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Program Development Community Arts for Children Series

Animator Workbook


By: Dr. J. Nathan Corbitt Co-Founder, President & CEO, BuildaBridge International Dr. Vivian Nix-Early Co-Founder & COO, BuildaBridge International Tracie Blummer Technical Writer, BuildaBridge International

BuildaBridge is a nonprofit arts education and intervention organization whose mission is to engage creative people and the transformative power of art-making to bring hope and healing to children, families, and communities in the toughest places of the world. BuildaBridge spans barriers of race, class, faith and culture to promote holistic personal, family and community development. BuildaBridge offers unique programs featuring cross-cultural perspectives and arts-integrated approaches that are child-centered, trauma-informed and hope-infused.

Community Arts for Children series made possible with financial support from the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

Š BuildaBridge International All Rights Reserved


Welcome! Welcome to Program Planning. This workbook is the third of the three part series Community Arts for Children. In this course, you will learn the basics of program planning including vision and goal setting and measuring success. You will also learn about engaging stakeholders in your project. The course will teach you how to write a project plan or grant including basic budgeting. You will also learn about different types of resource development, and practice writing letters to people who might give to your program. Finally, you will reflect on program sustainability. The course is designed to be completed in small groups with a facilitator to guide you. You should draw or write your ideas throughout this workbook. It is yours to keep. This workbook is divided into six lessons. Each lesson starts with an art experience followed by a short reading with basic concepts and definitions. Next, the lesson includes a real world example of that concept from communities around the world. Every lesson also contains learning experiences to help you practice new concepts and tools to use in your community. The lesson ends with a reflection to help you think about how these ideas apply to you and your community. At the end of this course there is a list of web links and resources for you to explore.


LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Introduce the basic project cycle 2. Explain key program planning elements including activities, objectives, goals, mission, vision, outcomes and indicators 3. Present and practice methods for analyzing child protection stakeholders and their influence 4. Differentiate between monitoring and evaluation and present simple evaluation tools 5. Introduce and practice basic components of a project plan 6. Explain different types of funding resources, introduce basic budgeting concepts and components of a letter of inquiry 7. Introduce and apply strategies for program sustainability 8. Practice applying for a grant for a child protection project Upon completion of the module participants should be able to:        

Define a vision, mission, goals, objectives, activities, outcomes and indicators for a child protection project Orally present a child protection project idea Provide an analysis of child protection stakeholders and their project role Write a basic monitoring and evaluation plan Write a basic project plan Develop a project budget Write a letter of inquiry for a child protection project Respond to an actual Request For Proposals


Table of Contents Lesson 1. Project and Program Cycle Reading: Projects and Program Cycle Experience: Preparing to Plan

Lesson 2. Vision and Goal Setting Reading: Vision and Goal Setting Example: Planning Chart Experience: Project Planning Chart Experience: Project Commercial Reflection: Successful Commercials

Lesson 3. Engaging Stakeholders Reading: Engaging Stakeholders Example: Stakeholder Analysis Experience: Stakeholder Analysis Ranking Experience: Stakeholder Analysis Diagram Reflection: Stakeholders

Lesson 4. Monitoring and Evaluation Reading: Monitoring and Evalution Example: Monitoring and Evaluation Tools Example: Common Evaluation Questions Experience: Monitoring and Evaulation Plan

Lesson 5. Writing the Project Plan Reading: Components of a Project Plan Example: Learning Arts Project Plan Experience: Writing a Project Plan

Lesson 6. Resource Development Reading: Resource Development & Budgeting Example: Budgeting Experience: Basic Budgeting Example: Letter of Inquiry Experience: Writing a letter of Inquiry Reflection: Barriers to funding

Lesson 7. Program Sustainability Reading: Sustainability Experience: Sustainability Planning


Course Assessment Grant Writing Tips New Term: Human-Rights Framework Haiti Fund RFP Your Proposal


Project and Program Cycle

Adapted from Peace Corps (2000) & Walker (2010)

Objective: This lesson will introduce the basic project cycle

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Lesson 1. Project and Program Cycle

Like transformation, project planning is a cycle that can repeat. Community Child Protection initiatives can be projects which are short term with a clear end. They can also be programs which are longer term and repeat the cycle many times. A Creative Child protection project might be a mural that children in your community paint to express their hopes and dreams for the future. An example of a Creative Child Protection Program is an community program that uses dance to encourage children to express their emotions every day for a year or several years. Both projects and programs go through the same planning cycle, but projects don’t repeat the cycle for as long as programs. The cycle of project planning includes: Look & Listen: Look for assets, needs and problems. Understand “your world as it is” and picture your “world as it could be” Interpret: Try to understand the assets, the needs and the problems that you saw and heard. What are things that you can change? What are barriers to change? Plan: Use what you learned in Look and Evaluate to write a project vision and goals. Determine who should be involved in the project and what resources you need to make it happen. Act: Make the project happen The cycle repeats: Look and Listen: Gather information about the project by carefully looking at the project accomplishments and challenges and listening to the participants and project leaders. Interpret: Review the information that you collected. Determine what the impact of the project was and evaluate if it was successful Plan: Plan changes to improve your project or plan a new project Act: Make the changes or the new project happen You have already completed many “Look” and “Interpret” experiences in the first two courses of this series. This workbook will focus on Step 3, the Planning.

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Experience: Preparing to Plan Look back at some of the activities in your first workbook and think about what you learned in the second workbook about Creative Safe Spaces for Children. What are your community’s greatest assets?

What are some of the needs you learned from the listening project?

What is the biggest problem for children in your community? What are some of the causes of the problem that you explored in the problem tree?

What was your project idea from the end of workbook 1? Do you have a new project idea after learning about Creating Safe Spaces for Children? Describe it below.

