome Circle - Pass out name-tags – Have students introduce themselves and share any thought or past experience with building. Sing the name song: “Du Du Madoori”


Introduction to Project: Welcome students to the class of peace. Introduce the class intention of creating canvases for scenery and masks for performance. All students will create both a canvas and a mask. Canvases will be built in pairs, but each student will make his or her own mask. Half of the group will work first on canvases, half on masks. Part way through the day the groups will switch tasks. Main Project: CANVASES Six Students will work in pairs to build three canvases, size 2.5 x 5 feet. The wood components will be pre-cut and students will use wood glue and electric drills to assemble frames. Stretch and secure canvas surfaces with staple guns. Brainstorm means and installment of handling from behind. Apply first coat of primer with rollers on poles. SWITCH to mask making. Apply second coat after working on mask armatures and allowing first coat to dry. Clean tools, hands, and work area. MASKS Six students will learn shaping and stapling techniques for forming six mask armatures from empty two-liter bottles, 90-pound paper strips, and aluminum foil. Look carefully at the characters represented in the Rattlesnake story and choose an animalidentity to create from scratch. Reference pictures for structural information. Apply paper mache to armature to form first coat of a `skin´. SWITCH to frame building. Apply second layer of skin after working on canvas frames and allowing first layer to dry. Clean tools, hands, and work area. Closing: Gather in a circle, assess day's progress and speak blessing on day’s work Give a verbal assessment of behavioral trends of the day and expectations for tomorrow Recite Buildabridge motto together Sing Welcome Song together as a closing Supplies: plastic and tape to protect floors and tables, roll of paper towels, pre-cut wooden frame pieces, 1.5 inch wood screws, 3 power drills with screw bits, sand paper, extension cords, 10 bottles of wood glue, painters canvas 6 x 24 feet, 9 scissors, 3 staple guns, 2 boxes of staples, one gallon of latex paint (any color), 3 three-inch brushes, 3 paint rollers and poles, three paint trays and liners, 8 empty two-liter bottles, 3 one-gallon buckets, 6 office staplers, office staples, 90 pound paper, lots of newspaper, aluminum foil, string, wire, hot glue guns and glue sticks, pictorial resources of animal characters Curriculum Project Title: Rattlesnake Day Lesson Title: DESIGN AND DEVELOP Lesson No. 2 (6-9 teaching hours) Lesson Description/Overview: Students will design and transfer the image to be painted on their canvases. Masks will be coated with several more layers. Goal: To ready canvases and designs for final painting and to bulk up mask structures to be ready


for painting as well. Message/Theme/Metaphor: Once you are set up to work and your project has a solid structural beginning, you can develop the identity of your image (your painting, your mask). This is like life. We can help form the nature and details of who we are and how we live. We need to decide what type of presence we want these identities to have, and how to communicate these decisions (like choosing colors for a painting). Lesson Objectives: (Artistic)-Students will select line, form, and color to convey moods, music, and characters from the rattlesnake story (Artistic)-Students will use line and form to create expressive masks (Academic)-Students will define the characteristics of different conflict response styles (Social)-Students will collaborate to form a design in pairs and self-delegate roles in transfer process (Social)-Students will compare conflict response styles to the masks the class is creating Vocabulary: line, form, color, convey identity, convey mood, posterior Lesson Breakdown: Welcome (THIS IS SUBJECT TO REVIEW AND SYNCHRONIZATION WITH OTHER MODALITY GROUPS) Sing Welcome Song as a group Recite Build-a-Bridge motto together Review Rules and Classroom Management (Earn system and consequences) Welcome Circle - Pass out nametags – Have students introduce themselves and share their favorite color. Sing the name song: “Do Do Madoori” Introduction to Project: Welcome students to the class of peace. Introduce the class intention of creating designs for the canvases and finishing the structure of the masks. Main Project: CANVASES Explain that each canvas will be an integrated and moving part of the scenery in the performance. Each character will have one canvas for its scenery, which must convey its identity and mood. Six Students will work in pairs to design on large paper with oil pastels the colors and shapes that convey the identity and mood of their chosen character. Explain principles of design that will enhance the effectiveness of the canvas scenery. Add type of posterior handles determined in previous lesson. Trace and transfer design onto canvas with projection technique. Clean tools, hands, and work area. SWITCH to mask making. MASKS This will be the long-haul with the mask project. Six students will work on mask armatures to build them up through many layers of paper macheadding or taking away structural sections as necessary throughout development and review. Make sure the inner curve of the masks still comfortably fits the human face. Begin inventing and exploring movements and postures that may accompany wearing the mask and fit the character. Get peer feedback on what is conveyed.


