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By Yael Chanoff

8 Curtain call for carriage? 9 Keep those propositions straight 10 Campaign lies wanted 20 Manna from Humboldt 28 People do this on purpose? 31 Now that’s a movie


Sunny Brae •Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Prices Effective October 17 through October 30, 2012

Jacoby Creek Land Trust 20th Anniversary!

Kokte Ranch, what a beautiful place to wander

or enjoy as a school field trip! The Jacoby Creek Land Trust holds several conservation and agricultural easements on private property around Humboldt Bay for scientific, educational or other values. “The Trust owns a couple of hundred acres within the Jacoby Creek watershed,” says Susan Ornelas, the current JCLT Executive Director. “Each year, at the Kokte Ranch, we raise turkeys, practice rotational cattle grazing and the Humboldt Wildlife Care Center is housed here, too. We are open to the public and encourage individuals, groups and schools to visit.” The members of the Board of Directors live in the area, and as Susan says, “We all shop at Murphy’s!”

Board o

f Directors (Pictured Left to R ight) Lucien E Chuck Powell, ddisford, Ralph Andy Waxman Faust, , Cheryl Dillin Susan Ornelas gham, Shelley . Not Pictured Morrison, : Mark Fritske , Annette Holla nd

A dinner benefiting The Jacoby Land Trust will be held at the Arcata Community Center on Sunday, November 11th. Twelve local chefs from twelve local restaurants will each prepare a Kokte turkey to serve at the dinner along with side dishes, and a pie auction. Space is limited so set your appetite and contact (707) 822-0900 or jclandtrust@yahoo.com for dinner reservations.

Celestial Seasonings

Image Foods

Herbal and Regular 20 Ct

Chocolate, Original or Vanilla 32 oz.

Enriched Rice Dream

Teas

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2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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table of 4 6

Mailbox Poem For Suzanne

8

News

26 Stage Matters More than Humboldt Honeys

27 Calendar 30 In Review

Break a Leg, Marty

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover Project Censored

14 Home & Garden

a cd

31 Filmland Affleck’s Revenge

32 Workshops 35 Field Notes

Service Directory

18 Music & More! 20 The Hum Close Your Eyes

25 McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, oct. 19, 6-8 p.m.

Looking for a Sine

36 36 37 42 43

Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

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Tonal Fail Editor: Got back into town last night and picked up the latest Journal. I looked at the cover, and started laughing. “The fine art and terrifying task of carrying groceries from market to home” (Oct. 11). You must have very little to write about if you are doing cover stories about shopping bags. In all my years of going to the grocery, I don’t think I’ve ever once been “terrified.” Not even by rising prices. Maybe you should’ve held this one until your Halloween issue! I’m sure that the article will be interesting and insightful, but not as edgy as you’re trying to make it.  Russ Cole, Arcata    

Interview Capleton Editor: I see a lot of controversy, shows canceled and a lot of talk about Capleton (“Pressure Drop,” Oct. 11) but what comes to mind is, did these persons making these comments and articles actually sit down with Capleton and do an interview to find out what is what?

Fact finding is really important and to place a judgment on a person without actually speaking with him one on one to find out what really took place is missing what journalism is about. All the information in your article is truly hearsay and nothing factual. Why don’t you call Capleton’s management and get a true story of the accounting of the situation and the song and what it means? Would be interesting to hear what the artist has to say!!! Nikii Davis, Lake Oswego, Ore.

Developer Schemes Editor: “A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it is but a prologue to farce or tragedy or perhaps both.” (James Madison, father of the U.S. Constitution). In this new “Citizen’s United” era, our communities are banned from knowing who was behind the numerous phony organizations that endorsed Rex Bohn last May. Bohn failed to report the occupations of his top donors, many with well-known ties to the development community. Were they responsible? (“Picking a Bohn,” NCJ, Blogthing, June 4).

