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thursday nov.l, 2012 vol XXIII issue 44 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

The Hoopa Valley Tribe kicks out aconvicted drug dealer By Scottie Lee Meyers

8 Internet: the eye of Sauron 10 Terror times two 21 Many painters, one model 25 Politics and PBS 30 Dueling fundraisers 32 Not one, not two, but three directors


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table of 4 6

Mailbox Poem Election Season

8

News Who’s Watching You?

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover

25 Stage Matters It’s Not Easy Reliving Bush

26 Music & More! 28 Calendar 31 In Review two dvds

32 Filmland

Banished

14 Home & Garden Service Directory

19 The Hum Music and Politics

21 Art Beat Crossing the Line from Model to Muse

22 Arts Alive! eureka, saturday, nov. 3, 6-9 p.m.

24 Fortuna First Friday friday, nov. 2, 6-9 p.m.

Split Personalities

34 Workshops 36 Field Notes King Arthur, Part 2: Mount Badon

37 37 38 42 43

Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

Central labor CounCil

Humboldt and del norte Counties

Cast Your Vote NoVember 6th Stop the Special exemptionS act take a Stand for education

We eNdorse:

Linda atkins eureka CitY CouNCil congratulations to:

Michael Winkler

Shane Brinton

arcata mayor

arcata vice mayor

Paid for by Humboldt & del norte Counties Central Labor Council

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012

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Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976 1026 Third Street, Eureka

(707) 445-9666

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Sorry, Greens …

… Or Not

Editor:  While it is a sad statement, right now a vote for Jill Stein of the Green Party is a mistake, unless the goal is to give Mr. Romney the election (Mailbox, Oct. 25). I would dearly like to vote closer to my heart and soul … but this election can’t afford it. I hold out hope that someday things will correct (I almost said “right”) themselves. I hope elections can’t be bought, that more choices of who might represent us are available and that “equality for all” isn’t a distant memory. I am very disappointed with Obama; the hopes he raised us to were exciting, but the reality is, he is the only choice in this very serious game of chess. The Romney/Ryan combination is a devastation. Closer to home, Bonino’s slogan is that “he walks the talk:” Whose talk is he walking? Linda Atkins has always been upfront, talking for more than the mere few. I trust her intentions and her actions.  Kathy Travers, Eureka

Editor: Margy Emerson expressed her worry, and that of many progressives, that voting for Jill Stein would help Romney/Ryan get elected. In a swing state, that would be a legitimate concern. But we do not live in a swing state. California polls show Obama holding a steady 15 percent lead over Romney. Even if Jill Stein garners 5 percent of the vote, Obama will carry the entire electoral college votes for the state. Noam Chomsky did say that, in a swing state, he would vote for Obama. He also said that since he lives in the state of Massachusetts, he will most likely vote for Jill. Like Massachusetts, California is a safe state. Romney may appear more dangerous than Obama, but, like Bush, his policies would undoubtedly encounter fierce resistance from the people. Obama, on the other hand, has been allowed free rein to spy on American citizens and to sign indefinite detention without trial into law. He has killed hundreds of civilians with drone strikes and maintains a secret kill list. He has allowed mountaintop removal,


Cartoon by joel mielke

hydrofracking and offshore drilling in the Arctic, and fully intends to complete the XL pipeline. He recently revealed his plan to lower taxes on corporations and cut social services. Obama may be the “lesser of two evils,” but he is also clearly the most effective. Frederick Douglas said, “Power concedes nothing without a demand.” But a demand is nothing without teeth. Every vote for Jill Stein puts teeth in your demand. It is a declaration of independence from corporate rule and a rejection of the austerity measures proposed by both Obama and Romney. Every vote for Jill is

a demand for a Green New Deal, for 25 million living wage jobs, for clean energy, for prosperity. There is power in your vote. Use it. Dana Silvernale, Blue Lake

Play Fair, Supes! Editor: Thank you for pointing out that the county is paying over $700,000 in wages and benefits for workers to stay at home (“Don’t Bother Coming In,” Oct. 25), as supervisors continue “denying raises to

minimum-wage workers.” IHSS home health care workers are the only county employees who are still paid minimum wage, and our Board of Supervisors has once again denied giving these workers an increase of even one dime. IHSS workers receive $8 an hour with no benefits, no health care and no expenses, not even for gas to and from their clients’ homes. Meanwhile, these “paid-not-towork employees” are receiving upwards of $25,000 a year in benefits in addition to their salaries. In my opinion this is Humboldt County’s greatest shame. But it is also a loss of what would be a financial gain for our local economy. For every dollar paid to IHSS workers the county contributes 17 cents. The remaining 83 cents is paid for by state and federal programs already in place, making it a net gain to our local economy of 83 cents for every dollar paid. By helping low income people remain in their own homes, in familiar surroundings, the IHSS program is keeping many clients out of nursing homes, thereby saving millions of taxpayer dollars in MediCal. Of course the Board of Supervisors should act out of basic humanity and raise

the wages of these employees, immediately and significantly. The fact that it would be a boost to the economy should only make this choice easier. Contact the Board of Supervisors at 707 476-2396  and demand they do the decent and financially prudent thing by raising the stalwart IHSS home health care workers who work so hard, for so little, and do so much good for so many. Richard Salzman, Arcata

What’s 35 About? Editor: You did your readers a great service by acquainting those of them unfamiliar with “Project Censored” (Oct. 18) with an important source of news, instead of the usual mass media drivel including the births of two-headed chickens and the latest activities of meaningless celebrities such as Paris Hilton and Charlie Sheen. The Ballot Recommendation Summary (Oct. 18 and page 9) was another important inclusion. Basically just seeing what the Republicans, Chamber of Commerce and Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012

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Nov. 1, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 44

North Coast Journal Inc.

continued from previous page

www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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Photo by Scottie Lee Meyers

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

are for is good enough for me to be against, and vice versa. However I was interested to see that one ballot measure that appeared to be a no-brainer (Prop. 35 — Human Trafficking) is opposed by the California Council of Churches. WTF? So, I looked them up online and was surprised to find out that they have actually analyzed this bogus ballot measure critically and concluded it’s just another “feel good” piece of legislation that basically makes something that’s already illegal “more illegal” without actually doing anything constructive, aside from helping out the prison guards union and privatized prisons by enabling the state to send a lot more low-level pimps and lower-echelon criminals to prison minus any beneficial consequences of actually curbing the problem it’s supposed to solve. Of course it’s supported by both the Democrats and Republicans, Allah forbid them from saying or doing anything that might be misinterpreted — such as opposing a law with harsher sentences on human trafficking, because it’s obviously such a swell idea no matter how badly flawed the measure actually is and no one really has the time to read any objections to it in between watching the World Series and the latest ET episodes about Lindsay Lohan and Justin Bieber. Also, www.ballotpedia.org is a great source of info about ballot measures in California (and many other states). Keep up the good work! Roy Henock, Eureka

Don’t Trust Monsanto Editor: Thank you for your article, “The $38 Million Label” (Oct. 11). Why would six chemical companies and their allies be willing to spend that kind of money to prevent one simple line on an ingredient label? Why are they so intent on concealment? What kind of public policy is it that withholds pertinent information from the consumer? On the basis of those questions alone, I’m persuaded to vote for Prop. 37. But there’s more.  When I read the opposition’s arguments, I’m struck by their purported concern over lawsuits against small mom and pop grocers. My understanding is that the entity guilty of mislabeling would be the responsible party, not the grocer who simply puts the product on the shelf. Further, Prop. 37 provides an out if a product has

Election Season   You’re self-absorbed and judgmental, he says — As if I’m the only one in the Human-mold population On Sandwich Earth That thinks of herself obsessively. It’s Election Season! I reply, I retort, I shake in reply. I have to be. You need to open up and let in the love You crave so badly, he tells me — As if teaming up with other spores On Sandwich Earth Will somehow save me. No Party Affiliation! I reply, and my eyes flare, Like red oily poison oak. Don’t even try to sway me.

— Emily Hobelmann

not been knowingly or intentionally genetically engineered. Ironically Monsanto, itself, seems to love lawsuits — provided it’s the plaintiff. Monsanto has been the biggest bully on the block when it comes to suing and bankrupting small farmers. And get this. If, for example, wind-born pollen from a neighboring GE crop contaminates your field, Monsanto’s licensing agreement absolves it and your neighbor from responsibility, while you can be (and most certainly will be) sued for patent infringement! I’m not making this up; it’s that crazy. So serious is the situation that a group of 60 family farmers, seed businesses and organic agricultural organizations filed a preemptive lawsuit against Monsanto, (Organic Seed Growers & Trade Association, et al. v. Monsanto) seeking protection from accusations of patent infringement should contamination occur. They lost the first round but the case is under appeal.   It seems to me we have a system that is out of control and we, the people, need to stand up and be heard. We need to know what is in our food. Yes on 37.   Kay Schaser, Eureka

Unfair to Bonino Editor: Eda Bachrach’s recent hysterical rant against Eureka City Council candidate


Joe Bonino (Mailbox, Oct. 11) was beyond unfair.   Accusing Bonino of being a liar and his supporter Rex Bohn as a borderline criminal based in part on the similarity of their campaign signs borders on pathological!! I support Joe Bonino for Eureka City Council on the merits. Slimy, unfounded attacks by Bonino’s opponents confirm that choice again. Just saying. Michael K. Robinson, Eureka

Go, Growers! Editor: Mr. Faulk’s article, “The Grow Tax” (Oct. 4), shed a very dim light (pardon the pun) on the grow room taxation. There are two major flaws in this proposal that will very likely cost the Arcata taxpayer serious money: First is the fact that the $650,000 cost of this scheme must be paid up front and may never be recovered by this ludicrous idea. There has been given no analysis of what happens if the majority of large indoor grows simply scale down to 400 watt lights, and cut the numbers? Secondly, as an owner of an all-electric car who pays P&GE $400 to $700 a month, and who made his purchase decision based on the massive savings offered by the State of California incentives which PG&E allows on electricity purchase, you are about to pass a law which is diametrically opposed to state incentives now in operation. As a member of the very passionate group of “first adopters” of this technology, I can assure you that this measure will be an instant lawsuit against the City of Arcata. Get ready to pay up, Arcata!! Not to belabor the point, but, Arcata city management believing that the city will make money off of this follows a pattern of serious mistakes it has recently made including: • The three “Homeless houses” still on  O Street; • The closing of the oldest community recycling center in the history of the United States and; • Allowing our Community Development Corporation to go bankrupt. If the city wants to tamp down the trouble caused by grow houses, it should simply enforce the laws now in place. The fee charged by the Building Department is $1,500 for each busted house. Unless Gallegos is intending to let them simply “Cruz” on out of here, then let Chief Chapman do his job.  Robert Silvers, Arcata

Schools Held Hostage Editor: Gov. Brown knows that to pass his tax proposal he can hold education as hostage (“Propping up Schools,” Oct. 4). What I would like to read is what cuts our legislators have made in order to respond to our weak economy. This is a government that cannot balance a budget without spending more than it brings in through taxation. So the only choice is to ask for more money and the sure way to do that is threaten to cut education. What about all the positions that were added when the economy was growing?  Were they eliminated as they would be in the business world?  Maybe I’m wrong and just missed that article somewhere. Mike Slavin, Arcata Editor: Proposition 30 — “Gov. Brown’s baby” in Heidi Walters’ parlance in her Oct. 4 cover article, “Propping up Schools” — has been much on my mind since. As a public school teacher in Eureka for 25 years, I have been very pleased to spend my last two Saturdays walking neighborhoods downtown, east of 101, talking with residents about it and another momentous ballot measure of a different stripe, and hearing from so many their clear recognition of how important public education is to their children’s, and our nation’s, future prosperity and democracy.   I sincerely hope your readers will add their own up and down votes this coming Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6 on two initiatives on this year’s ballot which will impact the future of public education, working people, and the bright future for California we all want.  Voting yes on Prop. 30 will prevent a further $6 billion in cuts to schools and colleges. (That would be on top of the $20 billion they’ve already been cut over the last four years.) Voting no on Prop. 32 will put a stop to a fraudulent measure which aims to silence the voices of teachers and other public employees while creating special exemptions that give even more power to Super PACs, corporate special interests, and the billionaires backing it.   Steve Catton, Arcata ●

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Have you seen a targeted political ad?

Who’s Watching You?

H

How companies have assembled political profiles for millions of Internet users ProPublica

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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credit reporting company. Datalogix, a company that 201 works with Facebook to track users’ buying patterns, is also involved. (Marketing materials and comment from the seven companies are also online.) CampaignGrid and a few, similar firms have been profiled for their innovative approaches. Yet the scale of the targeting and the number of companies involved has received little notice. Few of the companies involved in the targeting talk about it publicly. But CampaignGrid, which works with Republicans, and a similar, Democratic firm, Precision Network, told ProPublica they have political information on 150 million American Internet users, or roughly 80 percent of the nation’s registered voters. The information — stripped of your name or address — is connected to your computer via a cookie. Targeting firms say replacing your name with an ID number keeps the process anonymous and protects users’ privacy. But privacy experts say that assembling information about Internet users’ political behavior can be problematic even if voters’ names aren’t attached. “A lot of people would consider their political identity more private than lots of information,” said William McGeveran, a data privacy expert at the University of Minnesota Law School. “We make more rules about medical privacy. We make more rules about financial privacy. So if you think private political beliefs are in that category, maybe you’re concerned about having them treated like your favorite brand of toothpaste.” Google has stayed away from this kind of targeting. It classifies political beliefs as “sensitive personal information,” in the same category as medical information and religious beliefs. But other big players have embraced the “political cookie,” as one company branded it.

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f you’re a registered voter and surf the web, one of the sites you visit has almost certainly placed a tiny piece of data on your computer flagging your political preferences. That piece of data, called a cookie, marks you as a Democrat or Republican, when you last voted, and what contributions you’ve made. It also can include factors like your estimated income, what you do for a living and what you’ve bought at the local mall. Across the country, companies are using cookies to tailor the political ads you see online. One of the firms is CampaignGrid, which boasted in a recent slideshow, “Internet Users are No Longer Anonymous.” The slideshow includes an image of the famous New Yorker cartoon from 1993: “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” Next to it, CampaignGrid lists what it can now know about an Internet user: “Lives in Pennsylvania’s 13th Congressional District, 19002 zip code, Registered primary voting Republican, High net worth household, Age 50-54, Teenagers in the home, Technology professional, Interested in politics, Shopping for a car, Planning a vacation in Puerto Rico.” The slideshow was online until last week, when the company removed it after we asked for comment. (A link to full slideshow is online.) Rich Masterson, CampaignGrid’s chairman, wrote in an email that the slideshow was posted in error: “It was an unapproved version of a sales deck that was posted by an intern who no longer works for the company.” CampaignGrid does indeed collect 18 different “attributes” for every voter, Masterson told ProPublica, including age, gender, political donations and more. Campaigns use this data to tailor the online ads you see. Online targeting has taken off this campaign season. ProPublica has identified seven companies that advertise the ability to help campaigns target specific voters online. Among them is Experian, the

TI ON EC

TI ON C E

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By Lois Beckett

As we reported the ability — I think in June, Yahoo and our society very much Microsoft sell access values the ability — to your registration to efficiently reach a   information for desired audience with a elp ProPublica find out how polipolitical targeting. political message.” ticians are targeting you online. That’s one way CamNot everyone seems 1. If you spot a small blue paignGrid and other to agree. A recent triangle icon on any online political companies find you study from the Univerad, or the words “Ad Choices,” take a online. Political tarsity of Pennsylvania’s screenshot of the ad. geting firms say they Annenberg School 2. Then click on the blue triangle also work with other found that 86 percent or the words “Ad Choices” to find out websites, but would of surveyed adults did which company showed you the ad. not name them. not want “political Take a screenshot of that, too. While camadvertising tailored to 3. Email the screenshots to us at paigns and the your interests,” and targeting2012@propublica.org. Please firms working that 77 percent would include the full URL of the page where with them can not return to a website you saw the ad. buy reams of if they knew it “was If the ad asks you to “learn more,” data about votsharing information visit a website, donate, or sign a ers, voters have about me with political petition, please send us a screenshot been left mostly in advertisers.” of that site or petition, as well. (The the dark. While targeting page where the ad sends you may also Many online ad firms promise a wealth be targeted to what advertisers know companies mark of individual detail, about you.) targeted ads with a it’s hard to know how Not sure how to take a screenshot? small blue trimuch information most We have links online to instructions if angle symbol, or the campaigns are actually you’re using a PC, using a Mac, or using phrase “Ad Choices,” using. a smartphone. and offer surfers a “The more third — ProPublica chance to opt out. party data providers But even if web usyou use, the smaller the ers know what the universe of people who triangle means, they get no information you can reach becomes,” CampaignGrid’s about how or why they were targeted. Masterson said. “Republican women 25-34 “Consumers don’t really understand who drive SUVs and have American Express what’s going on and haven’t given their cards, and go to the theater once a month permission,” says Joseph Turow, a digital — that might be four people.” marketing and privacy expert at the UniOne place online voter targeting has versity of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School been used successfully is in the state for Communication. senate primary race of Morgan McGarThere are few legal regulations governvey, a Kentucky Democrat who faced off ing how online targeting works, or what against three other Democratic candinotification consumers must receive. dates this May. Online advertising experts point out With four liberal candidates competing that individual voting records are public for a liberal district, McGarvey told Proinformation and have long been used to Publica, he needed to convince the small target voters through direct mail. And number of voters who would turn out in targeting companies say they are offering a the primary that they should vote for him. valuable service. Instead of seeing random His campaign worked with Precision ads, users get to see ads from candidates Network to show online McGarvey ads they might actually want to support. to local voters under 35, and to female “We empower voters,” Jeff Dittus, coDemocrats who had voted in at least three founder of Campaign Grid and now head of of the past five primary elections. (Two of Audience Partners, wrote in an email. “We his challengers were women.) give voters information that is meaningful “When every dollar counts, when literto them and helps them make choices.” ally every vote counts, you have to be Stuart Ingis, a lawyer for the Digital Admore targeted,” he said. vertising Alliance, an industry group, said “I do think it helped us win.” that voter file targeting is a First AmendMcGarvey is now running unopposed in ment issue, and that targeting should be the November election. l protected as part of political speech. “These technologies provide a method Lois Beckett wrote this article for for politicians inexpensively to improve ProPublica, an independent, nonprofit our democracy,” he said. “I would say that newsroom that produces investigative the founding fathers firmly believed in journalism in the public interest.

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About Those Props

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or those still weighing the 11 staterates partly on whether a driver has had wide ballot measures, they are: insurance before. Prop. 30: Raises taxes temProp. 34: Abolishes the death O I T N EC porarily to fund schools and penalty. some state programs. Prop. 35: Toughens penalties for Prop: 31: Changes state budget human trafficking. cycle; shifts some sales tax money Prop. 36: Eases “three-strikes” 201 from state to counties. law to save $70 million-plus annually. Prop. 32: Sharply limits unions’ political Prop. 37: Requires labels for some foods contributions. with genetically modified ingredients. Prop. 33: Lets insurance companies set Prop. 38: A different temporary tax plan to fund schools. TI ON Prop. 39: C E Tightens tax rules for multi-state Proposition 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 businesses, raising Organization (Y=Yes, N=No) roughly $1 billion American Assoc. of University Women (AAUW) Y N Y annually. Calif. School Board Association Y Y Prop. 40: Keeps Calif. State PTA Y new state Senate Calif. Federation of Teachers (CFT) Y N N N Y Y Y Y Y Y districts. Calif. Faculty Association Y N N N Y Y Y N Y The HOPE CoaliCalif. Teachers Association (CTA) Y N N Y Y Calif. Democratic Party Y N N N Y Y Y Y N Y tion (Humboldt OrCalif. Republican Party N Y Y Y N Y N N N N Y ganized for People Calif. Green Party Y N N N Y Y Y N Y Y and the EnvironLibertarian Party of Humboldt N Y Y Y N ment) has prepared Peace and Freedom Party N N N Y N Y Y N Y this summary of League of California Cities N Y different organizaLeague of Women Voters (LWV) Y N N Y Y tions’ stands on Calif. Labor Federation (AFL-CIO) Y N N N Y Y Y Y N Y the 11 propositions Chamber of Commerce Y N N N Y on November’s Consumer Federation of Calif. N ballot. The Journal Common Cause N is reprinting it with Calif. Council of Churches Y Y N N Y N Y Y N Y Y permission. DeFriends Comm. on Legislation (FCL) (Quakers) Y N N N Y N Y Y N Y Y NAACP Y tailed explanations ACLU Y Y of each proposition Sierra Club N N Y Y can be found on League of Conservation Voters N N Y Y the Secretary of Calif. Nurses Association (CNA) Y N N N Y Y Y Y N Y State’s website at Calif. National Association for Women (NOW) N N N Y Y Y Y Y www.sos.ca.gov. ●

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Ballot Recommendation Summary

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Calif. Planned Parenthood Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association Calif. Retired Teachers

Y N

N Y N

Y

N N

My Vote:

Proposition 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

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Blog Jammin’ ANIMALS, SURFING, VICTIMS / BY RYAN BURNS / OCT. 30, 2:10 P.M.

