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BuildaBridge-UNICEF-Haiti Community Arts for Children Series Training

September 17-October 26, 2012 Final Report

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The Community Arts for Children Series Training was developed by: Dr. J. Nathan Corbitt Co-Founder, President & CEO, BuildaBridge International Dr. Vivian Nix-Early Co-Founder & COO, BuildaBridge International Tracie Blummer Technical Writer, BuildaBridge International

BuildaBridge is a nonprofit arts education and intervention organization whose mission is to engage creative people and the transformative power of art-making to bring hope and healing to children, families, and communities in the toughest places of the world. BuildaBridge spans barriers of race, class, faith and culture to promote holistic personal, family and community development. BuildaBridge offers unique programs featuring cross-cultural perspectives and arts-integrated approaches that are child-centered, trauma-informed and hope-infused.

Community Arts for Children series made possible with financial support from the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

Š BuildaBridge International All Rights Reserved

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Table of Contents Project Summary

5

Evaluation Summary

7

Module 1: Community Arts for Children

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Gonaives

Port-au-Prince

Jacmel

Trainer Recommendations

12 14 18 21

Module 2: Creative Safe Places for Children

23

Gonaives

26

Port-au-Prince

29

Jacmel

Trainer Recommendations

33 36

Module 3: Program Development

37

Gonaives

41

Port-au-Prince

42

Jacmel

Trainer Recommendations

43 45

Training Evaluation

46

Module Pre/Post Tests Analysis

46

Outcome Summary

48

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Participant Evaluation of Training/Trainers and Feedback

50

Gonaives

50

Port-au-Prince

53

Jacmel

57

Trainer Evaluation of Training

59

Appendices

61

I. Participant Group Photos

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II. Trainer Video Report

61

III. Media

IV. Module Pre/Post Tests

V. Training Master Participant List

VI. Trainer Biographies

VII. BuildaBridge Information

61 64 69 74 75

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Project Summary ___________________________________ Background Following the devastating Haiti Earthquake of 2010, UNICEF-Haiti implemented a program entitled “Art in a Bag” in Haiti. Developed to help children to overcome their psychological distress through Art and Storytelling, “Art in a Bag” aims to improve the psychosocial wellbeing of children and adolescents affected by the January 2010 earthquake. One of the objectives of this program is to enhance the skills of professionals and volunteers working with Child Friendly Spaces (CFS) in Haiti. The program seeks to do this through educating these workers in the use of the arts as a means to facilitate the psychosocial development of children and adolescents. In 2011 UNICEF Haiti requested BuildaBridge International, a U.S. American, Arts Education and Arts Intervention organization with over 15 years of experience working children affected by violence, poverty, and natural disasters, to present a proposal to train ninety (90) community workers in Haiti. Initially conceived as a train-the-trainer program for 15 “animators” selected by UNICEF, it was later changed to a direct training program of ninety (90) select participants from organizations affiliated with UNICEF. Upon acceptance of the proposal, BuildaBridge developed the “Community Arts for Children” training series. The “Community Arts for Children” Series Training is a component of the BuildaBridge Institute. The BuildaBridge Institute is a training and applied-research academy of BuildaBridge International (www.buildabridge.org) designed to prepare creative artists and community workers to integrate the arts effectively in education, and community and human development. Now in its twelfth year, the Institute has trained more than 750 professionals worldwide, and has attracted a faculty of 85 professionals in the field. BuildaBridge’s goals were to support the broader goal of the Art in a Bag project through its corresponding organizational goals: 1) Create safe places for children to play, live, and learn; 2) Promote resiliency healing and education for children living in transitional environments (shelters and residential care institutions); and 3) Build project sustainability and the capacity of local organizations by way of training local artists and community workers in creative arts methods of education, healing, and the environment. The Community Arts for Children Series Training curriculum was develop by Dr. J. Nathan Corbitt, Dr. Vivian Nix-Early, and, Tracie Blummer, Technical Writer, all from BuildaBridge International. Student manuals or workbooks were translated into Haitian Kreyol. Student workbooks consisted of relevant text, individual and group activities, glossaries, and sample documents (Mottos, Stakeholder Analysis, Program Proposal Plan, etc.). Trainer manuals were developed to provide the trainers with a pre-written script and concise information to assist them in training facilitation. Subsequently,

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student workbooks have been placed online to meet the requested need of participants. Links to relevant online materials can be found in the Appendices. The Community Arts for Children Series training consisted of three (3) modules: Foundations for Arts in Transformation (Atizay pou Chanjman) Creating Safe Places for Children (Espas Kreyatif San Danje), and Program Development (Devlopman Pwogram) Implementation The BuildaBridge-UNICEF-Haiti Community Arts for Children Series Training took place from Monday September 17, 2012 through October 28, 2012. The trainings were offered in the three (3) modules for three (3) days each in three (3) locations-Gonaives, Port-au-Prince, and Jacmel with 30 participants in each location, for a total of ninety (90) participants. Location Gonaives Port-au-Prince Jacmel

Training Dates September 17-27, 2012 October 1012, 2012 October 15-25, 2012

Training Site Heberson Paradise Hotel Hotel Montana Hotel Cap Lamandou

UNICEF was responsible for all site coordination of housing, food and training facilities. The training team consisted of three certified BuildaBridge trainers (Amy Tuttle, Jamaine Smith, and Laurie Williams) and one BuildaBridge translator (F. Gaelle Prophete). Two of the trainers had previously worked in Haiti on child protection projects with BuildaBridge. One of the trainers in Haitian-American with strong ties to a Haitian community, and the translator was from Cap Haitian with degrees from U.S. American Universities. All trainers hold Masters Degrees in Community Arts and/or Education. The 90 participating students in the program were selected by UNICEF affiliated organizations based on their basic understanding of community development and some experience in organizing communities and working with children. It was recognized that they may have knowledge and understand of arts-based community development for but that there was an openness for the power of the arts in transformation, or social change. Participants should also have a basic appreciation for the ways in which children and youth learn. They may have some knowledge of pedagogy and learning assessment. They will have an appreciation for the role of arts-based approaches to learning but may not be able to articulate ways in which this happens. Pre and post testing of participants’ knowledge, post program evaluation, group discussion and trainer observation were methods engaged for formative and summative evaluation. Participants were awarded a certificate upon successful completion of the training. The certificate represents a minimum of sixty (60) hours of on-ground instruction by BuildaBridge.

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Evaluation Summary Evaluations of the “Community Arts for Children” Series Training consisted of pre/posttest for each class module, written trainee evaluations of the training and trainers, trainer observations, and verbal feedback from trainees. The table below shows the overarching outcomes of the training, actual outcomes of the training and their indicators: Outcome Actual Outcome and Indicators 1. 100% of the 100% of trainees completed a mock community assessment as indicated by participation in: trainees will have completed a mock  Community Asset Mapping community  Turning community problems into asset activities assessment  Community Problem and Solution Tree creation  Creating Maps of Safe and Unsafe places for children  Creating drawings of their communities as they were and as they could be 2. 100% of the 100% of trainees were able to demonstrate 1 Arts project for their targeted trainees will be able community as indicated by: to demonstrate 1 arts Visual Arts: project for their  The creation of maps depicting safe and unsafe places for children targeted  The creation of images of their world as it is and their world as it could be community  The creation of visual community asset maps  The creation of “Problem and Solution” trees  Participation in the “Crumpled Paper Exercise” Storytelling:  Story of Haiti activity. “This is the story of Haiti and the Haitian children….” Drama  The creation of an holistic child development sculpture  The reenactment of the digestive system with sound, words, and movement. Music  Learning and participation in the “Obwisana” song.  The creation of an opening class song

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3. 100% of the 100% of the trainees were able to define trauma and demonstrate 1 trainees will be able technique on working/speaking with a traumatized child as indicated by: to define trauma and  Participation in and learning the components of a Child-Safe, Creative demonstrate 1 Space technique on  Participation in and the creation of “Child-Safe Activity Rituals” working/speaking  Learning and participating in “Speaking a blessing (affirmation)” of a child with a traumatized through spoken word and meaningful touch child  Participation in and learning how to build resilience in children through Artmaking.  Participation in and learning how to the Art-making process can be a metaphor to describe life (children can use metaphors to express difficult feelings).  Learning how the Arts are a means of non-verbal communication. 4. 100% of the 90%* of the trainees wrote a basic fundraising and development plan for their program as indicated by: trainees will have written a basic  The completion of a practice program proposal fundraising and  The completion of a basic project budgeting chart. development plan for  The completion of a practice letter of inquiry for funds. their program  The completion of a practice sustainability plan. *Participants in Jacmel were unable to complete some of the above mentioned assignments due to disruptions by Hurricane Sandy. Also, some participants expressed a need for more time to complete their practice proposals. 5. 90% will show 90% showed increased knowledge in vocabulary related to arts-based increased knowledge intervention as indicated by: in vocabulary related  The use of words/phrases such as “foster/building resilience”, “ritual”, to arts-based “creative safe places” during class discussion and post interview intervention questions 85% showed increased knowledge in planning skills and budgeting as 6. 80% will show increased knowledge indicated by: in planning skills and  The successful completion of a basic project budgeting chart budgeting.  The successful completion of a practice program proposal  The successful completion of a practice sustainability plan.

Participant Evaluation of Training/Trainers Trainees were given evaluations forms to complete at the end of the training in each of the three locations. Forms asked participants to assess the quality of the training, list valuable parts of the training, as well as what they would change about the training. Below is a brief summary of response by location. Please see pages 50-60 for a more detailed report of participant responses.