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Vision and Goal Setting

Objective: This lesson will explain key program planning elements including activities, objectives, goals, mission, vision, outcomes and indicators

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Lesson 2. Vision and Goal Setting The first step to program planning is to think about the big picture and envision the future. What long-term transformation are you working for? This part is called your vision. The vision is similar to the “World as it could be” pictures that you drew in the first course. Not everything in the vision will come true, but it is what Goals are the you are working towards. For example, your vision overarching might be: “ We envision a community where children ambitions of your grow in a family, have access to safe places to play and are protected from abuse, neglect and violence” project If you are a new organization or group, then you will have to think about your mission. A mission defines the purpose of the organization and the reason that it exists. It describes how your group or organization will contribute to its vision. For example BuildaBridge’s mission is to “engage creative people and the transformative power of art making to bring hope and healing to children, families, and Objectives are the communities in the toughest places of the world.” measurable steps If you are working with an NGO or a committee you may, with their permission, use their mission that you will take to for your program planning and resource achieve each goal development. Next, you want to consider how you will work towards your vision. Goals are the overarching ambitions of your project or what you hope to accomplish. For example, a program goal might be “To host a summer program that will use art-making to foster positive relationships between parents and children.” Objectives are the measurable steps that you will take to achieve each goal. They must be “tangible, specific, concrete, measureable and achievable in a specified time frame” . For the goal above, your objectives could be to “provide relationship-building art-making experiences to 40 children and their parents over a 3 month time period” and to “improve parental behavior towards children over a 3 month time period” What do you need to do to prepare to teach these children? Activities are the specific actions that you will take for each objective in order to achieve your goals. For example if you are planning an educational program then you will need leaders, children and a physical space. Your activities would include: recruit leaders, recruit children, and secure a program site. How will your community be different after your program or project is 5


completed? Outcomes are the measureable results of achieving each objective. You worked with 40 children and their parents for three months, but what was the result? For example, an outcome might be that “40 out of 40 children will demonstrate a more positive relationship with their parents.” At the end of the program you can measure your success by comparing your intended outcomes to your actual outcomes. Indicators are the measureable signs of change. For example the number of children and parents who attend each session is an indicator of how many families your program reached. You can measure indicators through collecting information on tools such as an attendance sheet . Another example of an indicator is change in perception. An evaluation given at the beginning of the unit to test children's perceptions before the session (a pre-evaluation) and an evaluation given after the session is completed (a post evaluation) will indicate how children and parents’ perceptions have changed as a result of your sessions.

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Example: Planning Chart Vision: We envision a community where children grow in a family, have access to safe places to play and are protected from abuse, neglect and violence Mission: To engage creative people and the transformative power of art making to bring hope and healing to children, families, and communities in the toughest places of the world Program Description: The Family Matters Project will provide art-making experiences that help strengthen family relationships and increase positive feelings between 40 children and their parents a for 5 days a week for 3 months.

Goal

Objective 1

Activities

Objective 2

Activities

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To host a summer program that will use art-making to foster positive relationships between parents and children Outcomes To provide 40 out of 40 children relationshipwill experience building art-making weekly opportunities experiences to 40 to bond with parents children and their parents over a 3 40 out of 40 children month time period will demonstrate a Recruit leaders more positive relationship with Enroll children and parents their parents

Indicators Number of children and parents attending

To improve parental knowledge and perception of children over a 3 month time period

Change in knowledge of children and perception of child value

30 out of 40 parents will demonstrate improved knowledge and perception of children

Change in children’s perception of parents


Experience: Project Planning Chart Fill in the chart below with your project ideas. Vision: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Mission: _______________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Program Description: ___________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

Goal Outcomes

Indicators

Objective 1

Activities

Objective 2

Activities

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Experience: Project Commercial To make your project happen, you need to be able to tell people about the project quickly and concisely. Telling people about the project will help you find volunteers, funding, and other resources to make it happen. You should write and practice a short commercial that will tell people the most important elements of your project in 1 minutes or less- the same amount of time as a commercial. Use the space below to write your commercial. Divide into pairs and practice your commercial. Then present your commercial to the class and vote on which person’s was most appealing.

Class Comments: Ask your class members to comment on your commercial and write some of the comments below.

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Reflection: What was the most difficult thing to communicate in your commercial?

What made the best commercials successful?

How can you change the way you describe your project so that it is more appealing? Write your revised commercial below.

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Engaging Stakeholders

Objective: This lesson will present and practice methods for analyzing child protection stakeholders and their influence

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Lesson 3. Engaging Stakeholders Do you think a project for children would be successful if you never talked to their parents? How about your Child Protection Committee? Projects can be more successful if you get a lot of people involved. It is hard to get everyone involved and hard to know who should be involved. When starting a project, you should think about who will be impacted by the project and who will influence the project or issue. Both of these types of people are called stakeholders because they have a stake, or vested interest, in the project. Even if they do not know about the project, they can be stakeholders. For example, stakeholders for a creative child protection program might include: Stakeholders who will be influenced by Project: Children Parents Teachers A local NGO Local Business people

Stakeholders who will influence project: Community Leaders Parents Officers of IBERS (The Institut du Bien Etre Sociale et De Recherches) Brigade for the Protection of Minors (BPM) Child Protection Committee

Some stakeholders can both influence the project and be influenced by it. For example parents benefit from their children’s participation but they can also make the project fail if they do not support their children’s participation. Stakeholders can be in your community or outside of your community. For example, a government education official who lives three cities away might have the ability to allow you to use your local school for your program. One way to start thinking about who should be involved is to complete a stakeholder analysis. A stakeholder analysis examines who has influence on the project and how much influence they have. A stakeholder analysis can identify:    

Groups that should be invited to participate at different stages of the project Potential conflicts or risks that could jeopardize the project Opportunities and relationships that the project can build upon Ways to reduce negative impacts of the project on vulnerable groups

Stakeholder participation is essential for ensuring long-lasting community change (project sustainability). Full participation of all stakeholders gives people some input over how projects may affect their lives, encourages widespread ownership of the project, and provides mutual learning opportunities that build the capacity of stakeholders and project leaders. 12


Example: Stakeholder Analysis The picture below shows all of the decision makers and the amount of their influence. People with more influence have bigger circles. People who work together have overlapping circles. The biggest circle, P.A., stands for the Peasant Association. In this community, the Peasant Association has the most influence over the project and also includes smaller organizations like the “Women’s Organization.”