Details Emerge about Gruesome Shark Attack

Humboldt Surfrider posted to its Facebook page an update about today’s shark attack on the North Jetty: A witness and friend says he saw the victim bob underwater, then his board popped up and he screamed for help. The witness says the bite went from the victim’s breast bone to his navel. The Times-Standard also provided an update, quoting Blue Lake resident Jason Gabriel, who reportedly drove the victim from the beach into Eureka, where he was picked up by emergency responders. Gabriel gave the T-S a harrowing account of the victim’s injuries: “It punctured all the way through. There were guts and meat hanging,” Gabriel said, adding that the victim appeared to be in shock. “He was going ‘Oh my God, oh my God.’” The victim has yet to be identified. The T-S reports that he is in “fair condition” at St. Joseph Hospital. Shark attacks and encounters have been happening more frequently than normal, according to a story last week in the Christian Science Monitor. Last Tuesday a surfer was killed in a great white attack in Santa Barbara County. Another woman was attacked Saturday in Maui. ● RAILROAD, TRANSPORTATION / BY RYAN BURNS / OCT. 30, 12:44 P.M.

7 Revelations from Arkley

Eureka kazillionaire Rob Arkley made some surprising revelations yesterday in a radio interview on KINS radio. Here are the biggest ones: 1) What Marina Center? “Frankly it’s not my priority right now given the east-west rail,” he says. 2) Arkley’s company — not the City of Eureka — is the lead agency on the eastwest rail project. “It looks like Security National is gonna be — we’ve got the community support and the governmental support. And we’re probably going to be hiring an investment banker ourselves who will be negotiating,” he says. 3) Eureka can stop trying to garner support and financing for a feasibility study. Arkley says that a private company will now handle it. He’s coy about identifying which one: “We know who we’re gonna READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

be negotiating with on the entire project,” he says before offering a hint. “Someone who operates ports and rails — think about the biggest one in the world.” He continues, “We’re going to be giving them an exclusive on the project from our perspective for a year while they do their own studies and try to reverse-engineer users.” 4) Arkley could pay for the railroad himself if he wanted to. “We [Security National] made the determination that our 300 acres is enough to justify the entire rail,” he says. “Our 300-acre Fairhaven site is enough to justify the entire rail expenditure.” 5) The only potential export product he’ll identify is lumber. Canada has a lock on container shipping, so that’s out, Arkley says. Host Brian Papstein asks the billion-dollar question: What will be shipped on these hypothetical trains? “Oh, we’ll export lumber,” Arkley answers. Never mind that the industry is a fraction of what it used to be, or that the county’s own economic development coordinator says, “They’re happy with trucks.” Arkley predicts that lumber exports will somehow exceed the volumes shipped south in the industry’s heyday, in part by opening up a “market for central valley mills.” Confusingly he adds, “Same thing on import.” 6) The proposed route has changed. Rather than ending up in Alton, Arkley now says, “We’re talking about going around Korbel and ending up in Anderson [in] an hour and a half, out South Fork Mountain.” 7) Mark Lovelace and “his ilk” are obstructing the train. Papstein asks, “Why hasn’t it happened yet?” apparently referring to permitting, financing, engineering and completing the largest infrastructure project the county has seen in decades. “I think because the Harbor District wants to study it,” Arkley answers. Also, County Supervisor “Mark Lovelace doesn’t want it, and a few of his minority ilk.” The Harbor District has expressed no intention to study the east-west rail project, specifically. Its commissioners are currently doing fact-finding on multiple rail connection possibilities, including the North Coast Railroad Authority’s defunct north-south line. Arkley doesn’t explain how this is hindering the project. “I guess the Harbor District wants to do their own study and I don’t get that at all,” he says. “I mean, why? We own the land. We’re going to get the rail done through a contract. If the Harbor District wants to develop its port, why don’t they let us lead?” He laughs. “And then they can see

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing 10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


what they can do.” Lovelace has not publicly opposed the project but has expressed skepticism about its feasibility. The Board of Supervisors has heard two items related to the east-west rail project — a proposal to draft a resolution of support and a proposal to join the UpState RailConnect Committee. Both were approved. ● ACTIVISM, MUSIC, PROTEST / BY RYAN BURNS / OCT. 29, 1:54 P.M.

Ocean Grove to Host More Murder Music

Undaunted by public outrage stirred up by the furtive Capleton concert earlier this month, the Ocean Grove Lodge in Trinidad has booked another dancehall performer whose lyrics explicitly call for the murder and brutalization of gays. This time, in a concert scheduled for Election Day, the performer is Beenie Man, a Jamaican dancehall icon with a history of making reluctant, passiveaggressive quasi-apologies to international consumers, only to backpedal and backslide when he’s in hotbeds of homophobia such as Jamaica and Uganda. As with the Capleton concert, next week’s Beenie Man show was arranged by local promoter Beau DeVito of Bonus Man Entertainment. Local gay rights activist group Queer Humboldt is planning a “peaceful, loving protest” to be held outside the Ocean Grove Lodge on the night of the concert. A call to Ocean Grove Lodge Monday morning was not immediately returned. ● TRANSPORTATION / BY RYAN BURNS / OCT. 29 10:51 A.M.

Buses. On Sunday.

Good news, public transportation fans. Your weekend bus options are about to expand. The Redwood Transit is adding Sunday service, starting this coming weekend, on Nov. 4. The transit system travels between Scotia and Trinidad, with stops in Rio Dell, Fortuna, Eureka and McKinleyville, according to a press release from the Humboldt Transit Authority. The full release is on our website. ● GOVERNMENT / JOURNAL STAFF / OCT. 26, 1:37 P.M.

County Appoints Hamblin Planning and Building Director

Kevin Hamblin, who was Eureka’s community development director for 25 years before taking a planning job in Del Norte County, will be Humboldt County’s next director of planning and building, the county said in a press release. The

full release is on our website. It omits the fact that Hamblin got the job on a split vote. The Times-Standard reported that supervisors voted 3-2 to hire him, with Clif Clendenen and Mark Lovelace dissenting. They apparently aren’t saying why. ● ENVIRONMENT, MARIJUANA, MEDIA / BY RYAN BURNS / OCT. 26, 11:32 A.M.

Rapacious Weed

Two news stories this week, the first from the Sacramento Bee and a follow-up from Mother Jones, examine the environmental impacts of large-scale outdoor marijuana grow operations, which have exploded over the rural hills of Northern California in recent years. Both stories point out how the conflict between state and federal laws has effectively stymied attempts to regulate medical marijuana, allowing outdoor growers to divert streams illegally and use herbicides, pesticides and rodenticides. MoJo quotes several locals, including Humboldt County Supervisor Mark Lovelace: “This is not about marijuana, good or bad. This is just about the reality that this one industry, due to prohibition, has been essentially granted immunity from regulation,” Lovelace says. “That’s the unintended consequence of federal prohibition.” The Bee, meanwhile, points to the sad irony of our eco-groovy community turning a blind eye to the environmental degradation of the marijuana industry, which a local Fish and Game scientist compares to the timber industry in the days of Charles Hurwitz and Maxxam. ● ACTIVISM, ARTS, INDIAN COUNTRY, KLAMATH RIVER / BY HEIDI WALTERS / OCT. 26, 10:28 A.M.

Painting into the Night

They started in the daytime and painted into the night, light flickering from a campfire merging with spotlights to show their handiwork. And the scene emerging on the large canvas was no surprise: an expression, oft repeated, of the keenest desire of many in our region, including members of local tribes, to see the Klamath River undammed. The Oct. 6 mural-painting event, in Orleans at the Amayav Market, was hosted by the Klamath Justice Coalition as part of the WaterWrites Mural Project, an effort of the Estria Foundation, a Bay Area public arts organization. The Klamath mural is one of a series being painted around the world, says Nancy Hernandez with the foundation: “The Klamath mural will be linked with mural projects completed in LA, Oakland, Honolulu, The Philippines, Palestine, and El Salvador.” ●

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11


Banished The Hoopa Valley Tribe kicks out a convicted drug dealer By Scottie Lee Meyers

A

rthur Jones has calmed down. His long, black ponytail salted with gray has stopped swaying. There are now thoughtful pauses between his words. He’s been talking for an hour with the fervor of one wrongfully accused. Standing at the rickety gate of his front porch, he stares out onto the Hoopa Valley. The expanse tranquilizes him. The sky, an opaque pale blue like pulverized turquoise, hangs above an earthly expanse of Douglas fir bluffs that look like the tops of giant broccoli florets. Just out of sight snakes the Trinity River, an artery that has been sustaining life for centuries. The 90,000 acre Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation, 50 miles inland from the Pacific, is the largest Indian reservation in California. About 3,000 people call Hoopa their home, 95 percent of whom are Hupa Indians. (The people themselves are

“Hupa,” while the valley is “Hoopa”). The tribe is one of very few that was never removed off ancestral grounds. Earth. Water. Sky. The Hupa were never forced to say goodbye. “This is the center of the world for Hupa people,” says Jones, whom everybody call Arty. “This is where the creator put us. We’re as much a part of here as that tree over there, or that river over there.” With his dark eyes still fixated on the sweep of land, the 58-year-old Hupa tribal member vows to never leave. It’s his home forever, he says. But he doesn’t have a choice. Jones was convicted of felony drug charges late last year in Humboldt County Superior Court. Last week, the Hoopa Valley Tribe banished Jones through Title 5, its controversial exclusion ordinance. He’s been ordered to leave the reservation and to never come back. If he won’t go volun-

12 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Arthur Jones stands on the front porch of his home, where law enforcement found methamphetamine and cash after he was arrested in late 2011. The 58-year-old is the first Hoopa tribal member to be banished from the reservation since a new tribal chair took office in 2009. Photos by Scottie Lee Meyers

tarily, tribal police will swing by, slap cold handcuffs on his wrists and escort him over the boundary. Where to? It doesn’t matter. Just not here.     Hoopa Valley Tribal Chairman Leonard Masten Jr. promised to clean up the valley’s drug problem — particularly methamphetamine, a drug that plagues reservations across the country — when he successfully campaigned for the position in 2009. He’s already kicked out one non-tribal resident since being elected, and has enforced strict pre-employment drug testing for all tribal employees. Forcing people to pee in a cup and exiling drug dealers has made him both a loved and

loathed figure in Hoopa. Jones has some unusual supporters for a notorious and self-acknowledged drug dealer. Even Masten’s predecessor, Lyle Marshall, is staunchly against the banishment. Jones contends that Masten and the tribe illegally altered the exclusion rules, and says the chairman selectively punished him because he’s an outspoken political foe. For more than a year now, Masten and Jones have been battling in court, a battle that now will continue through Jones’ appeal. Both men have lobbed vicious insults and accused each other of crimes and dubious tactics. It’s a strange turn for two guys who grew up


Tribal Chairman Leonard Masten Jr. promised to clean up the reservation’s drug problem when he was elected, even if that meant kicking people out. Photo by Scottie Lee Meyers

together, drank beers and dropped acid together in high school, and whose kids played together. When Jones came home from the military as a young man, one of the first guys he visited was Masten.

Two things stick out

when Arthur Jones reflects on that September day in 2011 when he was arrested in Hoopa: The blistering heat and the impression it may have left on Jesus, his 2-year-old son. Jones was driving home after picking up Jesus from preschool when Humboldt County Drug Task Force agents pulled him over for speeding. After searching his flashy silver 2011 Chevy Camaro, agents found 17 grams of meth packaged in plastic baggies, two pounds of marijuana, and more than $2,000 in cash. The district attorney’s office would later issue a search warrant for his house near the Hoopa rodeo grounds, where agents seized an additional five ounces of meth, almost six pounds of processed marijuana, a 9mm pistol, $41,000 in cash, and an additional $151,000 from a Coast Central Credit Union bank account. It was one of the county’s most lucrative busts in 2011.   Jones was cuffed and stuffed in the back of a squad car as officers finished searching his Camaro. He demanded that officers allow a family member take Jesus out of the heat and away from the scene. Jones suddenly started having chest pains and struggled to breathe. He passed out and was taken to Mad River Hospital for treatment. After a quick recovery, he was booked into jail on six charges, including intent to sell drugs, possession of a firearm and child cruelty. He was out on bail the next day. Jones hired Eureka attorney Greg Rael to represent him in Humboldt’s criminal

court. He pleaded guilty in February and was convicted of two felonies, possessing a controlled substance and possessing it with intent to sell. A probation report outlined Jones’ life story: how all four of his siblings died before turning 21, how his military service left him a disabled veteran, how he struggled with substance abuse, how he became a wrestler and wrestling coach, and how dedicated he was to his 10 children and 19 grandchildren. And then there were the letters of support. There were more than 30 of them. They came from librarians, teachers, drug abuse counselors, restaurant owners, a former tribal chairman, current tribal council members and retired federal employees, among others. (There were also an unknown number of opposition letters, but the Journal was unable to get copies before the court sealed his probation documents, which by law happens 60 days after sentencing.) One of the letters came from Tim Kyle, a Hoopa tribal member who was working for the tribe’s AmeriCorps program at the time and has since left for a higher paying job off the reservation. “Arthur is trustworthy and reliable; I believe he has more positive than negative to contribute to the community,” he wrote of Jones. Because the letters were public for a couple of months, anyone could read them, including Masten. “When I wrote the personal reference letter it seemed to cause a problem with the tribe for some reason,” Kyle said. “People start picking sides and all that bullshit that comes with it. Kind of strong arm tactics stuff.” Kyle said Masten called his boss and told her that the tribe does not condone continued on next page

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe’s exclusion case was held on Oct. 18. Christine Williams, center, presides over the exclusion trial. From left are Arthur Jones, his attorney Greg Rael, Tribal associate attorney Ethan Plaut, Supaha McCovey, clerk of the court (seated), and tribal attorney Rebecca McMahon (standing).

continued from previous page the letters, and that he might have to retract it down the line. But Kyle insists that he wrote on his own time and he’s not going to let anyone pick his friends. Like many others on the reservation, Kyle feels the ordinance should be used for molesters and violent criminals, not drug offenders and “all the other pieces of shit out there.” Masten repudiates Kyle’s characterization of the “strong arm” maneuver. “I didn’t put pressure on anybody. We don’t see those letters until after he was in the court system and being dealt with.” The military service and the character reference letters might have helped, but what ultimately saved Jones were California’s overcrowded prisons. Under the state’s new realignment laws, felony drug possession no longer makes criminals eligible for state prison. And even though he has previous felony charges for possession of a controlled substance and assault, Jones was sentenced to three years of supervised probation, 400 hours of community service, and forced to forfeit $100,000 of the seized funds. He got back close to another $100,000, and went home to Hoopa. Masten called the letters of support “disgusting.” He didn’t much like the “slap on the wrist” sentencing either. “How are we supposed to clean up our community when this is the sort of sentencing that is handed down?” he told the Two Rivers Tribune earlier this year. Later, Masten

Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune

said in his interview with the Journal, that he has put in an enormous amount of time with the drug task force and the sheriff’s office to coordinate efforts to catch drug dealers, and he feels frustrated state courts won’t do more. Next time, he said, he’ll urge federal courts to prosecute Hoopa-based dealers. The way Masten saw it, Jones did plead guilty to dealing and selling drugs. And so began the showdown in Hoopa Tribal Court.

At least 90 tribes

currently have exclusion codes in their governing ordinances, according to the National Indian Law Library. Before Europeans arrived, most disputes were settled through payment of one sort or another, said Marlon Sherman, a Native

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American studies professor at Humboldt State University. “Local North Coast tribes are especially famous for having been able to mediate disputes and settle them relatively amicably through the giving or exchange of goods, such as ceremonial items or canoes.” Banishment was more severe than other forms of punishment, he said, as it separated the person from all contact with his or her community. “Family and community were as essential to life in those days as food and water. Banishment was a punishment worse than death.” Modern exclusion ordinances may be a reaction to restrictive federal laws that prevent tribes from sentencing miscreants to substantive jail time, according to Sherman. Federal authorities did not believe tribes were competent to handle their own judicial affairs, he said, and many tribes did not have the funds to build and manage jails. While tribes in some states can impose relatively short jail terms, Hoopa does not have its own jail and has opted not to go that route. One tool it does have, though, is banishment, more formally called exclusion. continued on page 16

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Exclusion is a milder punishment than disenrollment, which actually strips a person of his or her tribal membership. Disenrollment has become increasingly common in tribes with large casino wealth, and those who are ousted lose their share of the pot. By contrast, a tribal member excluded from Hoopa can still share in government aid, legal settlements and other benefits offered to native people. He just can’t live there. Jones is the first tribal Arthur Jones says that the tribal chairman is selectively punishing him for being a political rival. member to be excluded Photo by Scottie Lee Meyers during Masten’s tenure, but Masten kicked out a non-member in 2009, soon after he and so far it doesn’t seem to be aimed at “I don’t understand Eureka and the people was elected chairman. Delbert Pole, now any other tribal member. here. I just want to go back home.” 51, said he was to be the example that Rael, who represented Jones in both Masten was doing his job. “I’m not a tribal superior and tribal court, says tribal law ordinance, passed by the tribe in 1986, member and he figured I would be the is pretty clear that any repeat criminal is exclusively administered through easiest one to kick out of the valley and living in Hoopa can be banished. “You the chairman and verified by the tribal I’m not happy about it. … They do things could probably find hundreds of people judge. But Masten didn’t want to be the their own way in Hoopa, and I know that, in Hoopa and outside of Hoopa who sole force behind Jones’ banishment but I didn’t deserve that.” would fall under that criteria. Why they’re and solicited support from the sevenPole grew up in Hoopa, and had lived singling out Mr. Jones for this treatment is member council. there his whole life. In 2009 he was arsomething I don’t understand.” The ordinance is laid out over several rested for providing a space for selling and Masten offers somewhat conflicting sections, and controversy has arisen over manufacturing meth. He served 150 days accounts for why Jones is the first tribal how it should be interpreted and when in jail and was put on three years’ felony member to be banished during his tenure. it can properly be amended. It allows the probation. While in jail he received word For one thing, Masten really was after tribe to exclude people from the reservathat the tribe intended to banish him with Jones, specifically. “Arty Jones is the largest tion for repeated commission of crimes, the exclusion ordinance. Pole pleaded to drug dealer we have here on the reservabut that provision apparently has rarely the tribal court to give him 30 days after tion, and has been for years,” Masten said. been used. Beyond that broad language, being released from jail to prepare for the “He was the number one person on my in August 2009 Masten and the council case. The tribe gave him three. list that I was going to deal with.” passed resolution #09-180, specifically He assumed that it would be like the Beyond that, the tribal chairman stating that people who distribute illegal criminal courts he’d been in before. There added, he doesn’t want to go after people drugs within Hoopa Valley Reservation would be an arraignment and he would be whose repeat offenses occurred before he “have committed an unauthorized entry” provided with legal counsel if he couldn’t was elected. And for those arrested after and can be banished. Only one member afford a lawyer. But this tribal court has no he took office, they must be convicted of the council, Hayley Hutt, voted against obligation to provide legal counsel. The and then somehow brought to his adminthe change at the time, saying it might tribal judge accused Pole of selling drugs istration’s attention. Usually, Masten said, be unfair. “There are literally hundreds of in the valley, as opposed to just providcommunity members or law enforcement members who qualify for exclusion under ing a space for sales, as Pole claimed. He would tell him about new convictions, the ordinance if the resolution is used didn’t fight the ruling because he didn’t because Hoopa is a small community and to amend the law,” Hutt said at a tribal want to stir up trouble considering he was people know what’s going on there. council meeting. on probation. The whole hearing lasted Ideally, Masten would like to establish Jones and several council members 20 minutes. And just like that, Pole was a new tribal law that would automatically have argued that resolution #09-180 is iltold he had 30 days to leave and to never initiate banishment for anyone meeting legal because it fundamentally changed or come back. a certain criteria — for child molesters, amended banishment rules without public He packed his Toyota and tow trailer murderers and drug dealers. input. Such a “major action” would have and left his two teenage sons behind with “I don’t have fun banishing anybody, required public input through Legislation his mom, eventually settling in Eureka. especially a tribal member,” Masten said. Procedures Act. The chairman and the More than anything he wants to go back “But we have to start someplace. [Jones] tribal attorney say that it wasn’t major — to Hoopa. “All my family is there and my just happens to be at the top. If he wasn’t it merely clarifies existing rules. Whether parents are getting old. I kind of need to be doing what he was doing, there wouldn’t that’s so or not, the drug dealing clause there. I don’t know if I can live there, but I be concern. He’s a convicted drug dealer.” was cited in the effort to ban Jones — want the ability to go back home,” he said. How many other drug dealers are there