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Gonaives Thirty-one out of 32 participants completed the final evaluation for the Community Arts for Children training. The overall quality of the training was rated “Excellent” by 20 participants; “Very Good” by 9 participants; and “Good” by one participant (who only participated in Module 3). Port-au-Prince Twenty-seven out of 33 participants completed the final evaluation for the Community Arts for Children training. Two students could not complete the entire training due to medical and personal reasons. The overall quality of the training was rated “Excellent” by 20 participants; “Very Good” by 6 participants; and “Good” by one participant. Jacmel Eighteen out of 34 participants completed the final evaluation for the Community Arts for Children training. Due to Hurricane Sandy, 11 hours of the training were not completed because of the cancellation of classes on October 24 (half day) and October 25, respectively. The overall quality of the training was rated “Excellent” by 11 participants; “Very Good” by 6 participants; and “Good” by one participant.

Trainer Evaluation of Training Trainers gained valuable insight into the success of the training through the observation of trainees during training, conversations with trainees during meals, one-on-one meetings with trainees, as well as review of trainee evaluation forms and pre and posttest. A link to a video report from the trainers can be found on page 61. Recommendations and follow up suggestions can be found at the end of each module description.

Report of Training Modules The following report is divided into three (3) sections based on the three (3) modules that comprise the “Community Arts for Children” series training. With a detailed description of each module, each section will highlight several activities completed by participants as well as detailed findings taken from the responses of participants given through the completion of highlighted activities and discussions. Highlighted findings can be used to inform further service to training locations. Recommendations for further replication and training are provided at the end of each module’s descriptions. Certain texts are hyperlinked with direct links to video of correlating activities for more clarification. An appendix with links videos of training components and supplemental materials, such as online versions of student workbooks, is included in the Appendices section.

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Module 1: Community Arts for Children Introduction to Community Arts and Transformation provides an overview of the field of community arts and the role of creative arts in both personal and community transformation. Focus will be on the role of creative artists and community workers in community and organizational contexts, models for effective community arts, and basic methods of working with communities for holistic development through arts-based social programs and community development. The primary focus and outcome of this course is to develop a community asset map and envision one or more projects or programs. The course: 1. Defines the history and context for the fields of arts in community development and arts-assisted learning for children and youth 2. Provides concrete models of successful programs and what makes them a success 3. Encourages participants to envision a project or program that empowers communities for transformation 4. Introduces the plan and process for developing a holistic community asset map 5. Explains the role of artists and creative community workers in transformation 6. Aids participants in the discovery of approaches and to establish a model for transformation through the presentation of case studies Upon completion of this course, participants will: 1. Define aspects to create a safe space for children 2. Ability to create and to conduct a ritual (structured and repetitive opening and closing) 3. Construct and implement a value-centered motto 4. Lead and establish rules and boundary expectations by demonstrating basic understanding and application of a discipline policy 5. Plan, prepare and execute lessons 6. Evaluate and assess the outcomes of lessons 7. Demonstrate two ways of “Speaking Affirmation” into the life of children 8. Understanding of taking an appropriate role with children, including role boundaries 9. Articulate the characteristics of a child-centered, trauma-informed, and hope-infused classroom Examples of Module 1 Activities: Envisioning Transformation/”Wall of Transformation”: Participants were instructed to draw a picture of their world (community) as it is with special attention on a community problem that affects children they would most like to change. Next, participants were each asked to complete the sentence “I envision____” (and fill in an idea that they have for community change). Then, participants were asked to draw a picture of their world (community) as it could be if the community problem was solved. Completed drawings were hung on a “Wall of Transformation” or Mi Chanjman (in Creole)” as a reminder of the goal participants were working toward.

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Asset Mapping: Participants were broken into groups of five (5) and instructed to think about the assets their communities possessed to help protect children and improve their well-being. Participants were then asked to draw a map of all important assets (people, economic, cultural, etc.) in their communities. Participants were encouraged to discover how some of the problems in their communities can also be turned into assets (Example: Litter such as plastic bottles can be turned into jewelry and sold for economic gain). Problem/Solution Tree: A problem tree is a tool used to explore the causes and effects of community problems. The causes are the roots of the tree, the roots of the problem. The trunk is the problem, and the leaves represent the roots of the problem. Participants were split into groups and asked to draw a problem tree based on a common problem I their communities. Participants were then asked to draw a Solution tree. The roots were the activities done to bring about the solution, the trunk was the solution, and the leaves were the effects the solution would have on their community. Further discussion helped participants realize what some barriers to the solution or community change could be.

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Gonaïves General Comments: In Gonaives, Haiti, most participants began with the world view that many community problems are too big, require institutionally-based solutions and action, and are outside of their control. Through work with BuildaBridge's transformational model, asset mapping, and problem tree exercises, 100% of participants were able to identify small steps they can make towards viable actions that are part of the solution. For example, J'Guandia, a participant from rural Haiti, was experiencing great difficulty approaching the creation of an asset map of her community. She stated: “My community is pretty new. We don't really have assets. We don't have any institutions. We don't have schools. We don't have UN. We don't have much outside help. We have only one place where children meet, but there are many obstacles that make it unsafe, the roof of the tent is ripped and leaks, and it is a very static space- not at all good for children. I am unable to draw anything that represents assets. We really just do not have assets.” Upon further consideration and conversation, a major shift in her paradigm became evident. She was first able to identify the production of bananas and vegetables in her community as an asset. Next, she was able to identify people and relationships as assets. She made the connection between people who know how to sew and the rip in the tent that makes it difficult for children to meet in the common space in the rain. Also, maybe she could ask for people to help her clear obstacles from the space that children meet, so that they could be safe. She could consider offering her community the activities she is learning at BuildaBridge training. In just a few hours, her worldview changed from “my community is broken and problems are outside of my control” to “my community is full of possibilities and assets that contribute to the solution.”

Findings from Activities Commonly expressed community problems/needs among group:  Lack of education  Restivek,  Sexual exploitation,  Childhood marriage  Environment (litter, etc.). Educational needs came up most often. This issue is very complex and involves resource needs: books, funding for teachers, space. The issue also taps into many others such as gender equity, family's value on education, etc. Root causes of commonly expressed community problems/needs:  Continued distance from education,  Economic hardship,  Exploitation of children,

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Spiritual/physical/psychological developmental delays

In the conversation we had to be very careful not to stigmatize the children and base the problem on values. Haitians are working hard to re-include these children into the community. Asset Mapping: Common Community Assets  Environment  Food production,  Family relationships,  School/teacher relationships,  CYC,  Te Male/UNICEF, CBOs, NGOs,  Relief International,  Schools  Churches “Wall of Transformation Activity”. Participants were asked to draw an image that represented their world (community) as it currently is. Common images included:  Flooding  Sexual exploitation,  Lack of safe places Participants were asked to draw an image that represented their world (community) as it could be: Common images included:  Well-constructed roads and sidewalks  Safe places  Food production  Safety from flooding  Ecoles. Solution Tree (see picture to right). Participants were instructed to draw a tree. The leaves represented the effect of a solution in their communities, the trunk represented the solution, and the roots represented the activities required to bring about the solution. For the collective problem tree- we focused on the issue of domestic servitude. As a group, participants worked on a common solution tree. It was realized that there were many solutions as the issue is confounded. The group focused on the solution of providing support to the child in the home (keep the child in the home). Activities that contribute to this were: family support, informal education (cooperation, community

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care, individual development, spiritual development, literacy, economic support for the families, education to families so that they understand children will not likely be well cared for in the home they work in. Results that the group would like to see are: increased percentage of children kept in the home, etc.

Port-au-Prince General Comments The group responded well to the Community Arts exercise and each group (community, arts) brainstormed wonderful and comprehensive lists of words/concepts/community roles related to community and to arts. This group loves group games, songs, and reading in concert. “Hey BuildaBridge” is very successful with this group, they picked up on all of the notes and words immediately and were not shy about dancing! “Koze, Koze” as a mingling and discussion game is very successful with this group. Also, the class is presenting the ground rules that they created each module. Each day, a different student presents. There was a challenge facilitating exercises that engage visual arts. From participant feedback, it was learned that educationally, visual arts are not promoted and are not presented as a means of learning/communicating in Haiti. Hence, in the first few days of training, participants generally exhibited difficulty when asked to represent their community or themselves with visual arts. It is the process of transferring ideas/concepts into symbols or visual images that is particularly challenging. However, participants became increasingly more comfortable with visual art as training progressed.

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The “Wall of Transformation”, or “Mi Chanjman” in Creole, activity has been very successful. The “Wall of Transformation” was kept up for the entire training as a visual reminder of the goals that participants were working towards.