Source: Mikkelsen, 2005, p.93

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Experience: Stakeholder Analysis Ranking Fill in the left chart below with all the people, businesses, and organizations who would be stakeholders in your child protection project. Then rank each stakeholder with a number from 1 (the most influential on child protection) to 10 (the least influential on child protection) in the rank column. Rewrite the list on the blanks on the right below with the most influential stakeholders first on the list.

Rank

Stakeholder

1. ___________________ 2. ___________________ 3. ___________________ 4. ___________________ 5. ___________________ 6. ___________________ 7. ___________________ 8. ___________________ 9. ___________________ 10. ___________________

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Experience: Stakeholder Analysis Diagram Use the list to draw a stakeholder diagram like the one earlier in this lesson. Draw the biggest circles around those with the most influence on child protection. Draw smaller circles for those with less influence on child protection. Draw overlapping circles for people, businesses, or organizations that work together. Put little circles inside of bigger circles for people or organizations that are a part of other groups.

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Reflection: Who has the most influence in your stakeholder analysis? Why?

How can you work with these people, groups or organizations to make your child protection project happen?

What barriers are there to working with these people or groups?

How can you overcome these barriers?

How do you think your project will change by working with many stakeholders?

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Monitoring and Evaluation

Objective: This lesson will differentiate between monitoring and evaluation and present simple evaluation tools

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Lesson 4. Monitoring and Evaluation The monitoring and evaluation section describes the way you will record the progress of the project (monitoring) and how you will evaluate the final results (evaluation). Monitoring and Evaluation can help you review your progress, identify planning or implementation problem and adjust your program to make the most impact. Monitoring Is constant in order to track and assess performance and make corrections as needed Gathers information daily Keeps track of activities Asks “are things being done right?”

Evaluation Occurs at the midpoint or end of the project to selectively assess a project

Provides information on if and how the planned activities are implemented Refers to activities, outputs and intermediate results Promotes informed re-design of methods

Provides information on the effect of activities Refers to goals and bigger objectives

Assesses impact at decision points Analyzes results and methods Asks “are the right things being done?”

Promotes informed design of new projects Adapted from Shapiro, J. (2001)

Monitoring Monitoring is the process of recording and analyzing the progress of a project while it is still going on. It involves establishing indicators , setting up systems to collect information about indicators, and analyzing the information. You should use your indicators to measure the success of each objective and ultimately the progress to towards reaching your goals. For example, you may want to monitor how many children your project is impacting with attendance sheets. You would need to set up a system for activity leaders to fill in attendance sheets daily and share them with project leaders. Project leaders would then need to review all of the attendance sheets to calculate how many children the project serves. Monitoring is usually done by the organization or group who organized the project. Evaluation Evaluation is the comparison of the intended project outcomes to the actual project outcomes. Evaluation can be completed internally by the sponsoring organization or externally by a consultant or team of consultants. A simple way to evaluate your project is to ask the participants a series of questions about the project. This is called a self-evaluation. The “Course Reflections” that you completed in this series are one example of a self-evaluation. 18


Some approaches to evaluation include: Goal-based: Assessing if the goals and objectives were achieved Goal-Free: Assessing the range of intended and unintended project effects Expert judgment: Allowing an outside professional to rate the project based on his or her expertise

Monitoring and evaluation measure the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of your project. Efficiency is how well the resources were used to achieve the project. For example if two projects have the same outcome, children feeling safe, but one takes 2 hours a day and the other takes 5 hours a day, which is more efficient? Effectiveness is how well the project achieves or is achieving its goals. For example if a child protection project aims to prevent child pregnancy, but there is no change in the number of new child pregnancies in your community, then the project may not be very effective. Impact is what has changed in your community as a result of the project. Even if your project is not very effective at achieving its goals, it can still have a positive impact. For example, your child pregnancy prevention program could have resulted in child mothers having more knowledge about their bodies and the birth process.

Example: Common Evaluation Questions Here are some common questions to consider in your project evaluation: 1.Who benefited from the project and how? 2.Do the money and time justify the outcomes? Why or why not? 3.What would improve the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of the project? 4.What lessons can be learned from this project? 5.What elements should be replicated?

Shapiro, J. (2001)

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Example: Some Monitoring and Evaluation Tools Tool

Description

Uses

How to do it

Interview

Asking the same series of questions to project stakeholders

To understand in depth how the project impacted or is impacting individuals

Select 5 key adult stakeholders and 5 participants. Ask them individually how this project has changed or is changing their life and their community.

Questionnaire Written questions that participants write responses to

To quickly gather basic anonymous information about how the project impacted or is impacting a large number of people

Write 5 questions each on a different sheet of paper. (You can write your own or use the questions in this workbook). Gather stakeholders together and pass each paper around the room for them to write their answer. When you are finished you should have 5 pieces of paper with answers from all participants.

Focus Group

A group of 6-12 people who are interviewed together

To quickly understand in depth how the project impacted or is impacting a group of people

Gather together a small group in a quiet private place. Ask them how they think the project is going and how it could be improved or expanded

Field Report

A structured report form that records answers to questions and observations

To record observations of project leaders on the progress or result of the project

Ask project leaders to observe activities for 1 day and share what went well and what they would like to change.

Ranking

Asking people to share what they think is most useful and least useful about a project

To get a quick assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the project

In small groups, have participants brainstorm what is most and least useful about the project then rank these items in order of usefulness.

Self-drawing

Asking participants to draw a picture of how they feel or think

To understand what children or illiterate adults think or feel

Give children paper and colored pens and ask them to draw a picture of themselves before the project, during the project and after the project. Work with adult stakeholders to interpret pictures.

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Experience: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan What tools will be most effective to monitor your project? Why?

Describe how you plan to monitor your project:

What tools will be most effective to evaluate your project? Why?

Describe how you plan to evaluate your project:

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Reflection: Monitoring and Evaluation Which of the monitoring and evaluation tools are best to use with child participants?

Choose another tool from the chart on p.23 that you think would work well with child participants. How would you adapt this tool for children?

Can you think of any other ways to monitor or evaluate child protection programs that were not discussed in this lesson?

