Issuu on Google+

thursday nov. 8, 2012 vol XXIII issue 45 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

northcoastjournal.com

OOL CORPS AIN’T S/R PEEPS/ IO D GROW H ELL OUSE EL ROA ECTRICI DS/ TY TAX TRIN IDAD SAL ES T AX E XTE NSIO N/F ORT UNA SCH OOL S

EMKEN/FEIN STEIN/HUF FMAN/ROB STEIN ERTS/CHES /HOE BRO/LYNCH FLING /ROM NEY/ JOHN SON/ BARR /OBA MA

north coast

EAN

BO

SCH ARC ATA

/B NINO

NS/ ATKI

A/

K EURE

NS

CO ICAL

THREE

LIT

PO NS’

ALTHC

MMUN

FERN

ITY HE

WE

/ DALE

ARE D

ITUS

/T LLER

SOUTH

ERN H

UMBO L

DT CO

DEATH GMO

FOOD

C

ING/

NI

OR ALIF

LABEL

ET/

DG A BU

PENA

AT

C EDU

IS FORTUNA/STREHL/GILLAM-TRENT/BROWN TRICT

LTY/

IO

UN ION/

STRIK ES AUTO INSURANCE/HUMAN TRAFFICKING/REDISTRICTING

NT

IO IR BUT

6 Gotta watch those clowns 8 Marijuana? On Main Street? 12 Planning a cocktail garden 34 Lower your expectations and these movies are fun 35 The once and future column


New students can begin registering on Monday, Nov. 21 for Spring 2013. Invest in yourself and your future. Register as soon as possible for spring semester 2013. Classes begin on January 12. ~

Go to www.redwoods.edu for registration information; look under Hot Topics. Or call to talk to an academic adviser at (707) 476-4150.

• You'll earn an estimated $380,000 more over a 40-year career with a CR Associate of Arts Degree compared to just having a high school diploma. • Fees and tuition at CR cost $1,104/ year; CSUs cost $7,025; UCs cost $13,000. • CR offers many Career Technical Education programs where you can earn a certificate in one or two semesters.

• You can earn your associates degree in two years. • CR offers guaranteed transfers to many 4-year universities, including HSU. • CR offers assistance in obtaining financial aid and fee waivers. • CR has many online classes for the convenience of students. • CR has excellent academic transfer and career technical education faculty.

HUMBOLDT COUNTY IHSS CANDLELIGHT VIGIL

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 5

Mailbox Poem Denial Generation

6

Media Maven Funny Business

8 Blog Jammin’ 12 The Drunken Botanist

26 The Hum Soul Reunion

28 Music & More! 30 Calendar 34 Filmland Weekend of Bummers

35 Field Notes

Herbalicious

14 On The Cover Election 2012

16 Home & Garden Service Directory

23 Art Beat Bucking the System

23 In Review a dvd

24 Arts! Arcata friday, nov. 9, 6-9 p.m.

King Arthur, Part 3: The Creation of Camelot

36 40 40 41 46 47

Workshops Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012

3


Cartoon by joel mielke

EARLY DEADLINES for the NOVEMBER 22, 2012 issue is Thursday, NOVEMBER 15, 4 p.m.

We will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 22nd & Friday, Nov. 23rd and reopen Monday, Nov. 26th.

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


We’re local

Denial Generation

Money spent at a locally-owned business stays in the local economy.

A

RC

A

Maybe it’s good That we still climb, Leaning over cliffs For another look At the abyss We have not Embraced. — Kirk Gothier

Keep dollarsoin my! our local econ

ATA , C

SHIPPING • MAILBOXES • NOTARY

600 F St • Arcata • M–F 8:30–6 • Sat 9–5

825-8295 www.posthastemail.com Authorized ShipCenter

Approved Shipper

Write a letter! Please try to make it no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com ●

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

5


Funny Business

C

lowns are creepy. There is something weird about a grown person who dons a rubber nose, floppy feet and loud clothes. Children don’t know what to think of them. They stare with mouth open and thumb in mouth. Some cry. Clowns terrify my sister. So when I read on Facebook that a police officer arrested Humboldt’s own clown extraordinaire, Shea Freelove, last week, I wasn’t sure what to think. But it was Halloween night. And Freelove was dressed, he later wrote me, as an explorer. Not a clown. Much less frightening. Here’s what happened, according to Freelove. He was on the Plaza, as were many other Halloween revelers, around midnight, when he thought he would saunter up to a police officer and engage in a conversation about the city’s new fire safety rules, which make it difficult for street performers, like Freelove, to use fire gadgets in their acts. The officer pushed

him away, almost knocking him down. Freelove came back later to ask the same question. An officer grabbed him by the throat, pinned his arm behind his back, handcuffed him and booked him into the Humboldt County Jail, under the name Shea Love Freedomhowler. There he sat for four hours, until released. Here is a guy who seems to live for entertaining people for very little money. You can’t live in this area for long without seeing his act. He performs for kids at the Arcata Farmer’s Market for free. But let’s put things into perspective. Last Halloween, the Plaza turned ugly. Apparently things were ugly this Halloween, as well. Police said they arrested some wacko who had an assault rifle around his neck and a magazine for it in his pocket. And in one of the many fights, someone got his ear cut off. Still, with armed crazies and severed ears, why would you bother with a clown like Freelove? I was in the Plaza earlier that day

walking my daughter from store to store so she could collect treats and show off the kangaroo costume I made her. (It is all about the pouch!) It seemed like Hokeytown, U.S.A. Except for the police. There were barricades around the Plaza’s inner circle. Police ringed President McKinley like Secret Service. The city stationed 36 officers and 15 cadets around and throughout the Plaza. We couldn’t walk up Eighth Street to get to our car parked on F Street. We had to walk around the bank because the police had the road closed off for the Critical Incident Response Vehicle, an impressive looking van the size of a small apartment.   When you send out a message to the community to stay away, law-abiding people stay away. That leaves the troublemakers. Police get hyped up by their expectation of trouble. And people who aren’t there to cause trouble find themselves in the midst of it. It is a recipe for trouble. I find it troublesome that in Humboldt County, our governments reach for the pound of police presence as their ounce of prevention, particularly when the trouble is linked to some form of assembly. We have in this country the right to assemble. It is one of the five rights embedded in the First Amendment, along with speech, press, religion and petition. When Occupy Humboldt set up camp in front

Annual

15%-20% off

CASE SALE Open House SATURDAY & SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10-11 NOON - 5PM

4241 Fieldbrook Road Fieldbrook, CA 95519 707-839-4140 www.fieldbrookwinery.com

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

&


of the courthouse last year, the county responded with police and criminal penalties. You will argue that people dressed up in Halloween costumes is not First Amendment protected speech or assembly, but it could be. On Oct. 26 dozens of community college students dressed as zombies “attacked” a crowd of people demonstrating in support of Prop. 30 to show what they thought would happen if the voters reject the funding measure. It is interesting that Freelove found himself on the ground and handcuffed after trying to engage an officer in a conversation about a new law. Couldn’t the officer have just humored him and said: “Hey man, I don’t pass the laws and I think the law sucks too”? Then Freelove would probably have blabbered for a while and staggered off. Does a dinky town like Arcata really need more than 40 police to protect people and property on Halloween? Bear in mind, I like police and I like laws. As a middle-aged, middle class white woman, my personal experiences with police have been all good. I think we need more laws. But couldn’t there have been a response that didn’t send such a militarized message? In big cities, when you send the message that a public place, like a park, is dangerous, the friendly people won’t go near it. Drug pushers, users and gangs then

make it their home. When you send the message that family-friendly activities will happen, scary people stay away because nothing frightens them more than familyfriendly activities. So I say police should be our last option, not our first response. Before we reach for the baton as a means of preventing violence, try instead something more benignly frightening. Bring out the Humboldt Harmonaires! Fill the center of the Plaza with 30 old men crooning barbershop songs. I guarantee you the troublemakers will flee. Bring out some accordion players and the guys with the didgeridoos. Imagine an army of fiddlers. Get those drunks to two-step or square dance and they’ll fall flat on their faces. You won’t have to worry about them till dawn. Get the whole crowd to line dance to “Achy Breaky Heart.” Break out the Abba. If that doesn’t work, send in the clowns. They’ll scare everyone away.

– Marcy Burstiner mib3@humboldt.edu Marcy Burstiner is an associate professor of journalism and mass communication at Humboldt State University. She wonders if Shea’s case wasn’t one of mistaken identity. Maybe we should ask: What was Steven Weaven doing that night?

 

www.LesSchwab.com

PASSENGER TIRES GREAT BUY! ECONOMY RADIALS

FREE

ROAD HAZARD • FLAT REPAIR MOUNTING • ROTATIONS AIR CHECKS

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE

STARTING AT

155/80TR-13 TREAD DESIGN MAY VARY

39 99

FREE

ROAD HAZARD • FLAT REPAIR MOUNTING • ROTATIONS AIR CHECKS

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE

STARTING AT

70

84 P155/80SR-13

ALL-SEASON RELIABILITY 70,000 MILE WARRANTY

Free Lifetime Tire & Mileage Care To help you get more miles out of your tires and more miles per gallon of gas

Free Peace of Mind Tire Protection

Whatever the road throws at you, from potholes to nails - any road hazard, we guarantee you’re protected

BEST BRAKE VALUE PROMISE Professionally Trained Technicians Premium Quality Parts Best Brake Warranty Over 30 Years

The Eclipse is a quality all-season tire Experience that features the latest in radial design FREE BRAKE INSPECTIONS and performance. It’s modern tread pattern provides excellent handling for FREE ESTIMATES • SAME DAY SERVICE increased vehicle safety. (ON MOST VEHICLES)

LIGHT TRUCK/SUV TIRES

TERRAMAX H/T ECONOMY RADIALS

FREE

ROAD HAZARD • FLAT REPAIR MOUNTING • ROTATIONS AIR CHECKS

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE

STARTING AT LT225/75R-16/10 TREAD DESIGN MAY VARY

9764

FREE

ROAD HAZARD • FLAT REPAIR MOUNTING • ROTATIONS AIR CHECKS

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE

STARTING AT

127 01

215/75SR-15

MUD & SNOW RATED 50,000 MILE WARRANTY

Attractive outlined white letters. Features a deep tread design for longer mileage. Mud & snow rated with a smooth, quiet ride.

Eureka 443-3507 | Fortuna 725-1169 | McKinleyville 839-8986

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 8, 2012

7


City of Fortuna

Blog Jammin’

PROMOTIONAL COUPON

VALUED AT UP TO $25

(OIL FILTERS ONLY!)

*NOTE: THIS IS NOT A COUPON

RECYCLE

USED OIL FILTERS

IT’S AS EASY AS 123

1.

TAKE YOUR OIL FILTER TO A PARTICIPATING CERTIFIED FORTUNA COLLECTION CENTER • Reener Petroleum: 2435 Newburg Rd • O’Reilly Auto Parts: 736 South Fortuna Blvd

WILL AWARD YOU WITH A COUPON FOR A NEW OIL FILTER, VALUED UP TO $25. 2. THEY YOUR OIL FILTER AT ONE OF THESE PARTICIPATING FORTUNA MERCHANTS 3. REDEEM • Napa Auto and Truck: 745 11th St • O’Reilly Auto Parts, 736 South Fortuna Blvd

AVAILABLE TO CITY OF FORTUNA RESIDENTS ONLY THIS PROMOTION ENDS MAY 31, 2013 (OR WHILE SUPPLIES LAST)

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

CRIME, ARCATA/ BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / NOV. 2, 3:58 P.M.

Goodbye Halloween, Hello Hospital A severed ear, a broken jaw and a broken nose for the civilians, along with a cut lip for a cop, were among the injuries Arcata police counted up during this year’s Halloween … uh … can it be called a celebration? The Plaza was packed, even with its core cordoned off and officers on hand from seven law enforcement agencies. Vandalism, police said, was reduced. The full press release is on our website.

daughter was placed into custody of a local relative.” The full release is on our website. ● OBITS/ BY HEIDI WALTERS / NOV. 2, 2:50 P.M.

Remembering the Light in John Tutuska

The light in John Tutuska recognized the light in so many Old Town denizens, and several dogs, over the past 20-plus years, they overflowed Clarke Street Plaza midmorning today as they gathered to bid him farewell. Tutuska, who was 67, died Oct. 14. ● He was that sunbaked, handsome, peacefulness-spreading fellow who often BUSINESS, CRIME / BY RYAN BURNS / could be NOV. 2, 3:56 P.M. found sitting Arcata Main Street or standing Director Busted against the Yes, that was Arcata bright white Main Street’s Jennifer wall of the Koopman whose mug shot Clarke Museshowed up with a press um on the correlease announcing officers ner of E and had discovered a 267-plant Third streets. grow in a Eureka garage. Sunlight was Officers seized the plants, the best way, plus $3,700 from inside the he said, to house in the 2600 block of spark that light Manzanita Avenue, a press within. He was release said. the man who It added, “Koopman was handed out placed under arrest for buttons saying cultivation and possession “The Light in for sales of marijuana, for Me Recogmaintaining a residence nizes the Light for manufacturing of a in You.” His controlled substance… apartment was JOHN TUTUSKA IN THE LIGHT. [and] for child endangerthe one above ment because of the electrical fire hazard the bookstore across the street from the associated with the indoor marijuana museum that had the large, handwritten growing operation. Koopman’s 7-year old sign in the window that said, simply, “For-


Nov. 8, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 45

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

give.” He often was alone, but other times one or two or three people would be next to him, quietly talking or just meditating. At least 140 people came to Tutuska’s memorial — coffee slingers, office workers, shoppers, government workers, shopkeeps, poets, musicians, merchants, sidewalk witnesses, members of his “A Course in Miracles” group and more. Someone burned sage, another set up a table filled with spiritual writings and CDs by various artists. The table also held piles of what appeared to be Tutuska’s calling card with Church of the Eternal Now. It has a photo of Tutuska on it (a photo taken by the Journal) and a number to call “for all the answers, or to contact John Tutuska.” The number, alas, conjures a recording that says, “Refinance your mortgage and save” and offers a 900 number to call. (The card also suggests meditation for all of the answers or talking to John, so, that might be the better course right now.) Many who spoke at his memorial noted how he “was a devoted student” of “A Course in Miracles,” that he shared its ideas with everyone, and that he exuded a love that seemed specific to each person he met. One woman said he was especially fond of one of the course’s teachings that says there is no death. “We come from spirit and we will return to spirit,” she said. A few spoke of his more earthly life — boxer, wonderful cook, Giants fan. But most remembered him as being, as one woman put it, “the spiritual anchor to Old Town.” An older man, pointing up through the canopy of trees into the cloudy bright sky, said “There, there is the light.” Tutsuka, he said, was all around, still here.

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

GARBERVILLE, HEALTH, MEDICAL / BY ZACH ST. GEORGE / NOV. 2, 2:38 P.M.

Vote Could Shape Future of SoHum Health Care

The little hospital and clinic that provide basic care in Southern Humboldt could soon get a new board of directors, in a vote that’s continued on next page

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Scottie Lee Meyers contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler MAIL/OFFICE:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Illustration by Lynn Jones.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

9


Blog Jammin’

continued from previous page

in part a referendum on the controversial hospital director. (See results page 15.) The Southern Humboldt Community Healthcare District has been through a bankruptcy and bouts of heavy turnover, and now is in a heated election for three of the five seats on its board. Although his name doesn’t appear on the ballot, the race revolves in large part around Harry Jasper, the health care district’s combined CEO/CFA, now in his third year on the job. The current board is broadly supportive of Jasper, but that tight relationship may not last. Three of the six candidates for the district’s three open seats have criticized his performance. “He’s good at finances, but he has terrible people skills,” says Judi Gonzales, who’s running for a two-year seat left open by the April resignation of board member Mary Krissie Branzei. Gonzales, long an outspoken critic of Jasper, points to the dozens of longtime hospital employees who were laid off or who resigned since Jasper’s arrival in 2009, and to falling numbers of patient visits. Even his critics, Gonzales included, say that Jasper has turned the health care district’s finances around. After going through bankruptcy in the early 2000s, the district spent most of the last decade struggling to stay above water, even after the passage of a parcel tax to prop it up. One of the biggest problems has been that a large share of the district’s patients are low income, and pay for care with help from Medicare and Medical. That makes it difficult for the district to recoup the costs of running its emergency room. To stay fiscally health, Jasper and others have said, the district must keep track of every penny spent caring for those patients. While previous administrators struggled to get paid in full, Jasper, trained in both

finances and health care administration, has had success at tracking and getting paid for patient-care expenses. Revenue is up, and although it remains dependent on the parcel tax, the hospital is in the black for the first time in years. That’s earned Jasper the admiration of his employers on the current board of directors. “Harry is — so far what I’ve experienced — very professional, very thorough with what he’s doing in regards to maintaining the [district’s] fiscal health,” says Clif Anderson, the interim board member who holds the seat vacated by Branzei. Anderson took the seat in July and says that while he wasn’t aware of Jasper’s relationship with the district’s lower-level employees, he sat in on one department head meeting and liked what he saw. “I was very impressed at how well they work together,” he says. “I was impressed with his leadership abilities.” His critics say, though, that the apparent cohesion is only because Jasper has removed everyone who didn’t agree with him. Although turnover has always been high in the health care district, it almost doubled in the first two years after Jasper’s arrival, with many longtime employees among those leaving. “The thing that disturbs me most is the employee turnover,” says candidate Karen Ruth. She says as a board member, she would like to contact former employees and find out why they left. Personnel matters should be left to the chief executive, says Corrine Stromstad, an incumbent board member running for reelection. (The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors appointed Stromstad to the health care district board in 2010. She previously ran against and received fewer votes than Judi Gonzales. In a July interview, 2nd District Supervisor Clif

Naturopathic Medicine - Helping You Be Well Naturally Bringing a Natural Medicine Approach to both Primary Care and Consultation In Association with Dr. Beverly Copeland, MD

DR. CHERE EDGAR, ND Naturopathic Doctor

1727 Central Ave, McKinleyville, CA (707) 840-0556 Now Accepting New Patients

Treating the Underlying Causes of Illness * Prevention * Weight Loss

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

* Homeopathy * Fewer Prescriptions


Daylight Savings Clendenen said he couldn’t recall exactly why the board chose Stromstad over Gonzales.) “The only employee we [the board] have is Harry,” Stromstad says, and he has done wonders for the district’s financial health. As to why any particular person left or was fired, she says, “I really didn’t get involved in the how-come or whatfor.” “Oh, he is the only employee? Wow, what a concept,” says candidate Beth Bennett-Allen, referring to Stromstad’s comment. “No, they don’t have one employee and I think that may be at the base of the problem. There are many, many people there that are to be considered and protected.” Candidate David Ordonez could not be reached for comment. ● EDUCATION, ELECTIONS, POLITICS / BY RYAN BURNS / NOV. 1, 3:28 P.M.

Students Vote for Obama More than a thousand students from a dozen Humboldt County schools participated in a statewide student mock election, and the local voters of tomorrow preferred President Barack Obama to Republican challenger Mitt Romney by a landslide. Obama earned 58.1 percent of the vote (673 of 1,159) among participating students from local elementary, middle and high schools. Romney, by comparison, garnered just 20.2 percent of the vote. (The only local school to prefer Romney was Ferndale Elementary.) Statewide the results leaned even farther left: Obama 69.3 percent, Romney 23.5 percent. A press release from the Secretary of State’s Office describes the mock election

as “a hands-on civic engagement project that helps cultivate the voters of tomorrow.” Teachers were given resources and materials to make Election Day a “teachable moment,” the release states. What and who else did local students vote for? Dianne Feinstein, for one. The incumbent U.S. Senator earned 61.2 percent of the vote, with Republican challenger Elizabeth Emken getting the other 38.8 percent. Statewide it was Feinstein 65.6 percent, Emken 34.4 percent. We also tallied local students’ votes on a few ballot propositions and compared them with the statewide results. Likely the most significant ones for the students personally are propositions 30 and 38, the dueling tax-increase measures aimed at boosting education funding. Humboldt students liked them both but preferred 30, with 74.7 percent voting “yes” compared to Prop. 38’s 61.5 percent approval. Statewide results were similar, with both measures passing but Prop. 30 faring better. It earned 65.3 percent support compared to Prop. 38’s 55.9 percent. On the issue of labeling genetically engineered food, local students were all about it. More than 70 percent mock-voted in favor of Prop 37. Statewide the measure earned 63.6 percent support, which is better than recent polling suggests it will do among adults. How about the death penalty, you ask? Just over half of the local students (53.6 percent) voted not to repeal it. Statewide the issue was a real squeaker, with 49.84 percent supporting a ban on the death penalty and 50.16 voting to keep it in place. The complete, school-by-school results for the county can be viewed from a link on our website. ●

SALE

Now through Nov. 10th

Solar Light Stakes Spring Blooming Bulbs

20% Off Decorative Hose Holder All Deciduous Trees (plus many marked down to 50% Off)

30% Off

RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW FOR THE JOURNAL

Holiday Gif t Guide Nov. 15, Nov. 22, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, Dec. 13 & Dec. 20

Hanging Geraniums Specially Marked Bedding Plants

50% Off

Plant Clearance Section

Now 75% Off

Frontier Soup Mixes

4 for 20% off

Call Colleen Hole Shane Mizer Karen Sack Mike Herring

442-1400

millerfarmsnursery.com 1828 CENTRAL AVENUE • MCKINLEYVILLE

839-1571 X 5 MONDAY-SATURDAY 8:30-5:30

www.northcoastjournal.com 310 F St ., Eureka CA 95501

for the NOVEMBER 22, 2012 issue is Thursday, NOVEMBER 15, 4 p.m.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

11


The drunken botanist

Spice Island cocktail with rosemary photo by Amy Stewart

Herbalicious By Amy Stewart

amystewart@northcoastjournal.com

I

t is with great excitement that I report to you on the arrival of a new gin, a gin that cannot even properly be called gin because its predominant flavor is not juniper but — are you ready? Sage. That’s right. Sage. It comes from the same clever people at Art in the Age who brought us Root, a liqueur inspired by traditional Pennsylvania Dutch recipes for root beer and birch bark beer. They also make a ginger liqueur called Snap and a rhubarb concoction called Rhubarb Tea, made in honor of early American botanist and friend of the founding fathers John Bartram. Intriguing, right? So now they’re doing Sage, a gin-like spirit created in honor of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello garden and his horticulturist Bernard McMahon. McMahon was charged with growing out the seeds and plants collected by Lewis and Clark on their expedition and with cataloging those plants. Angelica, dandelion, fennel, rosemary, sumac, thyme and — of course — sage are all ingredients in the drink. Now, these dead-garden-celebrity endorsements might be a bit of a stretch —

it’s not as if Thomas Jefferson and Bernard McMahon wrote out a recipe for sage gin and hid it in the basement until its exciting discovery earlier this year — but I do admire the spirit of the whole enterprise. Anytime botanists get a little credit for their work, that’s a good thing. And I’m wildly excited about these savory flavors ending up in a cocktail. So let’s run through some of the more piquant herbs you might grow for cocktails. In every case, remember that fresh leaves taste quite a bit different from dried leaves. You might hear that the flavor is more “concentrated” in dried leaves, but that isn’t quite accurate: In fact, as the leaves are dried some of the more volatile flavor compounds evaporate, which usually means that the brighter floral, citrus and menthol notes drift away while the warmer, woodsier flavors remain. That’s why I prefer fresh leaves in a drink, but let your own taste guide you. Sage: The sage to grow is Salvia officinalis, often sold as common sage, garden sage or culinary sage. You’ll see burgundy, gold and variegated varieties sold in garden centers, but if you’re serious about growing this plant for its flavor, stick with

12 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

the ordinary silvery-blue variety. I like a cultivar called “Grower’s Friend” because it rarely blooms. The level of essential oil drops after blooming — this is true of many herbs — so pinching back flower buds becomes a chore if you want more leaves for cooking and cocktailing. Plant sage in full sun or afternoon shade, and don’t fuss too much over the soil — it actually tastes better if it’s grown in lean, sandy, dry soil. It’s hardy to about 0 degrees F, and with a glass cloche or some other kind of frost protection it might even tolerate lower winter temps. In spring, wait until you see new leaves unfurling, then cut the old, dead wood down to where the new growth is starting. Sage is not a long-lived plant — you’ll want to replace it after about four years. Oh, and it’s particularly good in tequila drinks. Rosemary: If you live in our mild West Coast climate, rosemary is practically a weed. Just buy a plant and stick it in the ground and you’ll have it forever. In fact, it takes temperatures below about minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit to kill it. Look for the upright form of rosemary, not the trailing groundcover variety. The favorites among chefs are “Tuscan Blue” with its wide, aromatic leaves, “Roman Beauty,” a compact variety bred to have higher essential oil content (also sold as “Chef’s Choice”) and “Arp,” which is the most cold hardy of the bunch. If you’re really crazy about rosemary, “Spice Island” was once grown for commercial production and reaches 6 feet tall. The plant needs practically no care — just give it full sun, minimal water, and clip it to whatever shape you please. Rosemary and watermelon are surprisingly good together in tequila-based drinks. Thyme: Many varieties of thyme have been bred to work as groundcovers rather than as culinary herbs, so look for Thymus vularis, also sold as common thyme, if you’re after flavor. The citrusy T. citriodorus “Aureus” is another good choice. Both are hardy to about minus 15 F. They prefer sun but will tolerate light shade and don’t require much water or rich soil. The tiny leaves of thyme can be stripped off the stem, but in a cocktail, you’re better off just throwing the whole sprig in the shaker. Add thyme to any cocktail that calls for grapefruit. Savory: I’m referring here to winter savory, Satureja montana, not summer savory, S. hortensis. The summer type is used in fresh salads and sandwiches and is perhaps more comparable to parsley or lovage. Put that in a drink if you want to; I’m not going to stop you. But I’m talking

here about the winter type, which is a tough, woody, perennial herb more similar to rosemary. Give it sun or light shade, ordinary soil and just a little water. Use savory in drinks mixed with tomatoes or red peppers. Oregano: This herb has also been bred for its looks as well as its flavor, so choose carefully. In the garden center, just brush the leaves and see if the fragrance works for you as a food or drink ingredient. Origanum vulgare is the most common culinary species: the subspecies O. vulgare hirtum, called Greek oregano, is popular among chefs. “Jim Best” is a yellowleaved variety also grown for its flavor. Other species you might experiment with include O. dictamnus, also known as Dittany of Crete or hop marjoram, and two other marjorams, O. majorana and O x majoricum. All have similarly spicy, savory flavors. Try smashing oregano and cucumber together in the cocktail shaker, and then mix a dry martini with it. Tarragon: Because of its mint and anise flavors, tarragon makes an interesting cocktail ingredient. You’re looking for Artemisia dracunculus — and yes, absinthe drinkers, this is, in fact, a relative of wormwood, the artemisia species that flavors absinthe. Give it sun and soil on the dry side and protect it from temperatures below about minus 20 F. Try crushing a little tarragon into a mint julep for a spicier version. Here’s a simple gin drink (substitute vodka if you must) that will get you experimenting with herbs in simple syrup. It’s a popular cocktail that goes by many names; I’m naming it after a rosemary cultivar.  Spice Island 1.5 oz gin (or try the new Sage from Art in the Age) .5 oz lemon juice .5 oz rosemary simple syrup Club soda Rosemary for garnish To make rosemary simple syrup, combine equal parts sugar and water in a pan along with several springs of chopped leaves. Bring to a boil so the sugar dissolves, then allow to cool and infuse for at least 45 minutes. Strain before using. Combine the first three ingredients in a cocktail shaker and shake over ice. Strain into a tumbler filled with ice, top with club soda and garnish with a sprig of rosemary. l


since 197o styles have changed, but the great service remains!