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Hoopa’s banishment


remains unknown. Jones denies having in Hoopa? No one seems willing to say anything to do with it. But in his interview or even estimate. Jones was the one in with the Journal, Jones answered some Masten’s sights. questions with almost verbatim excerpts So after Jones was convicted in Februfrom the document. ary 2012, Masten served the banishment After Jones pleaded guilty to selling notice and a tribal court date was set. meth, he told a Richard Blake, the probation officer: “I tribe’s judge, redid not sell anything cused himself from on the [Hoopa] the case because he Valley floor. I sold had written a letter it in Willow Creek of support to Jones and Orleans.” Sort and is his cousin. Methamphetamine has disproporof a strange plea for The tribe hired a tionately devastated Native American sympathy. pro tem judge from tribal communities. Native Americans It’s especially San Francisco, Chrisnow experience the highest meth usage strange because if tine Williams, who rates of any ethnic group in the nation, there’s anyone who refused to comment according to a 2006 study from the knows the horror of for this story. National Congress of American Indians. substance abuse, it’s As Jones’ reThe study also found that: Jones, who told proquests to postpone bation officers that his tribal court date • Native communities abuse meth at he abused meth and and a plea to allow nearly three times higher rates than cocaine until comcharacter witnesses Caucasians. pleting an 18 month to testify on his be• 74 percent of tribal police forces rank rehab program in half were rejected meth as the greatest drug threat. Oregon in 1999. by the pro tem • 40 percent of violent crime is And for a man who judge, the “slippery attributable to meth. feverishly speaks eel” surfaced. The • 69 percent of tribal respondents about uplifting his eel is tribal slang indicated that they had no tribal tribe, you have to for trouble-making sponsored meth rehab centers. wonder, why did put into writing. • Native American teens and young he sling poisonous This three-page eel adults are two to three times more dope throughout was slipperier than likely than non-natives to use meth. the community? others; it was an • Parental meth addiction accounts He needed the anonymous memo, for 65 percent of all cases involving money, he said that circulated around child neglect and placement of Indian day on his front the reservation in children in foster care. ● porch. He needed it spring, and made to to eat, and to help look as if it came educate his grandfrom Masten. It kids. He needed it even though he gets a was printed on the official letterhead of combined $3,470 every month in disability the tribe, and stated: “Leonard Masten, payments from Social Security and the Chairman, and six of the Tribal Council Veterans Administration. members are requesting a list of 400 “I’m not looking for any sympathy. … names that fall under the new exclusion Do you know what a reservation is? For laws to help clean up the tribe and the most white people it’s where the Indienrollment.” ans get to hunt and fish and play in the Like Orson Welles’ famous “War of the river.” But for Jones, it is both a haven for Worlds” broadcast, the slippery eel was the Hupa people and a near-gulag being clearly theater, but many people took it created by its current tribal leadership. as real, and a good deal of panic ensued. Because of Masten and his cronies, Jones Especially because page three printed said, “I’m a 20th century POW living in more than 100 names of Hoopa residents a 20th century concentration camp, but who had criminal records for various they call it a reservation and now and then repeated offenses that could be subject they feed me.” to banishment. Hoopa tribal members refer to themAnd what slippery eel would be selves as Natinixwe. It literally means complete without a stinging accusation: “people of the place where the trails “When Mr. Masten was head of the tribal return.” For Jones, unless he wins on police, he didn’t do anything except what appeal or his exclusion is one day lifted, he’s doing now, going to the gorge, getting that trail will never return home to the drunk, and selling our fish.” Masten called Hoopa Valley. the accusations slanderous and absolutely ● untrue. The author of the slippery eel

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bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

E

verything in life is political. You have your office politics, sexual politics, environmental politics, food politics, local, national, international and — particularly right now — straight-ahead electoral politics. How does music fit in? As we head toward Tuesday’s big election, we’ll take a look. The eco-political Environmental Protection Information Center, aka EPIC, celebrates its 35th anniversary Friday night with a dinner and dance concert at the Mateel. The epic event starts at 6 p.m. with cocktails, a meal of gourmet Indian food and speeches honoring enviro-hero Rick Klein, founder of Ancient Forest International. Then at 9 p.m., it’s music time with the Canadian global fusion band, Delhi 2 Dublin, whose name sort of explains what the band does: combine Celtic fiddle with sitar, tabla and a touch of electronics. (Very danceable.) Incidentally, if you just want to hear the music, you can skip dinner (and pay less). Proceeds support EPIC’s mission, “to ensure the national forests, state parks, privateindustrial forests and rivers in Northwest California are managed to maximize their benefits for conservation,” which, of course, involves a lot of politics. Two sisters, Leah and Chloe, currently based in New Orleans, form the folky, Ani DiFranco-ish Rising Appalachia, singing in harmony in the service of various ecopolitical issues. “Music is the tool with which we wield political prowess,” says

Leah in a note of the duo’s webpage. “We are building community and tackling social injustice through melody.” Hear what they have to say Friday at the Arcata Playhouse. The rapper Abstract Rude came out of the scene around the Good Life Café in Los Angeles in the 1990s. He’s currently on the road keeping hip hop alive by hosting “four element community showcases” like the one Friday at the Ink People Annex, an all ages benefit for the MARZ Project (cohosted by Kyle “DJ Knutz” Stasse). Ab will do a short set and help judge four competitions, one for each element: graffiti art, beat-making (DJing), b-boy dancing and MCing (rapping). Express yourself! Make a statement, political or otherwise. Saturday night DJ Knutz takes his turntables to the Ocean Grove. His monthly funk vinyl parties there are usually on full moon nights, but this time things did not line up right, so this one’s just “for the funk of it.” Joining him: Funky T-Rex, Zephyr, Truth 1, Spaceman Spliff, Jaymorg and Mantease. Congo Cafe will be cooking up African food on the back porch. (Nothing overtly political.) Saturday at Arcata Presbyterian Church the Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir presents its annual Harvest Concert. Now in its 20th season, the choir got its start during the social/political turmoil surrounding riots in LA following the Rodney King verdict. Is singing gospel music a political act? In this case it is (and it’s supremely uplifting).

Also on Saturday night, the Va Va Voom Burlesque Vixens present a special Dia De Los Muertos performance at Nocturnum with special guest DJ Itchie Fingaz. The post-Halloween theme means costumes are encouraged (there’s a contest). Some of the ladies will be made up like skeletons and there will also be a Muertos altar if you want to honor dead loved ones. The political part: It’s a benefit for Six Rivers Planned Parenthood (and a reminder that women’s health care, abortion rights and contraception have become political hot potatoes of late). Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the Arcata Playhouse a collection of local folkies including Jan Bramlett, Joanne Rand, Morgan Corviday, Josephine Johnson, Andrea Zvaleko and Sarah Torres celebrate the 69th birthday of Joni Mitchell by performing a bunch of her songs. Political? When Joni sang about paving paradise to put up a parking lot or bombers turning into butterflies, it most certainly was political. Not so political: Local funkadelic/rock/ hip hop combo Acufunkture hosts a CD release party Thursday at the Jambalaya. Funk it up. Passion presents Hammond B-3 organ jammer Melvin Seals with JGB at Arcata Theatre Lounge Saturday. Seals is a selfproclaimed “keeper of the flame” for the soul excursions of the late great Jerry Garcia. Sunday, neo-bluegrass band The Infamous Stringdusters stop by Humboldt Brews on a tour in support of a new “high country music” release, Silver Sky. It’s what you might call jammy bluegrass, or as the band puts it on its Facebook page, “not your granddaddy’s bluegrass — unless your granddaddy was Jerry Garcia.” More stringy music Monday at HumBrews: Vince Herman‘s Colorado-based band Great American Taxi playing “Americana without borders” along with S.F. alt. bluegrass boys Poor Man’s Whiskey on a joint “left coast tour.” The so-called “Porno Stars World Tour” that hits Nocturnum Friday doesn’t have anything to do with the adult film industry. Headliners Kool Keith and Blowfly represent two generations of twisted rap with overt sexual content. “Kool” Keith Thornton came out of the Bronx rap crew Ultramagnetic MCs in the 1980s and went solo as Dr. Octagon in the 1990s; at this point he’s back to Kool Keith. His surreal raps often draw on sexual imagery — “pornocore” in Keith’s parlance. You could call Clarence “Blowfly” Reid the godfather of pornocore. He got his start in the 1960s as a soul singer but soon switched to novelty “party” records that took popular soul songs and changed the lyrics to make them sexually explicit. That’s still the core of his act. Now 73, he delivers his blue

material wearing a mask and a spangled cape. Local support for Friday’s show comes from alt. boy band Eureka Garbage Company. Confident supporters of the labelGMO initiative Prop. 37 are throwing a “Victory Party” Tuesday (election night) at Humboldt Brews with music by an ecogroovy songwriter known as The Human Revolution, who is on a California Clean Food Celebration Tour. Chicago’s jazzy alt. rock trio The Sea and Cake plays that Tuesday at the Jambalaya. The band’s music is not at all political, so that would be an escape from election madness. Also on Tuesday night, Jamaica’s selfproclaimed “King of Dancehall” Beenie Man plays at the Ocean Grove, apparently the only local venue not deterred by the local gay activist group Queer Humboldt, which tried in vain to stop the recent Capleton show there. In May of this year Beenie Man took to YouTube to offer what’s described elsewhere in this paper as a “reluctant, passive-aggressive quasi-apology” for his past musical sins. What exactly did he say? “I respect each and every human being, regardless of which race or creed, regardless of which religious belief you believe in, and regardless of which sexual preference you are, including gays and lesbian people.” It’s easy to dismiss his statement as disingenuous — he’s made it clear that he said it because he’s had too many concerts canceled, particularly in Europe. Boycotts are hurting him financially. It was a calculated risk in his homeland: Jamaica did not respond well to his statement. Beenie’s performance at the major festival Reggae Sunsplash was booed; he is under attack as a sellout by his peers in the dancehall community. It didn’t get the same attention here, but in July Jamaican reggae/dancehall singer Diana King proclaimed on her blog in all caps: “YES!!! I AM A LESBIAN.” In a heartfelt note explaining why she came out she wrote, “The harsh reality [is] that people like me are persecuted, beaten, jailed, raped and murdered everyday just for being who they are or just even being suspected of it.” That’s why the local gay community is protesting. Beenie wants to be forgiven, but he can’t erase his history — some will never forgive him. The mere fact that he said anything showing “respect” for gays and lesbians is at least a small step forward. That said, Jamaica still has a long way to go. Now if we could just get Diana to come to Humboldt. … ●

 

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012

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“Murphy’s is where I started out. My favorite job was running

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MOLLY IN A SWIM SUIT BY JOYCE JONTE MOLLY BY MIRA EAGLE MOLLY BY RACHEL SCHLEUTER IN SEARCH OF THE TRUTH BY JOYCE JONTE

Crossing the Line from Model to Muse

“The Molly Show” at C Street Hall Gallery By Jason Marak

M

olly Ritter likes being looked at. She is a six-foot-tall, vivacious redhead with a striking figure; it is thoroughly unsurprising that she has become a sought after model. But for the local artists who have been lucky enough to work with her, Ritter is much more than just another pretty face. For many, she has become an important part of their creative process. In honor of this local muse, the C Street Hall Gallery has put together “The Molly Show,” an exhibition of drawings and paintings, all of Ritter, by Humboldt County figurative artists.

Local painters Rachel and Stock Schlueter are the co-directors of the 208 C Street Hall Gallery in Eureka. Rachel came up with the idea to put together the exhibition during a conversation with Joyce Jonté, another well-known local painter and Ritter fan. “It was just kind of spontaneous. Molly’s birthday is coming up … and I thought, let’s celebrate Molly!” Rachel said. “Not to mention,” Stock laughed, “she’s our daughter-in-law!” Family connections aside, it is clear from the group of artists in “The Molly Show” that regard for Ritter is far reaching. There is a great deal more to modeling

has made her a hot commodity for local figure drawing groups and artists. Jonté is very conscious of this interaction with Ritter. “Every artist really responds to the model’s energy in a life drawing session,” she said. “There’s a definite connection — there’s a magic there. Sometimes when I’m drawing her I feel like she’s just putting herself onto the paper — it’s almost effortless.” Despite the fact that Ritter is an experienced artist herself, she prefers being part of the creative process from the other side of the canvas. “It’s really empowering because you’re not just a body, you’re a personality too. You’re a spirit, and the artist is putting all of that in,” Ritter said. “I put so much more into it and they take so much more from me than just the way I look. It’s been extremely rewarding.” There is one other key aspect of Ritter’s personality that likely has a great deal to do with her enthusiasm and success as a model. “I like being looked at, and I kind of always have,” Ritter admitted. “I’m not shy about it. A lot of people get really self-conscious but I’m not. I just take it as than walking to the center of the room a compliment when people look at me.” and disrobing. “It takes amazing stamina Ritter is excited about the show and and presence and intelligence to be a has become comfortable with her role as good model,” explained Jonté, who has “muse.” She was initially a bit embarrassed worked with Ritter extensively. A good at the prospect of an entire exhibition model needs to be able to keep things devoted to her until she realized that, in interesting whether the pose is for 20 seca sense, it really wasn’t. “Everybody paints onds or 20 minutes. Stock Schlueter likens themselves,” Ritter said. “It’s me, but it’s it to “acting for a still camera.” really them.” The model needs physical stamina “The Molly Show” will be up at C Street to hold difficult poses for long Hall Gallery (208 C Street in Eureka) stretches of time. And, perhaps A RTS from Friday, Nov. 2 (noon to 4 pm), ALIVE! most importantly, models have until Tuesday, Nov. 27. It will include NEXT PAGE to participate: They have to want work by Joyce Jonté, Frances Kuta, to be part of the process. Ritter’s Andrew Daniel, Micki Flatmo, Mira Eagle, willingness to put her whole self into her Steven VanderMeer, Gail Slaughter, Daniposes is part of what makes her such an elle Hickney, Bob Burroughs, Paul Fabian, interesting subject for artists like Jonté. Nancy Ensign, Michelle Murphy-Ferguson, “Molly has everything it takes. She’s gorJim McGee, Stock Schlueter and Rachel geous and strong and very involved in Schlueter. There will be a reception held her modeling. The work I’ve been doing at the Hall Gallery on Saturday, Nov. 3, with her over the past year has been very from 6 to 9 p.m. in conjunction with Arts! exciting,” Jonté said. Alive. In addition, Ritter’s calendar project, When a model is standing in front of an “Pissed off Pinups,” which she produced artist, the complex give and take between with her husband, photographer Tyson artist and model can have a profound efRitter, will be available. fect on the finished product. Ritter’s ability to participate in this subtle exchange

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northcoastjournal.com PIANTE GALLERY PRESENTS NEW WORK BY AMY GRANFIELD, A 26-YEAR RESIDENT OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY WITH A BACKGROUND IN NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCES. GRANFIELD USES OILS ON CANVAS AND WOOD PANELS TO PAINT STRIKING IMAGES OF ANIMALS AND PLANTS. “VIEWERS MAY EXPERIENCE MY WORK AS STRONGLY AESTHETIC BECAUSE I PORTRAY NATURAL ELEMENTS CAREFULLY RENDERED IN SETTINGS EITHER RICHLY WORKED OR ETHEREAL,” SHE SAYS. “HOWEVER, I SEE MY WORK AS STRONGLY EMOTIONAL AND POLITICAL. JUST THE ACT OF PLACING THESE OBJECTS AT THE CENTER, ENLARGED AND DOMINATING, CHALLENGES OUR NOTION OF A WORLD CENTERED ABOUT OURSELVES. MY ANIMALS ARE CAUGHT IN A MOMENT OF SOME STRESS, I.E. LIVING. IT IS AN AESTHETIC OF CHALLENGED BEAUTY WITH LOSS AND TENACITY AND POSSIBILITY AS COMMON THEMES.” THERE WILL BE A RECEPTION FOR GRANFIELD AT PIANTE ON NOV. 3, DURING ARTS ALIVE!

Presented by the Humboldt Arts Council and Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are held the first Saturday of each month. Phone (707) 442-9054 or go to www.eurekamainstreet.org for more information or to have an exhibit or performance included. 1. ST. INNOCENT ORTHODOX CHURCH 939 F St. Howdy Emerson, “Visions of Earth and Waters,” representational oils; Celtic harp music by Howdy Emerson 1a. EUREKA INN 518 Seventh St. 2. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL at the Morris Graves Museum of Art 636 F St. Main floor and galleries are undergoing floor restoration and will be closed. Downstairs Humboldt Artist Gallery Artist Cooperative representational and abstract paintings, prints, jewelry, photographs, ceramics, and glass art; Floyd Bettiga Gallery Gil Castro, mixed media, including ceramics, and jewelry; Youth Gal-

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6. DALIANES TRAVEL 522 F St. Jan Hollander, oil landscapes. 7. F STREET FOTO GALLERY at Swanlund’s Camera 527 F St. New show by Suk Choo Kim. 7a. THE LOCAL 517 F St. Ewok Lokitree, spray paint and oils. 8. SACRED PALACE BOUTIQUE - BIKRAM YOGA 516 Fifth St. Scott Sherman watercolors, emphasis on animals. 9. LIVING ROOM GALLERY at MikkiMoves Real Estate, Inc. 805 Seventh St. Eve Miller, Eldin Green, Susan Anderson, Heather Cruce, Melissa Carrau, Jan Ostrom and Jordan Gaskell, “Client Art Show.” Music by Marla Joy and Mike Conboy. 10. SEWELL GALLERY FINE ART 423 F St. Lida Penkova, From There to Here, tapestry paintings. Music by Tim Randles Trio. Wine sales benefit Sequoia Humane Society. 11. NORTH COAST DANCE 426 F St. Open rehearsals for Nutcracker. 12. SURFSIDE BURGER SHACK 445 Fifth St. Robert Humbo ldt Bay Walker, photography. 12a. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and Engineering 401 Fifth St. Michael Harris, photography. 13. AMIGAS BURRITOS 317 Fifth St. Vince Cavatio, “Wave and Surfing” photography. 14. PRIMATE TATU 139 Fifth St. Michael Arneson. 15. INK ANNEX (Ink People Gallery formerly Empire Squared) 47 W. Third St. Dia de los Muertos, comto 60 munity and individual altars and art; traditional music and crafts. 16. BAR FLY PUB AND GRUB 91 Commercial St. Colleen Hole, mixed media; Kathleen Bryson, works 58 from her private collection; Marnie Schneider; to 59 Music by St. John, of St. John and the Sinners. 17. CHERI34BLACKERBY GALLERY and THE STUDIO 272 C St. “Material Fabrications,” a group show of

lery and Classroom North Coast Preparatory & Performing Arts Academy, “Chaos of Creation: Teens Explore Political Ideas.” 3. COTTAGE ANNEX 618 F St. Shabby chic, cottage chic, enamelware, floral china and linens, etc. 3a. EUREKA THEATER 618 F St. Fifth Annual Strangrebrew Beerfest. Tickets $30. in advance, $35. at the door. 3b. ANNEX 39 608 F St. Art Deco and mid-century modern. 4. PAUL’S LIVE FROM NEW YORK PIZZA 604 F St. 5. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. RAA Winter Exhibition. Awards ceremony at 5:30 p.m. announcing best of show.

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experimental fabric constructions and art made by artists at The Studio. 17a. C STREET HALL GALLERY 208 C St. “The Molly Show,” Frances Kuta, Andrew Daniel, Micki Flatmo, Joyce Jonté, Mira Eagle, Steven VanderMeer, Bob Burroughs, Paul Fabian, Nancy Ensign, Michelle MurphyFerguson, Jim McGee, Rachel Schlueter and Stock Schueter. 17b. THE WORKS/ACCIDENT GALLERY 210 C St. Phillip King, artwork. 18. SAILORS’ GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo related art, antiques and memorabilia. 18a. LIVELLA STUDIO 120 Second St. Music by Mod Brothers. 18b. MANTOVA’S TWO STREET MUSIC 124 Second St. Music by Headache! 18c. THE BLACK FAUN GALLERY 120 Second St. Chris Hitchcock, “Coyote Eyes,” oil and mixed media on canvas; and installation of a multimedia, site specific piece. 19. STEVE AND DAVE’S First and C streets. Marni Schneider, photography. 19a. REDWOOD CURTAIN 220 First St. (Main entrance through Snug Alley). Greta Turney, “Day of the Dead” paintings on to 60 canvas, vintage coffee grinders, maracas, yo-yos and other objects until 8 p.m. Play Dusty and the Big Bad World begins at 8 p.m. Tickets and information at redwoodcurtain.com. 20.58CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. Traditional to 59 Southwest artists’ prints. 20a. ACCENT STYLING GALLERY 219 Second St. Music by Judy Phillips, harpist.