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Writing the Project Plan

Objective: This lesson will introduce and practice basic components of a project plan

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Lesson 5. Writing the Project Plan Now it’s time to put all of your ideas together in the project plan. The project plan is an internal document that is written before you search for funding to organize your project ideas and information. Your project plan will prepare you to write a full project proposal to a funder. Many of the elements of the project plan are the same as a project proposal. A written project plan includes Problem/Needs, Assets, Vision & Mission, Project Summary, People/ Leadership, Timeline, Budget, Monitoring and Evaluation, and Sustainability information. You may want to include additional information as well. Problem/Needs & Target Population The problem section gives a short description of the child protection problem or need that your project will address. It should include a description of the children who will benefit from the project, the “target population” and their current situation. What are the needs and problems of children in your community? You should support these needs with quantitative and qualitative information. For example, your problem section could state: “50% of all children in this community have no safe creative place to play” (quantitative). You should also include qualitative information like “In an interview, one parent said that her children often come home bruised and scratched from playing on broken car parts.” You can use the information that you gathered in the “Look and Listen” activities such as the listening project, problem tree, survey, and asset map to write the problem statement. Assets The assets section describes the resources that your community already possesses and how they will be used in your project. The asset map and brainstorming chart that you completed in course one are essential to writing your assets section. Vision & Mission You have already written a vision statement, in lesson 2. Reminder: A vision is an optimal goal; it is “your world as it could be.” It is the transformation that you are working towards, but you may never achieve it. A mission defines the purpose of the organization and the reason that it exists. It describes how your group or organization will contribute to its vision.

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Project Summary The project summary section describes what you plan to accomplish and how you will accomplish it. It includes many things that you are already familiar with such as goals, objectives, outcomes and indicators, but let’s review. Goals are the overarching ambitions of your project or what you hope to accomplish. Objectives are the measurable steps that you will take to achieve each goal. A project plan also includes activities, the specific actions that you will take for each objective in order to achieve your goals. Outcomes describe how things will be different as a result of your project. They are the measureable results of achieving each objective. Indicators are the tools that you use to evaluate outcomes. You can use a chart to summarize goals, objectives and outcomes and indicators. People & Stakeholders The people section includes the types of people that will help your project improve the welfare of children and what their role will be in child protection activities. You may need teachers, project coordinators, project leaders, and other staff or volunteers. You can use your stakeholder analysis to think about who to include in this section. Timeline How long will it take to complete your project? Will it be a project with an end date, or a program with no planned end date? The timeline is a diagram that shows how long the program will take and what some of the major milestones will be. Budget How much will the project cost? What resources do you already have? The budget section shows how much money and other resources you will need to complete your project. The budget is broken into categories like personnel, materials, space, and transportation. Monitoring and Evaluation The monitoring and evaluation section describes the way you will record the progress of the project (monitoring) and how you will evaluate the final results (evaluation). You should use your indicators to measure the success of each objective and ultimately the progress to towards reaching your goals.

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Sustainability Plan Throughout the whole project planning process, you should be thinking about how you can sustain community change. Many projects are very successful at first, but later they run out of funds or they dissolve when their leaders leave. Sustainability does not mean sustaining the project or program indefinitely. It is a plan for how the project or program will last as long as it is needed to achieve its goals. A Sustainability plan also describes how this change will endure at the conclusion of the project/program. On the following page is an example of a project plan for a hypothetical program called “Learning Arts”. You might not understand some of the terms like “in-kind,” but the final sections of this workbook will cover those in more detail.

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Example: Learning Arts Project Plan Problem & Target Population Children in Port Au Prince have limited access to safe places and structured learning experiences where they can learn and grow. The target population for this project is children in the Red Valley neighborhood of Port Au Prince. 35 out of 40 children surveyed in the Red Valley neighborhood of Port Au Prince play in the streets unsupervised all year long. Parents work and cannot supervise young children. Half of all parents interviewed said their children do not have access to education because they cannot afford school fees or children's housework conflicts with school time. This contributes to low education levels and a literacy rate of 50% in this community. Low literacy and education levels of children in this community lead to child exploitation and sustain a cycle of poverty. Vision We envision a world where all children will have a safe creative place to learn and grow . Mission The mission of the Committee of Concerned Haitian Citizens is to use art experiences to provide alternative learning opportunities for children in the Red Valley neighborhood of Port-Au-Prince. Assets  Some of the key community assets that the committee will rely on are:  creative people like community storytellers and weavers to help lead art experiences  Space available at Madame’s Academy  Community members who have volunteered to help lead activities  Community Leaders who have volunteered to help recruit children  Discarded food containers (litter) that we will use to make musical instruments Project Summary The Learning Arts Project will provide summer arts-integrated learning experiences for 40 children ages 7 to 10. These experiences will increase children’s competence in core science skills. Volunteer activity leaders will lead classes for 5 days a week, two hours a day for a period of 3 months.

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Project Summary Goal

Objective 1

Activities Objective 2

Activities

To provide a summer program that will use arts-integrated learning experiences to help children gain science and math skills

To provide artsintegrated learning experiences to 40 children over a 3 month time period Recruit activity leaders Enroll children To teach 40 children measurement and observation skills over a 1 month time period

Outcomes 40 out of 40 children will demonstrate an increased interest in science

Indicators Number of children attending

30 out of 40 children will demonstrate improved measurement and observation skills

Change in measurement and observation skills

Change in children’s interest in science

Secure Space Plan lessons

People The Learning Arts Project will be led by a committee of concerned Haitian Citizens. Our committee includes people from Friends for Haiti (a local NGO) teachers from Madame’s Academy, our Child Protection Committee and local artists. Our project coordinator, Mary White, recently completed a Community Arts for Children training taught by UNICEF and BuildaBridge International. The committee used the tools she learned at the training to design our Learning Arts project. Timeline This project will start as a 6 month project with three months of programing but we hope to repeat the project into a yearly program for children. In months one and two, the committee will focus on activities to help prepare and build resources for the project. Months 3-5 will focus on delivering and monitoring the program. Then, in month four the committee will evaluate the project and make changes as needed to ensure that outcomes are achieved. In month five the committee will host a community celebration to raise funds and awareness of the Learning Arts Project. Throughout the six months we will search for funding and other support to continue the program beyond the six-month project time period. 28


Learning Arts Timeline Activity

Month 1

2

3

4

5

` 6

Evaluate assets and needs Search for funding Engage stakeholders Recruit leaders and children Advertise project Project activities Monitor project Evaluate project Project celebration event