42 anniversary nd

E K I B E E FR RAFFLE Y A W A E V I G

sale

select inventory

6-9pm

8o%

off

everything in the store at least

25%

off

two stores, two chances to

save big!

Photo by Brenda Odell

up to

EUREKA, nov. 13th + ARCATA, nov. 15th

650 10TH ST., ARCATA • 822-4673 | 125 WEST 5TH ST., EUREKA • 445-1711 ADVENTURESEDGE.COM • OPEN DAILY MON-SAT: 9-6, SUN: 10-5 northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012

13


Prop. 30 ....................................................14 Grow House Tax....................................15 Colo., Wash. Legalize Pot ................. 17 Atkins, Bonino Party ............................19

HOO CORPS A IN’T PE LS/ EPS/GR R IO OW HOU DE L SE ELEC L RO TRICITY ADS TAX /TR INID AD SAL ES T AX EXT E NS ION/ FOR TUN A SC HOO LS

STEIN/HOE FLING/ROM NEY/JOHNS EMKE ON/BARR/ N/FE OBAMA INSTE IN/H UFFM AN/R OBER TS/C H ES B RO/L YNCH

More

ELECTION RESULTS Propositions ...........................................14 Southern Humboldt Healthcare Board ....................................................15 Local Ballot Measures .........................15 Congress and Legislature ................... 17 Contested Mayoral and City Council Races ..........................19 U.S. Presidential Race.........................20

EAN

ARC ATA SC

O/B

UMBO ERN H

CALIF

E DIST ILLAM-TRENT/BROW RICT N

FORTUNA/STREHL/G

/

DALE

FERN

HEALT

LER WEL

HCAR

US

/TIT

ORNIA

BUDG

ET/ E

DUCA

TION/

GM

NITY

LITICA

EL

LAB

UNION S’ PO

OD O FO

P

OMMU

EATH

D ING/

LDT C

Later returns and results elsewhere in California can be found on the secretary of state’s website at sos.ca.gov and on the Humboldt County elections office website at co.humboldt.ca.us/election.

L CON TRIBU

/TH

LTY ENA

TIONS

More Results

AUTO INSURANCE/HUMAN TRAFFICKING/REDISTRICTING

S

RIKE

ST REE

NS

ATKI

KA/ EURE

NIN /BO

SOUTH

Schoolpocalypse Averted Propositions

County totals as of 1:19 a.m. with 100% of precincts reporting; state and district totals as of 4:54 a.m. with 94.8% of precincts reporting on Nov. 7. Humboldt County Passed

#

Proposition

yes Votes

%

yeS

30

Temporary Taxes to Fund Education

28,854

63.02%

no

31

State Budget, State and Local Government

15,237

no

32

Political Contributions by Payroll Deduction

no

33

no

State %

yes Votes

16,932

36.98%

4,870,650

54.0%

4,141,944

46.0%

35.90%

27,201

64.10%

3,299,833

39.2%

5,110,981

60.8%

17,487

39.04%

27,303

60.96%

3,882,072

43.8%

4,990,349

56.2%

Auto Insurance Prices Based on Driver History

15,538

35.47%

28,264

64.53%

3,952,745

45.3%

4,780,483

54.7%

34

Death Penalty Repeal

21,914

48.79%

22,998

51.21%

4,199,285

47.4%

4,659,763

52.6%

yeS

35

Human Trafficking

35,552

79.43%

9,208

20.57%

7,155,556

81.1%

1,666,138

18.9%

yeS

36

Three Strikes Law

33,923

75.80%

10,829

24.20%

6,065,088

68.8%

2,752,582

31.2%

no

37

Genetically Engineered Foods Labeling

29,591

65.15%

15,827

34.85%

4,195,669

47.0%

4,724,518

53.0%

no

38

Tax for Education. Early Childhood Programs

13,456

30.39%

30,829

69.61%

2,438,463

27.7%

6,356,280

72.3%

yeS

39

Business Tax for Energy

28,295

64.43%

15,622

35.57%

5,194,890

60.2%

3,437,472

39.8%

yeS

40

Redistricting State Senate

30,266

72.93%

11,236

27.07%

5,948,478

71.5%

2,367,273

28.5%

no Votes

sources: Humboldt county elections office and california secretary of state

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

%

no Votes

%

With Prop. 30 taking a strong lead, healthier budget could help education By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

T

he governor can put away his bundle of knives now: The voters have passed Proposition 30. Across the golden state, school officials are heaving great, complicated sighs of relief. As of 5:25 a.m. Wednesday, the measure crafted by Gov. Jerry Brown and supported by the two major teachers unions had captured 54 percent of the votes. And that means the governor’s threatened $6 billion in “trigger cuts” from the 2012-13 state budget — cuts that would have been triggered by rejection of Prop. 30, that is — will not take place. Most of the cut would have come out of the state general fund account reserved for schools, but about $600 million of it would have come out of state funds allocated to fire and water safety, law enforcement, parks and natural resource services. Prop. 30 changes the California constitution to raise personal income tax rates by between 1 and 3 percent on incomes above $250,000 for seven years. And it raises the sales tax rate by a quarter cent per dollar for four years. (So, maybe some of the high-income folks aren’t celebrating, especially since the tax rate increase is retroactive to January 2012. And maybe the anti-more-taxes people are chafing at the state getting more tax money instead of, as they see it, being


Southern Humboldt Healthcare Board Vote totals as of 1:19 a.m. Nov. 7 with 100% of precincts reporting candidate 4 YeAr term (two seats) David ordonez corinne stromstad Karen Ruth Beth Bennett-Allen Write-In 2 YeAr term (one seat) Clifton Anderson Judith A. Gonzales Write-In

Absentee Votes %

election total %

Vote totals as of 1:19 a.m. Nov. 7 with 100.00% precincts reporting.*

totAl total

%

384 420 259 315 6

27.75% 30.35% 18.71% 22.76% 0.43%

458 403 378 437 5

27.25% 23.97% 22.49% 26% 0.30%

1,069 1,051 851 981 15

26.95% 26.49% 21.45% 24.73% 0.38%

404 408 3

49.57% 50.06% 0.37%

480 537 3

47.06% 52.65% 0.29%

1,137 1,238 8

47.71% 51.95% 0.34%

source: Humboldt county elections office

AT LEAST ONE CRITIC OF THE CURRENT HOSPITAL DIRECTOR APPEARED TO BE WINNING A SEAT; SEE BLOG JAMMIN’ ON PAGE 8 FOR BACKGROUND ON THIS RACE.

forced into better money management.) Most of the roughly $6 billion a year to be generated by these tax increases will be used to begin paying back some of the money the governor has borrowed for years from a schools-specific account. The proposition also guarantees continued state funding to counties to pay for certain state programs that were handed off to local governments recently — including handling low-level offenders as part of prison realignment. It’s true Prop. 30 doesn’t add “new” money to school coffers. But the folks who advocated for Prop. 30 were motivated less by any riches it offers than by the continued and deepening hardships promised if it didn’t pass. Those trigger cuts. In Humboldt County, up to $7 million would have been lopped from K-12 state funding; up to $1.6 million would have been cut from College of the Redwoods — triggering, in response, a reduction in the enrollment cap by 346 full-time equivalent students; and up to $5 million would have been cut from Humboldt State University — prompting, in response, a 5 percent resident and 7 percent nonresident tuition hike. Instead, some of our local institutions can look for a slight slowdown in the amount the state plucks each year from that school-specific revenues account. But Prop. 30’s not a complete fix. Last week, as the election neared and Prop. 30 wobbled in the polls, Humboldt County Superintendent of Schools Garry Eagles said if the measure passed he would, of course, be taking a deep breath to say, “Thank goodness the cuts aren’t going to be any deeper.” He might, he said, even celebrate post-election with an extra martini, knowing he won’t have to lay off anyone because of budget concerns and that some of his districts — such as Northern Humboldt

Local Ballot Measures

Union High School District — won’t have to trim the school year by five days next year as they’d been preparing to do if the measure failed. “But I know the system isn’t perfect, either,” Eagles said. “The bill doesn’t go far enough.” Prop. 30 monies will barely begin to mitigate for the roughly $100 million by which the state has underfunded Humboldt County schools in the past five years, either by delaying guaranteed payments or flat-out withholding money to use for other purposes, Eagles said. At Humboldt State University, meanwhile, staff is preparing to roll back the 9.1 percent tuition increase implemented earlier this year. A happy, but not necessarily easy, task. “The logistics of something like that is frankly boggling,” said Robert Snyder, vice president of academic affairs, last week. “We will have to issue credit or refund checks. We will have to recalculate financial packages.” Students will each be credited or refunded $249. Some might have their financial aid packages reconfigured. California State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed, in the meantime, has announced that across the system enrollments might rise a bit next fall, as university staff begins reviewing applications that had been put on hold until after the election. (Fewer students would be accepted had Prop. 30 failed.) At College of the Redwoods, officials are expecting passage of Prop. 30 to bring in an extra $222,720, said Vice President Lee Lindsey. The state also will pay the college $1 million of the $5 million it owes in late and deferred funding. And CR will be able to raise its enrollment cap by 49 full-time equivalent students. ●

Measure

VOTE BY MAIL BALLOTS Votes %

MAIL BALLOT PRECINCTS Votes %

1,927 58.43% 1,371 41.57%

197 60.8% 127 39.20

1971 61.50% 1234 38.50%

4095 59.98% 2732 40.02%

ELECTION

D – School Bonds

District Fortuna High School District

E – Parcel Tax

Arcata Elem. School District

1003 72.26% 385 27.74%

92 88

51.11% 48.89

2716 80.81% 645 19.19%

3811 77.32% 1118 22.68%

F – School Bonds

Arcata Elem. School District

958 70.34% 404 29.66%

99 55.93% 78 44.07

2553 77.65% 735 22.35%

3610 1217

74.79% 25.21%

¾-cent sales tax

G – Continue

City of Trinidad

58.2% 41.18%

0 0.00% 0 0.00%

57 53.27% 50 47.73%

97 78

55.43% 44.57%

H – Corporations are Not People

City of Arcata

1499 74.32% 518 25.68%

0 0.00% 0 0.00%

3641 84.97% 644 15.03%

5140 1162

81.56% 18.44%

I – Residential Electricity Users Tax

City of Arcata

1464 72.44% 557 27.56%

0 0.00% 0 0.00%

2823 67.28% 1373 32.72%

4287 68.96% 1930 31.04%

J – Bonds for Street Improvements

City of Rio Dell

240 56.47% 185 43.53%

0 0.00% 0 0.00%

252 53.50% 219 46.50%

492 54.91% 404 45.09%

40 28

Total

%

TOTAL Total

%

*SOME PROVISIONAL AND HAND-DELIVERED BALLOTS UNCOUNTED. SOURCE: HUMBOLDT COUNTy ELECTIONS OffICE

Lashing Out at Grow Houses

Arcata’s tax could be the start of a broader attack, waged though utility bills By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg

A

carrie@northcoastjournal.com

rcata could be starting something big. Its anti-grow electricity tax is being watched as a pioneering model for not just the city of Eureka but for all of unincorporated Humboldt County. Arcata voters were strongly backing the tax, by 69 percent to 31 percent, in the latest counts Wednesday morning, with only a majority vote needed for approval. Some provisional and hand-delivered mail-in ballots remained to be tallied. And while the last votes for Measure I are added up, everyone will be watching. For Eureka, whose city council voted unanimously in September to study a similar tax for a 2014 vote, Arcata can be a living laboratory. If there are legal challenges over privacy or other issues, Eureka can see how they are sorted out, while being still poised to prevent a “domino effect,” said Eureka Councilwoman Linda Atkins. She brought the issue to her city earlier this fall, worried that unless Eureka acted defensively, growers pinched by the tax would abandon Arcata and resettle to the south. Or they could head north — maybe

to McKinleyville, or other unincorporated areas? That’s one reason Humboldt County should at least think about a similar tax for the entire unincorporated area it oversees, said Supervisor Mark Lovelace, who plans to ask fellow board members to hear a presentation on what Arcata’s doing. So far, Lovelace hasn’t been hearing from people worried that their communities will have to absorb Arcata’s rejects — but he is hearing that a hefty tax might just be a good idea. “This measure is not a sin tax on marijuana at all. If it’s a sin tax, it’s a sin tax on excessive energy consumption,” Lovelace said. “To see people being so wasteful and doing such abuse of electricity consumption is frustrating.” With Arcata paving the way, some have speculated that Eureka and Humboldt might be able to impose a new tax with lower startup costs. Pacific Gas and Electric Co. estimated it would charge Arcata around $600,000 to create a system for collecting the tax. It’s too early to say whether that would be cheaper for other continued on page 17

NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL •• THURSDAY, THURSDAY, NOV. NOV. 8, 8, 2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com •• NORTH northcoastjournal.com

15


home & garden

service directory

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE

continued on page 21

WARM WINTER WISHES SANTA’S COMING SOON! We’ve got lots of goodies for gift giving and decorating, plus gourmet food tastings and more!

Friday, November 9th 5 - 8pm Saturday, November 10th 10am - 5pm Sunday, November 11th 10am - 5pm www.carljohnsonco.com • (707) 443-4851

Come Visit Our Showroom! 6 Month financing for a limited time! IN STOCK

REMNANTS & ROLLS

WOOL CARPET IN STOCK STARTING AT

$178 sq. ft.

WOOL RUNS ON GRASS.

4485 BROADWAY, EUREKA (just South of K-Mart)

442-3470 www.thecarpetdepot.com

In 1916, the USDA predicted that by the 1940s all paper would come from hemp and trees would no longer be cut down.

Beneficial Living Center and Garden Supplies

High grade compost tea Several products to help natural things thrive Knowledgeable staff as your resource

Fermenting Foods Workshop: Wed., Nov. 7 at 6pm Bring a quart-sized jar with a lid and go home with delicious fermented food 148 South G St., Arcata • 633-6125 • www.beneficiallivingcenter.com

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL ASSUMES NO LIABILITY FOR SERVICES ADVERTISED. YOU MAY WANT TO VERIFY CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBERS AND PROOF OF INSURANCE FROM THE VENDOR OF YOUR CHOICE.

Did you know...


continued from page 15

Legalized It

Recreational weed wins in Colorado and Washington. How will it affect us? By Ryan Burns

ryanburns@northcoastjournal.com

D

2

EL

id you feel that, Humboldt marijuana is not likely to end quickly or County? The ground just cleanly. The federal government still conshifted. Two big jolts, one three siders cannabis a Schedule One controlled states to our east and another substance, a drug worse than cocaine or two states to our north, just methamphetamine, with no recognized sent our major cash crop cascading over medicinal use. Federal agents have raided the tipping point. and shut down hundreds of medical mariAs you read this, marijuana buds are juana dispensaries in California, and the tumbling out of the shadows of the U.S. Department of Justice has even black market toward state-ligone so far as to threaten prosecuO I T N EC censed retail outlets in Coloration and imprisonment for state do and Washington, where on and local officials who license Election Day voters approved dispensaries. measures to legalize marijuana An email to the U.S. Departproduction, sales and posment of Justice last week was not 201 session of limited amounts for returned by press time. Spokespeople over 21. Not just for medicipeople for the department have nal purposes, either. People can consume steadfastly refused to comment, telling it even if they don’t have headaches or media outlets only that Attorney General insomnia. Barring swift and nasty federal Eric Holder won’t speculate on the ballot intervention, we’re about to see the first initiatives. This despite pressure from government-regulated commercial marisome of the nation’s top law enforcejuana markets in the industrialized world. ment officials to condemn the measures “This is a huge, huge political mopublicly. ment,” said Oakland attorney James Pundits have speculated that full Anthony. “It’s very exciting, and it’s going legalization at the state level will trigger to have broad implications for the war on a constitutional showdown, but Anthony drugs generally and certainly for medical believes that the feds no longer have the marijuana issues.” political capital or the manpower to enLike most wars, the crusade against force prohibition against the voters’ will.

TI ON C E

2

EL

jurisdictions once the groundwork has been laid for Arcata, said PG&E spokeswoman Brittany McKannay. If the final count confirms that Arcata’s tax has passed, it would go into effect as soon as PG&E is able to collect it. Arcata Mayor Michael Winkler figures that will take about six months. The tax would only affect the heftiest of power users — those who use six times the “baseline” amount that utility regulators have long established as a way to keep rates low for light electricity users. (Baseline consumption costs less per kilowatt hour, and after that electric rates go up in tiers, higher and higher as use increases.) On top of that tiered system, Arcata will slap a 45 percent tax on all electricity use above 600 percent of the baseline, which fluctuates by season, by region, and by whether a house is heated with gas or electricity. As soon as the results are final, Winkler said, the council will sit down with the city’s budget director to allocate funds for startup costs. Then comes the fun part — the council gets to start talking about how to spend the money. Back when it was considering the tax, PG&E told Arcata that about 600 of the 10,000 electric meters in Arcata rack up enough to be taxed, and unless those people cut their consumption — or just up and move — revenue could be around $1.2 million annually. “The city’s budget is on the order of $30 million, so it’s not a huge fraction of the budget. But a lot of the money is really locked in,” Winkler said, so this could be a pretty good discretionary chunk. The vote came as no surprise to Winkler, who’d been hearing from constituents that they were eager to find new tools against people who wrested houses from their normal uses. A poll overseen by Humboldt State University professor Mark Larson in late October found Arcata’s Measure I was well ahead, favored by 62.6 percent of likely voters, with 23.2 percent against and 15.2 percent undecided. The poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points, Larson said, giving the tax a comfortable lead. The anti-grow sentiments also ring strong beyond Arcata. While Eureka councilwoman Atkins supports medical marijuana use, she says she’s disgusted with growers who fill a house with plants, wrecking homes, disrupting neighborhoods and driving up rents. “In Eureka, our Victorian houses are priceless, and having them turn into firetraps is not good,” she said. l

201

Congress and Legislature

County totals as of 2:02 a.m. with 100% of precincts reporting; state and district totals as of 5:25 a.m. with 94.8% of precincts reporting on Nov. 7.