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Findings from Activities Assets identified by group:  Children  Teachers  Schools  Health Centers  Community Leaders  Local Businesses (much conversation around engaging local businesses in collaborative work)  Parents  Non-Profit Organizations Barriers faced in work:  Lack of funding  Lack of physical resources  Worldview: plenty of ideas, not enough external support to bring ideas and change into fruition  Narrow-mindedness/inability to plan for the long-term Overcome barriers by:  Identifying local assets  Engaging identified assets in work,  Adjusting the scope of solution- starting with small, manageable changes, planning strategically for the future, staying on course/on track to meet goals and objectives Problems faced by children in the community:  Restivek, trafficking,

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    

Lack of family planning → lack of resources → insufficient support and protection from families Living in the streets Poor access to education, Poor access to health care Limited safe places for children in the community

Root Causes of Problems  Economic stress  Poor educational access  Lack of community and family protection for children  Poor community infrastructure

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Jacmel General Comments Activities flowed well and the group was quick to engage in the training elements. The group responded to animation, loved activities involving dance and music, and had a general ability to grasp concepts- especially philosophical or abstract confirmations such as transformation. The following is information was gathered from the group: My World As It Could Be Activity:

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Pictures from Mi Chanjman Activity:

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Findings from Activities Assets of communities identified by the group:  Intellectual Assets: Teachers, Non-profit Leaders, Engineers, etc. (folks who contribute intellectual activity and property to a community). This is the first group to reference Intellectual Assets as its own category.  Children as assets  Local non-profit organizations  Parents  Business Owners Barriers faced in work:  Lack of funding  Lack of physical resources  Worldview: plenty of ideas, not enough external support to bring ideas and change into fruition

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Narrow-mindedness/inability to plan for the long-term

Overcome barriers by:  Identifying local assets  Engaging identified assets in work,  Adjusting the scope of solution- starting with small, manageable changes, planning strategically for the future, staying on course/on track to meet goals and objectives Problems faced by children in the community:  Restivek, trafficking,  Lack of family planning → lack of resources → insufficient support and protection from families  Living in the streets  Poor access to education,  Poor access to health care  Limited safe places for children in the community Root Causes of Problems  Economic stress  Poor educational access  Lack of community and family protection for children  Poor community infrastructure

Recommendations from Trainers Participants should continue to be shown the importance of researching the assets of neighboring communities so that they can share resources and information. This will encourage collaboration. o

Continued identification of the Arts as tools for achieving non-art goals and community artists as assets is strongly recommended. Artist help the community tell its story, document significant events, and allow less verbal community members a means to share their voices.. o

For future trainings, relate all activities to children, family, and community. For example, the use of asset mapping as a fun, engaging tool to help children form their own protection plan by identifying safe places, people, and various resources in their community. Ex: knowing where distant relatives are in case of emergency and need to flee area. o

Continued exposure to the “Creative People in the Transformational Cycle” model. Continue to make connections between the model and activities. o

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o Continued reinforcement of the concept “Scope of solution.� Participants often form solutions at too large a scale. Reinforcing small actionable steps and SMART goals with participants is necessary. Participants would also benefit from a more in depth asset analysis of their community.

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Module 2: Creative Safe Places for Children Creative Safe Places for Children outlines the structured environment needed to bring hope and healing to children by creating safe places for learning and play. Students will learn to create classroom rituals; set behavior guidelines; design appropriate spaces that foster a sense of safety for students; conduct assessments and evaluations; and plan, prepare, and execute lessons. Students will be introduced to classroom pedagogy and philosophy that will ensure trauma-informed, hope-infused and child-centered classrooms and community spaces. The course: 1. Discusses the importance of safe and creative spaces for children. 2. Presents the important role of ritual in maintaining safety and developing cultural identity. 3. Provides rationale for trauma-informed, child-centered and hope-infused model for working with children. 4. Reviews the importance of creativity and play in the holistic development of the children and youth. 5. Reinforces the role of the teacher and mentor in setting clear and appropriate boundaries for behavior and learning. Upon completion of this course, participants will: 1. Define aspects to create a safe space for children 2. Ability to create and to conduct a ritual (structured and repetitive opening and closing) 3. Construct and implement a value-centered motto 4. Lead and establish rules and boundary expectations by demonstrating basic understanding and application of a discipline policy 5. Plan, prepare and execute lessons 6. Evaluate and assess the outcomes of lessons 7. Demonstrate two ways of “Speaking Affirmation” into the life of children 8. Understanding of taking an appropriate role with children, including role boundaries 9. Articulate the characteristics of a child-centered, trauma-informed, and hope-infused classroom

Example of activities completed in Module 2: Class motto & Opening Experience: Participants engaged in discussion on the importance of rituals (a sequence of activities performed to help transition, heal, believe and celebrate) in creating a safe place for children. Rituals are important to helping children feel safe, feel like they belong, and get ready to learn. A “Beginning Ritual”, helps children focus on the experience of the safe space. In this ritual, there is a motto, rules, and opening experience. After reading examples of mottos in their workbooks, participants were broken into two groups and asked to list the values the possess that

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inform their work with children. Common values of the two groups were then used, by the group members, to create a class motto and opening song. Map of Safe/Unsafe places: Participants were split into groups of 5 (five) and asked to think like the children in their communities. With this mindset, they were instructed to draw a map of areas they deemed safe and areas they deemed unsafe. Groups were then asked to present their maps and explain the characteristics of their safe and unsafe places. Holistic Child Development Sculpture: Participants were split into six groups. In each group, two people were “sculptors” and three people were “clay”. Each group was given a card with a type of growth (emotional, social, intellectual, physical, creative, character/spiritual) written on it. The sculptors were then instructed to sculpt their other group members into a sculpture that represented the type of growth on their card. Each group was able to view each other’s sculptures and guess which area of growth they represented.

General Comments: 

The Safe Places Map proved to be a very effective exercise in all three sites as participants were able to clearly identify unsafe places within their communities. Participants enjoyed the process of creating the map as opposed to simply listing the characteristics. This activity proved to be a great way to introduce the physical characteristics of a safe place and affirm the work participants were already doing to make the child friendly spaces they work in more safe. Participants were able to discover common themes of both safe and unsafe characteristics and learned from each other on how to make unsafe places safe.

Using the Problems as Assets approach discussed and taught in Module 1, participants were able to look at places they deemed un-usable as contain assets to make it safe. Using the pictures on pages 7-8, made this area of activity and discussion even more effective as they participants were able to see the transformation of a space in their own country context.

Lessons 2 (Arts in Child Development) and 4 (Arts for Learning) proved to be very eye opening for participants. It appears that participants were unaware of the use of the Arts in education and human development. Not only were participants developed professionally, but many expressed personal development as they learned the Multiple Intelligences they possess: “I always knew that arts encompassed storytelling, painting, dance, song; but I

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didn’t realize what it promoted. Now I know that when I work with kids if I notice a weak area, I will know what I can use to help them grow.” – Participant Feedback. “Art isn’t just for self-expression, but for a child’s holistic development as well.” 

The “Broken Pot Experience” was replaced with the “Crumpled Paper Experience” which was extremely effective in teaching Art as Metaphor.

All participants group had little to no difficulty creating Opening Experiences and Class Mottos. This was an excellent way for the group to become even more unified as participants realized the common values that inform their work with children in their communities. Opening Experiences and Mottos were filled with passion and genuineness.

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Gonaïves General Comments: Participants in Gonaives struggled with the “Art as Metaphor” concept. They asked if metaphor was something you “possessed” and if only certain people possessed it. Hence, some time was spent on unpacking the concept. Some participants still had questions, so they concept was reinforced in other Module 2 activities. The creation of the opening experience was extremely fun, coordinated, and done very well by the participants. They chose to work together as an entire group as opposed to creating it in separate groups. This influenced our work as we trained participants in Port-au-Prince and Jacmel. Participants greatly enjoyed the Obwisana experience. Many asked for the translation of the song, which we had to find and confirm.

Class Motto: “Nap met tet nou ansanm poy nou ka avanse Nap met tet nou ansanm paske n nou ale avanse.” "We are gonna put our heads together so we can advance. We are gonna put our heads together because we will then advance."

Common values (from opening motto experience): *very collective set of values, reflects collective nature of the society Love One Another

Collaboration

Respect + Sharing

Solidarity

Tolerance

Team Spirit

Charity

Discipline

Unity

Hard-work

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Findings from Activities Characteristics of a Safe Place:  cleanliness  open space  large yard  trees for shade  reflective/quiet  barriers/boundaries for safety, limits vehicles  use activity as learning tool for kids  nothing on ground/debris  fences for safety  imagine clean space and teach responsibility for espas  safe space to teach  cultural expression and the arts

Risks identified by Participants (Characteristics of an unsafe place):             

Cars too fast Trash on the side of the road fence out of hay/straw/rockscould be used as weapons water in the street lack of safety danger of rocks structural damage open gutter space trash heavy traffic insects/mosquitoes cables smoke/fire hazard

List of types of growth participants believe the children they work with need the most:  Social  Physical

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 

Intellectual Spiritual were the top areas of growth participants believe the children they work with need the most.

Examples mentioned by participants on how they are using art to build up resilience within the children they are working with: Unable to assess. Due to time constraints, trainers were unable to complete the activity in which participants shared ways in which they used the Arts to foster resilience in the children they work with.

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Port-au-Prince Participants in Port-au-Prince were very responsive and engaged during Module 2. 

They enjoyed the wide variety of art forms used throughout the module and expressed deep understanding of course subject matter. They are an extremely musical group. Thus, they enjoyed creating songs as well as dancing.

Concepts such as “Art as Metaphor” were grasped with little difficulty.  The “Crumpled Paper Experience” was extremely effective with this group. The experience was debriefed very well and many participants desired to and did share their experience as they went through the process of the experience as well as the many metaphors that surfaced from the process.  Exercises such as the creation of our Class Motto and Opening Experience activity were very well.

Class Motto (a collaborated effort of all participants): Nap ini nou pou’n patisipe nan devlopman peyi nou. Angaje’n pou kwe nan travay ak lespwa pou yon vrè chanjman. We will unify to participate in the development of our country. We will engage ourselves to believe in work and

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hope for a real change.

Common Values (used to create above class motto):  In unity there is strength.  Collaboration  Unity  “Ansanm, ansanm nou ka chanje” – Together, together we can change  “Men anpil, chay pa lou” – Many hands lessen the burden

Findings from Activities Risks identified by Participants (Characteristics of an unsafe place):  Flooding  Homes built too close to the water  Unfenced areas  Un clean water  Bad sanitation/trash  Broken equipment Characteristics of a Safe place:  Adult Supervision  Fenced in Places

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            

Homes built away from water No discrimination Sense of belonging Code of Conduct for adults No dangerous materials Clean Water Clean Sanitation/Bathrooms Trash removed Clean environment Parents must pick up children Well planted trees/Integrity of buildings Away from street Gate

List of types of growth organizations believe children need the most:  Social,  Spiritual,  Creative, and  Intellectual were the top types of growth participants felt the children they work with needed the most. Examples of how organizations set up rituals when conducting their activities: 1. Students enter space, there is corporate prayer, activities, a closing story in relation to today’s activities, students exit space. 2. Students enter space, there is corporate prayer, activities, a meal, children usually leave after the meal. Examples mentioned by the participants on how they are using art to build up the resilience of children they are working with: This was done through a roleplaying/skit activity. Participants were split into four groups. Each group was given a separate art form-Dance (2 groups), Song, and Drama. The Song group in particular showed how they can use song/music to cause

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the children to make connections with each other. In their skit, there was a disabled boy (with one arm) who was an outcast in the group. The adults in the skit used song to connect him to another disabled child, a young girl, with no arms. They also used song to connect both of the disabled children to the rest of the group.