Hours: 10am-6pm, Mon-Sat 10am-5pm, Sun in between Eureka & Arcata

On HWY 101 in the Bracut Industrial Park 707.826.7435

*Sale prices through the month of October.

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Cartoon by joel mielke

Our democracy’s farce and tragedy have become so corrupt that most journalists avert their eyes, along with over half of the eligible U.S. voters who now abstain or are unregistered in nearly every election, (U.S. Census). Only once in living memory has the political dominance by the local development community been officially exposed (“Interested Parties,” NCJ, Oct. 14, 2010). With a minority of voters participating, developers have been free to harvest

our infrastructure like an entitlement program, building our county and cities into moratoriums with homes beyond the reach of 75 percent of local incomes, and beyond the infrastructure capacity of roads, sewers and emergency services. Everyone else is required to pay the full consequences of sprawl; skyrocketing sewer bills; record fatalities of pedestrians, cyclists and motorists; increased poverty, crime, drug abuse and homelessness from the chronic lack of

“A little before you go to sleep, read something that is exquisite.” -- Erasmus

Used Books

• New Books

Special orders welcome for new books!

402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344


affordable housing, and further delays to updating our 1980s General Plan. The local transfer of public wealth to the wealthy is the sad equivalent of our nation’s corporate bailouts, job exports and offshore tax havens. “Joe” Bonino claims he is running against Linda Atkins because “without two candidates, you have Russia” (“Watching Ward Two,” Oct. 11). However, with five like-minded Eureka city council members, we’d have the product of a tyranny forewarned by this nation’s founders. George Clark, Eureka Editor: I live in the Eureka City Council district where Linda Atkins, the incumbent, is running for office and one of her opponents is Joe Bonino. In the beginning he said he was running because he didn’t think anyone should run unopposed. Might that be the first lie Joe Bonino tells us? I think he is running because his buddy Rex Bohn (the county supervisor in my district) asked him to and has contributed generously to his candidacy. Interestingly, Bonino’s signs so resemble Bohn’s. Bonino’s other major contributors are developers including Kramer Investment Corp. And Bohn is the supervisor who at the last minute ran out and bought a house when he

found out the office he wanted was outside the limits of his home. Wow! I wonder how many of us can afford to do that? Now I’m not saying Rex Bohn did anything illegal. A member of the board of supervisors can legally contribute to the candidacy of a person running for city council. It seems like it is stacking the deck a bit, but it isn’t illegal. And I’m not saying Rex Bohn hasn’t done nice things in this community. But his generosity seems a bit over the top for “nice.”   Eda Bachrach, Eureka    

Just Label It! Editor: Thank you for the informative piece “The $38 Million Label” (Oct. 11). Until recently, I did not worry about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in my food, but I have been very concerned for younger people having reproductive issues down the road with too many pesticides inside the seeds or the engineering that makes the foods “Roundup ready.” After consulting a naturopathic doctor about some issues, and getting my blood and saliva testing results, I found out I have allergies to so many foods that I never had allergies to before. Along with not eating continued on next page

Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976 1026 Third Street, Eureka

(707) 445-9666

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 (707) 825-5000

election notice

Certified List of Candidates for 2012 Election area 1 Florine Fern Bates area 2 Everett Dewey Myers area 3 C. Ellen Durfee & Raja G. Storr area 4 & area 5 No Candidates UIHS Board of Directors has certified the List of Candidates on October 10, 2012 in acordance with UIHS Election Policy. Also in accordance with the UIHS Electon Policy, this notice serves as the official posting.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

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Oct. 18, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 42