US SENATOR Candidate

Humboldt Votes

Elizabeth Emken Dianne Feinstein

16,037 29,126

Humboldt %

35.51% 64.49%

Statewide Votes

Statewide %

3,441,145 5,519,176

38.4% 61.6%

US REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, DISTRICT 2 Candidate

Jared Huffman Daniel W. Roberts

Humboldt Votes

28,246 16,273

Humboldt %

63.45% 36.55%

Districtwide Votes

Districtwide %

159,287 67,882

70.1% 29.9%

STATE ASSEMBLY, DISTRICT 2 Candidate

Wesley Chesbro Tom Lynch

Humboldt Votes

27,746 13,676

Humboldt %

66.98% 33.02%

Districtwide Votes

Districtwide %

86,835 49,997

sources: Humboldt county elections office and california secretary of state

63.5% 36.5%

“What are the feds gonna do?” he asked. “Are they gonna roll tanks into Colorado and Washington and say, ‘No, your laws cannot violate our laws’? … There’s going to have to be an accommodation, and it’s not going to be a legal accommodation; it’s going to be a political and a social accommodation.” (An Oregon legalization measure failed on Election Day, but few are willing to draw any conclusions from that one, because it was widely criticized as being poorly written.) In the meantime, Humboldt County residents are left wondering what this means for our local marijuana industry, which has been valued in excess of $2 billion annually. Medical marijuana makes up a tiny fraction of that amount, but local industry advocates hope that this week’s votes in Washington and Colorado will give California legislators firmer ground to stand on. Kristin Nevedal is chair of the Emerald Growers Association, a coalition of medical marijuana advocates in Humboldt and Mendocino counties promoting sustainably grown outdoor cannabis. Frustrated by California’s county-by-county patchwork approach to regulating the industry, Nevedal is now optimistic that statewide regulation will be politically viable. “I suspect legalization [elsewhere] will create a little more of a safe-feeling political environment for our state’s legislators,” she said. Dispensaries in Colorado have sprouted like, well, weeds, with more than 200 of them in Denver alone. But federal agents have largely left those operations alone while cracking down on dispensaries in California. Nevedal believes that’s because Colorado, unlike California, has a comprehensive statewide regulatory system. Earlier this year in Californa, state Assemblyman Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco) withdrew a bill that aimed to establish such a system after it was scoffed at and burdened with amendments. Nevedal also hopes that bringing the industry into the sunshine will help educate people about the superiority of sustainable outdoor cultivation. “Patients continued on next page

North COAST Coast JOURNAL JourNal •• THURSDAY, thursday, NOV. Nov.8,8,2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com••NORTH

17 17


continued from previous page

l

Bonino supporters councilmember Mike Newman, Matthew Owen, John Chiv, councilmember Melinda Ciarabellini and councilmember Marian Brady watch Mitt Romney’s concession speech. Photo by Andrew Goff

The Waiting Game, with Drinks At election night parties, Eureka City Council splits 4-1 By Ryan Burns and Andrew Goff

Linda Atkins being interviewed by Dana Griffin of KIEM TV.

ryan@northcoastjournal.com andrew@northcoastjournal.com

W

Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com North Coast JourNal • thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com 1818North

2

EL

ith the high profile supervisodoor and hollered, “We got the Supreme rial seats all taken in June’s Court!” And then, with a little jump, she primary, one of the few local added, “Woo hoo!” contests saving Humboldt Atkins had come from the regular Tuesfrom being a complete elecday council meeting at city hall, and she was toral snoozefest was the contentious race completely unaware of how her own bid at to represent Eureka’s second ward. The main reelection was going. The lone progressive players: incumbent City Councilmember voice left on the council, she had spent Linda Atkins and challenger Joe Bonino. months campaigning against a likeable The mood at Democratic headand well-funded Republican chalO I T N EC quarters on election night went lenger. But hours before most of from optimistic to stoked before the votes would be tallied, she reaching all-out giddy as a couple already felt victorious. of dozen party die-hards munched “I won because President 201 Halloween-colored corn chips and Obama won,” she effused. “The cheered the results coming across Supreme Court is absolutely the the TV screens. The revelers moved most important thing this election.” in and out of rooms plastered with lefty The good news kept rolling in. “We have campaign signs, sipping chilled bottles of Ala lesbian senator!” Atkins cheered a few leycat Amber and joyfully heckling villainous minutes later, referring to Tammy Baldwin’s Republicans as they went down to defeat. victory in Wisconsin, which made her the Just 14 minutes after NBC called the U.S. Senate’s first out lesbian. More cheers presidential election for Barack Obama, erupted as Maryland and Maine became the igniting squeals and hugs, applause and tears first states to approve same-sex marriage by of joy, Atkins bounded through the front popular vote. And the good cheer contin-

EL

have not had the opportunity to be really well educated because we’re in a prohibition era,” she said. The federal government forbids laboratory studies of marijuana, and so the Food and Drug Administration hasn’t tested the plant’s tolerance levels for pesticides, fungicides and additives like nitrogen and phosphorous. But what about the other side of the industry, the black market? Professor Beth Wilson, the chair of HSU’s economics department, said it’s impossible to know for sure what the impacts will be, but certain economic principles could help with an educated guess. “I think that our market is, well, certainly national,” she said. “I grew up in Chicago and I remember people having Humboldt pot.” Like any export product, weed is subject to the law of supply and demand. If legalization serves to boost production in Washington and Colorado, as analysts have predicted it will, Wilson said she would expect to see marijuana prices drop nationwide. This would be bad news for locals making their living from pot, but it would also disrupt drug cartels. A study released last week by a respected Mexican think tank estimated that legalization in any U.S. state would cut Mexican drug cartels’ earnings in the U.S. by as much as 30 percent, according to the Washington Post. The study theorized that a state with legal weed could become a major producer for the nation, growing quality marijuana on the cheap and supplying illicit flows to other states. If competition expands, Humboldt County growers could be in trouble. Our county has good name recognition and an established support industry, Wilson said, but “I don’t believe that we have any advantage in terms of our soil or things that can’t be moved — our terroir, if you will.” Such market-based concerns are beside the point for Ellen Komp, deputy director of California’s branch of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). During the nonprofit’s 40-year history, politicians have consistently argued that the public isn’t ready for legalization. Now, Komp said, “Those arguments are out the window.” Anthony, the Oakland attorney, expects a domino effect. “It’s the beginning of the end for the black market,” he said. “I think that we’ll see the California Legislature take some kind of statewide action to regulate and clarify medical marijuana. Not to mention there will be a huge push, both in the legislature and by initiative, to pursue adult-use legalization either in 2014 or 2016.”

TI ON EC

Photo by ryan burns

ued as Obama kept racking up states and those Electoral College votes. Bonino’s event across town at Babetta’s was more subdued. Anticipating the late hour that local election results usually start rolling in, the gathering was scheduled to start at 8:30 p.m. — well after the presidential suspense had been played out. The man of the hour, looking debonair in a blazer, tie and bright red, white and blue starred scarf, chatted cordially with supporters and guests. “You want some pizza?” he offered one reporter who failed to resist. “Pepperoni or sausage?” The earliest results, released as the polls closed, showed Bonino with an early lead that he seemed to take in stride. “I walked most of the city and got a pretty positive response,” he said. “I feel like my message resonated with people.” If there were any question about the rift that exists on the current Eureka City Council, note that all four of Atkins’ fellow council members were in attendance at Ba-


Contested* Mayoral and City Council Races Vote totals as of 1:19 a.m. Nov. 7 with 100% precincts reporting.**

CANDIDATE JOE BONINO CHATS WITH SUPPORTERS AT BABETTA’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT IN EUREKA. PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF

Absentee candidate Votes % FeRnDAle MAYoR Ken Weller 124 46.44% Stu Titus 131 49.06% Write-In 12 4.49% FoRtUnA citY coUncil (two seats open) Douglas strehl 1,512 48.09% tami Gillam-trent 1,000 31.81% Joshua M. Brown 610 19.40% Write-In 22 .70% eUReKA citY coUncil, WARD 2 linda Atkins 1,697 48.65% Joe Bonino 1,747 50.09% Charles Bean (W) 35 1.00% Other Write-Ins 9 .26%

election total %

totAl total

%

163 156 10

49.54% 47.42% 3.04%

287 287 22

48.15% 48.15% 3.69%

1,163 817 531 16

46.02% 32.33% 21.01% .63%

2,675 1,817 1,141 38

47.17% 32.04% 20.12% .67%

2,238 1,980 0 47

52.47% 46.42% 0% 1.10%

3,935 3,727 35 56

50.75% 48.07% .45% .72%

*Offices with multiple candidates fOr each available seat. **sOme prOvisiOnal and hand-delivered ballOts uncOunted. sOurce: humbOldt cOunty electiOns Office

betta’s Tuesday night. Roll call? That would be Marian Brady, Mike Newman, Lance Madsen and Melinda Ciarabellini. All of them came to the party directly from Eureka’s City Council meeting. “I didn’t like how she used pictures of the council in some of her ads,” councilmember Newman said, listing his colleague’s latest transgression. “She took credit for doing a lot of things. I understand she’s campaigning but it’s a team effort.” Newman had heard that President Obama won reelection as he was coming out of the council meeting earlier in the evening. While he might have preferred a different outcome, he remained positive. “God’s in control. He knows what He’s doing,” he said. Also in attendance was freshly forged supervisor Rex Bohn, who has been a vocal public supporter of Bonino, a man he’s known for over two decades. Bohn rejected the notion — put forward by Atkins’ supporters — that having a fifth conservative voice on the council would be a bad thing.

“You want to have a cohesive city council. I think they can all be friends,” he said. “They have a great council now … except for Newman.” The named council member, well in earshot, briefly looked up from checking election results on his phone and chuckled. Brady, too, looked to poke holes in the conventional wisdom that Atkins’ is the council’s needed dissenting voice. “I have voted the same number of times against the majority as she has!” Brady said. “How does that make her the independent vote?” Bohn left early, noting that he’d promised Carolyn Crnich, the county’s registrar of voters, that he’d drop by later to see if the office needed any help. Maybe she’d have him go pick up some ballots. “Seems like an archaic system, doesn’t it?” he said with a smile. The evening progressed back at Atkinsland. The first report from the county elections office had Atkins down by 50 votes, but when the local media descended on Dem headquarters she calmly told first KHUM DJ John Mathews and then KIEM TV’s Dana Griffin that she wasn’t worried — those are just the absentee ballots, which tend to break conservative. Chatting with a supporter, Atkins characterized her opponent’s backers as a well-oiled pro-development machine. “They piled so much money into this [election],” she said. “This is a test to see if we could do it all grassroots and still beat those guys.” The next Eureka City Council will have some important tasks to handle, including hiring a new city manager and a new

police chief, as well as updating the city’s general plan. Pam Service, a member of the Humboldt County Democratic Central Committee, said that while Atkins is already outnumbered on many issues, her presence on the council is important. “It’s just a city council race; the world won’t end. But Eureka will change without a voice of dissent,” Service said. As the evening wore on, people started heading home and the buzz started to wear off. Shortly before 10 p.m., Atkins sat down at an abandoned laptop next to a TV that was being half-watched by a couple of people. She called up the county’s election office website and clicked the button to refresh the results. No news. “It’s gonna be a long night,” she said to no one in particular. And it was. When the second report came in at 10:09, Atkins went from 50 votes down to 66 votes up — a tenuous lead with fewer than half of the county’s precincts reporting. Back at Babetta’s, someone handed the challenger a small slip of paper with scrawled second wave of results called in from the election office. The candidate initially took the numbers as good news — “Wowie! All right!” — until a supporter clarified. “We’re down.” “Oh. Uh oh, that’s not good,” he said. “Well, we’ve got a long way to go.” “What’s an under vote?” unopposed city council candidate Melidna Ciarabellini wondered aloud while analyzing her numbers. “Is continued on next page

Do it Legally

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$ 85

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 12-6pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI , Veterans & Students New First Time MMJ Patie nts S

A

VE $50

with men tion of this ad

Lowest Price Evaluations in HC

Medical Cannabis Consultants

(707) 407- 0527 508 I Street, Eureka

(across from HC Court House)

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

19


Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

822-2227

THE

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

I S ION VCENTER

Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years.

616 H STREET • EUREKA

443-1619

continued from previous page that when people don’t vote at all?” (A good number of Eurekans decided to leave her box uncolored.) “Because they know you’re going to win anyway,” Brady reassured her. (Plus, those boxes take forever to fill in with a ballpoint pen, amirite?) Brady confessed that she probably took longer than the 12 minutes allowed by the spot she parked in when she visited her polling place earlier in the day. The crowd slowly petered out. With the race seemingly too close to call as the 11 o’clock hour approached, Bonino paid his tab and got ready to leave. “Kennedy didn’t stay up late to see his election results either,” the candidate said in parting. “He went to bed an average citizen and woke up president. So I’m in good company.” In Wednesday morning’s wee-est hours, the county board of elections filed its final report. With all local precincts reporting, Atkins appeared to be squeaking toward a win — 3,935 boxes filled in for the incumbent (50.75 percent) to 3,727 for the challenger Bonino (48.07 percent), and just 35 votes for write-in candidate Charles Bean. Countywide, more than 7,000 votes remained to be counted, but it was unclear how many of them were left in Eureka. Barring a swap, Kennedy stands alone.

Newly elected city council member Shane Brinton cozies up next to his Mom, Susan Brinton (left), and Kaitlin Sopoci-Belknap to watch election results trickle in. photo by Scottie lee meyers

Relaxed Reelection With no opponents, incumbents kick back in Arcata By Scottie Lee Meyers

M

ellow, all of it: The soft lullaby music from the gypsyjazz quartet of strings, the red-bulbed lighting, the soft cushioned seats, the low key comfort food, the deep red wines and dark beers. Nerves didn’t need calming at the election gathering at the Arcata Playhouse Tuesday night. Palms were wet from the condensation of drinks, not clammy from nervous watching, waiting, counting.

l

The mood perfectly matched the demeanor of Arcata’s three, newly reelected incumbent council members, Mayor Michael Winkler, Vice Mayor Shane Brinton and Susan Ornelas, who all ran unopposed. Their reelection was made easy after three would-be challengers failed to qualify for the ballot, unable to collect a mere 20 signatures from Arcata voters by the Aug. 10 deadline. You could say the incumbents cruised to victory on that August day.

U.S. Presidential Race

Clip this ad

Come in for Lunch, have a Specialty Appetizer on us! 11:30 to 4:00 daily Offer expires 11/30/12 Open Daily for Lunch and Dinner, 11:30am - 10pm • Extended Bar Hours

Reservations Recommended (707) 407-3550 1911 Truesdale Street Eureka Off Broadway behind the Best Western Bayshore Inn

Humboldt results as of 1:19 a.m. and California results as of 5:25 a.m. Nov. 7.

WA 12

And the winner is whoever gets 270 electoral votes.

OR 7

Wednesday morning counts said that was Barack Obama.

Candidates

Humboldt Humboldt Statewide Statewide Votes % Votes %

Jill Stein Official Entry Form 1,816

3.89%

56,980

0.6%

Name: _____________ 33.54% Phone: _____________

26,334

0.3%

3,543,430

38.4%

Cheri Honkala OfferGRN expires 10/31/12 Thomas Hoefling 79 Robert Ornelas AIP Mitt Romney 15,653 Paul Ryan REP Gary Johnson 685 James P. Gray LIB Roseanne Barr 279 Cindy Sheehan PF Barack Obama 25,757 Joseph Biden DEM

0.17%

1.47%

96,489

1%

0.6%

36,183

0.4%

59.48%

5,475,911

59.3%

source: Humboldt county elections office and california secretary of state

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

MT 3 ID 4

NV 6

AZ 11

MN 10

SD 3

WY 3 UT 6

CA 55

ME 4

ND 3

OK 7 TX 38 HI 4

ALASKA AND HAWAII NOT TO SCALE

MO 10

KS 6

NM 5

AK 3

IA 6

NE 5

CO 9

WI 10

AR 6 LA 8

NY 29

MI 16

IL 20

OH 18

IN 11

KY 8

PA 20 WV 5

VA 13 NC 15

TN 11

SC 9 MS 6

AL 9

GA 16

FL 29 sources: counts compiled by the journal from Humboldt county elections office, Huffington post, wasHingtonpost.com, electoral-vote.com

NH VT MA RI CT NJ DE MD DC

4 3 11 4 7 14 3 10 3


home & garden

service directory

continued from page 16

Depot Humboldt

Garden Center

(707) 825 0269 www.humdepot.com Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 10am-6:30pm 5201 Carlson Park Drive #2, Arcata GPS Address: 1264 Giuntoli Ln. (Behind McIntosh Farm Country Store)

Looking for the North Coast’s best resource on all things GREEN?

Newly elected city council member Susan Ornelas (right) chats about California’s initiative results with fellow council member Alex Stillman. photo by Scottie lee meyers

Be sure to pick up the Journal’s Do It A quartet of strings serenaded election party goers at Green Guide. the Arcata Playhouse as electoral results came in.

HUMBOLDT CARPET NEW LOCATION

212 F St., Old Town Eureka 442-0291

New Shipment of Oriental Rugs

WE’RE THE SOLUTION!

photo

by Scottie lee meyers

• Industrial • Residential • Secure • Durable • Rust resistant • Many colors

5660 WEST END RD., ARCATA LICENSED-BONDED • CA CONTRACTOR #808339

RUSS@HUMBOLDTFENCE.COM

B3200

Rugged & Reliable (707) 826-8400 5065 Boyd Rd. • Arcata Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm

2011

“I felt like if you can’t get 20 signatures, try, Availableyou ondidn’t newsstands and you’re probably not a very serious candidate,” Ornelas all over Humboldt said. A contested race is always good for democracy, she said, but she saved time and money this way. No need for County, at your favorite yard signs. About 40 people gathered inside the merchants theater, much and like green they would in a big living room, to munch on snacks and online at The watch election results trickle in on a giant24/7 projector. results were encouraging. “It looks very good, from local to northcoastjournal.com, national,” Winkler said. Without having to focus on the Arcatathe council race, the under Special attendees — who included Humboldt County Supervisor Mark Lovelace and  Arcata council member Alex tab. Stillman — Publications instead turned their attention to Eureka’s city council race and California’s initiatives. “How about 30? 32? And 37?” they free asked, as if it were a deli service line. But most eyes were on Measure I, Arcata’s grow tax, aimed to drive growers out of the area, or at least get them to pay more taxes for heavy electricity consumption. It was taking a strong lead. All in all, it was one of those election nights when just about everything goes right. It’s nice to have it so easy, said the incumbents, but it wasn’t always this way. All three have battled hard in previous elections to earn their seats. Now humboldt county’s they easily keep them for another four years. comprehensive

Want something different?

l

guide to green building, green living and more

northcoastjournal.com •• North northcoastjournal.com NORTH Coast COAST Journal JOURNAL • Thursday, THURSDAY, Nov. NOV. 8, 2012

21


ning w

www.bubbles-arcata.com

www.humboldtwick.com

Bubbles

Jack’s Hand Cleaner o

v

Rem

et h

You h av

Jessicurl

s. ni e

Awa rd-w in

he Lat

organicagavemixers.com

luten free B rea ds

eat! Av aila b le i th e h l e n Fe

www.tomasosspecialtyfoods.com

enly! heav

and

Truff le: C r

T he

s h a v i n g s o ap .

Muddy Waters Coffee

Fieldbrook Winery www.fieldbrookwinery.com

www.blackberrybramblebbq.com

Ask your local retailer about these fine products!

ls! h ee

ng

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

&s oot hi

www.SimmonsNaturals.com

r clas h ou

s ic

!

i rt eD

, Resi n and G ri me! www.jackshandcleaner.com

y

wi t

! organic iously Delic

wa

v er

. als

l eP

th W our N E

cal grocery store!

Simmons Aloe Shaving Soap

Light the Wick, Taste t he di f

nce! The Hum boldt Wick

or

Try

e lo orit fav

an

sw e t ! eet bl e n d .

the t ra di tional

.

Humboldt Traders e fer

g Caterin inning a rd-W & Aw

S av

p ru

al s o

For t h e B a th ! Planet www.Jessicurl.com t to remain c Chai igh urly r e

Rita’s Mexican Food to grab ‘n’ go at Ready you r

and hot

ad o ll he . . fa

www.venlochocolates.com

ces

et swe y l l u f n y , Si

ld mi

diu m , me

at

k.

S au

eam

www.ilovemud.com

Tomaso’s Specialty Foods

Venlo Chocolates

eB

h!

e Fin

Blackberry Bramble Barbecue

G

Heartfire th ForBakery

Head Over Heels

lo

drin

Hasta Be Pasta

Fall in

our hy wi t

produced in hum boldt county

ls a n d Pastries l o ,R

ve

et pasta me gourm lian

Delicious, authentic Ita


pull-out A RT sect i on

northcoastjournal.com

dvd Sherlock: Season 2

MONEY ART BY DONOVAN CLARK

Bucking the System

Donovan Clark’s money-art at Missing Link Records By Jason Marak

I

n these times of economic uncertainty, money is on everyone’s mind. Actually, it doesn’t really matter if times are good or bad, the power of money is a constant in our society. And we don’t just use it to buy burgers and beer. All too often it is the yardstick by which we measure an individual’s value, his or her worth to society. In the words of philosopher Cyndi Lauper, “Money changes everything.” Even the art world often seems slave to the almighty dollar with artists trying to turn their art into cold, hard cash. Enter local artist Donovan Clark and his new exhibition, “Adding Value to Money,” at Missing Link Records in Arcata. In a refreshing reversal, he’s turning cold, hard cash into art. Clark uses one-dollar bills as canvases, creating small works that often include popular culture icons. The Hulk, R2D2 and Tupac Shakur make appearances among many others. Trompe l’oeil imagery is also incorporated into the images and patterns already on the bills. The resulting works are fun, visually interesting pieces that challenge us to reconsider our cash-obsessed notions of value. First things first: Yes, it’s legal. Probably. “I’m walking a thin line,” said Clark in response to questions of legality. “I’m covering up the president and changing the imagery, but I haven’t changed it completely [to] where you can’t recognize it as a dollar.” Based on Clark’s reading of the law, the fact that his money-art pieces are still clearly dollar bills and the denomination has not been altered should be

enough to keep him out of trouble. Clark doesn’t mind that his works walk a line between art and criminal act. He even attributes some of the positive response he’s had to his money-art project to the fact that, like graffiti, the element of illegality actually makes the work feel edgier and draws people to it. The money-art project got its start where so many things do, at the laundromat. When a change machine wouldn’t take Clark’s dollar bill, he noticed that someone had done a rough, ballpoint pen drawing of Batman on the bill. It got Clark thinking about possibilities. “I thought, how far can I take this money-art thing?” he said. “I’d seen lots of people draw on money before but I’d never seen anyone do little paintings on the dollars.” Clark, one of the founding members of the local art collective Empire Squared, was already interested in the idea of free art and sharing art with the public in nontraditional ways. His money-art project provided him with another outlet to do just that. “I started using the dollars as tips,” Clark explained. “When I get a cup of coffee, I just put it in the tip jar. I felt like that would be a really cool surprise … to get a dollar with a nice painting on it instead of just a regular dollar. So that’s what I’ve been doing with most of them — using them as tips when I get breakfast.” From the looks of it, the art-tips are much appreciated. Clark said that several local businesses have started taking the bills out of tip jars and displaying them for patrons to enjoy. You might see some of

Clark’s bills the next time you visit places like Café Brio, Wildberries and Ramone’s. Because many of the money-art pieces do end up “in circulation,” Clark has been cataloging them on various social media sites to keep a record and as another avenue to share the work. As a result, an element of interactivity entered into the project. Clark said that several of the pieces he’s done have been inspired by ideas from his Twitter followers. The fact that the project has sparked this kind of dialog between artist and audience is something Clark seems to relish. As the project progressed and gained recognition, Clark started keeping some bills to show in a more traditional manner. Several bills were displayed as part of an Empire Squared group show at Piante Gallery in Eureka earlier in the year, but the Missing Link exhibition represents his first solo money-art show. And yes, the bills will be for sale. “I’m not opposed to making money off of my art,” Clark said wryly, “but that’s definitely not why I’m doing it. I’m more interested in the idea of sharing my art.” “Adding Value to Money” will be on display at Missing Link Records in Arcata (1073 H. St.) from Nov. 9 until Dec. 7. There will be a dollar-themed opening from 6-9 p.m. on Nov. 9, with music and snacks in conjunction with Arts! Arcata. For a preview, search out Clark’s money-art online at the following sites: www.donovanclark.blogspot.com, donovanclark.tumblr.com, donovanclark. deviantart.com and www.twitter.com/ money_art. ●

  Over the past century Sherlock Holmes has not been long absent from stage or screen, but he’s currently everywhere, from a motion picture franchise (with Robert Downey, Jr.) to a new CBS television series (Elementary, which I deduce will not last long). And that’s apart from Holmes mutations on The Mentalist and Law and Order: Criminal Intent. But he’s making perhaps his biggest international splash with the BBC-originated Sherlock, which has produced six TV films of 90 minutes each, all now on DVD. Another three go into production early next year. While the Downey features are set in the 1890s of the original stories, they are more steampunk than Arthur Conan Doyle. The BBC films are set in contemporary London, but they make more use of the original plots. Both of their Sherlocks are younger than usually seen, but so is the Holmes of the first Conan Doyle stories: He’s in his 20s. The BBC series is the brainchild of Steven Moffatt and Mark Gatiss, both known primarily for their association with Doctor Who. They are self-confessed Sherlock scholars who know the 60 Conan Doyle stories down to the geekiest details. Their films are full of references, mix and match plot elements and inside jokes — perfect for Sherlockian DVD obsessives. Yet they manage to make the characters and events convincingly contemporary. This is easily the most stylish version yet. Its Sherlock is a contemporary take on the classic character (Benedict Cumberbatch, inspired by Jeremy Brent’s interpretation for Granada television) but its Doctor Watson is singular, as played by Martin Freeman. Though troubled — like Doyle’s Watson, he’s just returned from service in Afghanistan — he is the anchor for these stories. There’s plenty of humor, but not (as in other portrayals) at Watson’s expense. And the relationship is complex but fun. (Before Holmes is to give court testimony: “Don’t be a smartass, Sherlock.” “I’ll just be myself.” “Have you been listening to me?”) The stories range from the fairly obscure (“Study in Scarlet,” Conan Doyle’s first, but rarely dramatized) to the most famous ones in Series Two. Those feature the only woman to impress Sherlock (Doyle’s adventuress reimagined as a dominatrix), the hound of the Baskervilles and a version of “The Final Problem,” in which Holmes confronts his arch-enemy Moriarty (a chilling 21st century villain) and dies. The original story’s fans had to wait years to learn he hadn’t really died, but Sherlock appears mysteriously alive at the end of this series. How did he cheat death? That’s in the next series. The DVD provides endless opportunities to look for clues. I found four. Possibly five. — William Kowinski

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

23


11th St

to HSU

8

31

18 5 24 13

Second Friday Arts! Arcata Friday, Nov. 9, 6-9 p.m.

19

15 14

G St

11

I St

Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at more than 30 participating locations in Arcata. Visit www.artsarcata.com for even more information about the event or call (707) 822-4500.

10th St

10

H St

27

22

9

2

21

23

12

4

FEATURED IN NOVEMBER AT ARCATA ARTISANS GALLERY: TAPESTRIES BY HOLLY GARBUTT, BEAD AND FABRIC CREATIONS BY OCEANA MADRONE AND JEWELRY BY ALEX CONNELL. A RECEPTION FOR THE ARTISTS WILL BE HELD FRIDAY, NOV. 9, 6-9 P.M. FOR ARTS! ARCATA. EGRET TAPESTRY BY HOLLY GARBUTT.