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Jacmel General Comments: Very visually arts based group. Also, our quickest in grasping concepts such as “Art as Metaphor” Class Motto: Nou kwè ak detèminasyon, konpreyansyon, kolaborasyon ak la fwa; nou ka pote chanjman nan kominote nou pou yon lavi miyò kika pèmèt nou jwenn bonjan siksè ak libète pandan nap kreye espas nan sikirite pou nou ka aprann nan renmen youn pou lòt. We believe that with determination, understanding, collaboration, and with faith; we can bring change in our communities for a better life that will allow us to find great success and liberty, while creating safe spaces so we can learn to love one another.

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Findings from Activities Characteristics of a Safe Place:  Space with barriers  Way to the library with no barriers  Lots of trees that provide shade from the sun and help give fresh air along with flowers.  Walls are fencing the safe space with a gate  Sense of order/structure  Person guarding spaces (adult supervision)  Houses that are built safely (earthquake ready)  Open field where kids can play safely together  Access to clean water  Basketball space  Soccer field  Medical clinic  Beautiful homes  Health center  Activity center  Games and Toys available  Clear walk way  Other Characteristics of safe places: Clean spaces with no access to river. Children find everything they need: schools, bathrooms, recreational spaces.

Risks identified by Participants (Characteristics of an unsafe place):  Open spaces (no fences)  Children are playing near spaces that have hazardous materials, such as glass  Near the river  Space has rocks and other natural hazards  Unsafe spaces have pigs and other animals  River- houses built near it  River that children have to cross  Large animals  Rocks; desert  A small water source where children use the restrooms  The yard is full of rocks caused by river flooding  Big hole behind the house  Children lying on the ground  Lack of access to a toilet  Playing in the river, clear access to river  Trash/Glass bottles

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List of types of growth participants believe the children they work with need the most:  Intellectual  Physical  Spiritual  Emotional were the top areas of growth participants believe the children they work with need the most. Examples mentioned by participants on how they are using art to build up resilience within the children they are working with: Due to Hurricane Sandy, we did not have an opportunity to discuss this with the participants.

Examples of Organizational Rituals: 1. Greeting, Prayer, Silence, One word to describe feelings, Activities, One word to describe feelings, Parting 2. Opening Song, Greeting, Welcome Message, Activities, Prayer (Closing). 3. Prayer, Organizational Song, Share experiences, Activity, Discussion on what was liked/disliked, Prayer. 4. Greeting, Game with ball (name game), Activity, Energetic Activity, Discussion on what was liked/disliked, Prayer.

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Recommendations from Trainers 

Participants consistently asked for the Trainers to visit their sites to assess all aspects of their site (physical space, staff, activities, etc.) and assist them in the implementation of further child-safe activity rituals. This is very important to the participants and thus, it is strongly recommended it be implemented in future trainings.

Participants have asked for and will need follow-up support in the form of suggestions, ideas, and the like as they continue using the Arts in education and human development as this appeared to be of the newest, most foreign information presented during the training.

Many of the participants are already creating safe places for children in their communities. The training gave them more specific ideas, language, and theory toward their work. Thus, terms and theories learned in trainings be reinforced in future trainings and ongoing correspondence with trainees.

Discussions surrounding creating a safe place for children aided trainees to discover how they can use natural resources in communities as well as what was once considered “trash” as elements in newly created safe, creative spaces. Hence, more resources on using recycled materials to create Art and practical items such as jewelry, purses, etc. can be given to ensure new and fresh ideas.

Each participant group greatly enjoyed the Obwisana experience. Port-au-Prince participants pointed out that it is a good idea to thoroughly explain the song, its purpose, and the fact that is has no spiritual meaning or background. Some participants were weary of participating in the activity because of “superstition”. Participants in Jacmel pointed out that the correlation between the song and their African roots. The song also contains the same rhythm and required movement as a traditional Haitian song and can be used to show how the two cultures intertwine.

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Module 3: Program Development Program Planning and Development (Fundraising) prepares leaders for organizing arts programs. The leader will learn the basics of planning and implementation of an arts program or project. Consideration is given to writing clear objectives and outcomes, organizing the project, selecting a location, training personnel, intake of students, and dealing with specific project related issues. Emphasis will be placed on funding the project, including writing a proposal for funding and other development options. The final project is to plan a program and have a written program plan in the form of a project grant proposal. 1. Introduction to Program Planning: The Program Grant Proposal 2. Determine Needs, Assets and Resources 3. Goals, Objectives, Outcomes 4. Select a Program Location 5. Develop Alliances and Partnerships 6. Enlist and Train Personnel 7. Manage a Program 8. Developing a Budget 9. Evaluate and Reporting 10. Funding a Program through Grant-Writing and Fundraising

Using materials from previous courses, participants will: 1. Define a need and apply the principle of arts-based solutions 2. Write a project description including goals and outcomes 3. Provide a workable list of potential collaborations from the community in which they live. 4. Write a project plan description that outlines the basic daily experiences 5. Write a job description for program personnel

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Examples of Activities from Module 3: Project Commercial: After learning aspects of Program Development such as developing vision, mission, goals, objectives, and activities for their project ideas, participants were instructed to write and practice a short commercial (30-60 seconds in length) that told people the most important elements of their proposed projects. Commercials were presented to the entire group and critiqued by group members. Stake Holder’s Analysis: In order to allow participants to tangibly see what organizations/people have the most influence on their projects, participants were introduced to and asked to complete Stake Holder Analysis of an organization represented in their group. Big circles were drawn around organizations with the most influence. Smaller circles were drawn around those with less influence. Overlapping circles were drawn for organizations, people, or businesses that work together. Smaller circles inside bigger circles were drawn for people or organizations that were a part of other groups. Practice Project Proposal: Using information gathered from previous activities such as the project commercial and stake holder’s analysis, participants were lead through the creation of their own practice project proposal. The practice proposal included an executive summary, goals, objectives, and outcomes, as well as evaluation plan sections.

General Comments on the Module 

A review of the Community Development Cycle learned in the first module (Arts in Transformation) helped the participants understand the program/project cycle. Participants in general were able to identify the differences between a program and a project at the end of the lesson, apparent through the examples given stemming from their own organization.

At all of the sites (Gonaïves, Port-au-Prince, Jacmel) the lesson describing an organization’s mission, vision, goals, objectives, and activities took some additional time (than originally scheduled). When asked about their own organization’s mission, participants seldom could provide a clear answer. Several discussions resulted to help distinguish the program development elements. The exercise in which groups had to draw a visual representation of mission, vision, goals, objectives, and activities was challenging; however feedback from peers and the trainers to group members seemed to really help in clarifying the distinctions between these elements.

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A visual presentation of Lesson 2 in Jacmel.

Following a discussion on outcomes, participants had the opportunity to complete the project planning chart. Due to the size of the group and limited time, it was difficult for the trainer to determine whether or not all participants were able to grasp the different concepts presented in the lesson. For future trainings, perhaps the group can be broken up into 6 sub-groups (with about 5 participants) with facilitators/trainers could answer questions and review the participants’ work.

The “write a short commercial about your project” exercise was a lengthy one, but a helpful one to assist participants in learning how to present their projects in a precise and concise manner. Only a few participants took the challenge of presenting an “elevator speech” to a potential investor, the remaining participants created commercials to recruit volunteers. .

The Stakeholder’s Analysis was a new term for the vast majority of participants in all the sites, though a few participants mentioned that they conduct this type of analysis in their respective organizations; yet use other Stakeholders techniques. The trainers analysis, creating their own Gonaïves. stakeholders analysis proved helpful for the participants. The challenge for the participants was to create an analysis based on their regional group, versus their individual organization. Most participants resolved this by creating a name for their regional groups and listing the organizations they are affiliated or wish to be affiliated with. As stated by several of the participants, the visual exercise helped them see the potential collaborations and networks that exist in their own communities.

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

Monitoring and evaluation tools were of great interest to all participants. Several participants stated that they recognized some of the evaluation tools listed in the lessons (the most commonly mentioned were: surveying, interviewing, and field reports).



The Project Plan and Budgeting sections seemed to raise the most questions at all sites. The following are a list of the most prevalent questions that surfaced: o o o o o o o o

What do funders require in a grant application? How much should I allocate for unforeseen expenses in my budget? What happens if I fail to meet the goals I submitted to a funder? How many goals or objectives should be listed in a grant request? Is there a limit? How can our organization create a profit with the art made by the participants? What happens if I need to change my budget after I submitted a grant application? Is it best for our organization to partner with other organizations before submitting a grant? Should I have a complete project plan before approaching a potential collaborator or funder?

Although all questions were addressed, participants did express concern that they did not have enough time to adequately complete their project plans and basis budgets. Participants also desired more time for individual feedback, which the trainers did their best to accommodate, but could not reach all participants due to the large class size. Participants at all sites expressed that they would continue to work on their projects after the training.

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Findings from Activities Gonaïves Ranking of the most important stakeholders:          

UNICEF Relief International Buildabridge Red Cross The Committee of the Protection of Children PARAN OCB BPM IOM Community Leaders

Main barriers mentioned by participants when working with these stakeholders:    

Financial limitations Access to material resources Individual projects versus collaborative projects Accessing organization leaders

Tools for monitoring most used by participants in their projects: 

Surveying

Interviewing

Focus groups

Field reports

Remarkable ideas shared about sustainability of their projects: 

Collaborations

Teaching

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Stakeholders Analysis, Gonaïves.