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20b. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. Lara MacMillan, 31. NORTH SOLES 407 Second St. Sheldon Chase, Humboldt Foxes pinup photography. acrylic paintings. 21. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Bob and 31a. SASSAFRASS 417 Second St. Donna Keyes, transcendent art gifts. Music by Jan 32. SISTERFRIENDSJEANS 108 F St. Rosalie ThomBramlett. son, oil and acrylic on canvas. 22. ROMANO GABRIEL SCULPTURE GARDEN 32a. HSU FIRST STREET GALLERY 422 First FORTUNA 315 Second St. Eureka Heritage Society St. Susanna Bluhm, “My Heart’s a Little Fast,” FIRST recently gifted Romano Gabriel Sculpture new paintings, acrylic, oil on canvas; Lush FRIDAY NEXT PAGE Garden to the Humboldt Arts Council. RibNewton, “Bread & Butter,” mixed sculpture bon cutting ceremony celebrating the worldand installation. renowned Italian folk artist, followed by European 33. HEALTHSPORT 411 First St. folk tunes by accordionist Lorna Brown. 33a. WHIPLASH CURVE 423 First St. Karan Col22a. ALTERNATIVE BUILDING CENTER 325 Second St. lenberg, copper plate etchings. Suite 102 Steve Regalo, found object art. 34. BAYFRONT RESTAURANT F St. Plaza Huichol 22b. RUSTIC WEST TRADING CO. 339 Second St. Amy Indian art from Mexico. Simon, chain saw jewelry; Christine Siverts, watercolors; 35. EUREKA FABRICS 414 Second St. Dancers and Carol Mallard, vintage jewelry; Lynne Bergman, crochet. costumes from North Coast Dance’s Nutcrack23. CIARA’S IRISH SHOP 334 Second St. Sara Westfahl, er; handwoven cotton saris from Bangalore. acrylics. 35a. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. 23a. HUMBOLDT GLASS BLOWERS 214 E St. Monica Rosalie Thompson, paintings. Haff, paintings; pinball tournament. 36. YARN 418 Second St. Jessica Waggoner, plarn 23b. CLARKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM Third and E streets. bags. “What Was Life Like Before Electricity?” featuring 36a. TREASURE TROVE 420 Second St. Casey clothing and everyday household items from the Smith, decorative trinket boxes and jewelry late 19th century. made from vintage and newer jewelry. 24. BELLA BASKETS 311 E St. Holly Vetter, photographs; 36b. EUREKA BOOKS 426 Second St. Peggy Irvine, RonVetter, frames from old growth and repurposed botanical illustrations; plus apple tasting. redwood. 37. SHORELINES GALLERY 434 Second St. Music by 25. STUDIO 424 424 Third St. James Reid and Mark Andy’s Band. McKenna, photography. PHOTOGRAPHER SUK CHOO KIM PRESENTS THE SECOND OF THREE CONSECUTIVE PHOTO EXHIBITS AT SWANLUND’S F STREET FOTO GALLERY. “FRANCE” IS A COLLECTION OF WORK PRODUCED THIS SUMMER WHEN KIM AND HIS WIFE, YOUNG MI, BICYCLED 250 MILES IN THE LOIRE VALLEY AND TRAVELED THROUGH OTHER PARTS OF THE COUNTRY BY BUS AND TRAIN. MEET THE ARTIST AT AN ARTS ALIVE RECEPTION ON SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 6- 9 P.M.

25a. SHIPWRECK 430 Third St. Instagram photography by Bob Doran. Music by Gunsafe. 26. CAFÉ NOONER 409 Opera Alley. Jill K. Duffy, photography; Music by The Living Rooms. 26a. THE SPEAKEASY BAR 411 Opera Alley. Showing paintings and art by Speakeasy staff. 27. HUMBOLDT BAYKEEPER 211 E St. Lance Drill, photography. Music by Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers. 28. RAMONE’S 209 E St. Tina Gleave, silk paintings. Music by Sugarfoot. 28a. BOOKLEGGER 402 Second St. Art of the written word! 29. TRUCHAS GALLERY/LOS BAGELS 403 Second St. Group show, “Dia de Los Muertos, Day of the Dead,” a thoughtful remembrance of departed loved ones, paintings, textiles, drawings and masks. 30. BELLE STARR 405 Second St.

38. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Greta Turney, Day of the Dead art; Simone Smith, Halloween creatures. 39. TALISMAN BEADS 214 F St. The artist is you. 40. ALIROSE 229 F St. Justine Levy, jewelry artist. 40a. THE WINE SPOT 234 F St. “Mini Show” 15 artists, 12x12 and smaller. 41. THE RITZ Third and F streets. Jennifer Mackey and Andrei Hedstrom, artwork. 42. OLD TOWN JEWELRY 311 F St. Libby George, dry paint, mono prints. 43. COCO & CUVEE 531 Third St. Sargon and Gabrielle Bacchus, “Brilliant” modern pin-up photography; The Humboldt Pin-Ups and a Window Cabaret with Bada Bling! Burlesque! 43a. DANNILYNN’S SHOE BOUTIQUE 527 Third St. Kim Norrie, paintings. continued on next page

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continued from previous page 43b. DISCOVERY MUSEUM Corner of F and Third streets. Kids Alive Program Drop off 5:30-8 p.m. Call for reservations 443-9694. 44. AMERICAN INDIAN ART GALLERY 241 F St. Leanne Duclo, professional preserver (jellies and canned goods). 44a. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 233 F St. Mary Anderson. 44b. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE VISITOR CENTER 526 Opera Alley. Photography by Humboldt Bay Coffee Company President John Hall. Music by Julian Lang: master of mid-tempo carnage (on top floor in Gallery). 45. BON BONIERE 215 F St. Alexandra Felt, ballpoint pen and watercolor portraits; Music by Dale Winget. 45a. CODY GALLERY 213 F St. 46. OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOLATES 211 F St. Emily Reinhardt, charcoal drawings of open mic performers; Ian Harriott, Celtic arts. Music by Jim Lahman Band. 47. OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING Corner of Second and F streets. Karen Chase Frazee, “Floral Still Life and Garden Landscape,” oil paintings. Harp music by Judy Phillips. 48. OBERON GRILL 516 Second St. Permanent display: historic photographs of Old Eureka from Historical Society. 49. LINEN CLOSET 127 F St. Fire & Light, recycled glassware and slide show of how it is locally handcrafted. 50. 527 SECOND ST. “IN FOCUS: Youth Perspectives on Alcohol and Other Drug Use,” photography and narratives by 23 young people, ages 12-21. Sponsored by Humboldt Allies for Substance Abuse and Prevention in partnership with DHHS.

SEWELL GALLERY OF FINE ART FEATURES FROM THERE TO HERE, A COLLECTION OF TAPESTRY PAINTINGS BY LIDA PENKOVA. BORN AND RAISED IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA, PENKOVA STUDIED ART HISTORY IN LONDON BEFORE MOVING TO GERMANY, TURNING TO PSYCHOLOGY AND BECOMING A PSYCHOLOGIST. SHE TRAVELED THE WORLD AND SPENT OVER A DECADE IN MEXICO BEFORE SHE STARTED TEACHING HERSELF TO BE AN ARTIST. HER WORK DRAWS ON MYTHOLOGY AND INDIGENOUS FOLK ART WORLDWIDE, INCLUDING AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ARTISTS, MEXICAN BARK PAINTERS AND WORK BY THE INUITS. A RECEPTION FOR THE ARTIST WILL BE HELD SATURDAY, NOV. 3, FROM 6-9 P.M. DURING ARTS ALIVE. “BLUE DOGS ATTACKING A MUSKOX” BY LIDA PENKOVA

50a. HIMALYAN RUG TRADER 529 Second St. 50b. HUMBOLDT HARDWARE 531 Second St. Meet local woodworkers, woodworking demos. 51. PARASOL ARTS 211 G St. Robin Friedman, fused glass jewelry and mosaics. Paint your own pottery and mosaics. 51a. BUHNE ART STUDIOS 207 G St. (Second Floor): Yuma Lynch, mixed media and landscape paintings, Suite 106; Rob Hampson, recent oil paintings, Suite 206; Wit McLeod, handcrafted furniture, Suite 212; Marnie Bugs, leather handbags and moccasins, Suite 217; Robert Busch III, landscapes, and oil paintings, Suite 333; David Steinhardt, acrylics and muralist, Suite 306; Anastasia Zielinski, paper and fabric collage, (studio at back of building, no number); Music on the third floor by Cory Goldman and Colin Vance. 52. ORANGE CUP CORAL SALON 612 Second St. Mike Stengl, portraits. 53. PIANTE 620 Second St. Amy Granfield, paintings. 54. DELIGHTFUL EYE PHOTOGRAPHY 622 Second St. Music by Tripwire. 55. SMUG’S PIZZA 626 Second St. Brandon Garland, pen and ink.

56. BAR AVALON Third and G streets. 57. ORIGIN DESIGN LAB 621 Third St. Rebecca Hubbard, Mari Penley and artists of Origin Design Lab, “ap’ples”, interpretations of the iconic fruit; Tina Carver, “it’s in the bag” handbags made from discarded books and recycled materials.

Fortuna First Friday Friday, Nov. 2, 6-9 p.m.

Find art, music and fun in Fortuna. Featuring local artists and musicians during an evening of shopping and strolling in Fortuna. www.fortunabusiness.com 725-9261 fbid@fortunabusiness.com 1. BARTOW’S JEWELERS, 651 12th St. Stained glass art by Steve Fregeau. 2. CUDDLY BEAR, 571 10th St. Acoustic jam session with Fernbridge Band — anyone welcome to join in. 3. DOWNTOWN STOREFRONT ART GALLERY, between 11th & 12th streets. Art by Anita Tavernier, Emma McDowell, Ginny Dexter, Natalia Drew, Elaine Gredassoff, Abbie Parrott, Louanna Johnson, Susan Schuessler. 4. FERNDALE JEWELERS, 1020 Main St. Art by Dakota’s Designs. 5. FORTUNA ART & OLD THINGS, 1026 Main St. Brooke Fox, mosaic folk art known as pique assiette (French for “piece of plate”). 6. FORTUNA MUSIC MART, 1040 Main St. Music by The Goble. 7. FUNITURE DEN & DESIGN W/WINE DEN, 1156 Main St. Gina Mobley, photography, “Alphabet Soup Art” and acrylic and oils painting by Penny Fregeau.

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

58. STUDIO S 717 Third St. Multiple artists, “Artist’s Choice.” 59. BIGFOOT COMPUTERS AND PHOTOGRAPHY TOO 905 Third St. 60. ADORNI CENTER 1011 Waterfront St. Renee Thompson, “Poppy Designs” paintings; Melissa Zielinsky, Mill Creek Glass, glasswork. •

8. HORIZON BUSINESS PRODUCTS, 1044 Main St. Alice Shaw watercolor, acrylics, prints and custom painted children’s furniture. 9. JAMAICAN GRILL, 939 Main St. Music by local Humboldt DJ. 10. KRAFTER’S KOZY KORNER GIFT, 1103 Main St. Photographer Greg Rumney (The Old Photo Guy). 11. L’S KITCHEN, 734 10th St. Local photography. 12. MAIN STREET GALLERY & SCHOOL, 1006 Main St. Miniature masterpieces and hyper-realism — controversial drawings by Chuck Bowden. Live music. 13. PRECISION INTERMEDIA, 1012 Main St. Oil painter Michelle Murphy Ferguson. 14. QUALITY ANTIQUES, 1240 Main St. Artist Deborah Kallish. 15. RAIN ALL DAY BOOKS, 1136 Main St. Desirae Inman photography and paintings. 16. STREHL’S FAMILY SHOES & REPAIR, 1155 Main St. Nancy Gregory photography. 17. TACO LOCO, 955 Main St. Paintings by Richard Leamon. •


northcoastjournal.com

TISHA SLOAN, ALISSA BARTHEL AND NATHAN EMMONS IN DUSTY AND THE BIG BAD WORLD. COURTESY OF REDWOOD CURTAIN.

It’s Not Easy Reliving Bush

Redwood Curtain’s cautionary tale, marriage equality play at HSU By William S. Kowinski williamkowinski@northcoastjournal.com

D

usty and the Big Bad World, now on stage at Redwood Curtain, is loosely based on real events: the 2005 decision by PBS — under pressure from the Bush administration — not to air a segment of a children’s program (Postcards From Buster) dealing with lesbian parents. Playwright Cusi Cram, who worked for an associated program (Arthur) at the time, engages in some score-settling, puts words of one actual participant in another’s mouth and inaccurately impugns the motive of the PBS president (who admittedly is an old acquaintance of mine). But on the whole, Cram uses the situation to create an independent, thoughtful and lively work of theatre that entertains ideas as well as the audience. First we meet 11-year-old Lizzie Goldberg-Jones (played by Alissa Barthel), who talks into her video camera about why

she should win the contest to be on the animated PBS children’s show Dusty along with her family: because her little brother really likes it, and “TV is important.” It might distract him from being teased about their “two dads.” Next there’s Marianne Fitzgibbons (Dianne Zuleger), a sunny but formidable presence who tells us at length how much she loves her new job, which turns out to be secretary of education. Her cheery demeanor toward her troubled secretary Karen (Carrie Hudson) is edged with menace. Marianne — whose zealous fundamentalism becomes increasingly clear — already has her sights on the Dusty episode resulting from Lizzie winning the contest. She means to squelch it and to cancel the series entirely. This puts the show’s producer and selfdescribed paranoid liberal Nathan Friedman (Nathan Emmons) on the bubble,

along with the show’s protective creator, Jessica Fields (Tisha Sloan). Playwright Cram gives these characters dimension and individuality, and this superb group of actors gives them even more. Dianne Zuleger inhabits her role to a truly scary extent. Nathan Emmons and Tisha Sloan are immediately convincing, and Alissa Barthel provides the not entirely innocent burst of light that redeems the adult-made muddle. But it’s Karen (with her love for Kermit the Frog) who becomes the moral center of the play. Carrie Hudson’s compelling performance takes us on that journey. How all this is a comedy with a partially happy ending is hard to describe. Some invented aspects of the plot are weak, but the script is witty and emotional, with lots of ideas flashing amidst the politics, confessions and intrigue. The characters are believable and memorable. I felt director Jyl Hewston struck the right tone — subtle and straightforward, letting the play and the actors carry the evening. Reliving the Bush atmosphere wasn’t easy, but worse is worrying about its second coming. Scenic design is by Daniel Nyiri, lighting by Michael Burkhart, costumes by Laura Rhinehart, sound by Jon Tunney. Dusty and the Big Bad World plays weekends at Redwood Curtain through Nov. 17. Dusty and the Big Bad World is one of three plays on North Coast stages this fall based on real events, involving similar issues. Eureka High just closed The Laramie Project, about the 1998 torture and death of a gay student that led to the federal Hate Crimes Prevention Act, signed into law by President Obama in 2009. The third play is 8, which gets its one and only North Coast staged reading at HSU on Thursday, Nov. 1. In a 2010 trial, a federal court judge found that California Proposition 8 (passed in 2008) could not amend the state constitution to ban same-sex marriages because it violates provisions of the U.S. Constitution. Though the U.S. Supreme Court is yet to weigh in, this case could make same-sex marriage a constitutional right. That trial is the subject of 8, a play by Dustin Lance Black, whose script for Milk — the movie starring Sean Penn about San Francisco’s Harvey Milk — won the Academy Award. After celebrity-rich readings on Broadway and in Los Angeles, the Foundation for Equal Rights granted permission for staged readings throughout North America (and beyond.) The HSU Department of Theatre, Film and Dance pursued and got the opportunity to produce it for the North Coast. Each local theatre gets

the spotlight for one night. In the week just before Arcata’s turn, there were readings scheduled in Des Moines, Baltimore, Anchorage, Austin and Minneapolis. As in readings elsewhere, the emphasis is on involving the whole community, beginning with the actors. So at HSU participants include Michael Fields, James Floss, James Hitchcock, Christina Jioras, Susan Abbey, Michael Thomas, J.M. Wilkerson, Elisa Abelleira, James McHugh, Catherine L. Brown, Sam Machado, Juan Carlos Contreras and Shea King. Clint Rebik directs, with set and lighting by Katie Dawson. “People need to witness what happened in the Proposition 8 trial,” said playwright Black, “if for no other reason than to see inequality and discrimination unequivocally rejected in a court of law where truth and facts matter.” This staged reading is a benefit for the Foundation for Equal Rights. It’s followed by a panel that will lead audience discussion. 8 is on the Van Duzer Theatre stage at HSU on Thursday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m. Donation is $5. Box Office: 826-3928. More information: http://HSUStage. blogspot.com. All three of these plays have at least one real world message: vote. ●

NLY! O T H G I R ONE N ATION FO

PACT’S N FOUND AMERICA ND BROADWAY IM SA T H IG R EQUAL

THURSDAY, NOV. 1ST AT 7:30PM IN JVD THEATRE $5 DONATION LIMITED FREE SEATING FOR HSU STUDENTS WITH ID THIS PRODUCTION IS PARTIALLY FUNDED BY THE INSTRUCTIONALLY RELATED ACTIVITIES FEE AND HSU’S DEPARTMENT OF DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION. Department of Theatre, Film & Dance

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012

25


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more

“SO GOOD.”

venue

North Coast Journal

835 J Street, Arcata • 822-WISH Open For Dinner @ 5:30 pm Tues-Sun

thur 11/1

fri 11/2

sat 11/3

THE ALIBI: ARCATA 744 9th St. Arcata 822-3731

Dirty Dancing: Hella Gay Edition with Pressure Anya 10:30pm

Find us on Facebook

Black Pussy (PDX rock) People (local heavy prog) 10:30pm

ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

Buddy Reed Trio (blues) 9:30pm Rising Appalachia 8pm

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-1220 BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770

Ocean Night w/ Michael Kew: film The Co-op presents Genetic Roulette: The Triptych & book Crossing 6:30 pm $3 Gamble of Our Lives 7pm free

Birth Story 6-9pm $10 Melvin Seals with JGB Doors at 7:30pm $25 adv.

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Dr. Squid (rock) no cover 9pm

Open Mic 7-10pm

Native Sibling, Telefawn, Maple Creek

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Safety Orange (surf/rock/reggae) 9pm

Safety Orange (surf/rock/reggae) 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Murder Mystery: Day of the Dead 9pm

Eyes Anonymous (‘80s rock) no cover 9pm

Blue Rhythm (blues/rock) no cover 9pm

EUREKA INN 518 7th St. 497-6093

Live music

Live music

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521

Guilty Apple (folk) 7-9pm

BEAR RIVER CASINO 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 BLONDIE’S Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770 CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McK. 839-0545

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739 HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights “8” 8pm (JVD)

Orjazzmic (local improv) 8pm - Free HSU Opera Workshop 8pm (FRH)

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Taxi (rock) no cover 9pm

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com HSU Opera Workshop 8pm (FRH)

Flow & Tell: Abstract Rude 6-10pm

INK ANNEX 47B West Third St. Eureka JAMBALAYA 915 H St Arcata 822-4766

www.barflypub.com

AcuFunkture CD Release Party 9pm

Naive Melodies (T Heads tribute) 9pm

C-Baker and Friends (hip hop) 9pm

LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad 677--0230 HSU Guitar Group (jazz) 7-9pm

Claire Bent (jazz vocalist) 7-10pm

La Musique Diabolique (jazz) 7-10pm

LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St Eureka 444-1344

When The Broken Doll 9pm

Amplified Heat (psych blues from Austin) 9pm

It’s a bar. We got beer.

MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

Fred and Jr (swing jazz) 6-8:30pm

JBC on tap www.madriverbrewing.com

THE MATEEL 59 Rusk Lane, Redway

Food Truck Night: Taqueria La Barca EPIC’s 35th: Delhi 2 Dublin 5:30pm

NOCTURNUM 206 W 6th St. Eureka

Kool Keith, Blowfly, EKA Garbage 10p

LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596

Clip this ad

Come in for Lunch, have a Specialty Appetizer on us! 11:30 to 4:00 daily Offer expires 11/30/12 Open Daily for Lunch and Dinner, 11:30am - 10pm • Extended Bar Hours

Reservations Recommended (707) 407-3550 1911 Truesdale Street Eureka Off Broadway behind the Best Western Bayshore Inn

Official Entry Form

NEW HUMBOLDT DESIGNS JUST ARRIVED, Offer expires 10/31/12 AND THEY WILL GO FAST SO COME IN TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SALE:

Name:ANY _____________ BUY 2 HOODIES SAVE $10 BUY 2 TSHIRTS SAVE $5 Phone:ANY _____________ BUY ANY 2 HATS/BEANIES SAVE $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

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26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Midnight Bells Of All Souls Night: Carpathian and friends 7pm

Arts Alive! with Jim Lahman Band (blues, etc.) 7-9:30pm

Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am www.pearlloungeeureka.com Francis Vanek, Damien Roomets, Mike Curran (jazz trio) 7pm

Pink & White Champagne Party Second Nature Sound 10pm

DJ Jsun Arts Alive! (dance music) 10pm

Stephanie Johnson Band 7pm

www.persimmons.net

We’re Back! Tasting room open again!.