1. ABRUZZI 780 Seventh St. Live music. 2. ARCATA ARTISANS COOPERATIVE 883 H St. Tapestries by Holly Garbutt, jewelry by Alex Connell, bead and tapestry art by Oceana Madrone. Wine served to benefit Humboldt Community Breast Health Project. 3. ARCATA CITY HALL* 736 F St. “Who You Gonna Call,” photographs of city of Arcata employees by Arcata Arts Institute students. 4. ARCATA EXCHANGE 813 H St. Artwork by Arcata House artists. Music by Hot Wings. Wine served to benefit Arcata House.

5. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Bluegrass by Clean Livin’. 6. CAFÉ BRIO 791 G St. Glass art by Melissa Zielinski. 7. FIRE ARTS CENTER 520 South G St. #A. Ceramics by Honoree Cress, Elaine Shore and Peggy Loudon. 8. FUNK SHUI 1091 H St. Castaway Creations antique architectural salvage furniture, recycled cassette lamps by Heffrey. 9. THE GARDEN GATE 905 H St. Art by Lynn Carlin and Thao le Khac. Music by The Pilot Rock Ramblers. Wine served to benefit Arcata Historical Sites Society.

8th St

20

Arcata Plaza 28 29 1

17 16

25 6

ARCATA NOVEMBER 2012 0

250 ft

7th St

3

7 26

© NORTH COAST JOURNAL/Miles Eggleston

10. HENSEL’S ACE HARDWARE KITCHEN STORE 884 Ninth St. TBA. 11. HUMBOLDT CLOTHING COMPANY 987 H St. Music by Seed. 12. HUMBOLDT OUTFITTERS 860 G St. TBA. Wine served to benefit NAFS. 13. HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Concert photos by John Chapman. 14. IRONSIDE GALLERY 900 Ninth St. Art by collective members. 15. JAMBALAYA 915 H St. TBA 16. LIBATION 761 Eighth St. New work by Jay Brown. Music by guitarist Duncan Burgess. 17. MAZZOTTI’S 773 Eighth St. Mixed media by Jen Mackey.

18. MISSING LINK RECORDS 1073 H St. “Adding Value to Money,” dollar art by Donovan Clark. 19. MONUMENT SETTINGS 1499 10th St. A. TBA. 20. MOONRISE HERBS 826 G St. Nature inspired watercolors by Anne Katz. Music by Lorna and Stephen Brown on accordion and guitar 21. MOORE’S SLEEPWORLD 876 G St. TBA. 22. NATURAL SELECTION 708 Ninth St. Photography by Erin Scofiled, serigraphs by Michael Guerriero. 23. NORTH SOLES FOOTWEAR 853 H St. Alan Sanborn’s watercolor critique group No. 2.

Food that one would find in an Italian home... simple, handmade and honest. A seasonal Italian menu with an extensive use of the local and organic. Also featuring regional Italian wines.

latrattoriaarcata.com • 822-6101

Dinners Thursday-Sunday, 5:30-9:00 p.m. • 30 Sunny Brae Center • Arcata

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

F St

9th St

30


northcoastjournal.com

MELISSA ZIELINSKI, WHO ALSO WORKS AS A NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL, PRESENTS AN EXHIBITION OF IRIDIZED TRANSLUCENT FUSED GLASS WORKS BASED ON IMAGERY FROM NATURE AT CAFÉ BRIO IN NOVEMBER. DRAGONFLY MARSH PANELS BY MELISSA ZIELINSKI.

30. STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 Bayside Road. Oil paintings from the Christopher Metzger estate, assemblage by Daniel Lazarus, mixed media by Andrew Hamer. 31. UPSTAIRS ART GALLERY 1063 G St. “Concrete Art” by John King. ●

24. OM SHALA YOGA 858 10th St. TBA. 25. PLAZA 808 G St. Acrylics and murals by David Steinhardt. Raffle for a quilt by Jodi Rusconi. Wine served to benefit Humboldt Wildlife Care Center. 26. REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING COMPANY 550 S G St. No. 6. Skateboard grip tape art by Dan Caspberry. 27. ROBERT GOODMAN WINERY 937 10th St. Paintings by Rob Hampson. 28. THE ROCKING HORSE 791 Eighth St. Children’s art. 29. SCRAP 791 Eighth St. Suite 11. Upcycled art pop-up shop. Wine served to benefit SCRAP.

*Venue open only during regular business hours.

OS X UPGRADE NEW

MOUNTAIN LION

CEMENT ARTIST JOHN KING SAYS HE THINKS DEEP THOUGHTS AND CONTEMPLATES THE ORIGINS OF THE LIFE ON EARTH WHILE HE’S WORKING ON HIS ART. “THE ATOMS THAT MAKE UP EVERYTHING IN THE UNIVERSE CAME FROM THE SURROUNDING STARS THAT BLEW AWAY FRAGMENTS AND DUST THAT SWIRLED INTO PLANET FORMING EDDIES,” HE WRITES IN AN ARTIST STATEMENT FOR HIS NEXT OPENING. “THE WONDERFUL THING IS THAT EVERYTHING IN OUR EXISTENCE, FROM ROCKS TO PLANTS, ARE MADE UP OF THE SAME TYPE OF ATOMS. THEY ARE JUST ARRANGED IN DIFFERENT WAYS.” KING’S SKILL IS IN ARRANGING THE ATOMS AND MOLECULES THAT MAKE UP CEMENT TO CREATE PLEASING FORMS, OFTEN DEPICTING PLANTS AND ANIMALS IN BAS RELIEF. AN EXHIBITION OF HIS CEMENT ART IS ON DISPLAY DURING NOVEMBER AT THE UMPQUA BANKS’ UPSTAIRS GALLERY IN ARCATA. YOU CAN MEET KING AND ASK HIM DEEP QUESTIONS AT A RECEPTION FOR THE ARTIST FRIDAY, 6-9 P.M. DURING ARTS! ARCATA.

• Combines features from iPhone, iPad and iPod touch to the Mac • Send iMessages • Get your Mac on Game Center • Receive notifications and more • And with iCloud now Mac works even better with your iOS devices

BASIC

UPGRADE

25

STARTS AT $

On the Plaza • 707-825-7100

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

25


Soul Reunion

Bishop Mayfield and the Dave Storie Band, plus KRS-One, a medical fun raiser, Jessica Lurie and Folklife action

Custome r Fa Firecrac vorite: ker Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

Looking for a venue to host your Holiday Party? Don’t stress it. Just pick up the Journal’s Menu of Menus. The 2012 Menu of Menus is available on newsstands throughout Humboldt County and online 24/7 at www.northcoastjournal.com

Hwy 101 in the Safety Corridor 707.826.7435 • 10-6pm M-Sat • 10-5pm Sun

Light It Up Sale

Finally...An excuse to wear sunglasses inside.

up to

30% off msrp

· Ballasts · Hoods · Bulbs · T5s & other lighting accessories

Sale Good Thru November

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

T

he Old Town Bar and Grill reunion at Humboldt Brews a couple of years ago brought together musicians and music fans from near and far. Among them, the soulful Bishop Mayfield, who was part of the Humboldt music scene from the ‘70s through the ‘00s. “I was in all kinds of bands: Straight Shot, Two Weeks Notice, Wild Child, 911, To the Bone, Flex,” he recalled in a phone call from his current home in Central Point, Ore. At the reunion he was talking with guitarist Dave Storie, another former local who led the band Commotion back in the day, and realized they were almost neighbors — both live in Oregon’s Jackson County. The result: Mayfield now sings for The Dave Storie Band. This Friday being Bishop’s 68th birthday, he decided BISHOP MAYFIELD to celebrate here in Humboldt with a blues and soul bash at Blue Lake Casino’s Sapphire Palace. Joining him for the occasion, another local soul/ blues veteran Earl Thomas (backed by Storie’s band) and a reconstituted Vintage Rock N’ Soul. Wait until you hear that band’s new vocalist Dee Hemingway — she’s got soul to spare. His name, KRS-One, is an acronym for “Knowledge Reigns Supreme Over Nearly Everybody.” The Brooklyn-born rapper also known as “The Teacha” drops some knowledge at the Arcata Theatre Lounge Thursday night with Nappy Roots, Gobi and the proverbial “special guests.” Thursday’s “Onward and Upward” show at the Jambalaya is a fundraiser for folky songwriter Caitlin Jemma‘s next CD. Her friends Gunsafe and Lela Roy are down with the cause. Kentucky born and raised indie-

folk cellist Ben Sollee stops by Humboldt Brews Friday with his trio to play tunes from his latest album, Half-Made Man, a merger of folk with classical and alt. rock (and plentiful cello). Friday’s all vinyl ‘80s Dance Party at the Jambalaya has DJ Red, Zephyr, King Maxwell and Jaymorg spinning new wave, rap, synth-pop, etc. It’s sad that they’re necessary, but benefits to cover medical bills have become a regular thing. Saturday in the Eureka Inn Ballroom, friends of Matt L’Herogan gather for a “fun raiser” to help pay for a lung transplant. The fun starts at 6:30 p.m. with jazz by Pete Zuleger, Bob Ebenstein and Val Leone, moves on to Hawaiian music and hula by Lost Coasters Kanikapila Band, then a solo uke set by Joey Koches from UKEsperience. Guitarist Angel Vargas and his dancer friend Ku-Hsiang Lin offer some flamenco starting around 8 p.m. followed by The Joyce Hough Quartet (9ish) and, last but not least, guitarist Doug Shernock and bassist Gary Davidson from Play Dead and friends sharing some classic G-Dead tunes. Silent auction: check. Beer, wine, snacks: check. Friends who care: most definitely. Earlier that Saturday friends of the late Jimmy Dangler will gather at Beginnings Octagon to pay tribute to the cigarchomping sound man with stories, beer, barbecue and birthday cake. DJ Selecta Prime supplies a reggae-ish soundtrack. You might remember saxophonist Jessica Lurie from her days with the jazz/ jam band Living Daylights. Her latest combo, The Jessica Lurie Ensemble, takes her in a few other directions on a new


release, Megaphone Heart. Lurie jumps from sax to flute, accordion and vocals, while Brandon Seabrook shifts between guitar and banjo, and the always-awesome Allison Miller lays down rhythms on melodic tunes that defy easy categorization. Good stuff. Catch the band Saturday when a West Coast tour brings them to the Arcata Playhouse. Motherlode guitarist/founder Greg Camphuis describes the interaction of the 10-piece funk/Afrobeat combo as “organized chaos.” That may be, but it’s also extremely funky. The band is at the Jambalaya Saturday night. Same Saturday at the Alibi: a double bill with two of my favorite local bands, The Trouble and Strix Vega. World Famous presents another night of bottom heavy EDM Saturday at the Arcata Theatre Lounge with Philly-based producer Starkey, Kastle from Pittsburg and young Ital Tek from Brighton, UK. Rudi Galindo of Teatro Pachuco is back in town for a Clowns Without Borders benefit Friday night at the Arcata Playhouse. Joining him are Shea Freelove, silk artist Leslie Howabauten, Lisa DaBoit, Jackie Dandeneau and David Ferney. (Since Ferney and Galindo were both in Los Payasos Mendigos, there just might be some striped tights action — “Listo!”) The Westhaven Center’s monthly Humboldt Talent Showcase turns toward the blues Friday night with Sandy Flippin on harp and Keith Schneider on guitar, plus Eclectica, Jasmine and a blues jam to close the night. Same Friday, the bluesy Jim Lahman Band plays a benefit at the Eureka Veteran’s Hall for Eureka High’s NJROTC. More blues at the Riverwood Saturday night with ace vocalist/harp player John Németh fronting a hot band. The Humboldt Folklife Society has a pair of concerts coming up at the Arcata Playhouse: Sunday it’s songwriter, guitarist, fiddler, banjo and mandolin picker Chris Brashear with his old friend Peter McLaughlin, a national flatpicking guitar champion. While he’s better known for his instrumental prowess, Brashear’s new album, Heart of the Country, features his songwriting. “I never set a course to become a songwriter,” he says in a note on his website. “But I saw the ocean, stood on top of the mountain, smelled the dust, ate the olive oil, held on to family memories and, at some point, these things started showing up as songs.” Then on Tuesday HFS presents Irish supergroup Lunasa at the Playhouse. This band headlines major festivals and is very influential right now in Celtic circles, according to deejay George Ziminsky (host of “From Cool Green Shores” on KMUD). The main innovation is the role of Trevor

Hutchinson‘s double bass, unusual in Irish music, at least until now. For a preview of Tuesday’s show, tune in Ziminsky’s show on Monday at 8 p.m. — he’ll be interviewing the band on the air. BTW, it’s also pledge drive time on KMUD. Give ‘em some money if you can; the station needs it. On the reggae front you have British dancehall/reggae star Gappy Ranks at Nocturnum Friday with The 7th St. Band and Seattle-based Bobby Hustle backed by Tripple Crown plus Humboldt’s own Rude Lion. Sunday at the Ocean Grove (aka Club More Fyah) Bonus Productions presents Tanya Stephens. Don’t expect a protest. Stephens is a vocal proponent of socially responsible reggae who complained to a crowd at the University of the West Indies, “The music that once spoke to and spread messages of peace and love, now merely judges, condemns and provokes.” The Eureka Chamber Music Series switches from string quartets to classical piano with Anton Nel returning to Calvary Lutheran Church Friday to play works by Bach, Chabrier, Chaminade, Poulenc and Schubert. Same Friday in HSU’s Fulkerson Recital Hall, students of guitarist Nicholas Lambson in the HSU Guitar Ensemble play music by Bartok, Ravel, Debussy and Astor Piazzolla among others. Then on Sunday afternoon, a collection of ensembles known as Chamber Players of the Redwoods take on Handel, Brahms, Crespo and others at Christ Episcopal Church in Eureka. Monday night’s choices: A pair of touring stringbands, Head for the Hills (from Colorado) and Fruition (from Oregon) share the bill at Humboldt Brews. Portland’s tres cool alt. surf pop trio Orca Team is at the Shanty with equally cool local neo-girl group The Lost Luvs. And AS Presents has New Orleans second line funk masters Rebirth Brass Band in the Depot. The California Honeydrops are back in town Wednesday, Nov. 14, bringing a blast of rockin’ soul to the Jambalaya with trumpet player/vocalist Lech Wierzynski out front. The Honeydrops are a guaranteed instant party. Something international? On Wednesday at Redwood Raks Humboldt Folkdancers present a band from Oakland called MWE playing Turkish and Balkan music on clarinets, zurna (a Turkish double reed instrument) and davul (a double-headed drum played with sticks, also Turkish). It’s dance music — Shoshanna will do something Middle Eastern, then the folk dancers take over. Dance, dance, dance!

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

Offering Fresh Local Ingredients for Lunch and Dinner

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

Taste the Love Come check us out!

Open Mon.-Sat. til 4 • Across from Jacoby Creek School 1602 Old Arcata Road, 822-4423

●  northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012

27


The California Honeydrops Wednesday at the Jambalaya

venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731 ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200

thur 11/8

fri 11/9

sat 11/10

Dirty Thursday Conscious Reggae & Dancehall Pressure Anya (DJs) 10:30pm

Find us on Facebook

The Trouble, Strix Vega (rock) 11pm

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

Buddy Reed Trio (blues) 9:30pm

Yeagar Creek Boys 9:30pm

Clowns Without Borders 8pm $10

Jessica Lurie Ensemble (jazz) 8pm $15

Bonus presents KRS One, GOBI, special guests. Doors at 10pm $25

Being John Malkovich Doors 7:30pm $5

World Famous presents Starkey, Kastle and Ital Tek 9:30pm

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

www.barflypub.com

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

Billy Allen & The Roadhouse Rockets (rock) 9pm

The Roadmasters (rock/country) no cover 9pm

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220 BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770 BEAR RIVER CASINO 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 BLONDIE’S Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

Caffé Italia

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093

BreakFaSt•eSpreSSo lunCh•dinner•Catering

444-2421

Pint Night Microbrew pints $2

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739 HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

M-F 9aM-10pM • Sat. 11:30-10pM • CloSed Sun.

JAMBALAYA Arcata 822-4766

Dr. Squid (rock) 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Pressure Anya (DJ dancing) no cover 9pm

Pressure Anya (DJ dancing) no cover 9pm

Bradley Dean & Chelsea Dove (rock, blues, country) 9pm

Matt L’Herogan Fun Raiser 6-midnight Salsa w/ Pablo King (Palm Lounge)

Josephine Johnson, Sam Whitlatch 7p

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521

3220 Broadway, Suite 8 • eureka (Behind Big 5 Sporting goodS)

Megagym 7pm B. Mayfield/E. Thomas (Sapphire) 8pm NightHawk (Wave) 9pm

Ben Sollee (cellist/songwriter) 9:30pm $10

Happy hour 3-6pm every day.

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Ballet Folklórico de México 8pm (JVD)

HSU Guitar Ensemble 8pm (FRH)

Humboldt Bay Brass Band 8pm (FRH)

Caitlin Jemma, Gunsafe, Lela Roy 9pm ‘80s Night: DJ Red, Zephyr, etc. 9pm

Motherlode (funk/Afrobeat) 9pm

LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad 677--0230 LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩ G E NTLEMEN ’ S C L U B

Nightly 6pm-3am

LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St Eureka 444-1344

2 1 + O N LY

MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM

HSU Guitar Group (jazz) 7-9pm

Duncan Burgess (guitar) 7-10pm

Tim Randles Trio (jazz) 7-10pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Sierra Rose Band (folk rock) 6-8:30pm

Black Skies, Caltrop, The Hard Ride (hard rock) 9pm

Da Band 9pm

Food Truck Night: Taqueria La Barca Hemp Fest Comedy 8pm $15

Double IPA on sale www.madriverbrewing.com Hemp Fest 11am-midnight $20

THE MATEEL 54 Rusk Lane Redway

CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923

MOSGO’S 180 Westwood Court, Arcata NOCTURNUM 206 W 6th St. Eureka

King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

Gappy Ranks, Bobby Hustle 10pm $25 Sub Nation (EDM) 9:30pm $5

OCEAN GROVE 480 P.P. Drive Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600

N O W S E RV I N G

PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

BEER & WINE

Sci Fi Club Readings: The Works of Ray Bradbury 7-9pm Second Nature Sound (dance music) 10pm

Jeff Demark and The La Patinas (music & stories) 7-9:30pm

Ray Bevitori 7pm

Bill Jones Band with Damien Roomets Matt Hemph, Larry Fries (jazz) 7pm

Songwriters in the Round Benefit for Children’s Orphanage

Chains and Frames: Illy Walsh/Damis

Los Traviezos De Jolibud 10pm $15

Magic Dover with Equipto 10pm $20

We’re Back! Tasting room open again!. Blues Night with Brian! Lesson 8pm, dancing 9pm $5

Open for pints, goblets, growlers, kegs, and merchandise - new space.

Saturday noon-9pm

Learn more at www.RedwoodRaks.com

USA Dances: Lesson & Party 6:30pm Salsa lesson, 7:30pm dancing

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Salsa Dancing 7pm $5

RAMONE’S 2223 Harrison Ave. Eureka RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 824 L Street, Arcata 616-6876

John Németh (blues) 9pm

RIVERWOOD INN Avenue of the Giants ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

NEW HUMBOLDT DESIGNS JUST ARRIVED, AND THEY WILL GO FAST SO COME IN TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SALE:

BUY ANY 2 HOODIES SAVE $10 BUY ANY 2 TSHIRTS SAVE $5 BUY ANY 2 HATS/BEANIES SAVE $5

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St., Eureka 407-3550

Itchie Fingaz (dance music) 10pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

Squar Peg (stranger chamber music) 9pm

Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass)

Open 11:30 am - 9:30pm daily

Come in for a great Dinner!

THE SHANTY 213 Third St. Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA 923-2814

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Liquid Katus (jam rock) 9pm

JL Stiles 9pm

Undone (rock) 9pm

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm

Boss Levelz (DJs) 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580 THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Throwback Thursdays

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials Humboldt Talent Showcase 6pm

www.fabuloustiptop.com


Eureka Car Stereo

entertainment in bold includes paid listings

Car Audio • Mobile Video iPod and Bluetooth Solutions

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more sun 11/11

mon 11/12

tues 11/13

wed 11/14

www.thealibi.com

Restaurant hours: Mon-Fri 10:30am-11pm

Ash Borer, Worm Ourboros, Loss (metal) 9pm

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Monday Open Mic 8-10pm

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

Chris Brashear/Peter McLaughlin 8pm

Lunasa (Celtic) 8pm $20

Squidling Brothers Circus 8pm

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Monday Night Football Chiefs v Steelers Doors 5:15pm - free - all ages

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Sci-Fi Pint & Pizza Night: Journey to the Seventh Planet Doors 6pm

Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Win a night’s stay at Bear River HSU Jazz Club 6pm

Double hours in The Poker Den Quiz Night 7pm-ish

No Limit Texas Hold Em 4pm

Win a night’s stay at Bear River

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Monday Night Football on the big screen + Flat Screen TV giveaways

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings and $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Veteran’s Day specials

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool $3 well drinks

Martini Mondays $5 house Martini

Top Shelf Tuesday

Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 5-7pm

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Head for the Hills, Fruition (stringbands) 9pm $12 adv/$15

Crushed Out (formerly Boom Chick) 9:30pm $10

Happy Hour 3-6pm every day

HSU Jazz Combos 7 & 9pm (FRH)

Rebirth Brass Band 10pm (Depot)

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Lion D, Ras Tewelde, Jah Sun 9pm

15th & Broadway, Eureka

445-3283

Open 7 days New Thai

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

California Honeydrops (soul) 9pm Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm Buddy Reed (blues guitar) 7-9pm

Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun! The Mad Belgian on tap Hemp Fest Forum 1:30pm free

We got beer.

Death Ray (rock) 9pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Growler Mondays $3 off refills

Hot Wings (eclectic folk) 6-8:30pm

4 For Jazz 6-8:30pm

Voices That Heal (film) 6:30pm free

The Tall Men Group (folk) 7-9pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM) Tanya Stevens (reggae) $25

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm

Now serving beer and wine

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

www.persimmons.net or find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Ask us about hosting your event

Gary Stuart & Mike Curran (jazz) 7-10pm

Sunday noon-9pm

Weekday Hours M-F 3pm to 9pm Monday Swing Night 7pm Class, 8pm Dance Party $5

Tropical Breeze (burlesque) $15 9pm

Sacred Wave Dance Meditation 10-11:30am, $10-15

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com Argentine Tango Beginning 8:15pm, $10

Pints for Non Profits for Food for People 4-9pm West Coast Swing 7:30pm MWE (Turkish/Balkan) 8pm $10

Zuzu’s Petals (jazz) 9pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

Salsa Dancing 9pm

Have a signature Cocktail in the bar!

Open 11:30 am - 9:30pm daily

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Orca Team, The Lost Luvs (rock) 10pm

Good & Evil Twins Scary-oke 8pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Kindred Spirits (humgrass) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Live music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

29


RECOGNIZING THAT SELTZER TO THE FACE IS UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE, THE NONPROFIT CLOWNS WITHOUT BORDERS USE THEIR CRAFT TO LIGHTEN THE SPIRITS OF REFUGEE CHILDREN AROUND THE WORLD. ON FRIDAY, NOV. 9, RUDI GALINDO OF LOS PAYASOS MENDIGOS FAME HEADLINES A NIGHT OF COLORFUL FACES AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE TO BENEFIT EFFORTS TO SEND CLOWNS TO CHIAPAS, MEXICO. HA.

IF YOU LIKE HAVING OFFICIAL DAYS TO REMIND YOU TO DO THINGS YOU SHOULD BE DOING ALL YEAR ANYWAY … ‘TIS VETERANS DAY THIS WEEK. MONDAY WILL BE HIGHLIGHTED BY A BENEFIT RUN/WALK IN HSU’S REDWOOD BOWL AND THE ARKLEY CENTER HOSTS A RED, WHITE AND BLUE EVENING OF MELODIES YOU CAN WAVE OUR FLAG(S) TO COURTESY OF THE EUREKA SYMPHONY. ALSO, HUG A VETERAN.