Clean tools, hands, and work area. SWITCH to canvas design. Closing: Gather in a circle, assess day's progress and speak blessing on day’s work Give a verbal assessment of behavioral trends of the day and expectations for tomorrow Recite Buildabridge motto together Sing Welcome Song together as a closing Supplies: large sheets of drawing paper, pencils, 3 sets of oil pastels, overhead projector, transparencies and fine sharpie markers, vine charcoal, additionally SAME supplies as previous lesson

Curriculum Project Title: Rattlesnake Day Lesson Title: CREATING AND FINALIZING EXPRESSIONS Lesson No. 3 (6-9 teaching hours) Lesson Description/Overview: This is the final work day for projects. Canvas designs will be painted in and resolved and masks will be painted and augmented with accessories. Goal: To complete canvases and masks and begin rehearsing their use in the performance. Message/Theme/Metaphor: Our projects need to come to resolution. We will need to collaborate and reach agreement on the canvases and receive feedback on the masks. This is like life. We need to find a way to work our own ideas in with others´ideas to find solutions. Projects will present problems that need to be solved. We need to listen to each others´ words share our thoughts as well. The way we experiment and find solutions that work are models for how we can communicate and cooperate over problems in life. Lesson Objectives: (Artistic)-Students will create an intentional composition (Artistic)-Students will develop a character mask complete with agreeing colors, style, and movements (Social)-Students will present ideas and projects to peers (Character/Virtues)-Students will affirm their own and others ideas as valid and valuable expressions of self Vocabulary: value, leads the eye, balance, character, resolution Lesson Breakdown: Welcome (THIS IS SUBJECT TO REVIEW AND SYNCHRONIZATION WITH OTHER MODALITY GROUPS) Sing Welcome Song as a group Recite Build-a-Bridge motto together Review Rules and Classroom Management (Earn system and consequences) Welcome Circle - Pass out nametags – Have students share a memory from the project so far. Sing the name song: “Do Do Madoori” Introduction to Project: Welcome students to the class of peace. Introduce the class intention of bringing the projects to resolution so that you can begin to rehearse for the presentation. Main Project:


CANVASES Six students will work on completing their canvases. Transfer and interpret colors of design onto canvas with latex paints. Emphasize sensitivity to paint qualities such as thickness, overlap, and relation to edges. Experiment with transporting and using canvases within a performance structure. Clean tools, hands, and work area. SWITCH to mask making. MASKS Six students will work on completing their masks. Coat masks with a layer of spray primer and let dry for 15 minutes. Design and decide upon colors and accessories for the mask´s appearance. Reference pictorial resources. Make palettes of acrylic colors and paint masks. Add fabric, string, or other scraps to make whiskers, eyebrows, or other accessories. Tie strings onto the sides of the masks for securing them to the students´ heads. Add padding inside the masks to make them comfortable to wear. Clean tools, hands, and work area. SWITCH to canvas painting. Closing: Gather in a circle, assess day's progress and speak blessing on day’s work Give a verbal assessment of behavioral trends of the day and expectations for tomorrow Recite Buildabridge motto together Sing Welcome Song together as a closing Supplies: spray primer, acrylic paints, variety of small brushes, disposable palettes, plastic cups for water, string, fishing line, and yarn to tie masks, felt and other fabrics and bits of decorative paper, craft glue, large water bucket, large craft needles, additionally SAME supplies as previous lessons ASSESSMENT APPENDIX Pre- and post-test of knowledge and skills in both PeacemakingConflict Resolution and Art will be administered prior to and after the program. As well, completed artwork, demonstrations, performances and verbal and written applications of concepts throughout the program and at the conclusion will serve as authentic assessment of the degree to which material was learned and mastered. Below are the rubrics for the assessment of both art and not-art outcomes and standards for the Artmaking to Peacemaking Themed Curriculum. Since our hoped-for long-term impact is that of increased resilience in young people, an assessment of increased resiience in participants as a result of regular participation is a third staple of any BuildaBridge classroom project’s assessment plan. Tools that BuildaBridge has and will used to assess improved resilience & character development are included in this assessment appendix. 1. RUBRIC FOR ASSESSING VISUAL ARTS STANDARDS – NATIONAL STANDARDS 1, 3, 5, & 6 FOR GRADES 5-8 National content standard for Visual