Budget The total cost of this project is $4980, but the committee has raised $1200 of in kind donations of volunteer time and space. The committee needs an additional $780 in fees, grants, or donations to fund materials and transportation for the project. Category Staff

Space

Materials

Transportation

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Quantity 2 people for 1 hour a day, 5 days a week, for 3 months 1 room 5 days a week for 3 hours for 3 months 40 sketch pads 40 pencils 40 rulers 5 days car rental

Cost

Source

$10 an in kind worth hour $1200 (Volunteer) $50 a day in kind worth $3000

Total Funds Needed $0

$0

$5 each

grant

$200

$1 each

fees for service donation grant

$40 $40 $500

TOTAL

$780.00

$1 each $100 per day


Monitoring and Evaluation Activity leaders will monitor the number of children and children’s learning through attendance sheets and daily session reflections. Leader performance will be monitored through observation by committee members. Indicator Number of children Change in child learning Activity Leader Performance

Monitoring Tool Attendance sheet Daily session reflections Observation

The project will be evaluated through a pre-test of children’s knowledge of science concepts in the third month and a post-test of their knowledge in the sixth month. Sustainability Although this is planned as a six month project, children in Port-Au-Prince will continue to need safe creative places to learn and grow. The committee is planning for program sustainability by:  Talking to stakeholders and building community support before the project begins  Using community assets like space and volunteer activity leaders to cut program costs and increase community involvement  Monitoring the project and adapting it to teach children more effectively  Continually searching for funding, in-kind donations and volunteers to sustain the project  Sharing our success and building community support through celebrations and communication with funders and media

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Experience: Writing a Project Plan Use the space below to write your project plan. Problem (describe target population and their needs):

Vision

Mission

Assets

Project Summary

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Goal Outcomes

Indicators

Objective 1

Activities

Objective 2

Activities

People (describe the people who will lead the project and what experience or qualities they have to lead)

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Budget Make a list of the kinds of things that you will need to achieve your project or program

Project Evaluation How will you evaluate the impact of the project after is finished?

Sustainability Is this a project or a program?______________________________ What will happen when it is over?

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Timeline Fill in the timeline below with the major activities and when they will take place Activity

Month 1

2

3

4

5

`6

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Resource Development

Objective: This lesson will explain different types of funding resources, introduce basic budgeting concepts and components of a letter of inquiry

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Lesson 6. Resource Development What do you need to make your program happen? Most people first think money, but a program needs more than money. Resources are all the things that you need to make your program happen—like space, materials, people, and money from grants and donations. Resource development is finding those resources that are essential to implementing your program. Below are some different types of financial support that you should consider. In-Kind donations: In the first course you started thinking about what assets your community already has. In-kind donations are things that people can give at no cost to your group or organization. They are community or personal assets. People might be able to donate extra art supplies, let you use their home to teach a class, or volunteer to cook for your students. These are all in-kind donations. Grants: Grants are money that organizations give you to do your project. You do not have to pay the money back, but you do have to write a detailed project plan and usually a report in the middle and at the end of the project. There is often a lot of competition for grants and, consequently, you may apply for several before you receive funding. If you decide to apply for a grant you should make sure that you have the capacity to meet the grant requirements or collaborate with organizations who do. Fees for services: Fees for services are ways that your program can earn money. For example, you could charge a small ticket fee for people to come and watch the children in your program perform a concert or play. You could also help children make art to sell at a local market or shop. If children’s art is sold, only a portion (maybe 25%) should go to the organization and the other 75% should be invested in children directly by paying for their school fees, materials or other needs. Parents should help decide how this money will be invested in their children. Another way to fund your program is to charge program participants a small fee. If you decide to charge participants, you should make sure that the fee is affordable so that it does not exclude children in need. Donations: Donations are money that people or organizations give you to start or maintain your project. You can ask people directly if they will give money for the project, or you can send them a letter. Many foundations will accept a “letter of inquiry” and consider giving you money for your project or program. You can also host fundraising events like a free concert where you ask attendees to donate as much money as they wish.

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Budget Monitoring Regardless of the type of project support, it is critical that project leaders monitor financial expenditures on their project. Many funders will expect or require that project leaders submit quarterly or annual financial reports that describe how project funds were used. A financial report often includes a description and proof (like original receipts) of the progress of the project and its expenditures. Project leaders should always:

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Be prepared to prove how all project money was spent

Spend donor and grant contributions on only the project expenses that they were raised for

Return unused funding or contact donors if project changes significantly

Keep all original receipts for project expenses (food, space, materials, etc.)

Keep a record of project income, source, and date received (donations, fees for services, grants, in-kind contributions)

Keep a ledger of volunteer hours that volunteers sign to document in-kind contributions

Keep a ledger of staff hours and write receipts (that staff and their supervisor sign) for all money paid to staff


Example: Budgeting A basic budget has major categories (on the left) and quantity and cost on the right. The source category lists where you plan to get each resource from. The total on the right calculates how much each line will cost. You will have to research costs and estimate how much of each item will be needed in order to prepare your project budget. Below is an example of a basic budget with staff, space, materials, and transportation. The pie chart shows the percentage of the total resources that are dedicated to each category.

Category Staff

Space

Materials

Transportation

Quantity

Cost

2 people for 1 hour a day, 5 days a week, for 3 months 1 room 5 days a week for 3 hours for 3 months 40 sketch pads 40 pencils

$10 an hour

40 rulers 5 days car rental

$1 each $100 per day

$50 a day

Source In kind worth $1200 (Volunteer) In kind worth $3000

$5 each

grant

$1 each

Fees for service donation donation TOTAL

Total Funds Needed $0

$0

$200 $40 $40 $500 $780.00

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Experience: Basic Budgeting Use your project plan to fill in the budget below. Use the blank circle to draw approximately how much of the total budget is dedicated to each category.