TO BE OR, YOU KNOW, NOT? THAT QUESTION WILL AGAIN BE PONDERED AS CENTERARTS BRINGS IN THE GLOBE THEATRE OF LONDON TO PERFORM SHAKESPEARE’S HAMLET ON THE VAN DUZER STAGE ON SUNDAY, NOV. 11. ADDED AUTHENTICITY? THE SHOW WILL BE PERFORMED WITH AN ELIZABETHAN-STYLE BOOTH STAGE -JUST LIKE THE BARD WANTED IT.

8 thursday EVENTS

Native American Arts Gallery Naming Ceremony. 5:30 p.m. Ground floor of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Building, near Union and 17th streets. New name is a Wiyot word that reflects the gallery’s mission of preserving and promoting indigenous culture through the sharing of traditional and contemporary art. 826-3629.

THEATER

Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. A grade school girl, a magic purple dust ball and the secretary of education are at the center of this hilarious and good-hearted send up of the culture wars. $10. redwoodcurtain.com. 443-7688.

MUSIC

KRS-One. 10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Bonus Entertainment presents the veteran hip hop artist. $25/$22 adv. www.arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. Ballet Folklórico de México. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Celebrated, long-running Mexican dance company features larger-than-life set pieces and a huge cast of 75 dancers, singers and musicians. $45/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

MOVIES

Twilight of the Mississippi. 7:30 p.m. Carlo Theater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Feature-length documentary film exploring the life and culture of people living along the Mississippi River as experienced by theatre troupe the Unseen Ghost Brigade on its 2010 river raft tour from Minneapolis to Caruthersville, Missouri. dellarte.com. 612-227-2690.

ETC.

Humboldt Handweavers’ and Spinners’ Guild. 6:45 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Monthly guild meeting features Ayala Talpai’s presentation “Felting Needles for Fiber Fanatics.” hhsguild.org. 541-272-2297. Humboldt Rose Society. 7 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Monthly meeting. 476-8180. Woodworking Demo. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Hardware, 531

Second St., Eureka. Wood turner Lane Thomsen demonstrates his craft. 444-2717. Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills for a career in maintenance. Get your OSHA certification and learn basic electrical and plumbing skills. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627. Kids’ Art Time. 10 a.m. Parasol Arts, 211 G St., Eureka. Kids paint their own pottery and mosaics. Sponsored by North Coast Parents. northcoastparents.org. Secondary Education Credential Online Orientation. 5 p.m. Teach the next generation at a critical time in their development. Register for the orientation online. humboldt.edu/education/students. 826-3729.

9

friday

EVENTS

Hemp Fest. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Three-day exploration and celebration of hemp and cannabis-related products and issues. Vendors, food, refreshments, comedy, music. Friday features comedian Ngaio Bealum. mateel.org. 923-3368. Clowns Without Borders Benefit. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Features international performing artist Rudi Galindo, known for his role as Lupita in the local comedy troupe Los Payasos Mendigos. Other performers include Lisa DaBoit, David Ferney, Jacqueline Dandeneau, Leslie Howabauten and Shea Freelove. $10/$8 kids 12 and

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

under. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Shine a Little Light for Homecare. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. California United Homecare Workers hold a community candlelight vigil to light up the night in support of a local IHSS caregivers’ wage increase. www.cuhw.org. 407-0542. Arts! Arcata. 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Self-guided, public art phenomenon featuring the work of more than 60 visual artists and live musicians at over 30 participating locations. E-mail info@arcatamainstreet. com. 822-4500. Baroni Annual Sample Sale. 4-8 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Proceeds benefit Humboldt County Breast Health Project. Marine Corps Ball. 5:30 p.m. Ingomar Club, Eureka. Everyone welcome. RSVP. $55. 443-1234.

Humboldt Talent Showcase. 6-10:30 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Local artists, community ears. Featuring Sandy and Keith, Eclectica and Jasmine. Blues jam closes the night. $5/$10 sliding scale. 822-5693. Veteran’s Benefit. 7 p.m. Eureka Veterans Memorial Building, 10th and H sts. Features beer, wine and music by the Jim Lahman Band. Proceeds benefit the NJROTC program. $10. Pianist Anton Nel. 7:30 p.m. Calvary Lutheran Church, 716 South Ave., Eureka. Eureka Chamber Music Series presents the internationally known artist performing works by J.S.Bach, Chabrier, Chaminade, Poulenc and Schubert. $30/$5 children. 445-9650. HSU Guitar Ensemble. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Guitar duos and quartets play Bartok, Ravel, Debussy, Astor Piazzolla and John Duarte. Directed by Nicholas Lambson. $7/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928.

Once Upon a Mattress. 7 p.m. College of the Redwoods Forum Theatre, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Humboldt Light Opera Company’s KidCo presents a fractured fairy tale for anyone who appreciates a good night’s sleep. $10/$6 kids 12 and under. hloc.org. A Taste of The Ooh La La Girls. 8-10:30 p.m. Hotel Arcata, 708 Ninth St. In-progress public rehearsal with each number repeated hourly. $5. www.theoohlalagirls. com. 223-4172. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Nov. 8 listing.

LECTURE

THEATER

MUSIC

Bishop Mayfield/Dave Storie Band. 8 p.m. Blue Lake Casino. Bishop Mayfield’s 68th birthday bash also features Earl Thomas and the Blues Ambassadors and Vintage Soul. $25/$15 adv. bluelakecasino.com. 668-9770.

Audubon Society Lecture. 7:30 p.m. Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Photographer Pablo Elizondo of the Costa Rica Bird Observatories on “The Conservation and Science of Costa Rican Birds.” Bring a mug to enjoy shade-grown coffee and come fragrance free. rras.org

10 saturday EVENTS

Hemp Fest. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. See Friday. Saturday features music by


RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW FOR THE JOURNAL

Hempin’ It Leave the garden alone and get to the Mateel Community Center in Redway this weekend for the 22nd Annual Hemp Fest. The three-day event has multiple strains of entertainment for the cultivated marijuana activist — laughs, music, art, food and some stimulating conversation too. Things kick off Friday, Nov. 2, with comedy night. Weed and comedy, well that just makes sense. Doors open at 8 p.m. and tickets are $15. Ngaio Beal-um headlines, and additional highlarity comes from San Francisco comedian and blogger Lydia Popovich and Sacramentobased jokester Rico da Great. The ladies of Bada Bling! Burlesque Troupe wrap things up with their flouncing, flirting and cupcake fundraising. Saturday marks the main event, with more

Heavyweight Dub Champion featuring Resurrector, Sasha Rose, Dakini Star, Dr. Israel, Thicker Than Thieves, The Fabulous Resinaires. Vendors, belly dancing, food. $20. mateel.org. 923-3368. Historical Society Benefit. 2 p.m. Benbow Inn, 445 Lake Benbow Drive, Garberville. Wine, hors d’oeuvres and silent auction. Live auction features a piece of the original teak decking from the USS Milwaukee, which ran aground on Samoa beach in 1917. $25. humboldthistory.org. 445-4342. Remember Jimmy Dangler. 4 p.m. Beginnings, 4700 Briceland Thorn Road, Redway. Remembering the cheeseburger-eating, cigar-smoking, sound man extraordinaire, good friend and neigbor. Share photos and stories, dance to DJ Selecta Prime and enjoy beer, barbecue and birthday cake. 223-1477. Baroni Annual Sample Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Proceeds benefit Humboldt County Breast Health Project. Features Garfield Elementary School’s fabulous bake sale. Intertribal Gathering and Elders Dinner. Noon. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Tribal dance demos, elders’ honoring ceremony, music, arts and crafts and dinner. 445-8451.

THEATER

Once Upon a Mattress. 7 p.m. College of the Redwoods Forum Theatre. See Nov. 9 listing. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Nov. 8 listing.

MUSIC

Jessica Lurie Ensemble. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Saxophonist and vocalist performs with band that includes Brandon Seabrook on guitar and Allison Miller on drums. In support of her newest release Megaphone Heart. $15. www.arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Starkey, Kastle and Ital Tek. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. World Famous Productions presents an evening of bass-heavy electronica. worldfamousproductions.net. 822-1220. Jeff DeMark and the LaPatinas. 7-9:30 p.m. Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Songs, stories and

than a dozen musical and theatrical performances. Doors open at 11 a.m. and there’s a $20 suggested donation. Heavyweight Dub Champion, the hip-hop dubtronica outfit, headlines along with Sasha Rose, Dakini Star and Dr. Israel. The rest of the musical lineup features a heavy dose of reggae, folk, Americana, blues and world music. Beer, wine and food will be available through various local vendors. The fest wraps up on Sunday on a more serious note with a hemp panel discussion. The forum features national authors and law experts — even Mendocino Sheriff Tom Allman will be there. Sunday’s admission is free. Proceeds from the festival help sustain the Mateel’s mission. For more info, head to mateel.org. — Scottie Lee Meyers

wild cards from Humboldt’s resident raconteur and band. www.jeffdemark.com. 445-8600. Soprano Voices. 7:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. Features voices of Dr. Elisabeth Harrington, Jenny Quigley and Ana Cruz. $10/$8 students and seniors. fortunaconcertseries.com. 682-6092. Humboldt Bay Brass Band. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. “Heroes and Warriors.” Includes several familiar tunes, including the Colonel Bogey March from The Bridge on the River Kwai and Bugler’s Dream, which includes the famous theme used by ABC for its Olympic coverage. $7/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928.

DANCE

USA Dance. 6:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Salsa Rueda lesson from 6:30-7:30 p.m. followed by open dancing to DJ music. $10. E-mail usadances@gmail.com. 464-3638.

ART

Artisan Craft Fair. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Craft items, jewelry, etc. hand made by local people. 726-0280. Second Saturday Family Arts Day. 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Includes lively folk tales with local storyteller Seabury Gould. E-mail janine@ humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Moe Morrissette. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Fall Native Plant Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Samara Restoration Native Plant Nursery, 5260 Dow’s Prairie Road. Nursery tour, a hedgerow ecology talk and expert native gardening advice. 601-3478. Manila Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Morning of invasive plant removal. Bring water, wear comfortable work clothes. Tools, gloves and cookies

continued on next page

Holiday Gift Guide You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

Nov. 15, Nov. 22, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, Dec. 13 & Dec. 20

Call Colleen Hole Shane Mizer Karen Sack Mike Herring

442-1400 www.northcoastjournal.com 310 F St., Eureka CA 95501 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

31


continued from previous page

Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Jean Santi for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. 826-2359. Coastal Naturalist Ambassador Training. 2-3:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Volunteer opportunities include assisting with guided walks, programs, tabling events and staffing the reception area at the Nature Center. 444-1397.

Turkey Time

FOOD

Arcata Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. humfarm.org. 822-5951.

ETC.

Matt L’Herogal Fun-raiser. 6 p.m. Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Music by Play Dead Duo, Joyce Hough Quartet, Joey Koches and Lost Coasters Kanikapila Band. Silent auction. Proceeds assist in Matt’s lung transplant expenses. $8. caringbridge.org/visit/mattlherogan. Family Fall Fest. 1-4 p.m. McKinleyville Activity Center, 1705 Gwin Road. Variety of carnival games, a cakewalk, arts and crafts and exhibitions. 839-9003. Humboldt Bay Christian School Fall Festival. 6 p.m. 70 Stephens Lane off of Old Arcata Road, Bayside. Theme: “The Great Outdoors.” 822-1738. Fig Twig Holiday Market. 10 a.m. Ferndale Fireman’s Pavillion, 100 S. Berding St. Thirty vendors to kick off your holiday shopping. 496-5867. Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Meditation. 9-10 a.m. Arcata Holistic Health Center, 940 Ninth St. Dalai Ani Kunzang Drolma leads meditation sessions. E-mail structuralthomas@gmail.com. 825-1088. FREE-RANGE TURKEYS ON KOKTE RANCH

PHOTO BY SUSAN ORNELAS

Now that Halloween is over, it’s time to start thinking about the next big holiday, Thanksgiving, aka “turkey day.” But first comes another turkey day, an Arcata tradition in the making known as The Awesome Autumn Feast. The idea is simple. “Eat from your watershed!” as it says on the event poster. The concept for the feast came from Arcata City Councilwoman Susan Ornelas, who also serves as executive director of the Jacoby Creek Land Trust. The nonprofit land trust was founded 20 years ago to oversee a couple of hundred acres in the Jacoby Creek watershed, including the 63-acre Kokte Ranch in Bayside. (Kokte is what the Wiyots called the Bayside area.) Ornelas started raising turkeys on the ranch a few years ago specifically for an annual dinner. This year the fresh-hatched turkeys came to Bayside at the end of May, shipped by mail from Fresno. “When they’re babies I really baby them,” said Ornelas. She collected pill bugs to hand feed the young turks, supplementing that with an organic grain blend. The free-range birds also eat a lot of grass on the ranch and whatever else they find ranging around. “They love spiders, and they’ll eat slugs; they really like mustard greens,” said Ornelas, noting that final plumping foods include pumpkins and apples.

At this point the birds are big, “maybe too big,” said Ornelas — 30-35 pounds each. On Thursday the turkeys will be slaughtered, chilled and distributed to local chefs who have until Sunday to come up with a unique gourmet preparation. This year’s participants include Avalon, Brick & Fire, Bless My Soul, Cafe Brio, Carter House Restaurant 301, Folie Douce, Jambalaya, The Other Place, Plaza Grill and Wildplatter Café, plus Uniquely Yours catering and Chef Brett Shuler. On feast day, Sunday, volunteers will prepare side dishes using produce donated by Paul Giuntoli’s Warren Creek Farms and Willow Creek Farms. The cooked turkeys will be delivered and a meal will come together. Chef Shuler will also oversee the Sunday volunteer prep/serving crew (including this writer). Meanwhile, volunteer pie makers are cooking up their specialties for a pie auction. Ornelas has gathered work from local artists for a silent art auction. Proceeds help fund the land trust’s conservation and education programs. The Awesome Autumn Feast takes place on Sunday, Nov. 11, starting at 5:30 p.m. at the Arcata Community Center, 321 Martin Luther Jr. Way. Tickets are $35, $20 for youth, free for kids under 5 and are available at Wildberries Marketplace, or by calling the Jacoby Creek Land Trust at 822-0900.

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 •

— Bob Doran

northcoastjournal.com

11 sunday EVENTS

Hemp Fest. 1:30 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. See Friday. Sunday features a free and interactive panel discussion: Samantha Miller on cannabis science; Dan Rush, national director of the Cannabis and Hemp Union; Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman and more. mateel.org. 923-3368.

THEATER

Hamlet. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Globe Theatre group from London performs the Shakespeare classic in a historically accurate reconstruction of the original theater where the bard staged his performances. $55/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. Dusty and the Big, Bad World Matinee. 2 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Nov. 8 listing.

MUSIC

Peter McLaughlin and Chris Brashear. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Humboldt Folklife Society presents the acoustic duo featuring national flat picking champion McLaughlin and multi-instrumentalist Brashear. $12/$10 students/members. 822-1575. Chamber Players of the Redwoods. 2 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Three North Coast chamber music groups perform the music of of Handel, Brahms, Crespo and others. E-mail phillips.v@ sbcglobal.net. 839-1452. Faun Fables. 6 p.m.-10 a.m. Mattole Valley Community Center, 29230 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Duo offers majestic adventures in song inspired by old European folklore, art-song and the portals of parenthood. $10. FaunFables. com. 629-3290. HSU Jazz Combos. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Two

jazz combos play at 7 p.m., three more at 9 p.m. Expect the eclectic. $7/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928. Open Celtic Music Session. 3 p.m. Mosgo’s, 180 Westwood Center, Arcata. Informal monthly gathering of musicians playing Irish and other Celtic music. Hosted by Seabury Gould. seaburygould.com. 845-8167.

ART

Wildlife Art Show. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. Opening reception for D. Nicholson Miller’s annual showcase of his work featuring wildlife both local and exotic. 725-4349.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Field Trip. 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Meet at Refuge Visitor Center off Hookton Road. Leisurely, two- to three-hour trip intended for people wanting to learn birds of Humboldt Bay area. 822-3613.

FOOD

Mad River Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. Pancake breakfast. Proceeds benefit local nonprofits. $4. 668-1906. Awesome Autumn Feast. 5:30-10 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Twelve great local chefs each cook up a pasture raised, organic turkey. Benefit for the Jacoby Creek Land Trust. $35. E-mail jclandtrust@yahoo.com. 822-0900.

LECTURE

Dharma Talk. 9:30 a.m. Aikido Center, 890 G St., Arcata. Arcata Zen Group hosts Soto Zen priest Angie Boissevain. Meditation begins at 8 a.m. 826-1701.

ETC.

Living Free Health Fair. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. McKinleyville Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1200 Central Ave. Free food samples, blood pressure check, skin cancer screening, oral cancer screening, blood sugar check and diabetic foot care. Screening of the film Forks Over Knives. www. livingfreehealthfair.com. 839-3832. Free Zoo Day. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Celebrating International Red Panda Day with Red panda themed activities. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. 441-4263. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Buddhist Study Group. 6 p.m. Arcata Yoga Center, 890 G St. Weekly gathering practices the Chenrezig sadhana and Dorje Yang Dron. 822-4756. Wounded Warriors. 7 p.m. Lifetree Cafe, 76 13th St., Arcata. Discussion explores post-traumatic stress disorder in the lives of military veterans. 672-2919.

12 monday VETERAN’S DAY

Second Annual Veteran’s Day RunWalk. 9 a.m. Redwood Bowl, HSU. Features 5K and 10K options, barbecue and live entertainment. Benefits local student veteran programs. humboldt.edu/veterans. 826-6272. A Musical and Artistic Tribute to Our WWII Veterans. 5:30 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Eureka Symphony performs patriotic music while portraits of World War II veterans by Trinidad artist Kathrin Burleson are projected on a huge screen. Free for veterans, naturally. $12. 677-0490.

MUSIC

Rebirth Brass Band. 9 p.m. The Depot, HSU. Formed in 1983, the New Orleans institution has evolved from play-


Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing with live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

13

tuesday

EVENTS

International Education Week. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Humboldt State University, Arcata. Learn about international issues and events; panel discussions on current events, workshops on studying, living and working abroad, presentations on Africa, Pakistan, South Asia. Complete schedule online. humboldt.edu/iew. 826-4142.

MUSIC

Lunasa. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Influential Irish instrumental music group performs. $20. www. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Stacey Earle and Mark Stuart. 7 p.m. House concert. Humboldt Folklife Society presents the singer/songwriter duo from Nashville. Email to RSVP. $15. E-mail zztop1@ gmail.com.

MEETINGS

North Group Sierra Club. 6 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. NGSC Executive Committee holds its monthly meeting. All are welcome for a discussion of local conservation issues. 826-3740.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Group of local business people who get together once a week to give and receive referrals. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. TED Talk Tuesday. 5:30-7 p.m. The Link, 1385 Eighth Street, Arcata. What is the “Digital Divide?” This talk features perspectives about what it is and what it means for people across the globe. the-link.us/events. 822-0597. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Volunteer training meeting for those interested in gathering signatures for a proposed ordinance that would require employers with 25 or more workers in Eureka to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Nondenominational prayer group. E-mail dlbitte@hotmail. com. 834-5800.

MWE. 8-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Oakland-based ensemble plays a mix of

WELLNESS

Eureka Mindfulness Group. 7:15 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Led by Cindee Grace. Topic: “Sidestepping Obstacles to Meditating.” Fragrance free, please. $3/$6 free will donation. 269-7044.

15 thursday EVENTS

Taste of the Holidays. 5-8 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Food samples from dozens of local vendors, wine and brew tasting, live music and raffle prizes. Presented by Rotary Club of Arcata Sunrise. $25. arcatasunrise.org. 845-4772. International Education Week. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Humboldt State University. See Nov. 13 listing.

MOVIES

Local Filmmakers Night. 6:30-9 p.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School, Eureka. Highlighting the work of local theatre director, actor, improvisational teacher and performer Carol Escobar. $5. www.accesshumboldt.net. 476-1798.

MEETINGS

Audubon Society Monthly Meeting. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Come discuss local and bigger-picture conservation topics with others interested in environmental issues. 442-9353.

ETC.

Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Nov. 8 listing.

Heads Up…

Stop The Violence. KHUM’s annual Stop the Violence Start the Healing campaign continues this week with morning DJ Cliff Berkowitz interviewing specialists in fields related to sexualized violence, marriage equality and bullying. Check khum.com for more details. Christmas Baskets Applications. The Arcata Presbyterian Church annual Christmas basket distribution applications are available for residents of Arcata, Manila, Samoa, Blue Lake and Bayside. Appear in person to sign-up: Saturday, Nov. 10, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.; Tuesday, Nov.13, 6-8 p.m.; Wednesday, Nov.14, 6-8 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 17, 1-3 p.m. Each basket will include a turkey, fresh vegetables, canned and dried foods and toys for children under the age of 17. ●

SERIOUSLY? YOU DIDN’T GET YOUR

INSI DE Venues Jewelry oes Gowns & Tuxed Flowers Bakeries And More…

INSIDE ◆

VENUES ◆

jEwElry ◆

GOwNS & TUXEDOES ◆

COOZIE?

flOwErS ◆

BAKErIES ◆

AND mOrE… INS IDE ◆

VENUES ◆

JEWELR Y

only $3 each (beverage not included)

GOWN S & TUXEDO ES ◆

FLOWER S ◆

BAKERIE S ◆

THEATER

Anything Goes Gala Opening. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. NCRT continues its 29th season with the musical comedy featuring music and lyrics by Cole Porter. $18. ncrt.net. 442-6278. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Nov. 8 listing.

MUSIC

Clan Dyken. 5 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Part of annual Revive the Beauty Way Tour. Benefit concert for the Dineh (Navajo) Nation at Big Mountain features guests Joanne Rand, Julian Lang, Morgan Corviday and Mo Hollis. clandyken.com. 672-2624.

AND MORE…

WeddingG

.Cover.07 1

INSIDE 2/8/07,

VENUES ◆

JEWELRY ◆

GOWNS & TUXEDOES ◆

FLOWERS ◆

BAKERIES ◆

AND MORE…

11:40

AM

RTH CO O

100% N

L

A

MUSIC

The Squidling Brothers. 9 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Humor-filled twist on the classic American sideshows of the early 20th century. Music, freak show, visual art, unusual sword swallowing, aerial performances, burlesque and body modification. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Eel River Valley Founders BNI. 7:30-9 a.m. Victorian Inn, 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale. Meeting of local business owners. 407-6827. Klamath Basin Coordinating Council Meeting. 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Includes an opportunity for public comment on the proposed amendments to the KBRA. klamathcouncil.org. Meditation. 5:55-7 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Sit in silence for 30 minutes, followed by a short period of walking meditation and open discussion. E-mail barryevans9@yahoo.com. 476-8317. Alzheimer Awareness Meeting. 12:30 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Alzheimer Resource Center program manager Rachael Riggs speaks on how to recognize the early signs of dementia and what to do about it. 444-8254.

Royal Dancers and Drummers of Burundi. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Pulse-pounding master drummers from East Africa weave together a collage of choreographed movement, song and sound. $45/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

C

International Education Week. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Humboldt State University. See Nov. 13 listing.

ETC.

DANCE

IF

ST

EVENTS

Resiliency in Cultural Identity. 6 p.m. Native Forum, HSU. Psychologist Elvina Charley discusses the importance of recognizing students’ cultural strengths in concert with the Navajo “Beauty Way,” which refers to achieving a healing balance among the emotional, mental, physical and spiritual dimensions of life. 826-5105.

See them all online on our Special Publications page!

A

14 wednesday

LECTURE

The Yolks and Folks Fest. 8:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Scrambled Sunshine Productions presents. Featuring The Farmhouse Odyssey, Clit Romney and the Freewillies, Jakbandit, live circus performance and live painting. $10/$8 students. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

310 F St., Eureka

DANCE

Turkish and Middle Eastern traditional and original tunes. Belly dancing by Shoshanna. Sponsored by Humboldt Folk Dancers. $10. shoshannaland.com/mwe. 616-6876. Song Circle. 7:30 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Seabury Gould hosts an evening of folk songs and other songs conducive to group singing. In conjunction with the Humboldt Folklife Society. seaburygould.com. 845-8167.

come by our office at

ing the streets of the French Quarter to playing festivals and stages all over the world. $25/$20 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

Now, available at your fingertips!