Meets Achievement Standard b) or c) as

Meets Achievement Standard a) as

Does not meet the Achievement


Arts, Grades 5-8 Standard #1 : Understanding & applying media, techniques, and processes

Standard #3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas

Standard #5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others

described in National Standards Very effective uses of stapling, shaping,paper mache, picture reference guide and decorating techniques to communicate animal (conflict style) identity and characteristics. Can verbally reflect on their choices of art media & techniques and how effective the choices were in communicating ideas of the identity and characteristics of their “animal mask� conflict style representations. Effective use of line, form, color and accessories to design canvas scenes and masks to convey moods, context and character of the dfferent conflict response styles. Effectively transfers and interprets colors of design onto canvas. Demonstrates good sensitivity to paint qualities of thickness, overlays, relationship to edge.

described in National Standards Somewhat effective uses of stapling, shaping,paper mache, picture reference guide and decorating techniques to communicate animal (conflict style) identity and characteristics. Able to explain somewhat their intended use of some media, but does not effectively reflect on their choices related to communicating ideas of the identity and characteristics of ther masks. Somewhat effective in integrating line, form color OR accessories concepts to to design canvas scenes and masks to convey moods, context and character of the dfferent conflict response styles. Moderately effective in transferring and interpreting colors onto canvas. Demonstrates fair sensitivity to paint qualities of thickness, overlays, relationship to edge. Effectively (verbal & Somewhat effective written) uses and (verbal) in comparing applies knowledge of a few characteristics of conflict response styles each of their created in order to compare art pieces with those of and analyze their and others regarding what

Standards Poor use of stapling, shaping,paper mache, picture reference guide and decorating techniques/techniques that fail to communicate animal (conflict style) identity and characteristics. Unable to explain intention regarding media, and cannot use reflect on their choices related to communicating ideas of the identity and characteristics of ther masks. Poor or no integration of line, form OR color concepts to to design canvas scenes and masks to convey moods, context and character of the dfferent conflict response styles. Ineffective in transferring and interpreting colors onto canvas. Demonstrates little or no sensitivity to paint qualities of thickness, overlays, relationship to edge. Unable to offer a substantive comparison of the characteristics of each of their created art pieces with those of


others’ masks and canvases. #6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines

Additional art knowledge, vocabulary and technique related to this lesson curriculum

they communicate others regarding what about conflict response they communicate styles. about conflict response styles. Conveys at least two Conveys two ideas Unable to put forward ideas about the kind of about the kind of any ideas about the music and movement music and movement kind of music and that would be that would be movement that would congruent (agreeing) congruent (agreeing) be congruent with their mask. with their mask. (agreeing) with their Describes with Describes with mask. Unable to significant detail an minimal detail an describe or offer example of an example of an details of an example opportunity for opportunity for of an opportunity for collaborative conflict collaborative conflict collaborative conflict resolution and problem resolution and problem resolution and problem solving that arose solving that arose solving that arose during the maks and during the maks and during the maks and canvas construction canvas construction canvas construction process. Can correctly process. Can correctly process. Unable to identify two ways in identify only one way identify any ways in which the steps of the in which the steps of which the steps of the art-making process are the art-making process art-making process are similar to one or more are similar to one or similar to one or more of the steps in the more of the steps in of the steps in the conflict resolution the conflict resolution conflict resolution process. process. process. Good

Fair

Poor

Student can: correctly articulate the relationship between all colors across from each other on color wheel; describe 3 things about the process of stretching a canvas; definition of armature in art includes all the following components: “underlying, framework” that provides “stability”, “support”, structure”, “around which to build a sculpture.”

Student can: articulate the relationship between some colors across from each other on color wheel; describe 2 things about the process of stretching a canvas; definition of armature contains 2 of the three major components.

Student unable to articulate the relationship between most colors across from each other on color wheel; can only describe 1 thing about the process of stretching a canvas; definition of armature contains 1 or none of the three major components.