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

continued from previous page

ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Scottie Lee Meyers contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler maIl/OffIce:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONe: 707 442-1400 faX: 707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

those foods, I was told to avoid corn, canola and soy oils and all other predominately genetically modified foods. How am I going to know what is genetically engineered if it is not labeled? Why do so many other countries require labeling and we don’t? I don’t understand what they are trying to hide with pumping $38 million into lies and false information to sway people not to vote Yes on Prop 37. Ingredients are essential to me, and so are the labels listing fat, sodium, trans fat, saturated fat, carbs, sugar, calcium, and other vitamins to keep a balance in my diet. This is not going to affect restaurants, alcohol, dairy or meat, among other exceptions. It is a step in the right direction. If these Monsanto and other people are so proud of their GMO foods, why not put labels on it? My university professor friend who spends half the year in Europe educating people said Europeans call genetically modified foods “Frankenfoods.” Are we the human test tube for this latest scientific experiment like we are for the pharmaceutical industry?   For the younger folks and myself, I am voting Yes on Prop 37 to label genetically engineered foods. Trisha Lotus, Eureka Editor:  Proposed legislation to label genetically engineered foods (aka GMOs) has failed in 19 states. In at least two states, Vermont and Connecticut, legislation failed immediately after Monsanto threatened to sue these states should a labeling requirement become law. The FDA does not consider the method of production, including genetic modification, to be meaningful information that is required to be on product labeling unless the modification results in a significant material change in the food product. As Michael Pollan points out, “thanks to the biotech industry’s own lobbying prowess, there is no federal regulation on labeling, only an informal ruling, and … nothing to pre-empt.” Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) introduced an amendment to the 2013 farm bill that would give states the right to require labels on food products that are genetically engineered. It also failed.  Subsequently, the biotech industry introduced the 2013 Agriculture Appropriations Bill rider, authored by Congressman Jack Kingston (R-Ga.), chairman

For Suzanne I will be there for you waiting in the place between worlds as night ended a morning you never saw the sirens echoed through Freshwater valley three times the red lights flashed wailing sensed your pain as body separated from soul saw the sobbing tears at your memorial hope there’s reason beyond the madness as my drum keeps your heartbeat and grieving pulls your people together what joy to have you in keeping if only for a while… ­— Mark Stratman

of the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and related agencies. Known as the “farmer assurance provision” (Section 733), it specifically outlines that the secretary of agriculture will be required, upon request, to “immediately” grant temporary approval or deregulation of a GM crop, even if that crop’s safety is in question or under review. Which brings us back to consumers’ right to know what’s in our food and how it is produced. U.S. consumers are demanding this fundamental information on food labels, information that is already being provided to most of the world’s population. Obviously the ballot initiative process remains the only way for this to happen.  Our governments and legislators have failed us. Similar ballot initiative efforts are under way in several other states. Let Californians lead.  Vote “Yes” on Prop 37. Peggy Leviton, McKinleyville    

Bah, Cat Lover Editor: I’m writing in regards to Dev Richard’s review of the film Frankenweenie (“Filmland,” Oct. 11). I was deeply touched by the film and I highly recommend it to anyone who has ever loved a dog.  Perhaps Dev is more of a cat fan.  And to those of you who think Tim Burton’s last good movie was Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, you’re in for a treat/mindfuck. Frankenweenie has soul.  Rebecca Holden, Bayside  


Grow On! Editor: Rather than penalize local, successful entrepreneurs by jacking their utility rates, killing our economy in the process, Arcata should support local businesses (“The Grow Tax,” Oct. 4). Create a solar panel farm in the bottoms to supply needed electricity to area businesses. Where there’s a will, there’s a way. Let’s encourage all the people, locals and others, who are helping to make this economic season a successful one for all of Humboldt County. “Hisss” to those who bring musicians with hate songs to Humboldt County (“Pressure Drop,” Oct. 11). “Bravo!” to those who stand against them. And please vote. While I agree with the ideals of the Green Party (“Jolly Greens,” Mailbox, Oct. 11), after nearly 20 years they have failed to build a politically significant grassroots movement. Energy — and votes — are better spent on strengthening and improving the Democratic Party. The Democratic Party is the only entity that stands between corporations that ruthlessly pillage the economy, the environment and us. Fhyre Phoenix, Arcata