ORNIA

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

33


Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 * = FRI.-SAT. ONLY 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 11/9- 11/15 unless otherwise noted. SKYFALL *11:25, 1:20, 2:35, 4:40, 5:50, 8:00, 9:10 FLIGHT *11:40, 2:40, 5:55, 9:05 THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 WRECK IT RALPH 3D 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 WRECK IT RALPH 2D 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:40 CLOuD ATLAS 12:40, 4:25, 8:10 SILENT HILL: REvELATION 2D 4:25, 9:35 CHASING MAvERICKS 1:40, 6:50 HOTEL TRANSYLvANIA 3D 12:35, 5:20 HOTEL TRANSYLvANIA 2D 11:45, 3:00, 7:40 ARGO 12:20, 3:10, 6:05, 8:55 PARANORMAL ACTIvITY 4 4:35, 9:30 SINISTER 2:05, 7:00 TAKEN 2 1:35, 4:00, 6:20, 8:45

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 * = FRI.-SuN. ONLY 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 11/9- 11/15 unless otherwise noted. SKYFALL *11:30, 2:35, 5:50, 9:05 FLIGHT *2:00, 5:15, 8:25 PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER *12:50, 3:25, 6:05, 8:45 WRECK IT RALPH 3D *12:15, 8:30 WRECK IT RALPH 2D *11:40, 3:00, 5:45 CLOuD ATLAS *12:45, 4:30, 8:15 SILENT HILL: REvELATION 3D 7:05 SILENT HILL: REvELATION 2D 9:30 HOTEL TRANSYLvANIA 3D 2:25 HOTEL TRANSYLvANIA 2D *12:00, 4:45 TAKEN 2 4:40, 9:20 ARGO *12:40, 3:35, 6:25, 9:15 ALEx CROSS *2:15, 6:55

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

* = SAT.-SuN. ONLY 1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 11/9- 11/15 unless otherwise noted.

PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER *1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:20 ARGO *1:00, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 SKYFALL *2:00, 5:20, 8:40

Fortuna Theater 707-725-2121 * = SAT.-SuN. ONLY

1241 Main Street, Fortuna ** = FRI.-SuN. ONLY Times are for 11/9 - 11/15 unless otherwise noted. SKYFALL *12:00, *12:50, 3:10, 4:20, 6:20, 7:30, **9:30 CLOuD ATLAS *12:05, 3:40, 7:20 WRECK IT RALPH 3D *1:00, 3:45, 6:20, **8:50 WRECK IT RALPH 2D *1:45, 4:30, 7:05, **9:35 PARANORMAL ACTIvITY 4 *12:50, 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, **9:45

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville FRANKENWEENIE TROuBLE WITH THE CuRvE

11/9- 11/11: 7:30 11/13 - 11/15: 7:30 EXCEPT: 11/14: 6:30

Denzel Washington gets all sopping wet in Flight

Weekend of Bummers

High hopes thrice dashed by movies that are less than the sum of their parts By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

FLIGHT. From a surprisingly R-rated opening (complete with day-drinking, fullfrontal nudity and a dusting of cocaine), Flight moves on to one of the most intense, harrowing airplane crash sequences in movie history. Then it slows, gets contemplative and begins the gradual, irrevocable process of losing my interest.

Nov. 9 Nov. 14 Fri Nov 9 - Being John Malkovich Doors 7:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Sun Nov 11 - Shrek (2001) Doors 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Mon Nov 12 - Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors at 5:15 p.m. Free All ages Wed Nov 14 - Sci Fi Night ft. Journey to the Seventh Planet(1962) Doors at 6 p.m. Movie at 7:15 p.m. All ages Free

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

northcoastjournal.com • North • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012 northcoastjournal.com Journal • Thursday, Nov. Coast 8, 2012 • JourNal 31 34 North Coast

The movie has more good stuff in it than bad, but ultimately its obvious sentimentality and maudlin pontificating undo the exhilaration of the opening scenes. As it turns out, Flight is as much a study in alcoholism as it is a disaster movie. Denzel Washington plays “Whip” Whitaker, a talented commercial airline pilot who also happens to be an inveterate drunk. On a turbulent but otherwise unremarkable commuter jaunt, his aircraft experiences traumatic mechanical failure. Whitaker executes heroic maneuvers and crash-lands the plane, averting a major disaster but losing the lives of four passengers and two flight attendants in the process. The ensuing investigation reveals Whitaker’s life-saving brilliance but also threatens to expose his alcoholism. The specter of a wrongful death lawsuit and a lengthy prison term looms ominously. The bulk of the movie takes place outside the context of the investigation as we watch Whitaker wrestle with Demon Rum. Washington plays him warts and all, down to the minor slurs of speech, stumbles and jaw clenches of a for-real drunk. It’s an impressive performance,

but nothing more than what we’ve come to expect from Denzel. When Whitaker falls in with a recovering junkie (Kelly Reilly), everything gets heavy-handed very quickly. Their relationship seems rushed and a little implausible, if well-acted, and the second act becomes a springboard for a long-form Alcoholics Anonymous promotion. Director Robert Zemeckis nearly salvages the movie with an extended “will he/won’t he” relapse conundrum, which is followed by a breathless, expertly executed courtroom sequence. But the smugly simplistic ending bleeds off all the tension. Above all else, Flight is deeply frustrating. The examination of the lifestyle of alcoholism, and the havoc it can wreak, is a worthwhile, ambitious task for a filmmaker to undertake. And in that examination, the movie is generally successful. But when it moves into judgment and suggestions of recourse, the movie comes off stodgy and myopic. This is particularly disappointing because, as I’ve mentioned, Flight contains some truly brilliant moments. But the moments between are its undoing. R. 138m. WRECK-IT RALPH. It may be my own fault, due to over-caffeination or inflated expectations, but Ralph was also a bit of a letdown. It starts out promisingly, with an inventive premise and gorgeous visuals. But it starts to drag in the second act, the plot gets predictable and the movie never recovers. The great John C. Reilly plays Ralph, the baddy from an eight-bit arcade game. In the midst of an existential crisis brought on by 30 years of playing the villain despite having a heart of gold, he escapes from his game in pursuit of accolades. He barges his way through a few other games, inadvertently wrecking stuff along the way. Inside a game called Sugar Rush — a sort of Candyland meets MarioKart — Ralph befriends a troubled little scamp named Vanellope (Sarah Silverman).           From there, Wreck-It Ralph turns completely conventional. Ralph and Vanellope commiserate as outsiders trapped by circumstance, then join together to try to beat the odds. Not surprisingly, their relationship is tested along the way, and there’s a villain — who isn’t quite what he seems — trying to drive them apart. Reilly, Silverman and the supporting voice cast (including Jack McBrayer, Jane Lynch and Alan Tudyck, perennial favorites all) are fun and convincing. The imagery is bold and inventive, but Ralph spends too much time in familiar territory without adding any significant new elements. PG. 108m. THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS. Here again, I’ve burdened a movie with perhaps unfair expectations. I’ve long been a fan of the RZA (aka Robert Diggs)


as a producer and MC. His imagination, grit, attention to detail and obsession with kung fu movies have enabled him to create some indelible, undeniable hiphop. I hoped those attributes, along with his collaborations with Jim Jarmusch (in Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai) and Quentin Tarantino (in Kill Bill), might produce a movie as entertaining and cool as his music. Sadly, rap producer chops don’t automatically carry over to cinema. The plot, in brief: The inhabitants of Jungle Village find themselves in the midst of clan conflict. The Lion clan is beset by mutiny, its scion having been drawn away by young love. His surrogate brothers are traitors to the cause and plan to usurp his power. They also plan to wage underhanded war against all of the other clans and steal a huge shipment of gold. Stuck in the middle of all the hoopla are a well-meaning blacksmith (RZA) and a grotesquely lecherous Englishman with obscure motives and a penchant for weird knives (Russell Crowe). Strong bloody violence ensues, most of it within the cozy confines of a brothel operated by Madame Blossom (Lucy Liu). The fact that this movie got made at all is something to celebrate, I suppose. Its existence as a passion project starring, cowritten and directed by the RZA himself is enough to make it philosophically better than much of what reaches the multiplex. But its execution is unfocused, the narrative is pointlessly rangy and over-complicated, and many of the combat sequences are shot and cut so we can’t actually see the vital details of the fighting. Iron Fists will undoubtedly enjoy a long, fruitful life as a DVD cult hit, and I certainly wouldn’t begrudge it that. I love B movies, and it’s refreshing to see a new take on the kung fu genre. I just wish it was better. R. 96m. —John J. Bennett

Previews

SKYFALL. In James Bond’s 23rd cinematic outing (the third with steely-eyed stud Daniel Craig in the lead), 007 must prevent an unhinged villain (played by a bleach-blond Javier Bardem) from tearing down British secret intelligence agency MI6. PG13. 143m. If you’re displeased with Tuesday’s election results and need a brain-cation, try escaping into the mind of renowned actor John Malkovich Friday evening at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. Spike Jonze’s 1999 head trip Being John Malkovich is easily one of the best and strangest movies of the last 20 years, thanks in large part to Charlie Kaufman’s brilliantly demented screenplay. 8 p.m. R. 112m. Sunday at 6 p.m. the ATL will screen Shrek (2001), which you certainly don’t need me to explain. It’s Shrek. Next Wednesday’s Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night will feature Journey to the

Seventh Planet, a 1962 Danish film about some astronauts who confront their inner demons on Uranus. (There’s just no way to mention that planet without sounding dirty, is there?) The Humboldt County Library is hosting a Native American Heritage Month film series at its Eureka main branch, with a movie screening each Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Next week’s feature will be director Michael Mann’s 1992 epic The Last of the Mohicans, with the great Daniel Day-Lewis acting as your white-man guide. R. 112m.

Field notes

Roman militaRy amphitheateR at the legionaRy foRtRess of CaeRleon, on the RiveR Usk neaR newpoRt, soUth wales. aRthURian legend links the site with Camelot.

Continuing

ALEX CROSS. Tyler Perry stars as a homicide detective hunting a serial killer, which is every bit as tired and formulaic as it sounds. PG13. 102m. ARGO. Ben Affleck can direct! Here he helms a thrilling and surprisingly funny account of the 1979-80 Iran hostage crisis, starring alongside Alan Arkin, John Goodman and Bryan Cranston. R. 120m. CHASING MAVERICKS. This surf flick, based on the true story of Jay Moriarty, follows the ready made template of underdog/coming-of-age sports movies. PG. 115m. CLOUD ATLAS. Uncommonly ambitious and sprawling, this philosophical, time-hopping adventure, based on the novel by David Mitchell, features a great cast (Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent) and some big ideas but ultimately falls short of cohesive movie magic. R. 172m. FRANKENWEENIE. Tim Burton directs this black-and-white stop-motion film about a quixotic boy who resurrects his dead dog. PG. 87m. HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA. Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) runs a posh, monsters-only hotel, catering to the likes of Frankenstein (Kevin James) and the Mummy (CeeLo Greene). PG. 91m. PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4. You know the paranormal drill: Hidden cameras capture supernatural hijinks in suburban bedrooms. Loud noises ensue. R. 95m. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER. A high school coming-of-age drama starring Emma Watson and Ezra Miller, directed by Stephen Chbosky, based on his own bestselling novel. PG13. 103m. SILENT HILL: REVELATION 3D. Sequel to a movie based on a series of survival horror video games involving evil specters shrouded in fog. R. 94m. SINISTER. Ethan Hawke stars as a truecrime novelist who accidentally unleashes some bad supernatural juju that was minding its own business in a box of old home movies. Oops. R. 109m. TAKEN 2. An ex-CIA agent proficient in the whupping of ass (Liam Neeson) has to protect his family from kidnappers. PG13. 90m. —Ryan Burns

photo by baRRy evans

King Arthur, Part 3: The Creation of Camelot By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

M

any men say there ys wrytten uppon [Arthur’s] tumbe thys: Hic iacet Arthurus, rex quondam rex futurus (Here lies Arthur, the once and future king). — Le Morte d’Arthur, Thomas Malory, 1465

The two previous Field Notes dealt with the sparse historical evidence we have for a warlord named Arthur who may have led British forces to a decisive victory against Anglo-Saxon invaders at Mount Badon around the year 500 CE. This week, we’ll look at how a misty memory became the stuff of legend. Arthur first appears in recorded history around 830, in a fantastical account attributed to the monk Nennius (whose authorship is a matter of debate). At Mount Badon, the legend goes, Arthur single-handedly killed 960 of the enemy. After that, Arthur was fair game for storytellers. By 1135, Geoffrey of Monmouth had elevated him to King of Britain (he was only a “dux bellorum,” or warlord, in Nennius’ account), son of Uther Pendragon, a legendary Welsh king of post-Roman Britain. After Geoffrey’s Arthur marries Guinevere, daughter of a noble RomanoBritish family, he establishes his court at Caerleon in Wales, once a major Roman fortress (and incidentally where Lord Tennyson wrote his version of the tale, Idylls of the King). It was French writer Chretien de Troyes who inspired the full flowering of the Arthur legend. Writing around 1180, Chretien pulled together previous strands of the story, including tales that probably

came to him via the Celtic-British colony of Brittany (“little Britain”) on mainland Europe. Knowing a good plot line when he saw it, he brought us the “eternal triangle” theme of Arthur-Guinevere-Lancelot, in which Guinevere betrays her husband the king by consummating her love for his favorite knight, Lancelot. Chretien also introduces the element of Christianity in the form of the Holy Grail, and mentions, for the first time, Arthur’s castle: Camelot. While great medieval romances abounded, such as those of Alexander (part of the “Matter of Rome”) and Charlemagne (the “French Matter”), none were milked to the extent we see with King Arthur in the “Matter of Britain.” The most imaginative of the re-packagers was English writer Thomas Malory (1405-1471), who combined the French courtly-love angle with his knowledge of Welsh sources, creating in Le Morte d’Arthur (The Death of Arthur) a story about believable and fallible heroes. It was first published by the pioneer printer William Caxton in 1485. Mallory’s interpretation — bolstered by Lord Tennyson’s Victorian-era re-telling and the musical Camelot with its associations with JFK — is the one that we know today, and that our grandchildren and their children will know tomorrow. The title of T.H. White’s four-part novel says it all: the tale of The Once and Future King is as timeless as the art of storytelling. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) has sought Arthur’s ghost at Caerleon, Glastonbury, Tintagel, Camelford, Badbury, Winchester and St. David’s. He’s still looking.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012

35


FREE PARENT/ DAUGHTER WORKSHOP. HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your daughter how to become a healthy powerful young women, then who will? The Media? Her Peers? Not likely. She needs you! Six Rivers Planned Parenthood Presents this Free interactive workshop for 9-12 year old girls and her parents, focusing on fostering positive attitudes about girl’s bodies and the changes to look forward to during puberty, Thurs., Nov. 8, 6-8 p.m, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (CMM-1108)

Computers INTRO TO ADOBE INDESIGN. Fast-paced, hands-on exploration of Indesign page layout software. Demonstration of tools, menus, palettes, page set-up, master pages, guides and margins, color and more. With Annie Reid. Tues. & Thurs., Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-1115) List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts HAND NEEDLE WORK WITH KATHY LEE. Variety of 2-Hour Classes including: Wonderful world of fabric Yo Yo’s and Intro to Shadow Quilting. Every Thurs., 6-8 p.m. $30. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-1108) SEWING WITH TINA. Offering a variety of beginning sewing projects. Every Tues., 6-8 p.m. $35. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-1108) 2 DAY UPCYCLING WORKSHOP. Nov. 29, 6-7 p.m. & Nov. 30, 6-8 p.m. $50. Learn the craft of upcycling as you dye, screen print, sew and embellish, Turn old into new. Bring washed clothes. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-1122) LEARN TO KNIT FAIR ISLE CLASS AT YARN. Thurs., Nov. 8 & 15, 5:30-7 p.m. $15 each class, plus materials. Learn the Fair Isle technique while making adorable holiday ornaments. Take one or both classes. Beginning knitting level required. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-1108)

Communication WOUNDED WARRIORS, WHEN WAR COMES HOME. Explore post-traumatic stress disorder in the lives of military veterans and discuss helpful resources at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Nov. 11, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-1108) STORY-CONNECTIONS DIGITAL STORYTELLING WORKSHOPS. Create multimedia stories with narrative, photos, video, text, graphics. Explore memories, honor, celebrate, archive. Small, confidential 2-3 day facilitated workshops with tech support. Open Topic and themed workshops scheduled. Custom workshops for groups and organizations. www.story-connections.org or 707-616-6009. (CMM-1122)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film SPIRIT DANCE WITH MARC TAKAHA. At Om Shala Yoga. Sat., Nov. 10, 2-5 p.m. This is the dance of intimacy: relating with others without losing connection to ourselves. Cost of $40. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (DMT-1108) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Boost your confidence on the dance floor with private lessons. Gift certificates available, too. (707) 464-3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie. biz (DMT-0124) USA DANCE INVITES YOU. To a social dance at Redwood Raks, 824 L St. Sat., Nov. 10. Salsa Rueda lesson from 6:30-7:30 p.m. followed by open dancing to DJ music. No partner necessary. Members FREE, $10 nonmembers, student discounts. Call (707) 464-3638 or email usadances@gmail.com. (DMT-1108) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227)

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Fitness PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1129) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www. northcoastaikido.org, info@ northcoastaikido.org, 8269395. (F-1227)

KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./ Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1129) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

Kids & Teens FOREST CANOPY TOUR. Discover the Redwood Canopy from a whole new perspective! Climb, zip and rappel through the Humboldt Skies. Sat., Nov. 17, 9 a.m. OR 2 p.m. Ages 12 and older. Contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit www. cityofarcata.org/rec (K-1108)

ZUMBA WITH M A R L A J OY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of ARCATA BREAK CAMP. Art Camp living. Exercise during school breaks. Kinderin Disguise. Now garteners-5th graders enjoy is the time to art lessons, painting, drawing start, don’t wait. and other mediums at the ArAll ability levels cata Community Center. Full-day, are welcome. Half-day or Single-day options. Every Mon. and Nov. 19-21. Contact Arcata RecThurs. at the reation Division 822-7091 or visit Bayside Grange CLIMB, ZIP AND RAPPEL THROUGH THE HUMBOLDT www.cityofarcata.org/rec (K-1108) 6-7 p.m., 2297 REDWOOD CANOPY. CALL OR 822-7091 OR VISIT TEEN FILMMAKING & MUSIC Jacoby Creek Rd. WWW.CITYOFARCATA.ORG/REC PRODUCTION. Learn the basics $6/$4 Grange of film & music production by members. Every working on original projects with professional Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 equipment. GULCH Teen Recreation Program meets Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon Tues.s & Thurs.s, 4-6 p.m. at Cooper Gulch 1720 10th and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla St. $5 drop-in fee & scholarships available. Call Brian Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (F-0110) at 441-4240 for more info. (K-1108) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with CRAFTY KIDS ON SATURDAYS. With Bequin. Ages swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, 7 & up. $25. Every Sat., 10 a.m.-Noon. Introduction intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages to a varied of fun creative crafts while learning to 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) sew and felt, materials included. Origin Design Lab, 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencin621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. gacademy@gmail.com (F-1227) origindesignlab.com. (K-1108)


TINY TUTUS BEGINNING BALLET II. Designed for ballerinas ages 4-7 who are ready for the next step. Must take Ballet I or have previous ballet experience. John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Mon.s, 6-6:45 p.m., beginning Nov. 12, $30. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-1108) YOUTH BASKETBALL LEAGUE. A fun, positive, semicompetitive atmosphere for boys and girls 1st-12th grades. Leagues based on grades and gender. Games run Jan. 5-March 2. Sign up today. For more information contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/rec (K-1108) FC SAMOA WINTER SOCCER ACADEMY. MENU FOR CLASSES START DEC 3, (week of) (4 p.m- 5:30 p.m. unless stated) SAMOA GYM, Mon-Boys age 10-11-12 with Salvador Espinosa Tues- Girls age 10-11-12 with Nick Parker. Tues- Goalkeeper School with Andy Salatnay (4-5 p.m ) (on field ) Thurs: Advanced* D1 Varsity Prep with Pete Fuller (not beginners nor intermediate) (pre-requisites- juggle 100 and prior Academy ) Fri: Pee Wee Pre Academy Age 7-8-9 yrs. co-ed with Casey Schmidt and Emi Monahan and Nick Parker. Sun: 1 p.m-5 p.m.,“Varsity prep and super-league u16 Futsal. AHS (Staff) $40 a month (Dec-Jan-Feb) (10 lessons) or $95 “up front” *A few scholarships always (discreetly) available. New members* also required to pay a (July) year of US Club insurance $40 FUTSAL- we run several Futsal teams as an optional companion to classes Most Futsal is played Sun’s with (Inside Sports) fees to play. fcsamoa.com (K-1129) THANKSGIVING BREAK CAMP. Join us in Blue Lake for our Thanksgiving Break Camp for 5-13 year olds. Mon.-Wed., Nov.19-21, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Full-day or half-day option. Register today as space is limited! Download a registration form at www. bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932, for more information. (K-1115) KIDS CLIMBING AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM. Learn climbing technique, safety, and build confidence at Far North Climbing Gym. Mon./Thurs., 3:30-5 p.m. Ages 6-12. $70 for 4 days. Corner of 10th and K St., Arcata. (707) 495-2774. (K-1129)

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

Lectures ESTATE PLANNING, MAPPING OUT YOUR FAMILY’S FUTURE. Free Seminar! Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Thurs., Nov. 29, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP at (707) 4432741 or online at www.premieradvisor.com (L-1122) FOOD SAFETY. Food Safety. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Wed., Nov. 21, 6-8 p.m., Healy Senior Center, Redway. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/ foodsafety or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 707-826-3731. (L-1108)

Over 50 OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) CONDUCTOR’S NOTES. Hear a lecture by Dr. Paul Cummings, Humboldt State University Symphonic Band conductor, before you attend the concert. Tickets are included! Fri., Nov. 30: Lecture 6:30-7:30 p.m., concert at 8 p.m. $20/OLLI members, $45/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1122) LEAVING A LEGACY. Living a Life of Significance. Identify your strengths and stories and learn the basic steps to leave a purposeful legacy, what you want to leave behind and be remembered for. With Scott Hammond. Tues., Dec. 4, 3-5 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1122)

F AIRY G ARDENS with Cassy Watts

Christmas Stocking 11/10 & 11/17 Do you love handmade Christmas decorations? Want to learn more sock techniques? Make an heirloom Scandinavian designed Christmas stocking. Choose from five designs: Peace, Love, Joy, Angel, or Cabin. You’ll learn how to do a provisional cast-on, hem top, knitting in the round, a fair isle (color) knitting technique that weaves the yarn rather than having strands in the back, short row heel (wrapping & hiding wraps), & Kitchener stitch grafting. Cost $75.00 (includes materials)

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

Saturday Nov. 10th 11a.m. FREE Space is limited Call 839-1571 x 5 Learn which plants work best in these miniature gardens.

1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville Mon.-Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 • millerfarmsnursery.com

Achieve your core potential at

MANAGING YOUR ESTATE, TRUSTS. Gain an understanding of trusts: What they are, how they work and how to create one for your needs. With Patricia Atwood and Barbara Davenport, licensed fiduciaries. Mon., Dec. 3, 6-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1122)

Arcata Core Pilates

THE ANCIENT AFRICAN KINGDOM OF KUSH. Uncover the history and culture of Kush, an ancient African kingdom that thrived along the Nile, and conquered Egypt forming the 25th Egyptian Dynasty. With Pamela Service. Sat., Dec. 1 & 8, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1122)

uPCoMiNg NoveMber eveNts:

NORTH COAST WEATHER. Tour the National Weather Service office on Woodley Island with NOAA meteorologist-in-charge Nancy Dean. Sat., Nov. 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1108)

new studio location!

Grand Opening Friday, Nov. 9

Celebrate with us and enjoy live music, brief complimentary massages, local artwork, wine and Cypress Grove cheese during this exciting event!

Booty LuvTM Workshop Combination of barre, yoga, pilates, FUN-CtIoNAL training, kickboxing and a bit of dirty dancing.

Spiritual TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation EUREKA SKATERS GIVE BACK! Come to roller skating on Nov. 17 for a night of fun & a chance to win great prizes while helping people in our community. For each can or non-perishable item brought in, earn 1 raffle ticket. Eureka Municipal Auditorium. 6-8:30 p.m., $4 Youth/$4.75 adults. Skate rental included. Call 441-4223. (SR-1108)

continued on next page

HeAtHer CrAig

Sun., Nov. 11, 11:30am-2:30pm $40 full price, $30 Students

Meet our Newest AdditioNs: NeNA sivess Certified Vinyasa Yoga Instructor

MelissA PerAzA Stott-trained Pilates Instructor

diANe dAvis Massage therapist

901 8tH Street • ArCAtA, CA 845-8156 • 826-0227 ArCAtACorePILAteSStUdIo.CoM

Last Classes For This Year! I’ve Got a Digital Camera, Now What! Saturday, Nov. 17th from 10am-Noon If you have a digital camera and would like to understand more or are thinking about purchasing one, this is a great class for you. You’ll learn about resolution, compression, aspect ratio and much more.