Open for pints, goblets, growlers, kegs, and merchandise - new space. World Dance Party: Club Band, Chubritza and Musaic 7pm free

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748 RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 824 L Street, Arcata 616-6876

Va Va Voom Dia De Los Muertos For the FUNK of It: DJ Knutz + 9pm $5

OCEAN GROVE 480 P.P. Drive Trinidad

Magic Dover: Husalah/Traxamillion

ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Blues Night with Brian Lesson 8pm, Dancing 9pm $5 Irish Music Invitational Sessions 9pm

SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St., Eureka 407-3550

Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (country swing) 8pm

Saturday noon-9pm redwoodraks.com

Find us on Facebook or www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Josephine Johnson, Sam Whitlach and The Guilty Apple (folk) 9pm

Live music

Come in for a great dinner!

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA 923-2814

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 1300 Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Chris Parreira (songwriter) 9pm

Groove Session (funk rock) 9pm

707 (rock) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm

Boss Levelz (DJs) 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

TOBY & JACKS 764 9th St. Arcata TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696 WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Throwback Thursdays

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com Evan Morden/Seabury Gould. 7:30pm


Abstract Rude Friday at the Ink Annex photo by Andria Millie

sun 11/4

mon 11/5

tues 11/6

wed 11/7

Restaurant open: Sat/Sun 8am-11pm www.thealibi.com

Restaurant hours: Mon-Fri 10:30am-11pm

2-Fer Tues: Buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm Cancelled by Hurricane Sandy

Arcata CC Election Gathering 10pm

Joni Mitchell: A Tribute 8pm

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Doors 5:30pm $5

Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors 5:15pm - free - all ages

EPIC presents Low Coal followed by election results Doors 5:45pm $5-$10

Sci-Fi Pint & Pizza Night: The Giant Gila Monster Doors 6pm

Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Monday Night Football! Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Win a night’s stay at Bear River HSU Jazz Club 5pm

Double hours in The Poker Den

First Tuesday Poker Tournament

Win a night’s stay at Bear River

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Monday Night Football on the big screen + Flat screen TV giveaways

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire pints

Wild Wing Weds: Chicken wings and $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool $3 well drinks

Infamous Stringdusters (alt. stringband) 9pm $15

Great American Taxi Poor Man’s Whiskey 9pm $15/$18

Happy Hour 3- 6 pm every day

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Gunsafe, Liquid Cactus, etc. 9pm

The Sea and Cake 9pm $15

El Ten Eleven (post-rock) 9pm

Do you tweet obsessively? So do we. Follow us. @ncj_of_humboldt

A Chorus Line 3 & 8pm (JVD) DGS: Church of Bass Tour 9pm $20

Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm Buddy Reed (blues guitar) 7-9pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

Bucket Flush (punk) 9pm

Daylight Savings Ends! Ready for some football?

Purl and Pour come knit and sip 6:30pm

Repeat: We got beer. Randles, Labolle and Amirkhan Trio (jazz) 6-8:30pm

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm

Beenie Man (dancehall)

Now serving beer and wine

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic with Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am www.pearlloungeeureka.com

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Ask us about hosting your event

The Damien Roomets Trio w/special guests 7-10pm

Sunday noon-9pm

Weekday Hours M-F 3pm to 9pm

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Find us on Facebook.

Modern Dance with Lela 3:30-5pm - all levels, $10 James Apollo and Murzik (folk and indie) 9pm

Monday Swing Night 7pm Class, 8pm Dance Party, $5

West African Drum and Dance 5:30-7pm

West Coast Swing Wednesdays 7:30pm lesson, 8:30 dancing

A Northern California Boutique Winery

Find us on Facebook

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature cocktail in the bar!

Open every day 11:30am - 10pm

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30am-4pm

Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Joe Griffin 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Live music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Pints For Non Profits Hospice of Humboldt WWW: Bassex, DJ iWon, Treemeista

The Squidling Brothers 9pm

Good & Evil Twins Scary-oke 8pm

Jonté and Patzlaff art opening 1-4pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012

27


AUDIENCES WILL SURELY HURRY HOME TO KISS THEIR TEMPUR-PEDICS AFTER WITNESSING PRINCESS FRED’S DISCOMFORT IN ONCE UPON A MATTRESS OPENING WITH THREE SHOWS THIS WEEKEND, NOV. 2 TO 4. HUMBOLDT LIGHT OPERA COMPANY’S MOST YOUTHFUL BRANCH KIDCO PRESENTS THIS UPDATED VERSION OF THE PRINCESS AND THE PEA. SLEEP TIGHT.

SOHUM LOOKS FORWARD TO AN EPIC EVENING THIS FRIDAY. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION INFORMATION CENTER CELEBRATES 35 YEARS OF ADVOCATIN’ GREEN AT THE MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER. GOOD TIME SOUNDAGE WILL BE PROVIDED BY ELECTRONICA-FLAVORED WORLD MUSIC GROUP DELHI 2 DUBLIN. PROCEEDS GO TOWARDS MORE ADVOCACY.

AS ELECTION SEASON LOOKS TO DIVIDE US YET AGAIN, CONSIDER INSTEAD ENJOYING UNITED VOICES. THE ARCATA INTERFAITH GOSPEL CHOIR AGAIN PUTS ON ITS ANNUAL HARVEST CONCERT AT 7 P.M. ON SATURDAY, NOV. 3, AT THE ARCATA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. THE SONGFUL COMMUNITY EVENT WILL BE BOLSTERED THIS YEAR BY THE TRUE GOSPEL SINGERS AND THE AIGC YOUTH CHOIR. VOTE “YES.”

1 thursday THEATER

8. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Local actors perform staged reading of the play based on transcripts of the California Prop. 8 trial that established marriage equality as a constitutional right, as a benefit for the American Foundation for Equal Rights. $5. HSUStage. blogspot.com. 826-3928. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. A grade school girl, a magic purple dust ball and the secretary of education are at the center of this hilarious and good-hearted send up of the culture wars. $10. redwoodcurtain.com. 443-7688.

MOVIES

Ocean Night Film Screening. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Features Humboldt State University alumni Michael Kew and the films Triptych and Guacamole. Sponsored by Ocean Conservancy, Humboldt Surfrider and Humboldt Baykeeper. $3. 822-1220. MUSIC Humboldt Folklife Society Group Sing Along. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Joel Sonenshein leads. 839-7063.

LECTURE

California’s Clean Energy Future: Policies and Politics. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University Science B Room 135, Arcata. HSU’s Sustainable Futures speaker series presents Anthony Eggert, executive director of the UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy. www.schatzlab.org/about/publications/ speaker_series.html. 826-4345.

ETC.

Human Rights Commission Meeting. 5 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, conference room A. Further consideration of the county ordinance related to health and safety measures on county properties and the seating of the County law Enforcement Liaison Committee. 668-4095. Food for People Volunteering. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Seeking volunteers looking for ways to give back to their community, especially during the busy holiday season. For more information about volunteering, please contact Randy Weaver, Volunteer Coordinator at 445-3166. foodforpeople.org. Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills for a career in maintenance. Get

your OSHA certification and learn basic electrical and plumbing skills. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627.

2 friday EVENTS

EPIC’s 35th Anniversary Celebration. 6 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Environmental Protection Information Center celebrates with the vibrant, high-energy music of Delhi 2 Dublin. Doors at 6 p.m. for dinner and cocktails, concert at 9 p.m. All proceeds benefit the wildlife and wild places of Northwest California. $25. wildcalifornia.org. 822-7711. Honoring Women Veterans. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J St. Annual program honors women who have served their country. 444-8271.

THEATER

Once Upon a Mattress. 7 p.m. College of the Redwoods Forum Theatre, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Humboldt Light Opera Company’s KidCo presents a fractured fairy tale for anyone who appreciates a good night’s sleep. $10/$6 kids 12 and under. hloc.org. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Nov. 1 listing. HSU First Fridays at Four. 4-5:30 p.m. Studio Theater, HSU. Hour-long seminar on auditioning techniques. humboldt.edu. 826-3579.

MUSIC

Humboldt Talent Showcase. 6-10 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Local artists, community ears. Hosted by True Gospel Singers. $5/$10

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

sliding scale. 822-5693. HSU Opera Workshop. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Directed by Elisabeth Harrington, workshop students put the comic back in opera with musical spoofs of grand opera figures. $7/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928.

DANCE

Halloween Barn Dance. 7:30-11 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Vivacious caller Sue Moon calls the steps to the live music of the Wild Rumpus Band and the Academy Fiddlers. 269-2061. World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. 839-3665.

MOVIES

Genetic Roulette. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Film provides an overview of the science, the health concerns, and the politics of genetic engineering. Free. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. SPOKEN WORD The Midnight Bells Of All Souls Night. 7 p.m. Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. The Halloween season continues with storytelling by the gentle wandering spectre Carpathian, Paul Woodland, April Parrott and Howard Emerson. patientcreatures.com. 445-8600.

LECTURE

Stan Yogi and Elaine Elinson. 5-7 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Campus Dialogue on Race keynote speakers present “Standing on the Shoulders of Those Who Came Before Us: Unsung California Heroes and Heroines” based on their book Wherever There’s a Fight. humboldt.edu/ dialogue. 826-5656.

ETC.

California Women In Timber Dinner. 6 p.m. Baywood

Country Club, 3600 Buttermilk Lane, Arcata. No host cocktails, raffles. Raises funds for scholarships benefiting local students. 668-4458. Murder Mystery: Day of the Dead. 9 p.m. Chapala Restaurant, 201 Second St., Eureka. Interactive murder mystery. Before the final dessert is served, someone is going to die. Can you figure out who the killer was before the hilarious Belgian detective solves the crime? $30/$25 adv. 223-4172. Willow Creek Library Story Hour. Noon. Willow Creek Library, Highways 299 and 96. Kids story and craft times. 530-629-2146.

3 saturday EVENTS

Arts Alive. 6-9 p.m. In and around Old Town, Eureka. Monthly celebration includes food, music and incredible art. 442-9054. Kinetic Kouture: Fashion With A Re-Purpose!. 7 p.m. Eagle House Victorian Inn, 139 Second St., Eureka. One person’s trash is another person’s Saturday night finerie! Celebrate new uses for old things and see some mindbending outfits, music, dancing and revelry. $10/$7 with your own cup. kineticgrandchampionship.com. 616-5703. Hobart’s Historic Halloween Happening. 7:37 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Humboldt Kinetic Association resurrects the spirit of Hobart Brown, Glorious Founder of the Kinetic Sculpture Race for a night of games games, costume contests, prizes, Undead local bands and DJs. $8/$6 kids. E-mail


a.krause@sbcglobal.net. 443-8261. Dia de Los Muertos Burlesque. 9 p.m. Nocturnum, 206 West Sixth St., Eureka. The Va Va Voom Burlesque Vixens host a night of burlesque. Costume contest. Music by DJ Itchiefingaz. Benefits Six Rivers Planned Parenthood. $13/$10 adv. srpp.org. Woodside Preschool Annual Wine and Ale Gala. 4-7 p.m. Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Wide selection of fine local chocolates and finger foods, music by HTB Trio, silent auction, Dutch lottery and door prizes. $30/$25 adv. woodsidepreschool.com. 445-9132.

THEATER

Once Upon a Mattress. 7 p.m. College of the Redwoods Forum Theatre. See Nov. 2 listing. Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Nov. 1 listing.

MUSIC

Harvest Concert. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Presbyterian Church, 670 11th St. Annual event features Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir (accompanied by a full band), The True Gospel Singers and the AIGC Youth Choir. $12. www. arcatainterfaithgospelchoir.com. 822-4444. Evan Morden and Seabury Gould. 7:30 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Irish/Celtic music concert. $7. 677-9493. Melvin Seals and JGB. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St., Arcata. American rock band continues the musical legacy of the Jerry Garcia Band, of which Seals was a long time member. $25. www.arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. Rising Appalachia. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Sisters Leah and Chloe combine voices for an evening of haunting, poetic Americana, Sliding scale. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. HSU Opera Workshop. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall. See Nov. 2 listing.

MOVIES

Birth Story. 6-9 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. About a group of women who taught themselves how to deliver babies on a 1970s hippie commune and changed

the way a generation thought about childbirth. $10. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

OUTDOORS

Discussion of Two Peoples, One Place,” about the local 19th century clash between Euro-Americans and Native Americans. 445-4342.

Audubon Society Arcata Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Pat Bitton. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Audubon Bear River Ridge Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet across from the Fernbridge Market. Tour the open prairies and forest edges in search of rough-legged hawk, golden eagle, horned lark and bluebird. Led by Daryl Coldren. 916-384-8089. California Coastal Conservation Corps Day. 9 a.m.noon. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join the CCC for a morning of dune restoration and native planting. Morning snacks and lunch will be provided. 444-1397. Trail Stewards Orientation/Work Day. 9-11 a.m. Meet at the parking area at the west end of Murray Road. Clean and treat the trail kiosks. Dress for work. E-mail sbecker@reninet.com. 826-0163. Lanphere Dunes Guided Walk. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet at Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata. Tour of the Lanphere Dunes with trained naturalist Jenny Hanson. 444-1397. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Elliot Dabill for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. 826-2359.

FOR KIDS

Arcata Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. humfarm.org. 822-5951. Learn to Homebrew Day. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Humboldt Beer Works, 110 Third St., Eureka. Basic beginning brewing class. Sponsored by Humboldt Homebrewers. 442-6258.

THEATER

FOOD

LECTURE

Humboldt County Historical Society Program. 1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Authors Ray Raphael and Freeman House present “A

KEET’s Kids Club. Noon-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Free monthly workshops for children, families and childcare providers comprised of viewing a segment of PBS Kid’s programming, reading short stories and doing art activities. Each family receives the book A Box Can Be Many Things. 442-0278.

ETC.

Dia de los Muertos Program. 1:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Danza Xalxiutlikue facilitates an Aztec drum and dance class for children and their families. Classes will be taught in English and Spanish and intoductory Nahuatl, a traditional language indigenous to Mexico. 269-1910. Flea Market. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Stuff! E-mail dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100. Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Meditation. 9-10 a.m. Arcata Holistic Health Center, 940 Ninth St. Dalai Ani Kunzang Drolma leads meditation sessions. E-mail structuralthomas@gmail.com. 825-1088.

4 sunday A Chorus Line. 3 and 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The classic Broadway production comes to Humboldt. Winner of nine Tony Awards, including “Best Musical” and the Pulitzer Prize for drama. $65/$35 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET EUREKA

MONDAY-SATURDAY

11:30AM-9:00PM

continued on next page

Cross Examining Marriage Equality

A local production of 8

grew up in a Mormon household, eventually came out as gay and won acclaim in film and television. He took home an Academy Award in 2008 for his screenplay for Milk, director Gus Van Sant’s biopic about slain gay rights advocate and San Francisco City Councilman Harvey Milk, He’s won two Writers Guild awards for his work on the HBO series Big Love about polygamy among splinter Mormon sects. He also received a GLAAD Media award in 2010 for 8: The Mormon Proposition, a documentary about the intense involvement of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in promoting California’s Prop. 8. Seeking to spread the play’s marriage equality message, the American Foundation for Equal Rights offered the script for 8 to groups across the U.S. The HSU Dept. of Theatre, Film and Dance won the right to perform it here. A local all-star cast was recruited including Dell’Arte Executive Director Michael Fields, North Coast Repertory Theatre E.D. Michael Thomas, as well as James Floss, James Hitchcock, Christina Jioras, Susan Abbey, J.M. Wilkerson, Elisa Abelleira, James McHugh, Catherine L. Brown, Juan Carlos Contreras,

MICHAEL FIELDS AS THE JUDGE IN THE LOCAL PRODUCTION OF 8 PHOTO COURTESY OF HSU

Sam Machado and Shea King. The local reading is directed by Clint Rebik from Redwood Curtain who noted, “This is the trial we did not get to see, but with this staged reading we get that opportunity.” You have just one opportunity to see 8 locally: the one-night-only reading is on Thursday Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m. in HSU’s Van Duzer Theatre. Tickets are $5, free to HSU students. Advance tickets are highly recommended and are available by calling 826-3928. — Bob Doran

NEW & USED

www.wildwood.ws

Four years ago, on Election Day 2008, California voters passed Proposition 8, a constitutional amendment that overturned a state Supreme Court ruling saying that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry. A protracted legal battle followed, leading to a dramatic 2010 federal trial where marriage equality was once again on the line. The appellate court ultimately overturned Prop. 8, reaffirming marriage equality. The court’s decision inspired LGBT rights activist, screenwriter and playwright Dustin Lance Black. Black took portions of the 2010 trial transcripts, mixed them in with interviews with plaintiffs, defendants and proponents and created 8, a staged reenactment of the trial. The play was produced in New York and Hollywood with an all-star cast including George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Martin Sheen, Morgan Freeman, John C. Reilly, Rob Reiner, George Takei, Kevin Bacon and Jamie Lee Curtis among others. A founding board member of the American Foundation for Equal Rights (the group behind 8), Black

Folk Instruments Books & Accessories

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Just Jewelry

continued from previous page

Ahh, Krap!

Second Hand Sale Sat., Nov. 3 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

1531 J Street Eureka

Eureka Woman’s Club No Checks Please Cash or Credit Cards Only

Proceeds to benefit Humboldt Domestic Violence Services Crisis/Support Line: 443-6042

Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

822-2227

Caffé Italia BreakFaSt•eSpreSSo lunCh•dinner•Catering

444-2421

3220 Broadway, Suite 8 • eureka (Behind Big 5 Sporting goodS)

M-F 9aM-10pM • Sat. 11:30-10pM • CloSed Sun.

If you refer back to recent local Kinetic lore we’ve reported on in these pages (“Kinetic Klash Kontinues” July 7, 2011, is a good place to start) you’ll note the existence of two merry, sometimes at odds kinetic kamps: The Kinetic Universe and the Humboldt Kinetic Association. Without getting too into it here, while there has been kontention over who should steward the Kinetic Grand Championship/Kinetic Sculpture Race, the race (whatever you call it) kontinues every year. And we Humboldtians love it. So there. But k’mon. We can’t fail to point out that the universe and the association are both holding kompeting fundraisers this weekend … on the same night, Saturday, Nov. 3. Sigh, the konflict kontinues, it seems. Here are your kinetic-y options: First, the really trashy party. If you’ve got some junk in your trunk, in your backyard, in your garage and/or in your basement, put it to good use! The Rutabaga Queensrun Kinetic Universe is once again hosting Kinetic Kouture: Fashion With A RePurpose, starting at 7 p.m. at the classy ol’ Eagle House in Eureka. What is it? Essentially a fashion show, but drenched in kinetic absurdity. Aspiring tailors design and display “junque fashion” pieces in an attempt to be

dubbed “Trashonista Gloriosa.” Past year’s winners have manipulated shower curtains, mini blinds, duct tape and bottle caps into carbon footprint-reducing duds. “We queens want to make a big splash, not a big footprint, so we work to find new uses for things that might otherwise end up in the landfill,” says Kinetic Universe President and past Trashionista Gloriosa Kati Texas. Conscious style. So in. The apparel will be significantly scarier across town. This year’s midweek Halloween granted us the opportunity to stretch out the spook. Taking advantage, the Humboldt Kinetic Association is again exhuming the spirit of the Glorious Founder for Hobart’s Historic Halloween Happening at 7:37 p.m. at the Runeberg Hall on Union and Wabash streets in Eureka. A more traditional All Hallows Eve shindig, the night will feature costume contests, games and organized noise by Mostly Harmless and the Justin Hobart Brown Orchestra. The festivities for some reason end promptly at 1:13 a.m. You have to think Brown to know why. Of kourse, you could go to both of ’em. Let there be peace! For more info on all this kookyness, invite yourself to the events’ respective Facebook event pages. — Andrew Goff

One Singular Sensation

A CHORUS LINE

Perhaps it was the meta nature of the story — a musical about the lives of dancers auditioning for a musical — but A Chorus Line became a true Broadway sensation. The 1975 production with a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban and music by Marvin Hamlisch swept the Tony Awards in 1976, then won the Pulitzer Prize for drama that same year. The storyline is simple: The director and choreographer for an upcoming musical are auditioning dancers for the chorus. Seventeen have made the first cut. All of them need work (as they sing in “I Hope I Get It”) but there are only eight parts, so more culling must be done. The director asks the dancers to talk about themselves and how they got into dance, and the cast presents a series of

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

self-revelatory monologues and songs. Much is revealed about the difficulties of the song-anddance life. The show ran for 15 years straight on Broadway, and was revived in 2006 to additional acclaim. Traveling companies have crisscrossed the country. The latest production started a national tour last week under the direction of Baayork Lee, who created the role of Connie Wong in the original production. A Chorus Line comes to Arcata Sunday for two performances on one day, Sunday, Nov. 4, at 3 and 8 p.m. in HSU’s Van Duzer Theatre. Tickets are $65, $35 for HSU students, available by calling 826-3928 or online at humboldt.edu/ centerarts. — Bob Doran


MUSIC

John Mark McMillan. 7 p.m. Faith Center, Bay St., Eureka. Christian singer/songwriter and worship music megastar performs. $15/$20 VIP. eurekafaithcenter.org. Sara Milonovich and Greg Anderson. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Humboldt Folklife Society present singer-songwriter and violinist Milonovich and guitarist Anderson. $12/$10 HFS members. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

ART

Jonté and Patzlaff Exhibit. 1-4 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Opening reception for Kris Patzlaff and Joyce Jonté’s dual watercolor and metal work show. Runs through Dec. 16. 677-9493.