Vote for Schools Editor: As a retired teacher who understands the significant role of public schools, I wish to commend the Journal and Heidi Walters for her article comparing Propositions 30 and 38 (“Propping up Schools,” Oct. 4). Not only did Ms. Walters do a good job of describing how each would assist schools in improving their drastic financial situations and the restrictions of each proposal; she made clear what the impact of the deferral of payments to the schools has been and how dire the conditions of our schools will be were neither proposition to pass. Another point that may be obvious but needs to be stated and stressed is that each cut to school staff also increased the unemployment in our area. That had a negative impact on the economic status of our county businesses, families and children. The summary chart of ballot recommendations for the propositions was clear and informative. It is interesting that all but three of the organizations (the Libertarian Party, the Republican Party and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association) made positive recommendations for Prop. 30.  Readers should know that both associations of retired teachers in California

(California Retired Teachers Association and the California Teachers Association, Retired) do enthusiastically support and recommend Prop. 30 as a strong proposition that would improve the outlook for California schools. It would end the state’s deferral of funds that rightfully were to be spent on our schools. We know that our schools, our children and our future depend on improving the funding situation for public education in California without further delay. CalRTA also recognizes that there is merit in Prop. 38, because any increase of funding would be better than none at all. Diana Berliner, Eureka

Fixing Prisons? Editor: I was horrified to read the article about the state of the California prison system (“To Redeem a Felon,” Sept. 27) and somewhat heartened about the process of “realignment” that is going on now as a first step to try to relieve the overcrowding. Even though I knew about the state of prisons in our country/state, to read the statistics is staggering. We have been dealing with social problems by putting people in prison in an environment that is not only not rehabilitative but outright toxic and helps to harden people already struggling with major individual and societal problems. To read of private prisons is chilling. It’s not surprising that this system has gone the way of our health care, food, educational arenas and so many other areas of need. Making commodities out of everything causes the breakdown of that system. This shows how broken our society is that we would allow someone to make a business of running a prison (or an illness or a war or … ). Engaging Humboldt’s citizens in this “realignment” process is the way to go. Let us know how we can get involved in the support of this effort so that we participate in making our communities safer and support all citizens. Thank you to those in corrections, law enforcement, public defender, local businesses and social services that are collaborating on this. Maybe if we rethink our priorities as a county, state and nation we won’t have to wait for a crisis to deal more effectively and humanely with an issue.  Lynn Kerman, Myrtletown

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

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Break a Leg, Marty Old Town Carriage Co. up for sale as actor-owner plans to leave Humboldt By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

A

fine mist had begun wetting Old Town’s streets. It fell on the huge, flattened disc of the world in front of the Fisherman’s Terminal. It fell on Old Town Carriage Co.’s Marty L’Herault, who was in the adjacent dirt lot hitching gentle Barney, a dappled-gray draft horse, to the gold-trimmed maroon-and-black carriage with its lover’s heart rear window. It was so light, the rain, you could barely feel it, and warm for mid-October. L’Herault groomed Barney’s shoulders and neck, attached the poop bag behind his rump, offered him a carrot, then swung up into the driver’s seat. He nudged Barney into the 3 mph pace that, together with L’Herault’s history lessons, has lulled many a tourist, no doubt, into a dreamy half-state between Eureka-now and Eureka-then. The eyes and ears disregard the cars and focus instead on the clopping hooves, the stories, the carriageframed visions of Victorian-era architecture. That structure there? The city’s first commercial building. This one on the corner, the restaurant? A saloon, once, with a “single ladies boarding house” on the second floor. Clip-clop, clip-clop, clip-clop, round the corner onto F Street. Nearing the