Class Tuition.........$34.99 Receive a FREE Point Card Good for 100 4x6 Prints........-$34.99 Actual Class Tuition.........FREE!

Beginning Digital SLR Saturday, Nov. 17th from 2-5 pm • Tuition: $49.99 Pre-registration required. Call or go to www.swanlunds.com for more information. All Classes Held in Swanlund’s Upstairs Gallery. SPace is limited. 527 F Street • Downtown Eureka www.swanlunds.com • 442-4522 Hours: Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 9-5:30 Wed 10-5:30 Sat 9-5

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

37


continued from previous page ADULT VOLLEYBALL. Bump, set & spike your way to fun and play volleyball with us! Form a dream team with your friends, family & co-workers for Winter/ Spring. Co-ed League or Women’s League $300/team. Register your team today at the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Call 441-4245 for more info. (SR-1108) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1227)

Therapy/Support FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1129) BE WIRED FOR JOY! Within the warmth of a small group, get at the root cause of depression, anxiety, and compulsive behaviors. Re-wire the emotional brain with Marriage and Family Therapist NancyBorge-Riis. (707) 839-7920 (T-1115) GRIEF SUPPORT SERVICES CREATIVE ARTS GATHERING. Navigating Grief Through the Holidays, Nov. 17, & Dec. 15. The holiday season is often an especially difficult time for those in grief. We will utilize the healing qualities of art and the creative process, natural elements, and community to find our way. No artistic experience is required. Suggested materials fee: $3-$5. Visit our website for more information at www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or contact Julie with questions at 445-8443. (T-1108) TYPE 1 DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP. meeting the 3rd Tues. of each month, 6-7:30 p.m, at the Foundation of Medical Care, 3100 Edgewood Rd. Eureka.Contact 443-0124. (TS-0214) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational NOTARY TRAINING. One-day seminar for new and renewing notaries provides the practical training needed to pass the comprehensive exam required for all California Notaries. Mon., Nov. 19, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $149 plus additional for live scan, photo and exam. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V-1108)

CANDLELIGHT YOGA AT OM SHALA. On-going. Mon.s & Wed.s, 7:30-9 p.m. with Jenni Brown and Fri.s, 5:30-7 p.m. in a heated room with Heather Woodman. 858 10th St., Arcata. $14/drop-in, $100/10-class pass. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W-1108) RELAX DEEPLY AT OM SHALA. On-going Sun.s, 6:30-8 p.m. with Jodie DiMinno. Slow down, experience stillness and restore. 858 10th St., Arcata. $14/ drop-in, $100/10-class pass. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (W-1108) TUES. & THURS. AFTERNOON MASSAGE WITH DIANE DAVIS. Enhance your Pilates or yoga practice or just unwind and relax with a massage session at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Nationally certified since 1997, Diane is trained in Hawaiian Lomi Lomi, Myofascial Release, Swedish, Craniosacral, Acupressure and Reiki. Questions? Call (707) 268-8926 to schedule an appointment. (W-1108) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1129) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Jan. 22, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) NORTHWEST INSTITUTE OF AYURVEDA. Classes with Traci Webb and KP Khalsa. BEGINNING WITH AYURVEDA, 3-Day Introductory Immersion. Jan 25-27, 2013. Learn to Balance Body and Mind using Doshas, Elements, Foods, Herbs, Essential Oils, Yoga, Meditation and Colors, $249. Serves as Prerequisite to 10-MONTH AYURVEDIC HERBALISM PROGRAM, Meets fourth weekend of month, Feb. 22-Nov. 17, 2013. Global Herbs, Ayurveda Therapeutics, Plant/ Mineral/Food Medicines, Formulating, Medicine Making Immersion, Herb Walk. REGISTER ON-LINE: www.ayurvedicliving.com, OR info@ayurvedicliving. com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0124) ●

Wellness/Bodywork DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Herbal Clinic Class. Jan. 14-April 15, 2013, Refine and expand your herbal counseling skills. Beginning with Herbs, Jan. 30-March 27, Eight Wed. evenings 7-9:30 p.m., plus two herb walks, at Moonrise Herbs in Arcata, learn herbal medicine making, plant ID, herbs for common imbalances and first aid in this fun hands-on class. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.-Nov. 2013. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in-depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Bothwell & Rosemary Gladstar, Nov. 14-23, 2013. More information to come soon. Get in touch to be on the interested list. Register online at www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0110)

SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

ONLINE www.northcoastjournal.com

NORTH Coast COAST Journal JOURNAL •• Thursday, THURSDAY, NOV. Nov. 8, 2012 ••northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 38 North 38

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED November 23, 2011. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE, IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on November 27, 2012, at the hour of 10:30 a.m., on the steps to the front entrance to the County Courthouse, located at 825 5th Street, City of Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, PRIME PACIFIC, a corporation, as Trustee will sell at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, all payable at the time of sale, real property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California, and the purported address is Humboldt County Assessor Parcel Nos. 214-232003-000; 214-234-008-000; and 214233-010-000, and is more particularly described as follows: PARCEL ONE: All that real property situate in Sections 22,23 and 26, Township 3 South, Range 3 East, Humboldt Meridian, County of Humboldt, State of California, described as follows: The Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 23, the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 26, and that portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 22 as follows: BEGINNING at the Section Corner common to Sections 22,23,26 and 27; and running thence North 09 degrees 52 minutes 31 seconds West, 960.62 feet to a 5/8 inch rebar with plastic cap tagged L.S. 7207; thence North 61 degrees 03 minutes 37 seconds East, 960.46 feet to the Northeast corner of said Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter; thence along the Section line between Sections 22 and 23, South 25 degrees 35 minutes 21 seconds West, 1564.61 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING therefrom, as to that portion lying with Section 22 above, all coal and other minerals in said lands, together with the right to mine and remove the same, as reserved in the Patent to John A. Weeks, recorded June 13, 1930, in Book 24 of Patents, Page 263. PARCEL TWO: The right to traverse for all lawful purposes the existing roadway located on the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 24, Township 3

South, Range 3 East, Humboldt Meridian, as conveyed by Max V. Larrea to Helen W. Barnum and Barnum Investment Co., Inc., by Deed recorded November 14, 1968, in Book 981 of Official Records, Page 549. PARCEL THREE: The appurtenant rights created under that certain “Easement Agreement” by and between Ken Bowman and Stephen B. Kahn and Edward L. Nilsen, as Trustee of the 1992 Helen W. Barnum Trust; recorded August 28, 1996, as Instrument Number 1996-19852-9, Humboldt County Official Records. PARCEL FOUR: The appurtenant rights created under that certain “Reciprocal Easement Agreement” by, among, and between the 1992 Helen W. Barnum Trust and Stephen B. Kahn, recorded December 30, 1996, as Instrument Number 1996-29394-7, Humboldt County Official Records. PARCEL FIVE: The appurtenant rights created under that certain “Easement Agreement”, by and between Everett H. Tosten and Marian P. Tosten, Trustees of the Tosten Family 1995 Living Trust UDT dated 8/8/95, as to an undivided one-third interest, and Gordon J. Tosten, Trustee of the Gordon J. Tosten 1994 Living Trust UDT dated 12/21/94, as to an undivided one-third interest, and Kenneth Wallan and Meredith Wallan, Trustees of the Wallan Family Living Trust UDT dated 3/12/92, as to an undivided one-third interest, and Edward L. Nilsen, as Trustee of the 1992 Helen W. Barnum Trust; recorded December 10,1997, as Instrument Number 1997-30534-10, Humboldt County Official Records. PARCEL SIX: A permanent nonexclusive road easement and right of way 50 feet in width the centerline of which is described as follows: BEGINNING at a 6 x 6 concrete Highway monument, set opposite of Engineers center line Station 689+50 POT, as said Highway Monument is shown on the Record of Survey for EldridgeBurgess-Lewis filed in the Office of the County Recorder in Humboldt County in Book 28 of Surveys, Page 97; thence South 21 degrees West, 34.0 feet;thence North 73 degrees West, 212.5 feet; thence North 57 degrees West, 89 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 26 degrees West, 79.7 feet;thence South 12 degrees East, 78.6 feet; thence South 46 degrees East, 99.1 feet; thence South 44 degrees East, 67.3 feet; thence South 61 degrees East, 128.7 feet; thence South 20 degrees East, 77.8 feet; thence South 9 degrees West, 34.7 feet; thence South 34 degrees East, 100.7 feet; thence South 47 degrees East, 83.9 feet; thence South 46 degrees East, 112.4 feet; thence South 63 degrees East, 48.6 feet;thence South 78 degrees East, 74.7 feet; thence South 75 degrees East; 161 .5 feet; thence South 76

degrees East, 76.6 feet; thence South 70 degrees East; 55.5 feet; thence South 49 degrees East, 31.1 feet; thence South 66 degrees East, 128.2 feet; thence South 63 degrees East, 59.6 feet; thence South 30 degrees East, 99 feet;thence South 79 degrees East, 82 feet to the intersection with the section line between Sections 10 and 11, Township 3 South, Range 3 East, Humboldt Base Meridian, and being in the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 3 East, Humboldt Meridian. Said easement shall be used for any and all commercial and land management purposes and is appurtenant to the lands of the Grantee in Sections 10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27 and 28 in Township 3 South, Range 3 East, Humboldt Meridian, being the easement granted to Edward Nilsen, Trustee of the 1992 Helen W. Barnum Trust, recorded May 1, 1997, as Instrument No. 1997-9915-3 Official Records, Humboldt County. PARCEL SEVEN: A non-exclusive 50 foot wide easement for ingress, egress and all types of travel, including the hauling of timber products over the existing roads running through those portions of Sections 13, 14, 22, 23 and 24 of Township 3 South Range 3 East, Humboldt Meridian, described in the Deed from Edward U Nilsen, Successor Trustee of the 1992 Helen W. Barnum Trust dated 2/28/92 to Charles D. Aalfs and Rebecca Aalfs, recorded July 14, 2000, as Recorder’s Instrument No. 2000- 14912-5, the location of which is shown and delineated on the Map attached as Exhibit Al to the Deed from Charles D. Aalfs and Rebecca Aalfs to Stephen B. Kahn, Trustee of the Stephen B. Kahn Living Trust dated 4/23/97, recorded August 16, 2001, as Recorder’s Instrument No. 2001-20705-9. APN: 214-232-003-000; 214-234008-000; and 214-233-010-000 Directions may be obtained pursuant to a written request submitted to the beneficiary: WALTER A. NIESEN c/o Selzer Home Loans, 551 S. Orchard Ave., Ukiah, CA 95482, telephone: (707) 462-4000 or by contacting the Trustee, Prime Pacific at (707) 468-5300 or mailing request to Prime Pacific, P.O. Box 177, Ukiah, CA 95482 - within 10 days from the first publication of this notice. If a street address or common designation of property is shown in this notice, no warranty is given as to its completeness or correctness. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid obligation, together with reasonable estimate of the costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this notice is $51,770.51. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. The sale will be made without covenant or warranty of title, possession, or encumbrances to satisfy the obligation secured by and pursuant to the power of the sale conferred in that certain Deed of Trust, all advances thereunder, interest pro-


vided therein, and fees, charges and expenses of the trustee. The Deed of Trust was executed by PATRICIA A. CLARK, Trustee of the Patricia A. Clark Trust dated August 3, 2006, as the original Trustor, to RICHARD P. SELZER, as Trustee, for the benefit and security of WALTER A. NIESEN, an unmarried man, as Beneficiary, dated November 23, 2011, and recorded November 30, 2011, in Document No. 2011-24658-7, Official Records of Humboldt County, and said property will be sold “as is” and no warranty or representation is made concerning its present condition. PRIME PACIFIC was substituted as trustee under that certain document recorded July 3, 2012, in Document No. 2012-016837-1, Official Records of Humboldt County. The address and telephone number of the trustee is: PRIME PACIFIC, Post Office Box 177, 215 W. Standley Street, #3, Ukiah, California 95482; Telephone: (707) 468-5300. Notice of Default and election to sell the described real property under the mentioned deed of trust was recorded on July 3, 2012, Document No. 2012-016838-2, Official Records of Humboldt County. The name, address, and telephone number of the Beneficiary (or Beneficiary’s agent) at whose request this sale is to be conducted is: WALTER A. NIESEN c/o Selzer Home Loans, 551 S. Orchard Ave., Ukiah, CA 95482, telephone: (707) 462-4000. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call PRIME PACIFIC at (707) 468-5300 Ext. 11 [telephone message recording] or you may can call PRIME PACIFIC at (707) 468-5300 Ext. 10 and talk to a

person directly. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information (Ext. 11). THE BEST WAY TO VERIFY POSTPONEMENT INFORMATION IS TO ATTEND THE SCHEDULED SALE. The mortgagee or beneficiary is not required to give notice under CA Civil Code Section 2923.5. Dated: October 30, 2012 PRIME PACIFIC - Trustee By: MARY F. MORRIS, President No. S-12-13F 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-323)

DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 707-445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: October 24, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: AHMAD CORPORATION The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 421 N FORTUNA BLVD FORTUNA, CA 95540-2724 Type of License Applied for: 21 - Off-Sale General 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-318)

DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 707-445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: October 18, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: HUNAN VILLAGE RESTAURANT INC The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 752 18TH ST ARCATA, CA 95521 Type of License Applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer And Wine - Eating Place 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-310)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00610

The following person is doing business as FALL LINE ADVENTURES at 4543 Valley West Blvd., Arcata, CA 95521. Rowan Gratz 4543 Valley West Blvd. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/1/2012. /s Rowan Gratz. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 9, 2012.

CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/2012 (12-316)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00615

The following person is doing business as MP DESIGNS at 1933 Cascara St., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Michael Andrew Pratowski 1933 Cascara St. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Michael A. Pratowski. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/2012 (12-319)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00632

The following person is doing business as CASA LINDRA SALSA/ TRINIDAD BAY COMPANY/CASA LINDRA PLAZA at 5425 Ericson Way, Arcata, CA 95521. Lindra Joi Lomeli 683 Stage Coach Rd. Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/18/2012. /s Lindra Lomeli. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 18, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/2012 (12-317)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00651

The following persons are doing business as LOST COAST GALLERY at 1131 Westhaven Drive South, Trinidad, CA 95570. Ginni Marie DeLong 1131 S. Westhaven Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 Jared Thomas DeLong 1131 S. Westhaven Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by A Married Couople. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Ginni DeLong. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 29, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/2012 (12-324)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00657

The following person is doing business as NORTH COAST IMPACT! VISUALIZATION SERVICES at 3128 Ingley St., Eureka, CA 95503. Erin Cearley 3128 Ingley St.

Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/1/12. /s Erin Cearley. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on November 2, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/2012 (12-321)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00658

The following person is doing business as FOWLEROPE BIRDING TOURS at 1386 Fernwood Drive, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Robert C. Fowler 1386 Fernwood Dr. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Robert Fowler. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on November 2, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/2012 (12-322)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00628

The following person is doing business as NOMO FARMS at 190 Jaymar Ln., Carlotta, CA 95528. Michael Rideau 190 Jaymar Ln. Carlotta, CA 95528 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/17/12. /s Michael Rideau. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-314)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00634

The following person is doing business as BLACK SHEEP FARM at 1302 Anvick Rd., Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 4873, Arcata, CA 95518. Geoffrey Kern 1644 Verwer Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/01/12. /s Geoffrey Kern. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 18, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-313)

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVlSO Al DEMANDADO): AlEXANDRA MICHEAlS YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PlAINTIFF: (lO ESTA DEMANDANDO El DEMANDANTE): WEllS FARGO BANK, N.A. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Website (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and cost on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corteque le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NUMBER: DR120282 (Numero del Caso): The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501-1153 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telephono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): REESE LAW GROUP HARLAN M. REESE, 118226, JOSEPH M. PLEASANT, 179571, MAX A. HIGGINS, 270334, DANA N. MEYERS, 272640 6725 MESA RIDGE ROAD, STE. 240 SAN DIEGO, CA 92121 DATE (Fecha): APRIL 25, 2012 NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. Filed: April 25, 2012 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/2012 (12-325)

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012

39


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00635

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

continued from previous page.

11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-312)

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

1. It’s what’s up 4. A lot of sassafras? 9. Sneaks a look 14. Actor’s signal 15. They trimmed the White House lawn when its gardeners were drafted during WWI 16. TV honors 17. RN workplaces 18. Pageant prop 19. Seating choice 20. Slag, e.g. 23. Piece of cake 24. Paul Anka’s “____ Beso”

DOWN

1. Barges 2. Osgood’s “Sunday Morning” predecessor 3. Army affirmative 4. High regard 5. Tanker, e.g. 6. Blacken on the grill 7. Gateway Arch architect Saarinen 8. Quarterdeck? 9. Birds with iridescent feathers 10. Give off 11. 911 response initials 12. Arizona senator Jon 13. Iceland-to-Ireland dir. 21. 2011 Rose Bowl winners: Abbr.

25. ____-mo replay 28. Big band blarers 33. “____ see it ...” 34. Actress Carol and others 35. TV show that featured the Italian pop song “Mahna Mahna” in its first episode 41. String quartet member 42. Brand created when Sam Farber saw his wife having difficulty gripping kitchen tools 43. With 54-Across, progress seeker’s frustrated comment (and a comment on words hidden in 20-, 28- and 35-Across) 22. Play for a sap 25. ____-Soviet relations 26. MGM mogul Marcus 27. Walk-____ (small parts) 29. Gasol of the NBA 30. Medium power? 31. ____ the iceberg 32. 1995 Eazy-E hit “Just ____ Let U Know” 35. Trident feature 36. Broke ground? 37. 2012 British Open winner Ernie 38. One adept at going off on a tangent? 39. Outside: Prefix 40. The Blue Jays, on scoreboards

50. Springfield’s Flanders 51. Med. plan 52. Avant’s opposite 54. See 43-Across 58. Some buggy drivers 61. Bar mitzvah scroll 62. Bout outcome 63. Mount in Exodus 64. Online reminder 65. It’s always in Shakespeare 66. Cinemax rival 67. Increases 68. “Silent Spring” subject

41. Max ____ Sydow 44. Subgenre of punk 45. Dorm room hanging 46. Bathes 47. Call from the PD 48. Violent, perhaps 49. Sent to the canvas 53. LPGA player’s wear 54. Peter the Great, for one 55. 1993 Nobelist Morrison 56. Cupid, to the Greeks 57. Party spread 58. Twit 59. Sch. where Ben Bernanke got his Ph.D. 60. ____ heartbeat MEDIUM #9

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

The following person is doing business as CENTER FOR NATURAL MEDICINE at 1460 G Street, Arcata, CA 95521. John Yamas 3710 Coombs Court Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s John Yamas. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 22, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00641

The following person is doing business as COMPLETE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 985 G St., Arcata, CA 95521. Sherilyn Arlene Munger 808 School Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Sherilyn Munger. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 23, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-309)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00649

The following person is doing business as SIX RIVERS PAINTING at 2415 Spring St., Eureka, CA 95501. Brian Mogel 2415 Spring St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/26/12. /s Brian Mogel. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 26, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-315)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00603

The following person is doing business as JAM SCREEN PRINTING AND GRAPHIC DESIGN OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA at 4149 E St., Apt.

A, Eureka, CA 95503. Perry Brubaker 4149 E St., Apt. A Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Perry Brubaker. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-304)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00618

The following person is doing business as INSPIRE WELLNESS at 4589 Fieldbrook Rd., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Juliet C. Ferri 4589 Fieldbrook Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Juliet C. Ferri. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-307)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00624

The following person is doing business as RIGDEN’S RURAL LAND SERVICE at 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #17, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 441, Klamath, CA 95548. Peter Rigden 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #17 Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Peter Rigden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-305)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00626

The following person is doing business as NORTH PACIFIC LANDSCAPE DESIGNS BY GAIRD RIGDEN at 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #16, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 1091, Trinidad, CA 95570. Gaird Rigden 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #16

Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Gaird Rigden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-306)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00582

The following persons are doing business THE CLOTHING DOCK & K STREET ANNEX at 1109 11th St., Arcata, CA 95521 Susan D. Paul 1403 Chester Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/30/1999 /s/ Susan Paul This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-301)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00586

The following person is doing business as PURE MAKEUP at 609 E Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Maria Darlina Brandon 3199 Mitchell Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Maria Brandon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-297)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00616

The following persons are doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE at 531 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501 Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 Lane Thomsen Po Box 275/1045 Hawk Hill Rd. Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy /s/ Lane Thomsen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-302)


10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-303)

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BARBARA CHRISTINE MCKELLAR AKA BARBARA C. MCKELLAR CASE NO. PR120258

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BARBARA CHRISTINE MCKELLAR, also known as BARBARA C. MCKELLAR and BARBARA MCKELLAR A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LANE V. MCKELLAR in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LANE V. MCKELLAR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 29, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court

11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-311)

Is my Fictitious Business Name Statement good forever

?

Y

our fictitious business name statement will expire

five years from the date it was last filed with the County Clerk. You have 40 days from the expiration date to renew your FBNS with the County. A new statement does not need to be published unless there has been a change in the information required in the expired statement. If any changes occur then you must file a new FBNS and have published again. Within 30 days from the stamped refiling date, you must begin publishing the statement in the newspaper. If you publish it in the North Coast Journal for the required four weeks, on the last day of publication a “proof of publication” will be sent to the County Clerk to complete the filing process.

the Employment

CONTINUED ON NExT PAgE

Mental health clinician Full-time opening for a licensed mental health Clinician anticipated to work until 8/31/13 however, ongoing employment may be available. Position provides assessment services to children, youth, and adults, individual and group therapy, and related services. Requires current MFT, LCSW, ASW, MFTI, or Clinical Psychologist license valid in California and ability to pass a criminal history fingerprint clearance. Experience providing psychotherapy with children and youth as the primary focus is preferred. $24.06/ $29.82 per hour, dependent on licensure. Benefits including paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and paid insurance. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address by Monday, november 19th at 8:30 a.m. EOE

Processing sPecialist Full-time Starts at $11.56/hr. Processing Specialist will assist with processing child care attendance forms and perform general office support duties. Must be able to pass criminal history fingerprint clearance. Excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and paid insurance. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at above address by tuesday, november 13th at 5 p.m. EOE

CONTINUED ON NExT PAgE

Police chief $142,500 /annual

The ideal candidate will have strong leadership and administrative skills, at least seven years of comprehensive senior level police work, including at least three years of administrative supervisory experience. a Bachelor’s degree in Police Science, Criminal Justice or a related field, or equivalent and a PoST Management Certificate are required. a Master’s degree is preferred. Visit www.ci.eureka.ca.gov for more information regarding this position, the City’s generous benefit package, and how to apply on line. or call the City’s job information line at (707) 441-4134 to request a packet be mailed to you. Closing date 11/30/2012.