Category

Quantity

Cost

Source

Staff

Space

Materials

Transportation

TOTAL

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Total Funds Needed


Example: Letter of Inquiry A Letter of Inquiry is a short letter, usually 1-2 pages, that asks a foundation or business to support your project. Letters of Inquiry always include: Introduction: which says what you are asking for (money, space, materials) Organization: description of your organization or of the group of people who are organizing the project Problem/Needs: a description of the people your project is targeting (age, location, ethnicity) and their needs Project Description: a short description of what you will do to make the project happen Other Support: other ways you will get support for the project including volunteers, community assets, and other organizations that have agreed to give money. Closing: end the letter with your contact information and how you will follow up on the letter. Look at the sample letter on the next page and think about how you can adapt this letter to your project and your committee or organization. Use the template to write your own Letter of Inquiry.

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Jean Luc Art Foundation 5554 Bell Rd Washington, DC, USA 20744 Dear Jean Luc, We are writing to ask the Art Foundation to consider supporting our Learning Arts project. Our Learning Arts project will engage art experiences to help 40 children in Port Au Prince learn science and math. We know that the Art Foundation wants to encourage learning through the arts and we hope that you will support our project by giving a gift of $1,000. The Committee of Concerned Haitian Citizens wants to ensure that children in our community have access to creative safe spaces to learn and grow. Our committee includes people from Friends for Haiti (a local NGO) teachers from Madame’s Academy, and local artists. Our project organizer, Mary White, recently completed a Community Arts for Children training taught by UNICEF and BuildaBridge International. We used the tools she learned at the training to design our Learning Arts project. Children in Port Au Prince have limited access to safe places and structured learning support where they can learn and grow. 35 out of 40 children surveyed in the Red Valley neighborhood of Port Au Prince play in the streets unsupervised all summer long. Parents work and cannot supervise young children. Half of all parents interviewed said their

children do not have access to education because they cannot afford school fees or children's housework conflicts with school time. This contributes to low education levels and a literacy rate of 50% in this community. Low literacy and education levels of children in this community lead to child exploitation and sustain a cycle of poverty. Our Learning Arts project will give 40 children in Port Au Prince a safe place to learn and grow. We will offer interactive learning experiences to these children five days a week for three months. These arts-integrated learning experiences will increase children’s motivation to learn science and math and improve their observation and measuring skills. We already have support from our community. Five teachers have agreed to volunteer and Friends for Haiti will loan us their classroom space. But to achieve this project, we need support from your foundation to fund art materials, books, and transportation. We hope that the Art Foundation will support our Learning Arts project by giving a gift of $1,000. We will contact you by phone next week to answer any of your questions and to learn about your donation process. If you wish to contact us you can call me at 444-4568890 or email marywhite@haiti.org. Thank you for your time and consideration, Mary White Project Coordinator Committee of Concerned Haitian Citizens

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Foundation Address:

Experience: Use this page

__________________ __________________ __________________

to practice writing a letter of inquiry for your project.

Introduction: Dear ________________,

Your Organization/Group:

Problem/Needs of Target Population:

Other Support:

Closing:

Thank you for your time and consideration, Your name:

_____________________

Title:

_____________________

Group Name: _____________________

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Reflection: In a small group talk about what barriers you think you will have in finding funding or other support for your project. Brainstorm alternative ideas to overcome these barriers. Writes some of your barriers and the group’s alternative ideas to overcome them below. Barrier

How will you overcome it?

Follow-up is one of the most important parts of getting funding. Describe how you will follow up with someone who you asked for support. Write your script below and practice with your group.

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Program Sustainability

Objective: This lesson will introduce and apply strategies for program sustainability

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Lesson 7. Program Sustainability Throughout the entire program planning process, program leaders should consider sustainability. Sustainability is how the community will continue to work towards the vision after the main program activities and funding end. The purpose of program sustainability is to sustain change over time. Not all programs need to sustain themselves. Some are only short term projects. But to make long lasting change, it is important to consider how to sustain the change that the project creates. There are many sustainability strategies, here are a few: Teach- education is one of the best ways to make your change sustainable. Teach others to be project leaders so that if you leave, someone else can take your place. Teach children new skills and attitudes because they will be the next generation of leaders of your country and community. Plan-always think about where your program is going and how it will get there. Problems will happen, but if you are ready for them then they will not make your project fail. Try to be flexible. Being flexible means that you adapt your program to your community’s needs and abilities. Being flexible also means that you change your program when it has problems. It will not be perfect, but you make it the best that it can be. Plan for sustainability. Look at the “8 Elements of Sustainability” and write a plan to make sure your change lasts. Collaborate- get many stakeholders involved in your project at every stage of planning. Work with similar organizations or people who want to do similar things. Make- make funding for your program with your community’s assets. Do not wait for a foundation or NGO to pay for your program. Use what assets your community already has—like people who will volunteer their time, or crafts people who will teach children how to make a product to sell at the market. Whenever you can use local materials and skills.

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Experience: Sustainability Planning Use the space below to describe how you will sustain your program or how you will sustain the changes that your project made.

46


Course Assessment

Objective:

This section will provide practice in applying for a

grant for a child protection project

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Experience: Applying to a Real Foundation A Request for Proposals (RFP) is an invitation for organizations and groups to apply for funding. The next few pages contain a real RFP used with permission from the Boston Foundation. Use the knowledge and skills that you learned in Community Arts for Children to write a grant proposal for a creative child protection project that responds to the questions and format described. Before you begin, read the “Grant Writing Tips” below.

Grant Writing Tips 1. Do not start writing a grant until you fully developed the program that you are requesting funding for. 2. Read the RFP (Request for Proposals) carefully and make sure your program will fit within the organization’s guidelines. 3. Make sure you understand all the terms in the RFP. For example do you know what a human-rights based framework is in the Haiti Fund RFP? Read about this new term on the next page. 4. Visit the foundation’s website to learn more about other projects they have funded 5. Visit or call the foundation officer and ask if your program meets their requirements 6. Outline the grant with the major categories that the foundation uses. Use the same words that they use to describe categories. 7. Answer ALL the questions that the RFP asks 8. Do not have any misspelled words or other writing errors. 9. Ask a friend or colleague to read through your proposal before you submit it

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New Term: Human Rights Framework Human rights are the basic standards that all people need to survive and develop in dignity. Human rights are inherent—we are born with them, inalienable—they cannot be given or taken away, and universal— they are held by all different types of people everywhere. Children have the same rights as adults, but they are particularly vulnerable and need special protection. Some of the key areas that children have the right to protection from are: physical

harm emotional distress family separation armed conflict cruel punishment child labor trafficking exploitation gender-based

violence

Children also have the right to: non-discrimination a

legally registered name survive and develop have an identity education receive special care and support if they have a disability or if they are refugees freely express their views and opinions to relax and play Projects that follow a human rights-based framework must respect, protect, and take active steps to help children enjoy all of their rights.