Sample of Project Ideas: 

Selling art and accessories from recycled trash

Creating an art center for music/visual arts

Creating a safe space (field) for children’s sports;

Selling children’s paintings to tourists.

Port-au-Prince Ranking of the most important stakeholders:  UNICEF  BPM  World Vision  IBERS  Buildabridge  PARAN  Red Cross (Dominican)  OPSED  OIM  Feed the Children  Main barriers mentioned by participants when working with these stakeholders:  

Financial limitations Access to material resources

Tools for monitoring most used by participants in their projects: 

Surveying

Interviewing

Field reports

Remarkable ideas shared about sustainability of their projects: 

Creating a network from the collaborations formed in the training

Teaching staff members at respective organizations.

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Sample of Project Ideas: 

Water well project for children

Violence prevention project

Safe space for children with disabilities

Home for girls to teach them life skills and art

Sports project for youth.

Stakeholders Analysis, Port-au-Prince.

Jacmel Ranking of the most important stakeholders (incomplete - cancellation of class due to Hurricane Sandy) :  

UNICEF Buildabridge

Main barriers mentioned by participants when working with these stakeholders:    

Financial limitations Access to material resources Access to decision makers Limited networking opportunities

Tools for monitoring most used by participants in their projects: 

Surveying

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Interviewing

Field reports

Remarkable ideas shared about sustainability of their projects: 

Teaching staff/colleagues, along with youth leaders who participate in programs.

Sample of Project Ideas: 

Portable water project

Teaching children basics of trade

Greeting card project

Creating art out of natural resources (i.e. coconut shells);

Culinary arts

Library project

Papier maché project in correlation to Jacmel tourism.

Vision Exercise, Port-au-Prince.

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Summary of Module 3 The participants at all sites expressed great interest in this particular module. Along with expressing a great appreciation for all modules, a large majority of participants stated that this particular module was of great value. All participants requested that this particular module take more time- either to focus on particular sections of the module or have longer sessions to go through the module more slowly.

Recommendations from Trainers More training is needed and greatly desired by participants on the following:     

describing an organization’s mission, vision, goals, objectives, and activities project chart creating a program plan finalizing a budget completing a grant application or RFP

Participants also expressed a need for individual feedback and consultations, along with additional resources (i.e. books or web references to seek grants). 

In future trainings, a focus on creating an “elevator speech” to a potential funder may be more useful for the participants.

Though the trainers were able to provide additional examples of evaluation tools, case studies with evaluation examples could be helpful for the participants as they move forward in their projects.

Several participants, particularly in Jacmel, also expressed a desire for Buildabridge to conduct an analysis of their community arts project when they learned about the evaluation methodology that uses outside evaluators (Expert Judgement). This is strongly recommended.

The participants also expressed interest in learning more about the other evaluation tools (ranking, focus groups, self-drawings) and requested more concrete examples.

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Training Evaluations Pre/Post Test Evaluation Pretests and posttests were administered to participants for each module of BuildaBridge’s Community Arts for Children training series. The tests each included 8 “closed “and self-rating questions according to module. The same test was administered before each module to assess preliminary knowledge of the topic and after each module to determine comprehension of content presented. After conducting assessments in all sites, the trainers determined that the written evaluations may have not been the ideal tools to measure knowledge gained. This is due to several factors, including the structure of the instruments, and some cultural elements that needed additional consideration. The length of the pre- and posttest instruments appeared to have been too long and detailed, which may have affected the participants ability to adequately respond to each question. In addition, the written format caused several participants some anxiety as a number of them expressed concerns about completing the tests and the effect their “score” would have on earning their certificate, despite several explanations on the part of the trainers of the purpose of these tools. Furthermore, the wording of some questions was not clear to participants at times. The combination of the above made it challenging to obtain an accurate assessment of details of the new knowledge acquired by the participants. However, as detailed below, some pre/posttest data were useful in assessing some key points of knowledge gained by a majority of the participants. In addition, oral and written evaluations conducted in class supported this data.

Module 1  When asked to describe characteristics of community art projects, 91% of respondents were able to accurately identify them after the training.  Whereas 49% of the participants could not identify development based on community assets prior to the training, 95% were able to identify their community assets after the training.  In addition to listing barriers to community changes, 92% of participants were better able to describe strategies to overcome these barriers after the training, as compared to 43% at the beginning of the training.

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Module 2  In posttest assessments and oral evaluations, 90% the participants were able to identify and describe Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence theory, whereas only 10% could do so prior to the training (as discovered through pre-testing).  Through self-rating, the 83% of participants expressed that they had higher abilities to lead rituals in child-friendly spaces; use the arts to teach non-art subjects; and lead a metaphor activity at the end of training. Module 3  Through classroom assessments and post-test evaluations, 82% of participants could more clearly articulate the differences between a mission statement, a vision statement, objectives, goals, and activities within a project plan.  Over 90% of participants successfully completed a Stakeholders analysis and expressed understanding of the goal of such an exercise.  Regarding their ability to develop a project plan, 86% of participants self-rated themselves on the higher end of the scale (1 to 5, with 5 being the highest) after completing this module. Conclusion: Due to the factors listed earlier, the pretests and posttests instruments provided, despite some limitations, data that proved that participants gained a significant amount of knowledge through the series of trainings. Written and oral evaluations from the participants also support the above statement. For future trainings, evaluation tools will be adjusted to be more concise and more interactive; in an oral format rather than written.

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Training Outcomes The table below represents the proposed outcomes of the “Community Arts for Children” Series Training and the actual outcomes. Outcome Actual Outcome and Indicators 1. 100% of the 100% of trainees completed a mock community assessment as indicated by participation in: trainees will have completed a mock  Community Asset Mapping community  Turning community problems into asset activities assessment  Community Problem and Solution Tree creation  Creating Maps of Safe and Unsafe places for children  Creating drawings of their communities as they were and as they could be 2. 100% of the 100% of trainees were able to demonstrate 1 Arts project for their targeted trainees will be able community as indicated by: to demonstrate 1 arts Visual Arts: project for their  The creation of maps depicting safe and unsafe places for children targeted  The creation of images of their world as it is and their world as it could be community  The creation of visual community asset maps  The creation of “Problem and Solution” trees  Participation in the “Crumpled Paper Exercise” Storytelling:  Story of Haiti activity. “This is the story of Haiti and the Haitian children….” Drama  The creation of an holistic child development sculpture  The reenactment of the digestive system with sound, words, and movement. Music  Learning and participation in the “Obwisana” song.  The creation of an opening class song 3. 100% of the 100% of the trainees were able to define trauma and demonstrate 1 trainees will be able technique on working/speaking with a traumatized child as indicated by: to define trauma and  Participation in and learning the components of a Child-Safe, Creative demonstrate 1 Space technique on  Participation in and the creation of “Child-Safe Activity Rituals” working/speaking  Learning and participating in “Speaking a blessing (affirmation)” of a child with a traumatized through spoken word and meaningful touch child  Participation in and learning how to build resilience in children through Artmaking.  Participation in and learning how to the Art-making process can be a metaphor to describe life (children can use metaphors to express difficult feelings).  Learning how the Arts are a means of non-verbal communication.

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4. 100% of the 90%* of the trainees wrote a basic fundraising and development plan for their program as indicated by: trainees will have written a basic  The completion of a practice program proposal fundraising and  The completion of a basic project budgeting chart. development plan for  The completion of a practice letter of inquiry for funds. their program  The completion of a practice sustainability plan. *Participants in Jacmel were unable to complete some of the above mentioned assignments due to disruptions by Hurricane Sandy. Also, some participants expressed a need for more time to complete their practice proposals. 5. 90% will show 90% showed increased knowledge in vocabulary related to arts-based increased knowledge intervention as indicated by: in vocabulary related  The use of words/phrases such as “foster/building resilience”, “ritual”, to arts-based “creative safe places” during class discussion and post interview intervention questions 85% showed increased knowledge in planning skills and budgeting as 6. 80% will show increased knowledge indicated by: in planning skills and  The successful completion of a basic project budgeting chart budgeting.  The successful completion of a practice program proposal  The successful completion of a practice sustainability plan.

All of these outcomes were measured through a pre assessment and post-test, post training interviews and focus groups.

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Participant Evaluation of Training/Trainer Reports Gonaives Thirty-one out of 32 participants completed the final evaluation for the Community Arts for Children training. The following details some of their thoughts and comments: The overall quality of the training was rated “Excellent” by 20 participants; “Very Good” by 9 participants; and “Good” by one participant (who only participated in Module 3). The most valuable parts of the formation for participants were: o The presentation of the trainers (2) o The activities of the participants on paper (3) o The activities/games (5) o The methods/games used by the presenters to give their lessons (4) o Respect o The discussions o Every part was important (8) o The project plan/program development (11) o Group work/Importance of collaboration (2) o The importance of the arts in the community (2) o The confidence established between the trainers and participants o All modules were connected and had their importance o The mutual respect was really established o The good manner we were trained o The modules were full of good documents o How we should deal with children and recognize their talent o Explanation of the word “Atizay” (4) o Safe spaces (2) Participants stated they would change the following:  Provide additional materials- notepads, pens, folder (6)  Nothing (12)  More practice with art education methodology  The occasional relaxation times for the participants  Certain points could be written more clearly for the benefit of the participants (2)  The number of participants- I would have liked more participants to have benefitted from this training  Additional modules and trainers  Didn’t want it to end; interesting things can’t last forever  On the ground training in the community

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Regarding the length of the training, 21 of the participants answered that the length was appropriate. The remaining participants left the space blank (the question was not clearly written and will be corrected for the next group). One participant answered both yes and no with the following explanation: “the length was appropriate for the trainers because they may be tired; not for me because I would like to receive additional training”. Additional Comments:  “We must pray at the beginning of each session. As previously stated, the distribution of additional materials. Nothing more to say. Congratulations!!!” –Emmanuel Estimable 

“Give us additional trainings” – Roberto Toussaint

“Anyhow, I have no reproaches regarding the training, because it was fantastic. I love you.”