CITY OF ARCATA

SCADA SYSTEMS MANAGER

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

Positions

SENIOR FINANCE ACCOUNTANT,1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST, 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 P/T Crescent City, 1 F/T- (Spanish Language)

MEDICAL BILLER, 2 F/T Arcata

is a flat $50 fee.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Eureka Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application Call 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information

442-1400

NON-CERTIFIED LUMBER gRADER. Sierra Pacific Industries, Arcata division seeks a lumber grader with experience in Fir and Pine. Must have knowledge in Shop, Dimension, Commons and Selects. Must be willing to work any shift and weekends. Apply in person at 2593 New Navy Base Rd, Arcata, M - F, 8 a.m - 11 a.m and 2 p.m - 4:30 p.m or fax resume to ATTN: Anne at (707) 442-4954. We are a drug & tobacco free work place. A verifiable SS # is required. EOE (E-1115) ACTORS/MOVIE ExTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN) (E-1115)

The CiTy of eureka

The cost for running your ficticious business name in the

NORTH COAST JOURNAL

AIRLINE CAREERS. begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial assistance available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214 (E-1108) NORTH COAST RAPE CRISIS TEAM. Has openings for two 40+ hr/wk positions w/excellent benefits for team oriented, self-motivated people: BILINGUAL (Spanish/English) CLIENT ADVOCATE provides in-person and phone support to survivors of sexual assault. EDUCATOR/ CLIENT ADVOCATE provides prevention education & community outreach to all ages from Preschool to Seniors and direct client services. Applications due 11/19/12 by 4 p.m. Call 443-2737 for info. EOE (E-1115)

The following persons are doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE WHOLESALE at 531 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501, 1340 Marsh Rd., Eureka, CA. 95501 Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON S.B. #30716 MORRSION & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00617

RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, 1 F/T Crescent City

$53,264.64 - $64,743.50/yr. Final Filing Date: 4:00 p.m., Friday November 16, 2012. Manages, coordinates, performs, and supervises work activities related to the installation, programming, testing, maintenance, repair, and calibration of the City’s SCADA, water/ wastewater control, industrial communication, water/wastewater instrumentation, telemetry, motor control centers and other equipment that support the City’s real-time systems used for monitoring and controlling water/ wastewater operations. Application materials are available at City of Arcata, City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, CA 95521; by calling (707) 822-5953; or at www.cityofarcata.org. EOE.

northcoastjournal.com• NORTH CoastJOURNAL JourNal•• THURSDAY, thursday, NoV. • NorthCOAST NOV.8,8,2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com

41


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

Employment Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Food Production Worker Cash Register Sales Smog Tech Office Assistant Caregiver – All Shifts Carpenter

County of Humboldt

Director of Public HealtH NursiNg

$5,994 - $7,692 monthly plus benefits The Director of Public Health Nursing is an integral member of the Department of Health and Human Services leadership and Public Health Administration’s management team and works in collaboration with Social Services and Mental Health in multiple innovative programs. This position oversees approximately 65 professional, administrative and support staff. Active evidence-based programs include Nurse Family Partnership and Safe Care. Under the Director’s leadership nursing will provide quality chronic disease prevention that aligns with the Department’s Community Transformation Initiative. The Director is also responsible for California Children’s Services and its Medical Therapy Unit, Foster Care Nursing, Emergency Response, General Relief, and In-Home Supportive Services/Adult Protective Services nursing. Education and experience should be equivalent to graduation in Nursing from a four-year college or university accredited by the National League for Nursing and two years of supervisory public health nursing experience which has included involvement in project leadership and program planning. Must possess a valid license to practice as a Registered Nurse in the State of California and a valid California Public Health Nursing Certificate. Must possess a valid California driver’s license. Filing deadline: November 30, 2012. For application come to Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs Jobline: (707) 476-2357 AA/EOE

The Trinidad Chamber of Commerce seeks an

Executive Director The Chamber is looking for a person who… • • • •

has strong verbal and written communication skills is a self-starter with a high level of initiative is able to work independently and meet deadlines has excellent computer skills & is familiar with MS Word, Excel, etc. • holds a valid California driver’s license • can work variable and flexible hours • has experience in marketing and/or public relations

Collections Officer Full time, benefited opportunity in McKinleyville for an experienced Collections professional. Must have knowledge of collecting, skip tracing, small claims actions, bankruptcy & repossession procedures, and lending & collections laws. Excellent communication skills, computer competence, and a professional image required. Must be bondable. Apply online at www.coastccu.org or in person at 2650 Harrison Avenue, Eureka. EOE.

This part-time position requires an average of about 20 hours per week (hours will vary depending on the season and scheduled Chamber events). Salary is $1100 per month. Tourism-related experience is desirable. To Apply, please respond to this ad with your résumé and a cover letter indicating how you meet these qualifications. Send to chamber.ed@suddenlink.net.

Library Assistant Performs clerical and other specialized Bear River Band Library duties relative to the general operation of a tribal public library. Supports staff, assists library patrons, manages the library collection, uses library software and performs other computer/ research requests. Tribal Preference is given in compliance with the Indian Self-determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C Section 450 e (B)) For application go to www.bearrivercasino.com or call 707-733-1900, x.167

Social Services Director Manages and oversees all aspects of Social Services Department; grant management duties, strategic planning and policy development, fiscal and program responsibilities.

County of Humboldt

For application go to www.bearrivercasino.com or call 707-733-1900, x.167

HUMAN RESOURCES ANALYST RISK I

$3,923 - $5,034 monthly, plus excellent benefits, including PERS retirement. Under direction, plan, implement and monitor County safety, workers compensation and other loss prevention and employee benefit programs; perform a wide variety of human resources administrative and analytical work. Qualified candidates should possess a basic knowledge of the principles and practices of public human resources/risk management administration and demonstrated skill in establishing and maintaining effective professional working relationships. Possession of a four year college degree in a related field is desirable. Valid CA driver’s license required.

Perform specimen collection, standardized laboratory testing and office support duties in a clinical laboratory. Qualified candidates should possess skill and knowledge of the basic principles, practices and procedures used in clinical lab testing, and one year of related experience.

Final filing date: November 19, 2012. Application materials available at Humboldt County Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, CA, or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. EOE

Final filing date: November 21, 2012. Application materials available at Humboldt County Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, CA, or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs AA/EOE

County of Humboldt

LABORATORY ASSISTANT I

$2,082 - $2,672 monthly, plus excellent benefits, including PERS retirement

42 North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Housekeeping/Janitorial • General Manager Director Of Sales Hospitality CPA Tax Specialist Commercial Lines Agent • Medical Assist. Refrigeration Tech. • Technology Sales B2B

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

PREVENTION COORDINATOR. HSU is accepting applications for a 20 hour/week ($2,500/month, for 10 months/year) Prevention Coordinator to design and implement peer education programs to prevent sexualized violence, including training and mentoring peer educators. Three-year, 10-month, grant-funded, non-state position. Minimum qualifications: demonstrated experience in developing and implementing peer education programs; knowledge of the problem of sexualized violence in campus communities; one+ years organizing to end sexualized violence; demonstrated ability to work with students/staff/faculty of diverse ethnic, sexual, gender, and class backgrounds; BA/BS degree. Complete job description available at http://humboldt. edu/hsuf/Employment.php. Submit 1 to 2-page letter of intent, résumé, and contact information for three references to Mira Friedman, Humboldt State University, Student Health & Wellness Services, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA, 95521. Ph. (707) 826-5123. Application review commences on 11/26/12. Start date immediate upon hire. (E-1115) BUSINESS OPERATIONS COORDINATOR. Interested in a job you can feel good about with people dedicated to making a difference? McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc., a dynamic and growing electrical and solar PV contracting company seeks to hire a Business Operations Coordinator, visit mckeeverenergy.com to apply. (E-1227)

CITY OF TRINIDAD - PUBLIC WORKS MAINTENANCE-F/T. Responsible for reading water meters, repair and maintenance of roads, buildings, recreation and sanitation facilities and the water distribution system. Must have or obtain California Water Treatment and Distribution Operator’s License Level 1 within one year of employment and Level 2 Treatment within two years. Salary $30,306 - $36,026 with excellent benefits. Visit www.trinidad.ca.gov for complete job description. Send resume to City of Trinidad, P.O. Box 390, Trinidad 95570. Deadline Nov. 16. (E-1108) PHP DEVELOPER. Humboldt County Office of Education. Advanced knowledge of PHP5 and MySQL, HTML5, C553 and JavaScript. Experience with MVC frameworks, CakePHP, WebServices and security. Contracted Service, fee to be determined. For further information contact gsziladi@humboldt.k12.ca.us or call (707) 445-7030. Classified app available at HCOE or online: www.humboldt.k12.ca.us Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501. Open until filled. (E-1108) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. (AAN CAN) (E-1129)


Employment

Rentals

Real Estate

Rental Helpers

Offers the largest listing of homes, apartments, condos and rooms for rent in Humboldt County! 4 Seventh Street, Suite A

(707) 443-HELP TheRentalHelpers.com CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS Gift Shop - Candy Cart Janitorial Crown Club Representative Deli Worker, Busser/Host (Sunset) Server (Sunset) Table Games Dealer/Dual Rate Vault Attendant 2 - Security SEASCAPE Dock Workers, PT TRIBAL OPERATIONS Human Resources Director Member Services Intake Worker - On Call Animal Control Officer Tribal Programs-Tribal Court Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists. For: Ads TV Film Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool. com (E-1108) BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Jamie, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) HELP WANTED!!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com (AAN CAN) (E-0228) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-1220) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227) Announce that job opening here. Call 442-1400 to place your ad. VISA/MC

Humboldt County’s only DRE Licensed Listing Service!

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1019 McCullens. Remodeled, Lg. yard, double car garage, hook ups, MtM W/C pet Rent $1300. Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) VERY COMFORTABLE 3 BEDROOM 2 BATH. In Arcata, Maria court. $1550 per month. please email at zhuozhao@suddenlink. net or call (707) 267-5281 for more info. (R-1108) LOLETA 2BD/1BA. $875/month, includes water & sewer. New stove & refrigerator included, $1000/ deposit, 649 Montgomery St., 733-5673. (R-1108) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Appliances, all utilities paid. $595. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1108) ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, parking, near bus, some utilities. $600, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R1108) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Parking, dishwasher, some utilities. $850, (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1108) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Deck, garage, yard, laundry hookups. $1400. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1108) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 3395 Trinity. Refridgerator, Lg Yard, Hookups. MtM W/C Pet. Rent $1200. Vac 11/4. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108)

CONTINUED ON next page

Corner 7 th & A of St.

PRA02054

EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 309 E St., Apt. #12. W/S/G Pd. Rent $495. Section 8 OK. W/C Pet. Vac 11/11. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM APT. Patio, some utilities, onsite laundry. $700. (707) 443-8227, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1108) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. 2 car garage, fireplace, pets considered, yard. $1300. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1108) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Laundry hookups, carport. $775. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1108) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer hookups, yard. $1390. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1108) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM APT. Parking, some utilities. $800. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1108) M C K I N L E Y V I L L E 2 B D/ 1 BA APARTMENT. 1146 Gassoway Ave., #12. W/S/G Pd. Hookups, Carport,W/C pet. 1 year lease rent $765. Vac 11/01. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1300. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R1108) S H E LT E R COV E 2 B D/2 BA . Ocean View. Furnished. 2 Car. $1100 + deposit. (916) 844-9926. (R-1122) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1335 6th St., #9. W/S/G Pd. MtM Rent $650. Vac 11/01. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) LOLETA 2BD/2BA TOWNHOUSE. 335 Lincoln Ave., #2. Range, Refridgerator, DW, Carport. W/C Cat. MtM Rent $800. Vac 11/02. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates. com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

MOBILE HOME SPACE FOR RENT. Double or Single Wide. Located Space #35 Glendale Mobile Estates. Call info (707) 442-4292 or (707) 407-8909. Near Bluelake. (R-1115) NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS. Plaza Point Apartments, 977 8th St., Arcata. 1 & 2 bedroom apartments and also apartments with special design features for individuals with a disability. Inquire as to the availability of rental subsidy. Must be 62 years of age or older; or disabled, regardless of age. Call (707) 822-2770, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-1 p.m. TDD #1-800-735-2929. We are an equal opportunity provider and employer. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY ACCESS. (R-1108) ELK RIVER 2900 SF 5BD HOME. No pets. Call for Details. 443-2246. (R-1129) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1140 E St., # 2. W/S/G Pd., Rent $595. Cat OK, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3222 17th St., Unit C. W/S/G Pd., MtM, Cat OK, Spacious, Garage, Rent $775, Vac Soon. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 230 Wabash Ave., Apt. #6, #19. W/S/G Pd. Rent $645. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 10/29. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/ 1BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Pd., 6 Month Lease, Sm. Pets OK, Rent $765, Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1108) ARCATA CLEAN 1BD. No growing, no illegal drugs, no smoking, no pets. References Required. $840/ month plus deposit. (707) 8227471. (R-1108)

real estate

Check out the listings on page 47

this week

Business Rentals DOWNTOWN EUREKA OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. Close to Courthouse. Call 443-2246 for sizes and pricing. (BR-1129) RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-1108) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

real estate

this week

or online @ www.northcoastjournal.com

real estate

this week

EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 443-4811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE1122) 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www. SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN) (RE-1108) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

Auto

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227) Too many cars blocking your driveway? Are you wanting to sell some of them? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www. chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-0124)

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 8, 2012

43


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 43

Buy/Sell/Trade SPECIAL

TOOL & ESTATE AUCTION THURS. NOV. 15TH 5:45 PM

HARDWARE STORE LIQUIDATION! New Hardware, Used Tools • Equipment

ALL NEW MERCHANDISE incl. key making machine & supplies, also special consignment of used NEWER TOOLS, incl Honda EU 6500 generator, Honda GX 390 pressure washer, Husqvarna 394 XT chainsaw + others. Cut-off saw, lathe, gas drill, airless paint sprayer, asst. hand tools

443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues & Sun

Select Jackets

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM PREVIEW: Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 am on

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE

ANNUAL FLEA MARKET. Loleta Firemans Pavilion. Sun., Nov. 11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Call (707) 733-1930 for more info. (BST-1108) PURSES, PUZZLES & PICTURES 1/2 PRICE! Yellow Tagged 25¢ Nov. 6-10. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. Providing Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-1108) TEMPUR-PEDIC FOR SALE . California King Tempur-Pedic mattress and box springs. This is the BellaSonna model and is about two years old. Entire set is in like new condition. This mattress is medium to firm support. Originally sold for approx. $5,000, selling for $2,000. Injuries from a recent accident are forcing us into a softer mattress. Text message to 845-4698 only. Available to view in the evenings. (BST-1122)

Vintage Clothing Furniture, Housewares & more!

KITS • $7

THE

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

Excellent guardian dogs for your home or ranch. Strong, stable temperament. $500.

SALE:

CARL JOHNSON CO. OPEN HOUSE NOV. 9TH - 11TH

Yard Sale

PRESA CANARIO PUPPIES FOR SALE

FLASHBACK

+ over 150 lots estate furniture & household misc.& MUCH MORE!

TOO MANY TUBAS, OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Services

Pets

CLOTHING DOCK &

K STREET ANNEX

Services

707.267.4087

IT’S FIREWOOD TIME! Alder, Douglas Fir, Juniper, Madrone (sometimes), Oak, Pepperwood, & Kindling. Call for current availability. We can deliver. Almquist Lumber Company, Boyd Road, Arcata. Open 7 days a week. Stop by or call; (707) 825-8880 (BST-0328) MONEY 4 ALL. 11,011 days! Automated. Easy. 831-238-6448 (AAN CAN) (BST-1108) REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL ! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945. (BST-1108) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

ESTATE

AUCTION

THURS. NOV. 8TH 5:45 PM 2 Complete estate housefuls! Lots of furniture incl. beautiful French sideboard, household collectibles, tools + new lumber lot incl. 83 - 1x6”, 12 - 1x8”, 27 - 1x12” surfaced & primed! ADVANCE NOTICE OF NEXT AUCTION

THURS. NOV. 15TH 5:45 BIG SALE! New Hardware from Hardware Store Liquidation! Used Tools • Equipment SPECIAL AUCTION! +Estate Furniture & Household Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM PREVIEW: Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 am on

11th & K Streets, Arcata

822-8288

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Services

FD1963

(707) 443-1104 BOUDOIR PHOTOGRAPHY. By Venus & Aphrodite, Classy to sassy, comfort and privacy guaranteed. $40 fall special. 2234172. (S-0110) GROCERIES DELIVERED. Order today. Delivered tomorrow. Get paid to help advertise. 831-2386448 (AAN CAN) (S-1108) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use solar energy to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating-CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail.com, (707) 502-1289 (S-1122) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-1108)

RIGDEN’S RURAL LAND SERVICE. Logging, Excavating, Grading, Water Systems, etc. Peter Rigden (707) 498-1588. (S-1213) SEABREEZE CLEANING CO. Office & Rentals, Licensed & Bonded (707) 834-2898 (S-0131) ST I TC H ES - N - B R I TC H ES I N MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502-5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches-n-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com (S0131)

hiring? place your ad ONLINE @

www.northcoastjournal.com

humboldtcremation.com No membership required.

Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-1129) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-1122)


Services

CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

Community

Music

RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW FOR THE JOURNAL

do you have a project or idea you would like to build? contact peter portugal (707) 599-2158 over 48 years professional experience in invention design - engineering - art - and fabrication in metal wood - fiberglass - plastic

let’s make something great together

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

Too many TUBAs in your cupboards? Are you wanting to sell some of them? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi-track recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-1122) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

Community

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Legal Services

Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976 1026 Third Street Eureka

(707) 445-9666

Music ROAD TRIX FOR YOUR HOLIDAY PARTIES. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1229) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1115)

WOUNDED WARRIORS, WHEN WAR COMES HOME. Explore post-traumatic stress disorder in the lives of military veterans and discuss helpful resources at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Nov. 11, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-1108) HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your daughter how to become a healthy powerful young women, then who will? The Media? Her Peers? Not likely. She needs you! Six Rivers Planned Parenthood Presents a Parent/Daughter workshop. A Free, interactive workshop for 9-12 year old girls and her parents, focusing on fostering positive attitudes about girl’s bodies and the changes to look forward to during puberty, Thurs., Nov. 8, 6-8 p.m, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (C-1108) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice,*Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com ) (C-1129)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124)

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

Holiday Gift Guide Nov. 15, Nov. 22, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, Dec. 13 & Dec. 20

Call Colleen Hole Shane Mizer Karen Sack Mike Herring

442-1400

national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

www.northcoastjournal.com 310 F St., Eureka CA 95501

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 8, 2012

45


body, mind ▼

&Spirit

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45

transformation consciousness expansion to enhance overall well-being New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

Institute of Healing Arts

725-9627

www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

KICK BUTTS! Become nicotine free with Dave Berman, Clinical Hypnotist. (707) 845-3749. www. ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-1108) REIKI CLINIC. Sat., Nov. 10. Arcata Holistic Health Center, 940 9th St. (across from the Co-Op) $25 suggested donation. 20-30 minute table sessions. (no one turned away for lack of funds) (MB-1108) WERE YOU IMPLANTED. WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and Dec. 2010? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800535-5727 (MB-1108) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www. tarotofbecoming.com. (MB-1227) GOD GIFTED PSYCHIC. Nicole Goodman Love Specialist, will provide happiness and peace of mind with your lover. Can solve all impossible problems. Never fails. 1-866-524-6689 (MB-1108)

Gambling Treatment • Trauma Recovery Addiction Treatment • Stress Management DOT/SAP

norcalrecoveryservices.com

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

Valerie Schramm

Give The Gift of Health – A Loving Hands Massage Gift Certificate

Marriage & Family Therapist, MFC 47122

(707) 496-2856 • shawnabmft@gmail.com 381 Bayside Road, Suite C • Arcata, CA 95521

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Est. 1979

739 12th St., Fortuna

707-839-5910

Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage.

MASSAGE THERAPY

SHAWNA BELL

Marny Friedman

GIT YER VALSSAGE!

Loving Hands,

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

~energy work~

Certified Massage Therapist

Diana Nunes Mizer

Energy Life Center FIND YOUR CENTER @ OM SHALA YOGA! Come practice in a supportive and conscious community. We offer a widerange of classes for all levels and ages, taught by skilled and dedicated teachers in a warm, light-filled studio in the heart of Arcata! Enjoy a free sauna, showers and lounge with each class. Our gorgeous retail boutique offers yoga apparel, props, books, music and gifts. Yoga styles include: Anusara, Vinyasa, Forrest, Kundalini, Restorative, Prenatal, Kids and more. Discounts for seniors, students and beginners. Take a breath. Enjoy the world. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (MB-1129) BREATHE LOVE, CLAIRVOYANT ENERGY HEALING INTEGRATED WITH AXIS MUNDI ASTROLOGY. Gain clarity for self-empowerment. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 8451450. www.sacredenergyspace. com (MB-1122) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)

Open house nov. 10th 10am-2pm Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1129) doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719 (MB-1115) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124)

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup.org. (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@salinarain.com, www. salinarain.com. (MB-1227)

Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-0110)

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227)


NEW

■ EUREKA

LISTI

2850 E St., Eureka

NG

(Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

real estate

this week Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION FOR THIS MOVE-IN READY MYRTLETOWN HOME! Built in 2008, 3 bd/2 ba and a spacious 1530sf. Granite tile counters and maple cabinets. Vaulted ceilings and skylights and a patio. This is a nice, clean home close to Eureka’s conveniences. MLS#236625 $274,000

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

this week

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

$399,900

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

$235,000

3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,400 sq ft single level wonderful home with views of the 7th fairway of Baywood Golf and Country Club, easy access, two living rooms, two fireplaces, decks and much more

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,650 sq ft spacious Eureka home with appealing floor plan, separate living room & family room, master is located at other end of home for privacy, large yard on dead end street

real estate

2 bed, 1 bath, 946 sq ft gambrel style home in the area above Bigfoot Golf Course in Willow Creek, one bedroom downstairs & a loft bedroom upstairs, great summer retreat, garden area

this week

$120,000

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

“WE WORK FOR YOU.”

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

iCe!

Snow Camp Mountain this panoramic parcel features a ed pR

Our Real Estate Loan Rates Funded through C.U. Members Mortgages 30 Year Fixed Rate

15 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 3.375%  APR - 3.554%

Rate - 2.750%  APR - 3.070%

10 Year Fixed Rate

5 Year Adjustable Rate

Rate - 2.750%  APR - 3.217%

Rate - 2.625%  APR - 5.093%

F.H.A

V.A.

FHA 30 Year Rate

Federal VA 30 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 3.250%  APR - 4.272%

Rate - 3.250%  APR - 3.628%

*These rates are subject to change daily. Subject to C.U. Members Mortgage Disclaimers. Up to $417,000.00

1270 GIUNTOLI LANE, ARCATA or 707-822-5902 northernredwoodfcu.org

ReduC

year round creek, developed water system, rolling meadows with scattered second growth and pockets of old growth trees. Call now!

$325,000

Willow Creek Land/Property

+/-250 acres near Waterman Ridge, only a half an hour from Willow Creek. property boasts Southern exposure, timber, two large year round springs, great access and multiple developed building sites.

$450,000

Zenia Land/Property

this beautiful, flat 40 acre parcel features 2 unfinished cabins, a yurt, small outbuildings, year round developed creek, phenomenal views and easy access. perfect year round homesteading property or summer retreat. Call today!

$269,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 2012

47


6:00 PM

6 pm - 9 pm

$125 each

$500

TO MIDNIGHT

10pm 11 pm & 12 am

WE ARE GIVING OUT OVER

6 pm - 9 pm

$18000 IN CASH I

THIS IS SOMETHING YOU DON'T WANT TO MISS

~

$125 each

$250 each ) $1,000 $250 each

10 pm 11 pm & 12 am

1-\I-~03

mo

$500 each $2,000 $500 each

6 pm - 9 pm

!

10 pm 11 pm & 12 am

$1,000 each $4,000 $1,000 each

6 pm - 9 pm

10 pm 11 pm & 12 am

Get all the details at the Crown Club Receive an entry for every 100 pOints earned per promotional day The 10 pm drawing can stili be won even If an earlier pnze wa

THROWBACK THURSDAY DJ NIGHTS!!! CHECK OUT THE NEW SCENE IN THE FIREWATER LOUNGE ON THURSDAYS!!! WE HAVE ACCURATE PRODUCTIONS TAKING IT TO OLD SCHOOL LEVELS. GRAB YOUR FRIENDS & ENJOY SOME GREAT BEATS!!!

TABLE BONUSES

BINGO BONUSES

NOVEMBER 30 AT 9 PM WE HAVE $2,250 UP FOR GRABS AND IT ALL MUST GO! SEE HOW MUCH YOU CAN MAKE IN 10 SECONDS! THE AMOUNT YOU RACK IS THE AMOUNT YOU KEEP!

GO GO GO ... BINGO 7 DAYS A WEEK! FRIDAYS IN NOVEMBER SPREAD THE WEALTH WITH BUDDY BINGO AND COMING IN DECEMBER IS THE MASSIVE NEW YEARS EVE BINGO MARATHON!! OVER $45/000 IN CASH PRIZES. IJ ~~~~b~ok I

I

27 SCENIC DRIVE • TRINIDAD, CA 95570 • 5 MINUTES OFF HWY 101 707 -677 -36 11 • 800-684-2464 • WWW.CHERAEHEIGHTSCASINO.COM • FREE SHUTTLE Management reserves the right to change or cancel any promotion at any time Bet with your head not over It Gambling problem?

Call1 ~aOO·522-4700


North Coast Journal 11-08-12 Edition