2. Rubric for Assessing the Non-Art or Conflict Resolution Content Outcomes of the Artmkaing to Peaceming Themed Curriculum


POINT VALUES

4 (Excellent)

3 (Good)

2 (Fair)

Correctly name all 4 needs & one example of how each need is met. Correctly name all 5 emotions Name & describe all 5 response types; name own type Correctly define 95% of vocabulary words

Correctly name all 4 needs; some examples provided. Correctly name 4 emotions Name 5 types; one mistake in description; name own type Correctly define 80%

Correctly name 3 needs; 1-2 examples provided Correctly name 3 emotions Name at least 4 types w/ 5 accurate descriptions Correctly define 70%

Name 2 or fewer needs and examples

List & correctly describe 4 Steps and the ALL substeps

List & correctly describe 4 Steps and 80% of substeps

List & correctly describe 3 Steps and 70% of substeps

List 2 or fewer Steps and fewer than 70% of substeps

Breathe from diaphragm; no shoulder movements; inthrough nose, out through mouth; can do w/o prompts.

Minimal shoulder movement &/OR forgets in/out nose/mouth some of the time; needs a little prompting

Lot of shoulder movement; always forgets in/out nose/mouth; always needs prompting to complete breathing

7. Demonstrates appropriate Active Listening Skills:

Listens, summarizes, clarifies according to protocols w/ no errors; uses no curtain closers

8. Demonstrates collaborative Peacemaking process skills

Follows all brainstorming rules; evaluates options during artmaking w/o criticism; accepts ideas of others

9. Demonstrates consideration and skills in forgiving

Identifies at least two need situation; uses protocol to ask for & offer forgiveness Shows up on time;

Listens, summarizes, clarifies according to protocols w/ 1 error; uses one curtain closer Follows most brainstorming rules; evaluates options during art-making w/ little criticism; accepts ideas of others Identifies one need situation; uses protocol to ask for & offer forgiveness Shows up “in

Moderate shoulder movement &/OR forgets in/out nose/mouth often; needs considerable prompting Listens, summarizes, clarifies according to protocols w/ 2 errors; uses 2 curtain closers Follows some brainstorming rules; some difficulty working together to evaluate options; favors own ideas. Has difficulty identifying need situation &/OR using protocol to ask for or offer Shows up late

1. Articulate four basic human needs 2. State five basic emotions 3. Name & describe your own and 5 types of response to conflict 4. Defines the key vocabulary words related to peacemaking 5. Lists the four steps in the Peacemaking Process and describes what happens in each step. 6. Demonstrates appropriate deep breathing technique

10. “Celebrates”

1 (Poor)

Correctly name fewer than 3 Name fewer than 3 types Define fewer than 75%

Listens, summarizes, clarifies w/ several errors &/or curtain closers Breaks several brainstorming rules; does not work together to evaluate options; pushes own ideas; negative towards others’ Unable to identify need situation &/OR unable to ask for or offer forgiveness No show OR


peacemaking achievement appropriately.

fully prepared for role/part; can help others get ready

time”; mostly prepared to execute role

&/OR Moderately prepared to execute role

Unprepared to execute role.

80-100% (Required for Peacemaker Certificate) Yes (96-100% Required for Peacemaker Certificate) Yes, and with all required elements present. (Required for Peacemaker Certificate)

70-79%

60-69%

Below 60%

No, but 83-95%

No, 67-82%

No, Below 67%

No; all but one assignment completed w/ just a few missing elements

No. More than 2 assignments missing &/OR many elements missing

Participates Actively

Volunteers to contribute in each ½ -day session

Participation in final celebration?

Yes (Required for Peacemaker Certificate)

Participates when called on w/o “attitude”. (Required for Peacemaker Certificate) No, but attended all rehearsals for it.

No. Two assignments missing; OR all assignments completed but several elements missing. Reluctantly participates when called on w/o “attitude” No, but wanted to.

No

Prepared = knows lines, lyrics, movements, blocking) 80% increase in overall knowledge on pre-post assessments Attendance 100%?

Assignments 100% completed with high or good quality?