“The length (of the training) led to too much concentration. We hope you take more time for relaxation to avoid feeling overwhelmed” – Enock Francius

“The trainers should learn some of the language of the participants” – Karenne Cadet

“What I would advise Buildabridge is to expand this training in the 10 departments so that many more can appreciate the arts in the country”Junior Marcelin Marceillant

“All I have to say is that it was extraordinary and that I was very pleased. Keep it up!” – Liliane Marceillant

The length of the training was appropriate “because it was really necessary for this training” – Henri Claude Vincent

“The trainers should improve in Creole. That way even if they can’t speak it, they will be better able to catch the nuances when the participants speak. (Also) for more impact, the trainings must be multiplied across the territory” – Farah Lamercie Augustin

“It is really extraordinary because the trainers teach us with a lot of excellence. The concepts presented will serve us in life since there are many good lessons” – Shellaidine Jean-Baptiste

“The training was good because the trainers use their full capacity to facilitate our learning; the reason why the training had such a positive impact. I hope you stay strong and courageous” – Justin Bureau

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“The four of you; you are wonderful, impressive, excellent. I love you. Keep it up. Bye!” – Leona Faustin

“Simply, we want a program after the trainings; just for the application of the lessons we studied” – Junior Michel

“I would like for the trainers that you continue to improve in your capacity. May God bless you. I have no reproach on the training; only, thank you.” – Mimose Marceillant

“Up to now, there is no reproach and the formation has had a lot of impact”

“It went well, but if there was the possibility for it to last longer…” – Patrick Pierre

“All the techniques used are good for the application of the course. You are very rich in teaching methodology. That’s why I checked “excellent”” – Jusme Jusmond

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Port-au-Prince Twenty-seven out of 33 participants completed the final evaluation for the Community Arts for Children training. Two students could not complete the entire training due to medical and personal reasons. The following details some of their thoughts and comments: The overall quality of the training was rated “Excellent” by 20 participants; “Very Good” by 6 participants; and “Good” by one participant. The most valuable parts of the formation for participants were: o The Arts (2) o Program Development (6) o All was important, but the 3rd module was most valuable (5) o Community Development (2) o Art for learning o Creative Spaces o All modules were valuable (9) o Evaluations o Teaching methodology through creative experience; opening and closing ritual; the way to separate and regroup the group. o Changing of way of thinking Participants stated they would change the following:  Longer with other assets  Detailed development of a project  No comment/Nothing (8)  That the trainers learn Creole so the information can be communicated more clearly.  The Arts  More time for the last module  More time to correct homework  To put together a project from its conception to completion would have been an extraordinary experience.  More materials to practice.  A better grasp of project management  More time in order to do and practice more  Practice and experience  More fun activities for the last module  To tell us what’s good/not good; help us correct our homework  I would add a more practical section on the use of the arts; such as teaching the participants some techniques in drawing or painting Regarding the length of the training, the following comments were made:  It was very good  I have nothing additional to say  It’s fine

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    

The space was well-chosen. The training and books were made in our native language. Acceptable. Or else a closed training (on-site) would have been the best. Sufficient for each module The training should have lasted 3 weeks I believe that the training is very intense and would be more appropriate as a retreat or in the community itself to stimulate thought and produce better results.

Additional Comments:  “It was excellent. My comments are congratulations to the Buildabridge staff. Congratulations to all of you!!! Thank you so much. We’re going to miss you so much.”- Lesly Delira 

“For me, I think that everything is clear.”- Adler Toussaint

“We are all satisfied of this training because it helped reinforce our capacity (abilities).” – Georgia Georges

“I am really satisfied.”- Jean Mislène

“We are all satisfied regarding this training because it reinforced my abilities to prepare and write a project.” – Marie Neptune Mérisier

“I found that everything went well from the methods used or the behavior of trainers and the participants. However the behavior of UNICEF did not go well in my opinion.” – Unknown

“This training must last 3 weeks.” - Joseph Mercilus

“Make sure that the translations are correct. Reduce the presentations and exercises (more concise for the professionals, more practice for the animators). Ensure that the participants retain the essential points; correct as needed the presentations in order to better orient the participants. Sometimes they did not grasp the essentials.” – Ginou Pierre Taverne

“I don’t have any.” – Evelyne Denney

“I have nothing to say because the training went very well.” – Mirlande Valère

Additional comments collected during training (when participants shared their experiences at the end of training):  “The training was a good opportunity. On behalf of all Haitians we say thank you for giving us this opportunity.” – Ronald (works in Waf Jeremie –Cité Soleil- with over 200 children across 20 schools with a focus on violence prevention)

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“They always say that children are delinquent. We work with children. I’m very happy and satisfied. Thank you.” – Evelyne

“Thank you very much for the training and for taking risks.” – Lesly Delira (participant who hopes to implement a water well project for children)

“Congratulations on your work. I learned how to keep my children’s space safe.” – Paul (working on expanding space for children with disabilities)

“I’m glad about the project development. Thank you for sharing.” – Lynda (works with girls and hopes to teach them practical skills so they can eventually sell their own work)

“The training was very intense. With your techniques we were able to learn in 2-3 days how we can do our own project plan. We don’t have to pay someone to do it.” – Fagnole

“We learned a lot how to treat children. We got more than expected. We are satisfied about all the days. You are kind.” – Mirlande (Nurse who works with children in child protective spaces)

“We want all kids to be integrated in the country. I learned a lot about Program Development. Thanks to all the trainers.” – Ernst

“We learned so we can do what we can in our communities.” – Junior

“I think many challenges can be overcome in this country. Thank you Buildabridge for sending these trainers. And it was in Creole. You have to understand the importance of having this in our language.” –Paul

“I can do a project now. I’ll teach my kids.”- Ketsia (hopes to acquire a larger physical space to continue training kids in the arts) “Thank you with all my heart. I wasn’t expecting all of this from the training. There is always a problem once you have financing to maintain (a project).” – Lude (want to help kids develop intellectual capacity through sports)

“My vision is to pass this on to other organizations. Thanks to the training we will know how to write a project. In the training we formed a family.” – Mercilus (has project to help pregnant girls (1415) who are in this situation due to the financial challenges of parents)

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“Parents have challenges for housing and food. Children need more support. The local community is key to this. I loved the art units a lot. I want a safe place for them” – Carline

“Thank you to Gaelle. She gave everything within her to make this happen.” – Neptune

“I’m glad I had this training. I can’t take all of this and put it in a drawer. I want to say thanks, but I think it is too small. This is more than ‘thank you’. Knowledge is priceless. I appreciate you all. Gaelle was our bridge to where I needed to go, because I don’t have wings. I couldn’t go on my own.” – Mislène

“I hope this is not the last time. I like the methodology.” – Gregory

“I will go back to continue my project to increase the capacity of the children. I know how to write a project, but I would pay people to help me implement it. Now that I know how to monitor and evaluate, our reports will be productive. We got in the children’s shoes. We formed another family.”- Yavelina

“I will use arts for community development and transformation. I will translate this and do trainings” – Ginou (wants to initiate the biggest youth movement in Haiti)

“I didn’t have the ability to use all the resources around me. I will look at everything around me and make a park.” – Darli

“It was the first time I learned about physical and relational resources. I will share everything- based on this, we need to plan how to integrate what we’ve learned into the child protection projects we have now.” – Yves André

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Jacmel Eighteen out of 34 participants completed the final evaluation for the Community Arts for Children training. Due to Hurricane Sandy, 11 hours of the training were not completed because of the cancellation of classes on October 24 (half day) and October 25, respectively. The following report details some of their thoughts and comments: The overall quality of the training was rated “Excellent” by 11 participants; “Very Good” by 6 participants; and “Good” by one participant.z The most valuable parts of the formation for participants were: o All modules were valuable (2) o Program Development (11 o All 3 modules, but Module 3 was most valuable (1) o Module 2 (2) o Resource Development (1) o Exploring assets (2) o The Listening Project (2) o Problem Tree (1) o Community Arts (1) o Group work (1) o “Mingle, mingle” with Amy (1) o Creative Spaces for children (1) o Planning Chart (1) o Partner Analysis (1) o The way to use trash to create art (1) o The way to use drawings to express worries and joys (1) Participants stated they would change the following:  A training about the training  More time for training  A follow-up to this training  Make the modules more explicit by adding much more details  Everything went well/there’s nothing to change (3)  No comment (3)  To see a Buildabridge office in Jacmel  Program Planning  To better translate the training documents  More time on the third module  More details on program development (3)  To stretch out the time for the length of a year Regarding the length of the training (“Was it appropriate?”), the following comments were made:  Yes (2)  Ok  It was good  It was appropriate; this training increases our knowledge

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         

Yes, however it is always preferable during vacation time (July or December) Appropriate, but too many days (two weeks) No comments (3) Yes, because we were able to review 3 modules Yes; unfortunately, we lost a day The programming was good, but the number of days to process is too short. There would need to be more days for such a training Yes, but for me, it was quite short, because it was wonderful. Yes (but if it wasn’t for the cyclone, we would have had the chance to see everything; however, it was good) The length of the training was really appropriate because we learned a lot during that time No, because Hurricane Sandy took from our planned time.

Additional Comments:  “No comments. Thank you.” 