OUTDOORS

palachia and the campaign to stop it. Q&A follows with West Virginia natives Junior Walk and Brandon Nida. $5/$10 donation. wildcalifornia.org. 822-7711.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Group of local business people who get together once a week to give and receive referrals. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Non-denominational prayer group. E-mail dlbitte@hotmail.com. 834-5800.

7 wednesday

Sierra Club Hike. 9 a.m. Carpools meet in Arcata Safeway parking lot. Hike the Coastal Trail from False Klamath Cove south to the Klamath Overlook Area and return. No dogs. 668-4275.

LECTURE

Japanese Tea Ceremony Demonstration. 1-3 p.m. Ink People Center for the Arts, 517 Third St., Eureka. Seasonal demonstration of Chanoyu, the Japanese Tea ceremony. Guests should wear comfortable clothing, be fragrancefree and wear minimal jewelry. Everyone is welcome. Free will donation (suggested $3-$5). horaizons.blogspot.com.

UH

Freshwater Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Grange, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Monthly pancake breakfast. $5/$3 kids. 445-2517. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Buddhist Study Group. 6 p.m. Arcata Yoga Center, 890 G St. Weekly gathering practices the Chenrezig sadhana and Dorje Yang Dron. 822-4756.

Joni Mitchell: A Tribute. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Performed by Jan Bramlett, Rick Copeland, Joanne Rand, Morgan Corviday, Josephine Johnson, Tim Gray, Marla Joy, Sarah Torres, Andrea Zvaleko and other north coast musicians to celebrate Mitchell’s birthday. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

ETC.

5 monday MUSIC

Great American Taxi and Poor Man’s Whiskey. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Night of bluegrassinfused jam bands. Part of the 2012 Left Coast Tour. $18. humboldtbrews.com. 826-2739.

ART

De Corporis. 4 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Opening reception of an exhibition of figure drawings created during a summer life drawing group hosted by CR art instructor Dean Smith. Artists include Ben Vaughn Zeitlin, Sharon Ruchte, Katie Kirk, Janiel Giraldo, Tyson Rodriguez and Sonny Wong. 476-4556.

ETC.

Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills used in an office setting. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627.

6 tuesday DEMOCRACY

You Should Vote. Capiche? Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. co.humboldt.ca.us/election. 445-7678.

MOVIES

Low Coal. 6-10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. EPIC presents film about mountaintop removal in Ap-

H St., Blue Lake. Feature-length documentary film exploring the life and culture of people living along the Mississippi River as experienced by a theatre troupe called the Unseen Ghost Brigade on their 2010 river raft tour from Minneapolis to Caruthersville, Mo. dellarte. com. 612-227-2690.

ETC.

Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Nov. 1 listing.

Heads Up…

Ride the Voter Bus. Persons with disabilities and seniors in the greater Eureka area will have an opportunity to get a free ride to cast their vote in the upcoming Nov. 6 election. Reservations are required and potential bus riders are asked to call the Humboldt Community Access and Resource Center at 443-7077. ●

The Squidling Brothers. 9 p.m. Red Fox Tavern, Eureka. Humor-filled twist on the classic American sideshows of the early 20th century. Music, freak show, visual art, unusual sword swallowing, aerial performances, burlesque and body modification. $8. 845-5842.

MUSIC

ETC.

Eel River Valley Founders BNI. 7:30-9 a.m. Victorian Inn, 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale. Meeting of local business owners. 407-6827. Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Nov. 5 listing. Alzheimer’s Resource Center Volunteer Training. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Adult Day Health Services, 1901 California St., Eureka. For community members who wish to work with people with dementia and their families. Call for applications. www.humsenior.org. 444-8254.

8 thursday EVENTS

Native American Arts Gallery Naming Ceremony. 5:30 p.m. Ground floor of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Building, near Union and 17th streets. New name is a Wiyot word that reflects the gallery’s mission of preserving and promoting indigenous culture through the sharing of traditional and contemporary art. 826-3629.

THEATER

Dusty and the Big, Bad World. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Nov. 1 listing.

MUSIC

KRS-One. 10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Bonus Entertainment presents the veteran hip hop artist. $25/$22 adv. www.arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

DANCE

Ballet Folklórico de México. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Celebrated, long-running Mexican dance company features larger-than-life set pieces and a huge cast of 75 dancers, singers and musicians. $45/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

northcoastjournal

dvd Two DVDs A pair of worthy films that did not play in local theaters are now out on DVD: Damsels in Distress. In Whit Stillman’s first film since The Last Days Of Disco, a private East Coast college is watched over by a group of young philanthropists in training, headed by Violet Wister (Greta Gerwig). These preppy “perfume obsessed” and ultimately well-meaning girls believe that the high suicide rate at the college could be curbed by teaching depressed dorm dwellers and frat boys proper hygiene — and giving them parts in tap dancing musicals. The girls declare war on the journalism department when the school paper suggests that the college’s elitist frat house be shut down. When Violet comforts a lovelorn girl by advising her to lower her standards in men, the girl takes her advice by stealing Violet’s clueless, “not very good-looking” boyfriend, which sets Violet on a downward spiral. Although this takes place in the same upper class East Coast world as Stillman’s critically acclaimed Metropolitan, this film’s humor is less dry and more like a classic screwball comedy. Once the absurdity sinks in, Damsels is hilarious, gently mocking its characters without feeling mean-spirited. (Recommended for fans of Wes Anderson.) The Woman in the Fifth. Ethan Hawke and Kristin Scott-Thomas star in this unnerving psychological thriller from Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski. Tom Ricks (Hawke) is an American novelist attempting to settle down in Paris to be near his young daughter, despite a restraining order placed at the request of his ex-wife. The Paris here is not one typically seen on the big screen; it’s a seedy vortex that calls to creative people like a siren, then eats them alive. Ricks’ belongings are stolen as soon as he arrives; he ends up staying rent free above a rundown Turkish café whose owner tells him, “You’re American; I trust you.” The proprietor gives him a mysterious job that involves sitting in an underground room somewhere in the city, watching a security camera and only letting in people who ask for “Monsieur Monde” (Mr. World). Ricks soon notices screams, bloodstains in the hallway and electrical drains that make the lights dim, but he continues to do his job. In his off hours, he begins an affair with a haughty widow (Scott-Thomas) who is the muse of a Hungarian poet, and things get even stranger. Despite his intriguing new life, it seems Ricks is only able to write letters to his daughter. This is a film that leaves much to the imagination, which can be either refreshing or frustrating — perfect for fans of offbeat thrillers with a strong sense of place. — Aimee Hennessy

MOVIES

Twilight of the Mississippi. 7:30 p.m. Carlo Theater, 131

 

Aimee Hennessy is co-owner of La Dolce Video, an independent Arcata video rental store specializing in foreign and indie cinema.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012

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Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 * = FRI.-SAT. ONLy 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 11/2- 11/8 unless otherwise noted. FLIGHT *11:40, 2:40, 5:50, 9:00 THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 WRECK IT RALPH 3D 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 WRECK IT RALPH 2D 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:40 CLOuD ATLAS 12:40, 4:25, 8:10 SILENT HILL: REvELATION 3D 4:05, 8:55 SILENT HILL: REvELATION 2D 12:50, 5:40 CHASING MAvERICKS 6:50, 9:30 HOTEL TRANSyLvANIA 3D 1:40, 6:35 HOTEL TRANSyLvANIA 2D 3:20, 8:00 FRANKENWEENIE 2D 1:50, 4:10 ARGO 12:20, 3:10, 6:05, 9:05 PARANORMAL ACTIvITy 4 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 SINISTER 4:30, 9:20 TAKEN 2 1:35, 4:00, 6:20, 8:45 FuN SIzE 2:10, 6:55

Mill Creek Cinema

Tom Hanks and Halle Berry look concerned in Cloud Atlas.

Split Personalities Movies employ multiple directors and actors tackle multiple roles with mixed results

707-839-3456 * = FRI.-SuN. ONLy 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 11/2- 11/8 unless otherwise noted.

By John J. Bennett

WRECK IT RALPH 3D WRECK IT RALPH 2D FuN SIzE SILENT HILL: REvELATION 3D SILENT HILL: REvELATION 2D HOTEL TRANSyLvANIA 3D HOTEL TRANSyLvANIA 2D SINISTER TAKEN 2 ARGO PARANORMAL ACTIvITy 4 ALEx CROSS

Reviews

*12:15, 3:00, 8:30 *12:00, 5:45 *2:35, 7:05 *1:20, 6:20 3:50, 8:50 5:30 *12:50, 3:10, 7:50 *1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30 4:50, 9:20 *12:35, 3:25, 6:15, 9:05 *1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 *1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

* = SAT.-SuN. ONLy 1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 11/2- 11/8 unless otherwise noted.

PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER *1:55, 4:25, 6:55, 9:25 ARGO *1:00, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 PARANORMAL ACTIvITy 4 *1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

Fortuna Theater 707-725-2121 * = SAT.-SuN. ONLy

1241 Main Street, Fortuna ** = FRI.-SuN. ONLy Times are for 11/2- 11/8 unless otherwise noted. WRECK IT RALPH 3D *1:00, 3:45, 6:20, **8:50 WRECK IT RALPH 2D *1:45, 4:30, 7:05, **9:35 SILENT HILL: REvELATION 3D *1:30, 4:40, 7:10, **9:30 FuN SIzE *1:40, 4:25, 6:40, **9:00 PARANORMAL ACTIvITy 4 *12:50, 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, **9:45 HOTEL TRANSyLvANIA *1:50, 4:10, 6:30, **8:45

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville TAKEN 2

11/2- 11/8: 7:30 EXCEPT 11/7: 6:30

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

CLOUD ATLAS. Years ago, filmmaker siblings Andy and Lana Wachowski (The Matrix), who can be called many things but not unambitious, decided to take a stab at adapting David Mitchell’s reputedly un-adaptable novel Cloud Atlas. They invited German filmmaker Tom Tykwer (Run Lola Run), another potentially brilliant filmmaker/iconoclast, to work on the screenplay. Together they came up with the questionably bright idea to make the movie together — as in, three directors. Knowing nothing about the narrative complexity of Mitchell’s novel, I was nonetheless curious about the division of labor. As it turns out, the story is built

of six interlinked chronologies, so the filmmakers just divvied them all up. The Wachowskis direct three timelines, Tykwer the other three. They work with separate, mutually exclusive crews, sharing only actors. And the principal actors play at least five roles apiece. The result is a movie that’s difficult to reckon with. The plot bounces between the distant, post-apocalyptic future Earth, the South Pacific circa 1849, Britain in 1936, San Francisco in 1973, back to Britain in the present and to “Neo-Seoul” in the year 2144. Each story arc reappears in the one that follows it chronologically, as a story being told or read by one of the protagonists. The characters across these storylines are played by the same core cast, which includes

Nov. 1 Nov. 7 Thurs Nov 1 - Ocean Night ft. Surf Journalist & HSU Alum Michael Kew Doors at 6:30 p.m. $3 All ages Fri Nov 2 - Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives (film screening) Doors at 6:30 Free All ages Sun Nov 4 - Harry Potter & the Order of the Phoenix (2007) Doors 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG-13 Mon Nov 5 - Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors at 5:15 p.m. Free All ages Tue Nov 6 - EPIC presents Low Coal Doors at 5:45 p.m. $5-$10 donation All ages Wed Nov 7 - Sci Fi Night ft. The Giant Gila Monster (1959) Movie at 7:15 p.m. All ages Free

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

northcoastjournal.com • North JourNal • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012 Journal • Thursday, Nov. 1,Coast 2012 • northcoastjournal.com 31 32 North Coast

NEWN!

UDO BOWL O N ODLE

Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, Hugo Weaving and Jim Sturgess. Thematically, the movie delves into the fundamental philosophies and conflicts that define the human experience. Each segment deals with servitude, greed, intellectual freedom, loyalty and trust. It’s an ambitious project, but it suffers from some of the oversimplified philosophizing that made the second and third Matrix movies almost unwatchable. The intellectual exploration is intriguing, but it left me feeling like I’d been hit over the head with a Basic Human Psychology textbook. Plus, some of the storytelling choices come perilously close to unintended, outright silliness. Post-apocalypse Hanks speaks in a pidgin dialect that sounds suspiciously Binks-ian. The green tormentor of his imagination borrows liberally from The Mighty Boosh’s Baboo Yagu. And the prostheses used to “transform” the actors get pretty tiresome and noticeable by the end. Setting aside those complaints, I have to say I found Cloud Atlas generally enjoyable. It certainly didn’t feel like a three-hour movie, and I’m always happy to see Hollywood filmmakers attempt ambitious, difficult art. While this is definitely more popcorn than it is philosophy, it’s also clearly the work of people with the temerity and resourcefulness to bring a unique vision to life — big, colorful, intermittently dazzling life. I have my doubts that this will go down as a classic or a great movie. It may not even be all that good, but it represents a welcome respite from the stream of tent-pole horror, amusement park ride adaptations and remakes that we’ve gotten used to. R. 172m. CHASING MAVERICKS. This one may be even harder to figure out. It’s a surfing movie, co-directed (for some reason) by Curtis Hanson (L.A. Confidential) and Michael Apted (the Up documentary series), both of whom are accomplished directors with some inarguably great work on their résumés. But this collaboration lacks any of the visual poetry and unblinking storytelling that characterize their best stuff. Based on a true story, Mavericks chronicles the early rise of Jay Moriarty (Jonny Weston), a latchkey kid from Santa Cruz who became one of the most prominent names in professional surfing. The movie introduces us to Jay as an ocean-obsessed 8-year-old and then fastforwards almost a decade. As a teenager, he becomes fixated on surfing the nearmythical break of Mavericks, a towering man-killer of a break that few people even know exists. He convinces roofer/surf yogi Frosty Hesson (Gerard Butler) to train him up, and they set off on a journey of self-


discovery and friendship. Narratively, this is all very familiar, and Hanson and Apted do little with the material to differentiate it from any other PG underdog, coming-of-age sports movie. It lacks any insight into the blend of philosophy and athleticism that makes surfing so fascinating. Even worse, the surfing sequences are shot and cut in such a standard, traditional way that they come off lifeless and overlong. There are a few touching, emotional scenes scattered throughout, but they’re all so simple, so overt, that whatever honesty the actors can convey dissipates into the Disney afternoon atmosphere. I was pleasantly surprised at Butler’s performance, but the hard-partying Scot seems an odd choice to play a NorCal beachbum and father of two. Weston’s Moriarty is convincing, presenting him as an open, genuinely good-natured kid making the most of the few good opportunities life throws his way. There isn’t anything particularly bad or offensive about Chasing Mavericks, except the sharp disappointment of oncegreat filmmakers turning a good story into a dull, unexceptional movie. PG. 115m. —John J. Bennett

Previews

WRECK-IT RALPH. This computerized cartoon imagines what would happen if a video game bad guy (John C. Reilly in the title role) had an existential crisis and embarked on a journey through other video games, meeting classic characters like Q*bert and Zangief along the way. PG. 120m. FLIGHT. Hollywood gloss-maestro Robert Zemeckis (Forrest Gump, Cast Away) directs this Denzel Washington vehicle about an airline pilot who makes a miraculous crash-landing. Momentarily a hero, the pilot soon falls under suspicion as an investigation reveals … well, let’s not spoil it. R. 93m. THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS. The story goes that RZA, the genius producer/emcee of the Wu-Tang Clan and an avowed Kung Fu junkie, spent several weeks with Quentin Tarantino on the set of Kill Bill. Then he made his own Kung Fu movie starring himself, Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu. This is said movie. R. 96m. THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER. A high school coming-of-age drama starring Emma Watson and Ezra Miller (who was creepy-good in We Need to Talk About Kevin), this indie charmer is directed by newcomer Stephen Chbosky, based on his own bestselling novel. PG13. 103m. The Arcata Theater Lounge rings in November with Ocean Night, featuring a surf

doc (Triptych) and book reading (Crossings) by HSU grad/surf journalist Michael Kew, Thursday at 6:30. Friday night, get your Prop. 37 juices flowing with the antiGMO documentary Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives, presented by the Arcata Co-op. 7 p.m. Revisit Harry Potter’s fifth year at Hogwarts Sunday at 6 p.m. with Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. If you vent all of your anger in the voting booth next Tuesday, head to the ATL to get re-outraged with Low Coal, a documentary about the impact of the coal industry on small communities in Appalachia. 6 p.m. If you need escapism after the election results, hit up Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night next Wednesday, featuring The Giant Gila Monster (1959). Doors at 6 p.m., movie at 7.

Continuing

ALEX CROSS. Tyler Perry stars as a homicide detective hunting a serial killer, which is every bit as tired and formulaic as it sounds. PG13. 102m. ARGO. Ben Affleck can direct! Here he helms a thrilling and surprisingly funny account of the 1979-80 Iran hostage crisis, starring alongside Alan Arkin, John Goodman and Bryan Cranston. R. 120m. FRANKENWEENIE. Tim Burton directs this black-and-white stop-motion film about a quixotic boy who resurrects his dead dog. PG. 87m. FUN SIZE. A sarcastic high school senior (Um, hello? Redundant much?) is like totally bummed cuz her mom is making her take her stupid kid brother trick-or-treating, which sucks cuz she and her sassy best friend like totally wanted to go to this awesome party hosted by this totally hot guy. PG13. 90m. HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA. Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) runs a posh, monsters-only hotel, catering to the likes of Frankenstein (Kevin James) and the Mummy (CeeLo Greene). PG. 91m. PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4. You know the paranormal drill: Hidden cameras capture supernatural hijinks in suburban bedrooms. Loud noises ensue. R. 95m. SILENT HILL: REVELATION 3D. Sequel to a movie based on a series of survival horror video games involving evil specters shrouded in fog. R. 94m. SINISTER. Ethan Hawke stars as a truecrime novelist who accidentally unleashes some bad supernatural juju that was minding its own business in a box of old home movies. Oops. R. 109m. TAKEN 2. An ex-CIA agent proficient in the whupping of ass (Liam Neeson) has to protect his family from kidnappers. PG13. 90m. —Ryan Burns

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/ MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts 2 DAY UPCYCLING WORKSHOP. Nov. 29, 6-7 p.m. & Nov. 30, 6-8 p.m. $50. Learn the craft of upcycling as you dye, screen print, sew and embellish, Turn old into new. Bring washed clothes. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-1122) HAND NEEDLE WORK WITH KATHY LEE. Variety of 3-hour classes including: English Smocking, Ribbon Embroidery and Doll Making. 1-4 p.m. $40 plus $8 supply fee. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-1101) LEARN TO KNIT FAIR ISLE CLASS AT YARN. Thurs., Nov. 8 & 15, 5:30-7 p.m. $15 each class, plus materials. Learn the Fair Isle technique while making adorable holiday ornaments. Take one or both classes. Beginning knitting level required. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-1108) PHOTOS 1. Tues., Nov. 6-Dec. 18, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $85. Learn more about your digital camera and the techniques that will help your artistic expression in making photographs. College of the Redwoods Community Education at 333 6th St. www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to register today. (AC-1101) PHOTOS 2. Thurs., Nov. 8-Dec.20, 5-7:10 p.m. $85. A more in-depth concentration on technical proficiency and editing skills. The end goal of Photos 2 class will be to collectively participate in a group exhibition. College of the Redwoods Community Education at 333 6th St. www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to register today. (AC-1101) RAKU FIRING. Come to Fire Arts and experience the enjoyment of pottery firings. Bring your own bisqueware or select from a variety of unglazed pieces & glazes from Fire Arts. Call Thurs. to reserve space. Glazing at noon & Firing at 1 p.m. on Fri., $6/ piece or $25/kiln load. Fire Arts Center, 707-826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-1101)