Refuses to participate OR criticizes others OR participates w/ attitude

3. Social-Emotional & Resilience Assessments

BuildaBridge Student Observation Guide (Recorded after the first, middle and last sessions) Site: ________________________________________________   Observer:     None of the time 2- Some of the time 3- Most of the time 4-All of the time Student:   Score   Comments   Agency       Attentive     Responds  positively  to  feedback     Works  independently     Participates  actively     Follows  directions  and  rules     Takes  initiative     Requests  help  when  needed    


Apathetic and  unmotivated   Completes  projects  or  activities   Has  difficulty  concentrating     Impulsive;acts  without  thinking   Section  Total   Social  Adaptability   Shows  respect  for  others   Is  able  to  wait   Helps  others   Gets  along  with  peers   Refuses  to  talk   Resolves  conflict   Section  Total   Emotional  Control   Uncooperative   Disruptive   Demanding   Dependent   Cries  Often   Irritable;  easily  provoked   Stubborn   Section  Total  

                                         

Locus of Control Pre-Post Survey How much do you agree or disagree with the following questions? Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Most of the time, I feel that I can change what might happen tomorrow by what I do today. I believe that wishing can make good things happen. Most of the time I feel that getting good grades means a great deal to me. I believe that most problems will solve themselves if I just don’t fool with them. I believe that whether or not people like me depends on how I act. I believe that if somebody studies hard enough he or she can pass any subject. I feel that most of the time it doesn’t pay to try hard because things never turn out right anyway. I usually feel that it’s easy to get friends to do what I want them to. I feel that one of the best ways to handle most problems is just not to think about them. I usually feel that it’s almost useless to try in school because most other children are just plain smarter than I am. 11. When I get punished does it usually seem it’s for no good reason at all. 12. I feel that when I do something wrong there’s very little I can do to make it right. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Resilience Checklist for Children From A Guide to Promoting Resilience in Children: Strengthening the Human Spirit


Edith H. Grotberg, Ph.D. The International Resilience Project

The following items were used in the International Resilience Project as a checklist for perceptions of resilience in children: 1. The child has someone who loves him/her totally (unconditionally). 2. The child has an older person outside the home she/he can tell about problems and feelings. 3. The child is praised for doing things on his/her own. 4. The child can count on her/his family being there when needed. 5. The child knows someone he/she wants to be like. 6. The child believes things will turn out all right. 7. The child does endearing things that make people like her/him. 8. The child believes in a power greater than seen. 9. The child is willing to try new things. 10. The child likes to achieve in what he/she does. 11. The child feels that what she/he does makes a difference in how things come out. 12. The child likes himself/herself. 13. The child can focus on a task and stay with it. 14. The child has a sense of humor. 15. The child makes plans to do things. Assessment Instruments Under Consideration recommended by the Partnership for AfterSchool Education: Engagement in Leearning 1. Promising After-School Programs Surveys: Work Habits Scale. source: www.gse.uci.edu/childcare/pdf/ afterschool/WORK%20HABITS%20STUDENT%20REPORT%20documentation.pdf. Completed by Teachers, Program Staff and Youth. Work Habits is an adaptation of Work Habits Scale on Mock Report Card. 2. School Connection Scale. source: McNeely, Clea A., James M. Nonnemaker, and Robert W. Blum. 2002. “Promoting School Connectedness: Evidence From the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.” Journal of School Health 72(4):138-46. Used in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Scale measures how cared for students feel at school and how much they feel like they belong to their school community. 3. Belonging (to after-school) Scale source: Gambone, M. A., & Arbreton, A. J. A. (1997). Safe Havens: The contributions of youth organizations to healthy adolescent development. Philadelphia, PA: Public/Private Ventures. The Belonging Scale is a modification of the original scale. It includes seven questions for youth to answer on a frequency scale. Improved Communication, Positive Behaviors, & Life Skills 1. California Health Kids Survey: Module B (Resilience and Youth Development) source: www.wested.org/hks. Comprehensive youth health, risk and resiliency survey sponsored by the California. Department of Education; cost of $1.50 per survey; youth fill out scales that include: Caring Relationships; High Expectations; Opportunities for Meaningful Participation; Peer Group Cooperation and Communication; Empathy; Problem Solving; Self efficacy; Self Awareness; Goals and Aspirations 2. The Colorado Trust’s Toolkit for Evaluating Positive Youth Development source: www.coloradotrust.org. Includes 8 scales for youth to report on: Academic Success; Arts & Recreation; Community. Involvement; Cultural Competency; Life Skills; Positive Life Choices; Positive Core Values and Sense of Self.

Art Lesson Plans and Assessments  

Lesson 6 (of eight lessons) in the Arts4Peace Themed Curriculum focuses on students learning about the various ways people resolve conflict,...

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