“I have no comments to make because everything was wonderful for me.”Jean-Philippe

“To create a schedule and programming which would as much facilitate as possible ‘more interaction’.”- Joseph

“I don’t have any comments because everything was wonderful.”

“I congratulate you for all. You were very patient, understanding towards us. You are excellent, jovial. From the bottom of my heart, I love you.” – Esther

“I congratulate the UNICEF and Buildabridge teams for the way they proceeded to organize this beautiful and important training session. I would like to take more time to study the Program Development module. And as one responsible for a network of 15 Committees of Protection of Children in the Southeast, I would like to have a large seminar for the members of my network entitled: ‘The Network of the Committee of the Protection of Children in the Southeast (RKPTS)’”- Adonis Daniel

“Use a true translation of Creole for the documents in creole and ask people in management positions to take this training.” – Germain Peterson

“The modules were really interesting. The trainers and the interpreters were of high quality.”- Rémus

“Almost no additional comments, but the participants thought there was a per diem for transportation. They relaxed about it (unclear)” –Michelet

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Additional Feedback 

Based on verbal and written feedback, the majority of participants felt encouraged and empowered to use tools and information gained from trainings in their communities right away.

The training provided participants with theory and language needed to further reinforce their current work with children.

Participants appreciated the interactive, arts-based BuildaBridge teaching methodology.

Participants greatly benefited from the “Problems into Assets” instruction and activities. Many experienced significant positive shifts in their view of their communities and their individual and collective power. Through work with BuildaBridge's transformational model, asset mapping, and problem tree exercises, 100% of participants were able to identify small steps they can make towards viable actions that are part of the solution.

Participants enjoyed the progression of the training. They experienced great excitement as the training cumulated with Module 3 as they were able to integrate information learned from Module 1 and 2 in the planning of their own projects.

Participants stressed the importance of and a strong desire for continued support, additional materials, trainings, and resources from BuildaBridge.

Translation by Ms. F. Gaelle Prophete was excellent in quality. Her understanding of the Creole language and Haitian culture aided in the proper translation of new terms and words such as “Atizay” (Art-making). Her skill was highly praised by participants in all three training locations.

Participants were not only developed professionally, but personally as many discovered creative talents they were unaware they possessed and their own levels of resiliency. Participants also learned which of Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences they possessed.

Using the Arts to describe tough experiences and situations within their communities (such as the characteristics of un-safe places and “restivik”), proved effective among participants. In identifying such characteristics, participants appreciated the ability to then artistically create “what their world/community could be” (positive change-safe places, no “restivik”). The inclusive of such creative approaches was essential to the success of training.

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A few participants stressed sincere gratitude for written training materials printed in Creole. In addition, a small number of participants preferred the trainers speak Creole themselves without the use of a translator.

UNICEF’s ability to assemble so many engaged and passionate community leaders is highly commendable.

The planning of local sites and locations for training were conducive to training.

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Appendices I.

Participant Group Photos

II.

Video Report from Trainers http://youtu.be/Ecsv5OmXcdY

III.

Media Links to Student Workbooks  Module 1: Foundations for Arts in Transformation https://sites.google.com/a/buildabridge.org/atizay-pouchanjman/home 

Module 2: Creating Safe Places for Children https://sites.google.com/a/buildabridge.org/espas-kreyatif-sandanje/?pli=1

Module 3: Program Development https://sites.google.com/a/buildabridge.org/devlopman-pwogram/

Training Video Playlist http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ecsv5OmXcdY&feature=share&list=P LwtI-J-115ZfrcvJjZh52AhKacsQ2LjXj

IV.

Pre/Post Test

V.

List of Participants

VI.

Trainer Biographies

VII.

BuildaBridge Information

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I.

Participant Group Photos

Gonaives

Port-au-Prince

62


Jacmel

63


IV. Pre/Post Test Examples (in Creole with English translation after)

64


65


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Module Evaluation (Pre/Post Test) Questions-English Translation M1 1. Describe some of the characteristics of a community arts project. 2. List three different ways that community arts projects can transform communities. 3. Identify some of the roles that creative people play in community transformation. 4. Rate your ability to envision a project for community transformation (1=little ability, 5=high ability). 5. Rate your ability to identify and map community assets (1=little ability, 5=high ability). 6. Describe asset-based development. 7. Identify at least three methods to learn about community needs. 8. Identify at least two barriers to community change and strategies to overcome these barriers. M2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Identify the characteristics of a safe space Rate your ability to lead an arts experience that promotes holistic child development. (1=little ability, 5=high ability). Rate your ability to lead a child-safe ritual (1=little ability, 5=high ability) Describe the 7 multiple intelligences proposed by Howard Gardner Rate your ability to use art to teach non-art subjects (1=little ability, 5=high ability). Rate your ability to lead an art-as-metaphor experience. (1=little ability, 5=high ability). Identify at least four ways that arts-based interventions foster resilience. Identify 5 elements to be considered when writing a creative child protection program.

M3 1. Explain the difference between a project and a program. 2. Describe the following terms in your own words: b) Activities c) Objectives d) Goals e) Mission f) Vision g) Outcomes h) Indicators 3. Describe the purpose of a stakeholder analysis. 4. State one way that you could monitor your project.

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5. State one way that you could evaluate your project. 6. Identify at least 5 components of a project plan. 7. Identify 3 different types of funding resources. 8. List several types of information that you should you document for budget monitoring. 9. Rate your ability to develop a child protection project plan. (1=little ability, 5=high ability). Rate your ability to respond to an actual Request For Proposals (1=little ability, 5=high ability).

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V. List of Participants BuildaBridge-UNICEF-Haiti Community Arts for Children Series Training Master Participant List Location: Gonaives Participant Name Marc, Marlantha Farah Lamercie Augustin Jean Baptiste, Shellaidine

Address

Training Dates: September 17-27, 2012

Gattreau 9 #5

Telephone Number 509-4621-4822

Email Address

Organizatio n Croix Rouge Haitenne Relief International

MarlanthaMarc@yahoo.fr

3E Rlle Roger #10

509-3746-8656/ 4799-8663

Foucy29@yahoo.fr Farah.Augustin@yahoo.fr

Biennoc 6 #1

509-3679-1478/ 3353-2212

lobelleshellaidine@yahoo.fr

Joanēs, Seide Hilaire, Paul Frito

64, Rlle Nazareth Ranquitte

509-3628-1463/ 4398-1857 509-3694-7796

Joanes.Seide@yahoo.fr

Toussaint, Roberto

Pilate

509-3784-1316

Michel, Junior Vincent Henri Blau De Alexis Dieudelyn Desrameaux , Jodelin Marceillant, Liliane Charles, Chantale

Bienac 1B #5, Gonaives Ranquitte

509-3711-2961/ 3369-2333 509-3725-8385

Port Margot #5 Port Margot

509-4684-8726

AlexisDieudelyn@yahoo.fr

MODEP

509-3102-5512

DJodelin@yahoo.fr

MODEP

Port-auPrince Cap-Haitien

509-4777-2858/ 3424-1981 509-3784-3006/ 3394-6408

MarceillantLiliane@yahoo.com

Nap Vanse

Charly509@yahoo.fr

IHP

AJDG (Association des Jeunes Devoues aux Gonaives) Croix Rouge Haitenne ARA (Association des Agriculteurs de Ranquitte) UJDEP (Unions des Jeunes pour le develop Pilate) AJDG MPR

69


Bureau, Justin Cadet, Karenne

Mulatre, Elie

Pierre, Patrick Milien Junior Marceillant

Marceillant, Mimose

e Esther J. Gay

Exilus, Jocelyne

Pierre, Rigaud Faustin, LĂŠona Bedouet, Charles Carmelo JusmĂŠ Jusmond Francius, Enock Jean Lous, Merline

Lapictoire

509-4789-8900

CFM

Rlle JoJo #13, Ave des Dattes, Gonaives Bahon

509-4629-2851

Cardy225@yahoo.fr

EIIES

509-3732-9052

Organedespaysans@yahoo.fr

Gonaives Gatreau #133 97 bis, Arcachon 32, Carrefour, Port-auPrince, Haiti 15 Cote 28, Carrefour, Port-auPrince, Haiti 49 Rlle Sapotille Carrefour, Porta-auPrince 20, Rll Andre Cator, Carrefour, Port-auPrince, Haiti 70, Rue Lozamar 3 Ruelle Bigot, Gonaives Bretagne 11 zon dimase

509-3621-2244/ 3392-7460 509-4837MMJunior509@gmail.com 4050/3463-4439 MJunior509@yahoo.fr

Organisation Fidelite des Paysans de Bahon (OFPB) (MA) Maison de Artistes Nap Vanse

509-3876-3366/ 4876-7801

MFVG

Ravine Trompette, Pilate 16 Ruelle LaZore Trousable Cap-Haitien, Ruelle Bilano

509-3683-6391

COTAPOP

509-3491-3577/ 3687-2077

MarceillantMimose78@gmail.com

Nap Vanse

509-3628-8750/ 3770-4326

EstherGay78@yahoo.fr

Relief International

509-3442-7444/ 4735-0594

Wilslyne84@yahoo.fr

Relief International

509-3673-5047/ 3200-3245 509-3176-8799/ 4379-9023

PierreRigaud91@yahoo.fr

OFADHA

LeonaFaustin89@yahoo.fr

ACOSADE

509-3656-0873/ 3391-4752

EnockFrancius82@yahoo.fr

OAGEAA

509-3878-1105

MerlineJeanLouis@gmail.com

Relief International

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Estimable, Emmanuel Charléus, Ruth Sandy L. Fils-Aimé, Steevey Laurena, RoseMerline Desulme Gardy gaslaire

#5 Port-Margo (Nord) IMP. Meeklemboin g #2, Gonaives Rlle Necker #16Descahos Pont-Gaudin Deriso Bretail 7 Rout Basin