SMILE, EVEN WHEN YOU THINK YOU CAN’T. Proven ways to cope with difficult situations in life discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Nov. 4, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-1101) STORY-CONNECTIONS DIGITAL STORYTELLING WORKSHOPS. Create multimedia stories with narrative, photos, video, text, graphics. Explore memories, honor, celebrate, archive. Small, confidential 2-3 day facilitated workshops with tech support. Open Topic and themed workshops scheduled. Custom workshops for groups and organizations. www. story-connections.org or 707-616-6009. (CMM-1122) FREE PARENT/ DAUGHTER WORKSHOP. HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your daughter how to become a healthy powerful young women, then who will? The Media? Her Peers? Not likely. She needs you! Six Rivers Planned Parenthood Presents this Free interactive workshop for 9-12 year old girls and her parents, focusing on fostering positive attitudes about girl’s bodies and the changes to look forward to during puberty, Thurs., Nov. 8, 6-8 p.m, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 4422961. (CMM-1108) FREE PARENT/SON DISCUSSION GROUP. HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your son how to become a healthy & responsible young man, then who will? The Media ? His Peers? Not likely. He needs you! Six River Planned Parenthood Presents this interactive workshop for 6th- 8th grade boys and his parents, focusing on responsibility, peer pressure, and the changes to look forward to during puberty. Thurs., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (CMM-1025)

Computers

INTRO TO ADOBE INDESIGN. Fast-paced, hands-on exploration of Indesign page layout software. Demonstration of tools, menus, palettes, page set-up, master pages, guides and margins, color and more. With Annie Reid. Tues. & Thurs., Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (C-1115) continued on next page

VERY BEGINNING SEWING WITH JODI. Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. $35. Learn to sew and really use that sewing machine. We will have you sewing a straight line in no time, then on to fancier stitches. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-1101) BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE WOODWORKING. Learn how to make small wood projects primarily with hand tools. McKinleyville Middle School Wood Shop, evenings, 1-2 nights/week. All tools supplied. Ages 16+. Maximum 20/class. Approximately $4-$7/ hour. Information, email randhall@suddenlink.net (AC-1101)

Communication

MOTIVATION, EXPECTATIONS & CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK. A management workshop. Develop your staff and increase motivation with clear communication of roles, responsibilities and boundaries, while delivering timely feedback. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $85 (includes materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended (C-1101)

North Coast Academy

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

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Dance, Music, Theater, Film

Christmas Stocking 11/10 & 11/17 Do you love handmade Christmas decorations? Want to learn more sock techniques? Make an heirloom Scandinavian designed Christmas stocking. Choose from five designs: Peace, Love, Joy, Angel, or Cabin. You’ll learn how to do a provisional cast-on, hem top, knitting in the round, a fair isle (color) knitting technique that weaves the yarn rather than having strands in the back, short row heel (wrapping & hiding wraps), & Kitchener stitch grafting. Cost $75.00 (includes materials)

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Boost your confidence on the dance floor with private lessons. Gift certificates available, too. (707) 464-3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT-0124) SPIRIT DANCE WITH MARC TAKAHA. At Om Shala Yoga. Sat., Nov. 10, 2-5 p.m. Dancing the Ecstatic Wave as Spiritual Practice. $30 if paid by 11/1, $40 after. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (DMT-1101) USA DANCE INVITES YOU. To a social dance at Redwood Raks, 824 L St. Sat., Nov. 10. Salsa Rueda lesson from 6:30-7:30 p.m. followed by open dancing to DJ music. No partner necessary. Members FREE, $10 non-members, student discounts. Call (707) 464-3638 or email usadances@gmail.com. (DMT-1108) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

HARD STYLE LIFTING. With Levi Rivas. Learn the kettlebell basics. Tues.s and Fri.s, 6 p.m., in Fortuna. Sign up for classes online at http://www.kjhanzfitness.com or contact Levi Rivas at LeviLrivas@gmail. com. Personal training sessions available. (F-1101) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129)

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AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1227) KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./ Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1129) PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1129) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-1227) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-0110)

AFTER SCHOOL FELT CLASSES. With Bequin. Tues.s or Thurs.s, 3:15-5:30 p.m. $25 Intro to the wonders of felting wool fibers with several projects created to take home. Includes materials. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (K-1101) ARTS IN THE AFTERNOON. 6th-12th graders spend your afterschool hours in the art studio. Arcata Recreation’s Arts in the Afternoon runs Mon.-Thurs., 3-6 p.m. throughout the school year. Ceramics, video production, painting, jewelry making, drawing and more. Something for everyone. Call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/rec (K-1101) BIRTHDAY PARTIES. Looking to host a birthday party for your child? Arcata Recreation offers themed parties: Arts & Crafts, Sports, Gymnastics, Karaoke and Gaming. Two supervised hours of fun. No stress, no mess! Call 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org/rec (K-1101) FIESTA KIDS. Latin inspired dance fitness class for kids ages 5-11. Crank up the music, shake, wiggle & have a blast! Mon.s, 4 p.m. starting 11/5 at the Adorni Center. $20/child. Register online at www.eurekarecreation. com or visit The Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. 441-4244. (K-1101) TEEN FILMMAKING & MUSIC PRODUCTION. Learn the basics of film & music production by working on original projects with professional equipment. GULCH Teen Recreation Program meets Tues. & Thurs., 4-6 p.m. at Cooper Gulch 1720 10th St. $5 drop-in fee & scholarships available. Call Brian at 441-4240 for more info. (K-1101) THANKSGIVING BREAK CAMP. Join us in Blue Lake for our Thanksgiving Break Camp for 5-13 year olds. Mon.-Wed., Nov.19-21, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Full-day or half-day option. Register today as space is limited! Download a registration form at www. bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932, for more information. (K-1115)

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227)

FC SAMOA WINTER SOCCER ACADEMY. MENU OF ALL CLASSES START DEC 3, (week of) (4 p.m- 5:30 p.m. unless stated) SAMOA GYM (and fields) MonBoys age 10-11-12 with Salvador Espinosa (4-5:40 p.m.) Tues- Girls age 10-11-12 with Nick Parker. TuesGoalkeeper School with Andy Salatnay (4-5 p.m ) (on field if weather allows) Thurs: Advanced* and D1 and Varsity Prep with Pete Fuller (not for begginers or intermediate) (pre-requisites- juggle 100 and prior Academy class) Fri: Pee Wee Pre Academy Age 7-8-9 yrs. co-ed with Casey Schmidt and Emi Monahan and Nick Parker. Sun: 1 p.m-5 p.m., “Varsity prep and super-league u16 Futsal. AHS (Nick Parker and Staff) $40 a month (Dec- Jan-Feb) (10 lessons) or $95 “up front” * A few scholarships are always (discreetly) available. New members* are also required to pay for a year of US Club insurance (July-July) $40 FUTSAL- we are running several Futsal teams also as an optional companion to these classes Most Futsal is played on Sun’s and has separate (Inside Sports) fees to play. fcsamoa.com (K-1129)

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

LITTLE BUDDHAS YOGA. Children’s Yoga Series. Fri.s, Nov. 2-Dec. 14 (no class Nov 23). Ages: 3-6, 4:15-5 p.m. Ages: 7-10, 5-5:45 p.m. Location: Redwood Raks. $50/6-week series. www.littlebuddhasyoga.com/ children (K-1101)

ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227)

Kids & Teens

ARCATA PLAY CENTER & POSTPARTUM EXCERCISE CLASS. Join Arcata Recreation’s “Just for Me” Postpartum Exercise Class Tues.s, 9-9:45 a.m. Child care provided. Also, bring your children ages birth-5 to Arcata Play Center for fun, socialization and parenting support. Mon.s/Tues.s/Wed.s, 10 a.m.-Noon. Call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata. org/rec (K-1101)

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)


Lectures

FOOD SAFETY. Food Safety. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Wed., Nov. 21, 6-8 p.m., Healy Senior Center, Redway. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/ foodsafety or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 707-826-3731. (L-1108) MYSTERIES, RUINS & REMNDERS OF THE NORTH SPIT. Sat., Nov. 3, 1-4:30 p.m. $49. See the ruins of an 1850’s Lighthouse, Shipwreck sites of the Corona and Milwaukee, reminders of WWII US Navy bases, and more. College of the Redwoods Community Education at 333 6th St. www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to register today. (L-1101) ESTATE PLANNING, MAPPING OUT YOUR FAMILY’S FUTURE. Free Seminar! Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Thurs., Nov. 29, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP at (707) 4432741 or online at www.premieradvisor.com (L-1122) PASSING YOUR LAND & LEGACY TO THE NEXT GENERATION. Workshop focused on succession planning. Learn simple techniques to help with passing your land and its legacy on to the next generation. Nov. 1, 6-8 p.m., Agriculture Center on Humboldt Hill. $25 per family. Registration Required. Information http://ucanr.org/tiestotheland or (707) 445-7351 (L-1101)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) HOT WHEELS SENIOR SKATE. Remember how much fun it was to skate? Enjoy skating fun from yesteryear. For adults 55 & up. 11/9 at Eureka Muni, $5 class fee includes skate rental. Must pre-register at the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. 441-4244. (O-1101) GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE. You can easily attract wild birds and animals to your yard, even without a green thumb. With Louise Bacon-Ogden. Thurs., Nov. 8, 6-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1101) NORTH COAST WEATHER. Tour the National Weather Service office on Woodley Island with NOAA meteorologist-in-charge Nancy Dean. Sat., Nov. 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1108) THE WAY OF WELLNESS. Learn a few time-tested principles of wellness that include portable, low-cost ways to build your fitness, fuel your body, protect yourself against disease, maintain emotional balance and strategies to change long-held habits. With Louisa Rogers. Thurs., Nov. 8 & 15, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1101) THREE ANCIENT MYSTERIES. Explore King Arthur, the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World and the demise of the dinosaurs with Barry Evans. Wed., Nov. 7-28, 1-3 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1101)

Pets/Animals

PUPPY, BASIC & RALLY OBEDIENCE. Puppy class starts Thurs., Nov. 8, 6 p.m. For puppies 6 months or less. Minimum one vaccination required. Basic obedience starts Thurs., Nov. 8, 7 p.m. DHLPP and rabies vaccinations. Rally Obedience starts Wed., Nov. 7, 7 p.m. Do something fun with your dog. Call Mette Bryans 443-1183 for info or sign up at the Adorni or eurekarecreation.com (P-1101)

Spiritual

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1227) EUREKA SKATERS GIVE BACK! Come to roller skating on Nov. 17 for a night of fun & a chance to win great prizes while helping people in our community. For each can or non-perishable item brought in, earn 1 raffle ticket. Eureka Municipal Auditorium. 6-8:30 p.m., $4 Youth/$4.75 adults. Skate rental included. Call 441-4223. (SR-1101)

Therapy/Support

FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1129) GRIEF SUPPORT SERVICES CREATIVE ARTS GATHERING. Navigating Grief Through the Holidays, Nov. 17, & Dec. 15. The holiday season is often an especially difficult time for those in grief. We will utilize the healing qualities of art and the creative process, natural elements, and community to find our way. No artistic experience is required. Suggested materials fee: $3-$5. Visit our website for more information at www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or contact Julie with questions at 445-8443. (T-1108) GET WIRED FOR JOY! 8-session young adults group forming. Learn a USF research-based method to manage emotions in an optimal way that reduces stress and increases joy! Emotional Brain Training Provider Nancy Borge-Riis, LMFT. (707) 839-7920 or nancyborgeriis@gmail.com (T-1115) TYPE 1 DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP. meeting the 3rd Tues. of each month, 6-7:30 p.m, at the Foundation of Medical Care, 3100 Edgewood Rd. Eureka.Contact 443-0124. (TS-0214) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

NOTARY TRAINING. One-day seminar for new and renewing notaries provides the practical training needed to pass the comprehensive exam required for all California Notaries. Mon., Nov. 19, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $149 plus additional for live scan, photo and exam. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V-1108)

Wellness/Bodywork

EARLY MORNING YOGA. Wake up and energize with a flowing Vinyassa practice with Nena Sivess at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Tues. morning, 6:45-7:45 a.m. Involves flowing movement meditations, meant to take students out of the brain and into the heart. $10 drop-in, $30 for 5 class pass. (707) 826-0227. (W-1101) FIND YOUR CENTER AT OM SHALA. Offering a wide-range of classes for all levels and ages. Taught by skilled and dedicated teachers in a warm, lightfilled studio! Enjoy a free sauna, showers and lounge with each class. Our gorgeous retail boutique offers yoga apparel, props, books, music and gifts. Yoga styles include: Anusara, Vinyasa, Forrest, Kundalini, Restorative, Prenatal, Kids and more. Discounts for seniors, students and beginners. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W-1101) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1129) NORTHWEST INSTITUTE OF AYURVEDA. Classes with Traci Webb and KP Khalsa. BEGINNING WITH AYURVEDA, 3-Day Introductory Immersion. Jan 25-27, 2013. Learn to Balance Body and Mind using Doshas, Elements, Foods, Herbs, Essential Oils, Yoga, Meditation and Colors, $249. Serves as Prerequisite to 10-MONTH AYURVEDIC HERBALISM PROGRAM, Meets fourth weekend of month, Feb. 22-Nov. 17, 2013. Global Herbs, Ayurveda Therapeutics, Plant/ Mineral/Food Medicines, Formulating, Medicine Making Immersion, Herb Walk. REGISTER ON-LINE: www.ayurvedicliving.com, OR info@ayurvedicliving. com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0124) 5 ELEMENTS OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Five Elements (Wu xing) is an ancient Chinese worldview that has relevance today in Traditional Chinese Medicine, as well as in our day-to-day living. Explore what each of the Five Elements embody and how they relate to our health today. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., Nov. 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-1101) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Herbal Clinic Class. Jan. 14-April 15, 2013, Refine and expand your herbal counseling skills. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.-Nov. 2013. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in-depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Bothwell & Rosemary Gladstar, Nov. 14-23, 2013. More information to come soon. Get in touch to be on the interested list. Register online at www. dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-1101) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Jan. 22, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

classified@northcoastjournal.com

KIDS CLIMBING AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM. Learn climbing technique, safety, and build confidence at Far North Climbing Gym. Mon./Thurs., 3:30-5 p.m. Ages 6-12. $70 for 4 days. Corner of 10th and K St., Arcata. (707) 495-2774. (K-1129)

depaRTMeNT OF alCOHOlIC BeVeRage CONTROl 1105 6TH STReeT, SuITe C euReKa, Ca 95501 707-445-7229 NOTICe OF applICaTION TO Sell alCOHOlIC BeVeRageS

Date of Filing Application: October 18, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: HuNaN VIllage ReSTauRaNT INC The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 752 18TH ST aRCaTa, Ca 95521 Type of License Applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine eating place 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-310)

puBlIC Sale

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 7th of November, 2012, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Christina Dimico, Unit # 5044 Christina Dimico, Unit # 5140 Linda Mahan, Unit # 5208 Roy Watkins, Unit # 5329 Leticia Maxfield, Unit # 5449 Ashley Tuttle, Unit # 5458 Jeremie Hennings, Unit # 5532 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Sangvane Khounsinnavong, Unit # 2117 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Salina Vanderwaal, Unit # 1119 Amie Ely, Unit # 1157 Christopher Kinnamon, Unit # 1310 Aaron Longtin, Unit # 1741 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Arthur Bergenn, Unit # 123 Ian Weatherbee, Unit # 141 Elaine Hermann, Unit # 472 Items to be sold include, but are

legal NOTICeS CONTINued ON NexT page

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NORTHCoast COASTJourNal JOURNAL• •thursday, THURSDAY,NoV. NOV.1, 1,2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com ••North


Field notes

Wroxeter, near presentday shreWsbury. although the basilica of the roman baths fell into disuse around 350 ce, a later phase of large Wooden buildings With classical facades Was constructed around 480, demonstrating a high level of civilization 70 years after the exodus of roman legions from britain. photo by barry evans

King Arthur, Part 2: Mount Badon By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

T

hen Arthur along with the kings of Britain fought against [the Saxons] in those days, but Arthur himself was the war-lord. … The twelfth battle was on Mount Badon in which there fell in one day 960 men from one charge by Arthur; and no one struck them down except Arthur himself, and in all the wars he emerged as victor. — History of the Britons, c. 830, attributed to the Welsh monk Nennius Last week, we saw that Britain was left virtually defenseless against invaders from the north and from continental Europe after the Roman legions left the island in 410. But we also have many clues and halfclues that the Britons living in the region now called England, inspired perhaps by a Che Guevara-type leader — Arthur? — put up a good fight, at least for a while. Archeologists know that the entire country didn’t immediately sink into anarchy after the legions left, pointing to such sites as the Roman cities of Dorchester and Wroxeter, where civilized town life continued for at least another 200 years. Also, many Iron Age (c. 600 BCE 100 CE) forts were rebuilt in the late fifth century, evidence of organized resistance. The earthworks of Somerset’s South Cadbury, for instance, were strengthened around 470, and digs there have unearthed Mediterranean pottery and remains of Roman-style buildings from that time. More telling, perhaps, is the curious pattern of continental-style graves and pottery, which are abundant in the lowlands of south and east Britain beyond London from before 500 and again after 600. That century-long gap seems to indicate a

period when Anglo-Saxon invaders were held at bay. Which brings us to the battle of Mount Badon “the last great victory of the fatherland,” according to the monk Gildas, writing around 540. Tellingly, perhaps, he doesn’t mention Arthur. That was left to another monk, Nennius, writing three centuries later, who claimed that Arthur single-handedly slew 960 of the enemy. Historians are pretty sure that at least one major battle was fought around 500 CE in which Britons decisively beat the invaders, but they are divided on where it happened, and whether a British (or Romano-British) general called Arthur led the defending forces. One prominent theory holds that Mount Badon was Badbury Rings, a large earthen Iron Age fort located in east Dorset. Badbury was one of the strongholds refortified around 500, and that, together with the similarity of the names Badon-Badbury, has led some historians to propose that a warrior named Arthur led British forces to a decisive victory there, in what Lord Alfred Tennyson poetically called “the last dim weird battle of the west.” However thin the evidence, Arthur’s legend lives on today, in countless books and movies. Next week we’ll see how a semi-historical Arthur was transformed into the myth of the “once and future king.” Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) likes to think his Celtic forebears fought alongside Arthur. He is teaching a course at OLLI (826-5880) on King Arthur, dinosaurs and the Seven Wonders starting Nov. 7. l

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

business name listed above on n/a. /s Perry Brubaker. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-304)

continued from previous page. not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appliances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self-Storage, 707-443-1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 25th day of October 2012 and 1st day of November 2012 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-308)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00628

The following person is doing business as NOMO FARMS at 190 Jaymar Ln., Carlotta, CA 95528. Michael Rideau 190 Jaymar Ln. Carlotta, CA 95528 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/17/12. /s Michael Rideau. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-314)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00634

The following person is doing business as BLACK SHEEP FARM at 1302 Anvick Rd., Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 4873, Arcata, CA 95518. Geoffrey Kern 1644 Verwer Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/01/12. /s Geoffrey Kern. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 18, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-313)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00635

The following person is doing business as CENTER FOR NATURAL

MEDICINE at 1460 G Street, Arcata, CA 95521. John Yamas 3710 Coombs Court Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s John Yamas. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 22, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-312)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00641

The following person is doing business as COMPLETE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 985 G St., Arcata, CA 95521. Sherilyn Arlene Munger 808 School Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Sherilyn Munger. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 23, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-309)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00649

The following person is doing business as SIX RIVERS PAINTING at 2415 Spring St., Eureka, CA 95501. Brian Mogel 2415 Spring St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/26/12. /s Brian Mogel. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 26, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2012 (12-315)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00603

The following person is doing business as JAM SCREEN PRINTING AND GRAPHIC DESIGN OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA at 4149 E St., Apt. A, Eureka, CA 95503. Perry Brubaker 4149 E St., Apt. A Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00618

The following person is doing business as INSPIRE WELLNESS at 4589 Fieldbrook Rd., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Juliet C. Ferri 4589 Fieldbrook Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Juliet C. Ferri. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-307)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00624

The following person is doing business as RIGDEN’S RURAL LAND SERVICE at 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #17, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 441, Klamath, CA 95548. Peter Rigden 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #17 Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Peter Rigden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-305)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00626

The following person is doing business as NORTH PACIFIC LANDSCAPE DESIGNS BY GAIRD RIGDEN at 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #16, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 1091, Trinidad, CA 95570. Gaird Rigden 3633 Patricks Point Dr., #16 Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Gaird Rigden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-306)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00582

The following persons are doing business THE CLOTHING DOCK & K STREET ANNEX at 1109 11th St., Arcata, CA 95521 Susan D. Paul 1403 Chester Ave.