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Sample RFP Request for Proposals Proposals Due Friday, January 21, 2011

Spring 2011 Overview of Priorities The Haiti Fund was created in the aftermath of the January 12, 2010 earthquake to provide relief and reconstruction support to communities in Haiti and Haitian-Americans in the greater Boston area. Our third round of grants will focus on long-term reconstruction in Haiti. Grants up to $30,000 will be awarded in early May 2011. Small grants (under $5,000) are possible and encouraged for innovative projects within our funding priorities. With the majority of reconstruction funding flowing into Port-au-Prince, the Haiti Fund hopes to focus its funds on supporting communities outside of the capital. Without viable rural communities, small cities and towns, migration to Port-au-Prince will likely remain unsustainably high and decentralized government, services and economic activities will remain elusive. Emphasizing the importance of decentralization and the empowerment of grassroots Haitian organizations, we will favor proposals that demonstrate some or all of the following practices and principles: Incorporate a human rights based framework Foster Haitian leadership development Serve the most poor and vulnerable persons Promote a sustainable model Work in alliance to accomplish their goals Seek to influence policy Build infrastructure Can measure the impact of programs and are accountable for their outcomes Demonstrate transparency in financial management

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Sample RFP The Haiti Fund will focus this round of grants on supporting: Grassroots Haitian Organizations Rural livelihoods, rural and provincial enterprises and food sovereignty - Viable rural communities and provincial cities and towns are essential for building an improved, decentralized Haiti. We seek to support rural and provincial enterprises as an engine for decentralized development. The Haiti Fund also seeks to strengthen rural organizations and cooperatives to improve families’ capacities to feed themselves and their neighbors as well as to influence agricultural and trade policy. Education - A stronger Haiti will emerge through the leadership of better-educated youth. Because educational reform is such a massive task, we seek to fund educational efforts that offer a systematic approach for a group of schools or a region rather than focus on a school-by-school rebuilding strategy. We would welcome pilot school projects that link to a systemic reform strategy, schools that integrate vocational training and livelihood generation, or training programs that would have a far-reaching impact on the quality of education for a large body of students. Permanent housing - With Haiti’s shelter crisis continuing to deteriorate, this is a critical focus. We seek pilot efforts that can relocate displaced camp residents to permanent housing in the provinces. These pilot efforts must demonstrate an innovative and holistic approach with a plan for long-term sustainability. Advocacy Promoting respect for human rights – We seek to grant to Haitian-based organizations helping communities build capacity to guarantee basic human rights to political participation; civil liberties; food, water and life-giving resources; freedom from violence, etc. Promoting transparent and effective aid - The Haiti Fund is a small funder relative to the massive flow of public and private aid. Because we believe that Haitians should be the ones deciding how that aid ought to be allocated, we seek to support Haitian-led advocacy efforts to hold the “donor community” accountable to equity, sustainability and efficiency standards. Boston Based Organizations Serving the Haitian Community Locally, we will seek to support organizations that attend broadly to the needs of the Haitian community, but especially to recently arrived families that were displaced by the January 2010 earthquake. We are particularly interested in organizations 51


Sample RFP that: help Haitians cope with the emotional, financial and legal burdens caused by the earthquake. іі. help facilitate a more smooth and successful transition for recently arrived Haitians into the Boston community. The Haiti Fund will be awarding grants annually moving forward. This will be the one funding opportunity for 2011. The Fund does not make grants to individuals, political organizations or to support organized religion. Only one grant application per organization will be accepted. Proposals for multi-year funding will not be considered at this time. Application Procedures (we request one complete application mailed or e-mailed) Cover summary form (the final page of this document) Proposal narrative of no more than 5 pages (12 point font, one inch margins) which includes: Executive summary. Brief description of applicant organization - including mission, history, current programs and key achievements. Description of program or project for which funds are being requested – including statement of need or opportunity, the methods or strategies to be used in carrying out the project, and a description of project administration. Statement of project goals and objectives. Plan for how project outcomes and success will be monitored and measured, including measurable indicators for each objective listed. Key activities over the course of the grant. Key allies in project implementation including coordination with government agencies. Statement of the outcomes to date, if any, of the applicant project. Statement of how the proposed project fits with the Haiti Fund’s areas of interest. List of Board of Directors and their affiliations. If a U.S. organization, copy of the organization’s US IRS determination letter or that of a fiscal agent. If a non-U.S. organization, a letter of agreement from your fiscal agent or intermediary. (If you are a Haitian-based organization without an identified US 501c3 affiliate, we encourage you to apply and we will work with you to identify an intermediary.) Budget and funding plan for the project, including a project budget proposing how Haiti Fund monies would be used. Please list other sources of support and describe how the project will 52


likely be financed in the future (1-3 years). Overall operating budget and sources of revenue for the organization’s current fiscal year (or the fiscal year for which funding is being requested). Copy of the organization’s audit or financial statement for the most recently completed fiscal year. We hope you will carefully review the requirements of this Request for Proposals (RFP) and only submit a proposal if your project matches our funding priorities. Your proposal must be received by Friday, January 21, 2011 at the following email: laura.mcconaghy@tbf.org or at the address below. No faxed proposals will be accepted. Laura McConaghy re: The Haiti Fund The Boston Foundation 75 Arlington Street, 10th Floor Boston, MA 02116 Funding decisions will be made by the Boston Foundation Board of Directors and announced in May 2011. Due to limited staffing, The Haiti Fund is not able to meet with individual applicant agencies. On occasion, applicants are contacted by telephone to respond to questions raised about their requests. Questions or requests for additional information should be directed to Laura McConaghy at laura.mcconaghy@tbf.org or 617-338-2676.