509-4622-7939 509-3811-0336

SandyCharleus@yahoo.fr

OFDA

509-4260-6642

SteeveFilsaime250@yahoo.fr

GFAG

509-3293-6672

Rose_MerlineLaurena@yahoo.fr

AFDZ1

509-3788-5061

Gardy_Gaslaire@yahoo.fr

OFVRBB

Location: Port-au-Prince, Haiti Participant Name Pierre Yves Andre Eliscar F. Marilyn Christine Pierre Darline Jean Marie Yavelina Jean Mislene Merisier Marie Neptune Georges Georgia Laurent Carline Antoine, Emeline Joseph Mercilus Decembre LudePeterson Michel,

Telephone Number (+509) 3871 9922/3751 8477 37930288/37525413 3758-5912

MODEP

Training Dates: October 1-12 , 2012 Email Address

Organization

YvesAndrePierre@gmail.com/ Miripsud@yahoo.fr

MIRIPSUD

inisyativLanmlakay@yahoo.fr

INIFAL

RecreationHaiti@gmail.com

Recreation Haiti

pofad@live.fr/yavjeanmarie@yaho o.fr mismissou@yahoo.fr

POFAD

38009836/38974918 37332304/47729890 3627-3249

MarieNeptuneMerisier@yahoo.fr

Relief International (APPCS)

anarhculture@yahoo.fr

ANARH

CarlineLaurent741@hotmail.com

OPSED

4616-0404

Visionen

FEVE

3707-0427

UJDHRD@yahoo.com

UJDHRD

37370499/33592669 3196-5712

dLudepeterson@yahoo.fr

CENEA

edensmichel@yahoo.fr/

GRUEEDH

3765-2252 3828-1770

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Relief International


Edens Guilloun, Ketia Evens, Paul

Lapointe, A. Junior Auguste, Ernst Valerie Mirlande Milord, Fanold Mouscardy Volmar Lynda Delira, Lesly

Dennery, Eveline Jean Mary Ronald Clervil Dahomie Ermistil Paul Merjuste Gregory Seterin Emile Toussaint, Adler

grueedhhaiti@yahoo.fr Ketou_Cr@yahoo.com

VJA

37200275/36612814 3889-0965

EvensPaul1@yahoo.fr

Scouts of Haiti

mmocah@yahoo.fr

OCCAARH

3794-5068

Jeunesseideole@yahoo.fr

FI

36452373/37477976 4649-6301

ValerieMirlande@yahoo.fr

CRH

MilordFanold@yahoo.fr

AVSI

38484211/44332023 31020568/36108593 4842-9978

afeldhafeminin@yahoo.fr/ lvmouscardy@yahoo.fr

AFELDHA

DeliraLesly@yahoo.fr

AJART

Edennery12@yahoo.fr

TFSF

38342517/37597756 3781-5802

ucddj@yahoo.fr

UCDDJ

ClervilDaHomie@yahoo.fr

CASCU

3820-3904

Haolostill@yahoo.fr/paole_still@ya hoo.fr ODACHOrganisation@yahoo.fr

OSAEH/MOSAJ

3168-6113

37311853/38548474 3108-8939 38801051/37488481

CNiTE

Location: Jacmel, Haiti Last Name Jean-Gilles ALMAZOR ANTOINE CHARLES INOCENT SERMOT JEAN-BAPTISTE MATHIEU

ODACH

Training Dates: October 15-26, 2012 First Name Michelet Ange-Gabrielle Frantzo Edzer Jean-Felix Jinette Malita ChĂŠna

Organisation FOCUJE FOCUJE OFEDEPE ASEDSE MJDL GRAJ ADET ADET

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COLIN VITAL MENTOR GARRAUD ADELSON MARDY JEAN-PIERRE FORTUNAT JEUDY JEAN-PHILIPPE ANCION LAUTURE THELISNOR-JOSEPH STANLY PIERRE-LOUIS JEAN DESOUVRE PANTALEON MONDESIR BOSSE FRANCOIS MAITRE ADONIS BADIO BENOIT JEAN-GILLES AGENA INNOCENT

Josué Claudy Rose-Marie ketcheny Jonel Medese Gaёlle EDERT Myriam Ghernie Marie Rose Mika Remus WENDY Nicolas Jean Wilson Joseph Jameson Emilie Marie-Nicole Mildrede Esther Daniel Cassagnol Marie-Férol Michelet Wilky Jean-Felix

73

ASPDSH ASPDSH AJDP OSESD OPDEL ADDEB OSESD CEJM MIEL CASED CASED FEDEZ 2 FEDEZ 2 CLAJA CRICH OPED CLEE CLEE FSJ IBESR AMODR Croix-Rouge Croix-Rouge MJDL


VI. Training Team Bios Jamaine Smith was born and raised in Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York, and is a graduate of Eastern University's (Pennsylvania) Master of Arts in Urban Studies, (Arts in Transformation concentration). Jamaine obtained a Bachelor of Science in Social Work from Nyack College (New York). It was during his time at Eastern University where Mr. Smith learned to how to effectively merge his passion for the Arts with social justice, education and human development. Mr. Smith has been a trained BuildaBridge Artist on Call for the past two years, is a registered BuildaBridge Trainer and was the Artology summer program Education Director for the summer of 2012. He will direct the Philadelphia Community Programs of BuildaBridge upon his return from Haiti. He is a firm believer in the transformative power of the Arts and is passionate about educating others on incorporating Arts into education, community work and youth development.

Amy Tuttle is a "placemaking" artist and arts-based community development specialist who resides in Cincinnati, Ohio. She has a Master of Arts degree from Eastern University in Urban Studies: Arts in Transformation. Amy specializes in the field of "arts-based placemaking." Placemaking is a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces. Put simply, it involves looking at, listening to, and asking questions of the people who live, work and play in a particular space, to discover their needs and aspirations and represent them through the arts. Amy has engaged her passion for placemaking in many settings including: Haiti, Philadelphia, India, and Cincinnati. Amy has worked with BuildaBridge for 3 years as a student, Artist on Call, and recently- a Trainer.

Laurie Williams is a visual artist (calligrapher and painter) and vocalist. As an artist and community development specialist, she has had the opportunity to promote the arts through many avenues: as an instructor for various children’s organizations; a facilitator of craft programs for domestic violence victims; and as a research assistant for the Taking It to the Streets: Using the Arts to Transform Your Community project, under the leadership of Drs. J. Nathan Corbitt and Vivian Nix-Early. Laurie earned her undergraduate degree in Community Health Education at the University of Maryland, a graduate degree in Urban Economic Development at Eastern University, a Master’s in Multicultural Education. She truly enjoys her current work as an ESL (English as a Second Language) teacher and a freelance writer.

F. Gaelle Prophete is a translator, business administrator, and consultant. She obtained both her Masters of Science in Higher Education Administration as well as her Bachelor of Business Administration from Florida International University. She is fluent in English, French, and Haitian-Creole. Currently residing in Cap-Haitien, Haiti, she is actively involved in assisting both local and international organizations with program development, translation (written and verbal), evaluation, and grant management. She contains in-depth, accurate insight on Haitian culture and is in constant pursuit of more opportunities to increase her knowledge base on local and international issues.

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VI. BuildaBridge Information

Mission ...engaging the transformative power of the arts to bring hope and healing to children, families, and communities in the tough places of the world. BuildaBridge trains artists and community personnel to effectively serve children and their families in tough places. We envision a world where all children are resilient, experience self窶親fficacy, and have a vision for their future. BuildaBridge dedicates its resources to building the capacity of creative adults and local communities to fulfill this vision. We connect artists to service opportunities through Artists-on-Call and provide direct service to children in transition though arts-integrated programming in Philadelphia and around the world. Our annual Institute has trained over 550 artists in service to their communities since 2002. The BuildaBridge Institute The BuildaBridge Institute is a training and applied research academy designed to prepare artists, youth workers, community and congregational leaders, teachers, social service professionals, and nonprofit organization personnel to integrate the arts effectively in education, social services and community development. All training of BuildaBridge is listed as part of the Institute, including: trainings at the BuildaBridge House, The Annual Institute, International Trainings as part of Diaspora of Hope and Arts Relief and Development, and the Online Institute. Goals BuildaBridge Institute seeks to: 1. Change the basic assumptions of arts in seeking a new paradigm of arts in action and service to others 2. Consciously and systematically discover the impact of arts in the areas of justice, education, community development, healing & reconciliation and identity development 3. Encourage musicians, dancers, visual artists, thespians and other artists to use their gifts and abilities in service to their communities 4. Equip community and congregational leaders, educators and artists with strategies and skills to reach out to people of different cultures using the arts 5. Develop arts based educational curricula and teacher skills for multicultural communities using oral and non-literate approaches

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6. Enliven celebration by creating space for expanded use of the arts in new forms and styles 7. Foster cooperation between civic communities through increased participation in joint programs and performances Partner with colleges and community development organizations to offer arts training for gifted artists/leaders/teachers Outcomes for all Institute programs At the end of an Institute or the graduate and certificate programs, participants should be able to: 1. Articulate a clear philosophical basis for the arts in community service 2. Write an initial strategy and goals for using the arts in community service 3. List critical indicators for a successful community arts program 4. Understand the role the arts play in the spiritual and psychological development of children and youth 5. Understand the impact of the arts on learning and cognition 6. Demonstrate the foundations of one art form 7. Develop networks for support in developing a community arts program 8. Demonstrate the knowledge and ability to apply the BuildaBridge Classroom model Contact Information: BuildaBridge 205 W Tulpehocken Street Philadelphia, PA 19144 Phone: (215) 842-0428 Fax: (215) 842-2025 Info@buildabridge.org http://www.buildabridge.org

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BuildaBridge UNICEF Haiti Project Report 2012  

This is the final report of the project conducted in Haiti with UNICEF.

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