10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-297)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00616

The following persons are doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE at 531 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501 Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 Lane Thomsen Po Box 275/1045 Hawk Hill Rd. Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy /s/ Lane Thomsen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-302)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00617

The following persons are doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE WHOLESALE at 531 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501, 1340 Marsh Rd., Eureka, CA. 95501 Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-303)

10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-290)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00601

The following persons are doing business as CHARLIE ROSS INSTALLATIONS at 2848 Campton Heights Dr., Fortuna, CA 95540. Charles Kingsland Ross, Jr. 2848 Campton Heights Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 Mary Lu Ross 2848 Campton Heights Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/1/96. /s Charlie Ross. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 4, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-291)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00604

The following persons are doing business as STEVE AND DAVE’S BAR at 200 First St., Eureka, CA 95501. Bryan and Kadiver Inc. 200 First St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s David Kadiver, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-292)

Curious about legal advertising? 442-1400

11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2012 (12-311)

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

The following person is doing business as PURE MAKEUP at 609 E Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Maria Darlina Brandon 3199 Mitchell Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Maria Brandon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BARBARA CHRISTINE MCKELLAR, also known as BARBARA C. MCKELLAR and BARBARA MCKELLAR A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LANE V. MCKELLAR in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LANE V. MCKELLAR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 29, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON S.B. #30716 MORRSION & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

21. 1989 play about Capote 23. “Balderdash!” 24. “You don’t say!” 27. Style 30. See 19-Across 32. Words before corner or profit 34. “Absolutely!” in Acapulco 35. French law 36. Last rites 39. What preschoolers learn 41. Oath 42. Orator’s skill: Abbr. 44. Zilch 45. See 19-Across 49. Home bodies?

DOWN

20. Nautical rope 22. Singer Carly ____ Jepsen with the #1 2012 hit “Call Me Maybe” 24. “Oh, pooh!” 25. Moviegoer’s chocolate bite 26. Keats and Shelley, e.g. 27. “Downtown” Julie Brown and others 28. “Absolutely!” in Arles 29. Sweatpants feature 31. Chickadee relative 33. Jacuzzi sight 37. Jazz trumpeter Baker 38. WWI mil. group 40. Undersea explorer

1. “Eating ____” (1982 comedy) 6. E pluribus ____ 10. Word with a head slap 13. His #13 was retired by the Miami Dolphins 14. Its symbol is “$” 15. Elizabethan ____ 16. It may be hidden 17. Not dull 18. Luncheonette order 19. With 30-, 45- and 54-Across, a biased-but-true statement about where to find “Republican” in the dictionary

1. Prego competitor 2. Mars : Roman :: ____ : Greek 3. Balm 4. It’s observed on Oct. 24 5. Casual Friday shoe 6. Maintenance costs 7. ____-do-well 8. Apply 9. Vogue and Elle, e.g. 10. Springsteen’s “Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.,” for example 11. Link letters 12. Fashion item in mid-Manhattan? 13. Army VIP

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

50. Don’t participate in 51. Screenwriter Ephron 53. Burgle 54. See 19-Across 58. Israeli weapon 60. La ____ Tar Pits 62. Program with steps 63. Persona ____ grata 64. Fontanne’s theater partner 65. 3 Musketeers filling 66. Gear tooth 67. Old Testament bk. named for a woman 68. ____ pole

43. Words following bored or scared 46. Furthermore 47. Crunch unit 48. Dissolving agent 52. “I” pad? 54. It may be stabilized 55. Spirit in le ciel 56. Chomsky who said “I was never aware of any other option but to question everything” 57. Demolition supply 58. Duke’s NCAA rival 59. Place with feeding times 61. Ukr. neighbor VERY EASY #15

www.sudoku.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00586

The following person is doing business as CURTIS WILSON CA FISHING GUIDES at 1140 Q St., Arcata, CA 95521. Curtis Wilson 1140 Q St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Curtis Wilson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BARBARA CHRISTINE MCKELLAR aka BARBARA C. MCKELLAR CASE NO. PR120258

Solution, tips and computer program at

10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-301)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00585

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/30/1999 /s/ Susan Paul This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 1, 2012

37


the

from previous page.

NoTiCe of peTiTioN To aDmiNisTer esTaTe of marY H. raNDaLL Case No. pr120247

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARY H. RANDALL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SUSAN RANDALL in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SUSAN RANDALL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 15, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DONALD W. BICKNELL S.B.# 83266 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 5TH STREET, SUITE H EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-0878 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

NoTiCe of peTiTioN To aDmiNisTer esTaTe of maTTHeW arTHur peseNTi Case No. pr120244

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MATTHEW A. PESENTI A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by RAYMOND R. PESENTI, JR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that RAYMOND R. PESENTI, JR. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 15, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DONALD W. BICKNELL S.B.# 83266 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 5TH STREET, SUITE H EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-0878 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-296)

Employment Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Smog Tech Retail Clerk $8/hr Cash Register Sales Entry Level Mill Worker Carpenter Laborers with Transportation

CITY OF ARCATA

POLICE OFFICER

(LATERALS, GRADUATES, CURRENT ACADEMY STUDENTS)

$47,523.84 - $57,765.52 / yr. Final Filing Date: Open until filled. Application materials are available at City of Arcata, City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, CA 95521; by calling (707) 822-5953; or at www.cityofarcata.org. EOE.

CITY OF TRINIDAD - PUBLIC WORKS MAINTENANCE-F/T. Responsible for reading water meters, repair and maintenance of roads, buildings, recreation and sanitation facilities and the water distribution system. Must have or obtain California Water Treatment and Distribution Operator’s License Level 1 within one year of employment and Level 2 Treatment within two years. Salary $30,306 - $36,026 with excellent benefits. Visit www. trinidad.ca.gov for complete job description. Send resume to City of Trinidad, P.O. Box 390, Trinidad 95570. Deadline Nov. 16. (E-1108) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214. (E-1101)

PHP DEVELOPER. Humboldt County Office of Education. Advanced knowledge of PHP5 and MySQL, HTML5, C553 and JavaScript. Experience with MVC frameworks, CakePHP, WebServices and security. Contracted Service, fee to be determined. For further information contact gsziladi@humboldt.k12.ca.us or call (707) 445-7030. Classified app available at HCOE or online: www.humboldt.k12.ca.us Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501. Open until filled. (E-1108) BUSINESS OPERATIONS COORDINATOR. Interested in a job you can feel good about with people dedicated to making a difference? McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc., a dynamic and growing electrical and solar PV contracting company seeks to hire a Business Operations Coordinator, visit mckeeverenergy. com to apply. (E-1227)

Processing sPecialist Full-time Starts at $11.56/hr. Processing Specialist will assist with processing child care attendance forms and perform general office support duties. Must be able to pass criminal history fingerprint clearance. Excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and paid insurance. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at above address by tuesday, november 13th at 5 p.m. EOE

General Manager Director Of Sales Hospitality Commercial Lines Agent Medical Assist. • Construction Remodel Tech. Refrigeration Tech. • Technology Sales B2B

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

Chief TreaTmenT PlanT OPeraTOr CIty oF FortunA $

55,556 - $67,501

Ft arcata Positions!

Administrative, operational and maintenance functions. Valid CDL, Grade III Wastewater, Grade II Water required, Grade IV Wastewater preferred or must be obtained within 12 months of hire and Grade 3 Water Certification within 18 months. Complete job description and application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, (707) 725-7600. Applications must be received by 5:00 pm, 11/9/2012

clinical nurse CA Registered Nurse license; prefer 2+ yrs related exp.

engineering technician ii

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

compliance Officer & Operations auditor Must have a BA degree req’d; MA degree desired. A min. of 2 yrs. exp. in healthcare compliance, to include demonstrated leadership. Familiarity w/ operational, financial, quality improvement, & human resourced resource procedures & regulations is req’d. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference will be given. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. Applications at|www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes 11/9/12

10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-299)

Coast Journal JourNal• •Thursday, thursday, NoV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com North Coast NOV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com 38 North

CIty oF FortunA $

40,573 – $49,296 (Plus excellent benefits)

Perform a variety of technical office and field engineering work; to perform public works inspections, surveying, prepare engineering drawings using CADD, GIS mapping; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications and resume for must be received by 5:00 pm on Friday, 11/9/2012


CONTINUED ON next page

Rentals

Employment HELP WANTED!!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com (AAN CAN) (E-0228) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-1220) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

DRIVERS NEEDED!! Delivering phone books. Must have license, insurance & own transportation. Call Now! 1-888-718-8485, www. deliveryofphonebooks.com (E-1101) BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Jamie, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227)

CITY OF ARCATA

SCADA SYSTEMS MANAGER

$53,264.64 - $64,743.50/yr. Final Filing Date: 4:00 p.m., Friday November 16, 2012. Manages, coordinates, performs, and supervises work activities related to the installation, programming, testing, maintenance, repair, and calibration of the City’s SCADA, water/ wastewater control, industrial communication, water/wastewater instrumentation, telemetry, motor control centers and other equipment that support the City’s real-time systems used for monitoring and controlling water/ wastewater operations. Application materials are available at City of Arcata, City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, CA 95521; by calling (707) 822-5953; or at www.cityofarcata.org. EOE.

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

Positions

REFERRAL SUPPORT, 1 F/T Eureka SENIOR FINANCE ACCOUNTANT, 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST, 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 P/T Crescent City MEDICAL BILLER, 2 F/T Arcata RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, 1 F/T Crescent City MEDICAL ASSISTANT, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Eureka PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT/NP, 1 F/T Eureka Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application Call 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN) (E-1115)

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Bingo Inventory Clerk Janitorial Crown Club Representative

Deli Worker Busser/Host (Sunset) Server (Sunset) SEASCAPE

Dock Workers, PT TRIBAL OPERATIONS

Human Resources Director Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

Rentals EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Appliances, all utilities paid. $595. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1101) ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, parking, near bus, some utilities. $600, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R1101) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Parking, dishwasher, some utilities. $850, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R1101) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Deck, garage, yard, laundry hookups. $1400. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1101) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM APT. Patio, some utilities, onsite laundry. $700. (707) 443-8227, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1101) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1300. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R1101) SHELTER COVE 2BD/2BA. Ocean View. Furnished. 2 Car. $1100 + deposit. (916) 844-9926. (R-1122)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. 2 car garage, fireplace, pets considered, yard. $1300. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1101) EUREKA HOUSEMATE . For 2BD/1BA furnished 2nd floor seniors apartment in the Meadows. $450/month, $70/utilities, $500/ deposit. Lease. Must be 42 or older. (707) 672-4096. (R-1101) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Laundry hookups, carport. $775. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1101) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer hookups, yard. $1390. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1101) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM APT. Parking, some utilities. $800. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1101) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1146 Gassoway Ave., #12. W/S/G Pd. Hookups, Carport,W/C pet. 1 year lease rent $765. Vac 11/01. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 309 E St., Apt. #12. W/S/G Pd. Rent $495. Section 8 OK. W/C Pet. Vac 11/11. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1101) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1335 6th St., #9. W/S/G Pd. MtM Rent $650. Vac 11/01. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 3395 Trinity. Refridgerator, Lg Yard, Hookups. MtM W/C Pet. Rent $1200. Vac 11/4. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1101) LOLETA 2BD/2BA TOWNHOUSE. 335 Lincoln Ave., #2. Range, Refridgerator, DW, Carport. W/C Cat. MtM Rent $800. Vac 11/02. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101)

MOBILE HOME SPACE FOR RENT. Double or Single Wide. Located Space #35 Glendale Mobile Estates. Call info (707) 442-4292 or (707) 407-8909. Near Bluelake. (R-1115) EUREKA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 3946 Harrison, #6. W/S Paid. Double Car Garage, Fenced Patio. W/C Cat. Rent $850, Vac 11/08. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) FORTUNA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1206 P St. City Views, Yard with Deck. Double car garage. Hookups. Rent $1500, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS. Plaza Point Apartments, 977 8th St., Arcata. 1 & 2 bedroom apartments and also apartments with special design features for individuals with a disability. Inquire as to the availability of rental subsidy. Must be 62 years of age or older; or disabled, regardless of age. Call (707) 822-2770, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-1 p.m. TDD #1-800-735-2929. We are an equal opportunity provider and employer. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY ACCESS. (R-1108) ELK RIVER 2900 SF 5BD HOME. No pets. Call for Details. 443-2246. (R-1101) EUREKA 1300 SF 3BD HOME. No pets. Call for Details. 443-2246. (R-1101) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2214 Fairfield St., Apt., #6. All Utilities Pd. Rent $615. Cat OK, Vac 10/27. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1140 E St., # 2. W/S/G Pd., Rent $595. Cat OK, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 225 Hillsdale St., Apt. #2. W/S/G Pd. Rent $750. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 11/27. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1101) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3222 17th St., Unit C. W/S/G Pd., MtM, Cat OK, Spacious, Garage, Rent $775, Vac Soon. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101)

EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 230 Wabash Ave., Apt. #6, #11, #19. W/S/G Pd. Rent $645. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 10/29. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 17 W 14th St. 6 Mo. Lease, W/C Pets, Den & DR, New Paint, Garage, Rent $975, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Pd., 6 Month Lease, Sm. Pets OK, Rent $765, Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1101) ARCATA CLEAN 1BD. No growing, no illegal drugs, no smoking, no pets. References Required. $840/ month plus deposit. (707) 822-7471. (R-1101)

Business Rentals DOWNTOWN EUREKA OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. Close to Courthouse. Call 443-2246 for sizes and pricing. (BR-1101) RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-1108) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wallto wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail. com. (BR-1227)

Real Estate EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 443-4811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE-1122)

on Page 43

Real Estate

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 1, 2012

39


Real Estate

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Buy/Sell/Trade

Pets

FLASHBACK

own ld T

LO NEW

in O ION CAT

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www. chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-0124)

443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues & Sun

SALE:

Select Jackets

General Store 707-777-3385

Garden Center 707-777-3513

State Hwy 36 • Milemarker 19.5 • Carlotta • Open 9-6

CLOTHING DOCK &

K STREET ANNEX

11th & K Streets, Arcata

822-8288

TOO MANY TUBAS, OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

TOO MANY CARS BLOCKING YOUR DRIVEWAY? Are you wanting to sell some of them? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

le garage sa ›

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

Rummage

this way

SALE KITS • $7 20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • groomingbyLinn.com • 826-0903

PRESA CANARIO PUPPIES FOR SALE

Services

Swains Flat OUtpost Garden Center

THE

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

Gentle Professional Grooming Since 1989

Come on in!

      

 

Vintage Clothing Furniture, Housewares & more!

Auto

• Grooming & Boarding by Linn •

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

SLEEPWEAR, SOCKS & INTIMATES 1/2 PRICE! Green Tagged Clothes 25¢ each! Oct. 29-Nov. 3. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. Providing Opportunities for Local Youth (BST-1101) TEMPUR-PEDIC FOR SALE. California King Tempur-Pedic mattress and box springs. This is the BellaSonna model and is about two years old. Entire set is in like new condition. This mattress is medium to firm support. Originally sold for approx. $5,000, selling for $2,000. Injuries from a recent accident are forcing us into a softer mattress. Text message to 845-4698 only. Available to view in the evenings. (BST-1122) IT’S FIREWOOD TIME! Alder, Douglas Fir, Juniper, Madrone (sometimes), Oak, Pepperwood, & Kindling. Call for current availability. We can deliver. Almquist Lumber Company, Boyd Road, Arcata. Open 7 days a week. Stop by or call; (707) 825-8880 (BST-0328) REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL ! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945. (BST-1101)

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Excellent guardian dogs for your home or ranch. Strong, stable temperament. $500. 707.267.4087

Services MONEY 4 ALL. 11,011 days! Automated. Easy. 831-238-6448 (AAN CAN) (BST-1108) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

Pets PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227) FOUND FEMALE WHITE LABRADOR IN WILLOW CREEK. On 10/20 on 299 west of Willow Creek. 407-5383. (P-1101)

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

Sales

Service

Solutions

RIGDEN’S RURAL LAND SERVICE. Logging, Excavating, Grading, Water Systems, etc. Peter Rigden (707) 498-1588. (S-1213) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-1129)

SEABREEZE CLEANING CO. Office & Rentals, Licensed & Bonded (707) 834-2898 (S-0131) ST I TC H ES - N - B R I TC H ES I N MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 5025294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches-n-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com (S-0131) BOUDOIR PHOTOGRAPHY. By Venus & Aphrodite, Classy to sassy, comfort and privacy guaranteed. $40 fall special. 223-4172. (S-0110) GROCERIES DELIVERED. Order today. Delivered tomorrow. Get paid to help advertise. 831-2386448 (AAN CAN) (S-1108) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use solar energy to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced-Sunlight Heating. CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail.com (707) 502-1289. (S-1122) CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207)


Services

at

MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-1122) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) real estate LESGUITAR/PIANO/VOICE SONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936 HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-1101) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-1122)

see page 14

Community

Music

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y

&

this week

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Community

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson

homeAttorney & garden

service directory DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies

Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc.

ROAD TRIX FOR YOUR HOLIDAY PARTIES. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1115) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227)

FREE CONSULTATION home & garden 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM You’ll find searchable back issues, articles, workshops & classes, the calendar, the Menu of Menus, the Wedding Guide...

SMILE, EVEN WHEN YOU THINK YOU CAN’T. Proven ways to cope with difficult situations in life discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Nov. 4, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-1101) HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your daughter how to become a healthy powerful young women, then who will? The Media? Her Peers? Not likely. She needs you! Six Rivers Planned Parenthood Presents a Parent/Daughter workshop. A Free, interactive workshop for 9-12 year old girls and her parents, focusing on fostering positive attitudes about girl’s bodies and the changes to look forward to during puberty, Thurs., Nov. 8, 6-8 p.m, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (C-1108) HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your son how to become a healthy & responsible young man, then who will? The Media ? His Peers? Not likely. He needs you! Six Rivers Planned Parenthood Presents a Parent/Son Discussion Group, Free, interactive workshop for 6th- 8th grade boys and his parents, focusing on responsibility, peer pressure, and the changes to look forward to during puberty. Thurs., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (C-1025)

service directory

garden

service directory

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-1101) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124)

Check out the listings on page 43

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

real estate

this week

or online @ www.northcoastjournal.com

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

real estate

this week

service directory

home & garden home &

CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

service directory

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, NOV. 1, 2012

41


body, mind

&Spirit

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

Sabrina Knight MA, MFT

Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY Give The Gift of Health – A Loving Hands Massage Gift Certificate Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

707-822-5244

Medical Cannabis Evaluations Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years. Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Call for Walk-in Availability Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems co n

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MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

Marriage & Family Therapist Individuals & Families

443-3611  517 3rd Street, Suite 21 Eureka, CA 95501

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

Open house nov. 10th 10am-2pm

www.northcoast-medical.com

Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

SHAWNA BELL

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW

Marriage & Family Therapist, MFC 47122

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating. Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

LCS # 23232

LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH, FROM THE INSIDE OUT. Dave Berman, Clinical Hypnotist. (707) 845-3749. www.ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-1101) FIND YOUR CENTER @ OM SHALA YOGA! Come practice in a supportive and conscious community. We offer a widerange of classes for all levels and ages, taught by skilled and dedicated teachers in a warm, light-filled studio in the heart of Arcata! Enjoy a free sauna, showers and lounge with each class. Our gorgeous retail boutique offers yoga apparel, props, books, music and gifts. Yoga styles include: Anusara, Vinyasa, Forrest, Kundalini, Restorative, Prenatal, Kids and more. Discounts for seniors, students and beginners. Take a breath. Enjoy the world. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (MB-1129) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@salinarain.com, www. salinarain.com. (MB-1227)

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

Just need someone to talk to?

839-1244

Swedish, Deep Tissue

& Therapeutic Massage.

Energy Life Center

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems?

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

GIT YER VALSSAGE!

Gambling Treatment • Trauma Recovery Addiction Treatment • Stress Management DOT/SAP (707) 496-2856 • shawnabmft@gmail.com 381 Bayside Road, Suite C • Arcata, CA 95521

norcalrecoveryservices.com

BREATHE LOVE, CLAIRVOYANT ENERGY HEALING INTEGRATED WITH AXIS MUNDI ASTROLOGY. Gain clarity for self-empowerment. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 8451450. www.sacredenergyspace. com (MB-1122) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1129) doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719 (MB-1115)

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 4424240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (MB-1227) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227)

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-0110) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)

Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

home & garden

service directory

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup. org. (MB-1227)

home & garden

Need some help home around the house?

& garden

home & garden

service directory service directory see page 14

servic


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

real estate

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

this week

real est

this w

■ Dows Prairie

$480,000

BeautIful cuStOm hOme with dramatic entry! Soaring ceilings in this lovely 2005 home. The cook’s kitchen adjoins a large dining area, the library/office has many built-in bookcases, and the master suite is downstairs. Includes a secondary, completely separate, home for rental or extended family. mls#236296 $699,500

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,534 sq ft Westhaven home on 5 flat forested acres, large south facing yard, 2 large agricultural buildings totaling 5,376 sq ft, income is over $1,500 per month, very comfortable

$359,500

3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,198 sq ft wonderful Eureka home w/fantastic redone backyard with views, new decks, solar heated pool, outdoor shower, hot tub in redwood trees, will consider lease/option

real estate $229,500

1,350 sq ft building currently being used as a single family dwelling, highest and best use would be medical or professional office facility, neighborhood commercial zoning, close to hospital

this week

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COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com • NORTH northcoastjournal.com COAST JOURNAL• •THURSDAY, THURSDAY,NOV. NOV. 1,1, 2012 2012 • NORTH

43


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North Coast Journal 11-01-12 Edition