53


Practice Proposal

COVER SUMMARY CONTACT INFORMATION Organization: Address: Executive Director: Contact for this proposal: Phone: Fax:

Title: Email: Website: ORGANIZATION INFORMATION

Does the organization have US IRS 501(c)(3) status? If no, please identify your fiscal agent or US intermediary:

Yes

No

Please attach a letter of agreement from your fiscal agent or intermediary supporting this application.

Organization mission:

Organization’s total annual budget: Total number of staff Full time:

Part time: Total number of volunteers:

Total number of Board members: Name and contact information for Board Chair:

PROJECT INFORMATION Project name: Location: Haiti Project type: education agriculture housing rural development human rights advocacy Boston support other Amount requested: Total Project budget: Proposal summary (in 6 sentences or less):

The period this grant will cover (date range):

Boston

- Spring 2011 -

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Practice Proposal Project Title: __________________________ Executive Summary Briefly describe the organization, the project, and the amount of support requested. Although this section appears first in the document, it is usually written last.

Organization Introduce your organization or group and briefly describe its vision, mission and history, Describe any current projects and accomplishments.

55


Practice Proposal Project Description Describe the program or project for which funds are being requested. Include a description of the target population and related community needs and assets. Describe the strategies that you will use to carry out the project and who will lead these efforts.

Project Goals and Objectives, Outcomes State the desired goals and objectives and outcomes for your project below.

56


Practice Proposal Monitoring and Evaluation Plan Discuss how progress will be evaluated throughout and at the end of the project

Key Activities (Timeline) List any key project activities below and when they will take place

Activity

Month 1

57

2

3

4

5

`6


Practice Proposal

Allies (Collaborators or Partners) List any collaborators and or partners and describe their role in the project.

Outcomes to date Describe anything that the project has already accomplished

Fit to Haiti Fund Describe how this project fits the Haiti Fund’s funding priorities

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Practice Proposal Project Leadership List any key project leaders, their experience and education, and their role in the project.

Budget and Funding Plan Describe how the Haiti Fund monies would be used. List other sources of support and describe how the project will likely be financed in the future.

Attachments: Operating Budget for Organization Documentation of NGO status Copy of Organization’s Financial Audit

59


Congratulations! You finished the third course, Program Planning, in the Community Arts for Children series. Now you have all the basic tools you need to start your own Community Arts program for children. For more information, look at the online course resources or go to www.buildabridge.org to request assistance.

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Course Reflection: What was the most interesting thing that you learned in this course?

What would you like to learn more about?

Do you think these concepts will work in your community?

Why or Why not?

61


References: Foundation Center (2012) “Proposal Writing Short Course”. Retrieved from: http:// npcm.com/Resources/GoalsObjectivesOutcomes/tabid/60/Default.aspx Mikkelsen, H. (2005). Methods for Development Work and Research: A New Guide for Practitioners (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Sage Publications India NCSTAC (n.d). “Fundraising Basics.” retrieved from: http://www.ncstac.org/content/ materials/FundraisingBasics.pdf Nonprofit Capital Management (2012) “Goals, Objectives, Outcomes” http:// npcm.com/Resources/GoalsObjectivesOutcomes/tabid/60/Default.aspx Peace Corps Office of Overseas Programming and Training Support (OPATS) (2000). Promoting Powerful People. Information Collection and Exchange. Retrieved from: http://multimedia.peacecorps.gov/multimedia/pdf/library/ T0104_promotingpower.pdf Save the Children (2009) Child Friendly Spaces Facilitator Training Manual. Retrieved from: http://resourcecentre.savethechildren.se/content/library/ documents/child-friendly-spaces-facilitator-training-manual Secure the Future (2009) “NGO Financial Management Pocket Guide.” Retrieved from: http://www.securethefuture.com/our_experience/archive/financemng.pdf Shapiro, J. (2001) “Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit”. CIVICUS. Retrieved from: http://www.civicus.org/new/media/Monitoring%20and%20Evaluation.pdf UNICEF(n.d.). FACT SHEET: A summary of the rights under the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Retrieved from http://www.unicef.org/crc/index_30228.html UNICEF (n.d.) Convention on the Rights of the Child. Retrieved from: http:// www.unicef.org/crc/index_using.html United Nations Population Fund (UNPF) (n.d.) Human Rights: The Human-Rights Based Approach. Retrieved from: http://www.unfpa.org/rights/approaches.htm Walker, M. (2011) “Water and Sanitation in Bunkpurugu, Ghana: analysis of current resources for community action”. Virginia Tech University. Unpublished thesis. World Wildlife Fund (WWF) (2005). “Cross-Cutting Tool:Stakeholder Analysis” Retrieved from: www.panda.org/standards/1_1_stakeholder_analysis/ 62


Glossary Activities: the specific actions that you will take for each objective in order to achieve your goals Donations: money that people or organizations give you to start or maintain your project Efficiency: how well resources were used to achieve the project Effectiveness: how well the project achieves or is achieving its goals. Evaluation: the comparison of the intended project outcomes to the actual project outcomes Expert judgment evaluation: allowing an outside professional to rate the project based on his or her expertise Fees for services: ways that programs can earn money through providing goods and services Goals: the overarching ambitions of your project Goal-based evaluation: assessing if the goals and objectives were achieved Goal-Free evaluation: assessing the range of intended and unintended project effects Grants: money that organizations give you achieve your project with no obligation to pay back these funds Human rights: the basic standards that all people need to survive and develop in dignity Human rights-based framework: projects that respect, protect, and take active steps to help people enjoy all of their rights Impact: the change in a community that is the result of the project Indicators: the measureable sign of change In-kind donations: community or personal assets (like time or space) that people give to your project at no charge

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Mission: defines the purpose of the organization and how the organization will contribute to its vision Monitoring: the process of recording and analyzing the progress of a project while it is still in progress Objectives: the measurable steps that you will take to achieve each goal Outcomes: the measureable results of achieving each objective Program: a longer-term intervention with no definite end Project: a shorter-term intervention that has a clear end Request for Proposals (RFP): an invitation for organizations and groups to apply for funding Stakeholders: people who have a vested interest in the project because they will be impacted by the project or because they can influence the project Vision: the long-term transformation that you are working towards

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