stop sign at Second Street, L’Herault tugged lightly on the reins, nudging the horse into a perfect nose-first parallelparking maneuver. Soon, after setting up his sign advertising carriage rides, he would settle inside the dark interior, plinking away on his black ukulele, reading the paper or tapping at his smart phone. In one world and another, all at once. It’s easy to imagine that Marty L’Herault and his horse-drawn carriage would be offering this relatively cheap time travel forever — sometimes with Barney in the carriage braces, other times with Buster. But come next January, he plans to slip from this North Coast backwater into another world entirely — New York or maybe Chicago. He’s hanging up the harness and dapper driving gear and putting the Old Town Carriage Co. up for sale. Why, why would he strand us here in modern-day Eureka? Well, partly, it’s because he wants to be closer to his daughter, Kim, who is going to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “And I’m re-starting, after a brief 25-year hiatus, my acting career,” he said. L’Herault, who’s 58 and has a theater degree, has had a come-and-go relationship with Humboldt since 1979, when his brother Mitch, a Navy man stationed in Ferndale, lured him here. He managed

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

"That horse represents a very, very large energy force," says Marty L'Herault about the beast who pulls his Old Town carriage. "When you see that horse and carriage walk by, that's something that can't be ignored." Photo by Heidi Walters

the old Tomaso’s restaurant in Old Town, acted in local plays and sang in a band. Then he moved to New York to launch his starving-artist life, acting, waiting tables and driving a horse-drawn carriage in Central Park. “I thought that was the coolest thing in the world,” L’Herault said. “It was romantic. It was theatrical. It was historical.” The work felt like a calling. “One morning — it was a Sunday morning, really quiet — I’m hooking up the horse to the carriage, and it’s quiet, really quiet,” he said. “And, I don’t know, I don’t want to sound weird, but this feeling came over me, and it seemed like I’d always done this, forever, almost in another lifetime. I felt, ‘This is what I should be doing.’” Years later, another brother researching family history found their great-great grandfather had owned a horse-andcarriage business in Ireland.

“We all think we make our choices in life, but sometimes you wonder if you’re hardwired into what you’re going to do,” L’Herault said. After New York, L’Herault and his now ex-wife, Michele (they divorced earlier this year), ran a carriage company in Humboldt from 1989 to 1995, then sold it for another sojourn back East before L’Herault returned in 2009 to set up shop anew. Now he hopes to sell the business for $32,000 for the whole shebang: horses, trailer, truck, carriage, harness and other gear, plus training and consultation during the transition. If no one buys it by next January, he’ll sell it off piece by piece. He’s already auditioned in New York for a Broadway show, and he’ll be out of here, pulled by his original calling. Can a man have two callings? Perhaps, in another time, he also had an ancestor who acted. l


Proposition Primer By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com

S

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shifts some sales tax money from state to counties. Prop. 32: Sharply limits unions’ political contributions. Prop. 33: Lets insurance companies set rates partly on whether a driver has had insurance before. Prop. 34: Abolishes the death penalty. Prop. 35: Toughens penalties for human trafficking. Prop. 36: Eases “three-strikes” law to save $70 million-plus annually. Prop. 37: Requires labels for some foods with genetically modified ingredients. Prop. 38: A different temporary tax plan to fund schools. Prop. 39: Tightens tax rules for multistate businesses, raising roughly $1 billion annually. Prop. 40: Keeps new state Senate districts. l

Ballot Recommendation Summary 2

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The HOPE Coalition (Humboldt Organized for People and the Environment) has prepared this summary of different organizations’ stands on the 11 propositions on November’s ballot. The Journal is reprinting it with permission. Detailed explanations of each proposition can be found on the Secretary of State’s website at www.sos.ca.gov.

Proposition 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 Organization (Y=Yes, N=No) American Assoc. of University Women (AAUW) Calif. School Board Association Calif. State PTA Calif. Federation of Teachers (CFT) Calif. Faculty Association Calif. Teachers Association (CTA) Calif. Democratic Party Calif. Republican Party Calif. Green Party Libertarian Party of Humboldt Peace and Freedom Party League of California Cities League of Women Voters (LWV) Calif. Labor Federation (AFL-CIO) Chamber of Commerce Consumer Federation of Calif. Common Cause Calif. Council of Churches Friends Comm. on Legislation (FCL) (Quakers) NAACP ACLU Sierra Club League of Conservation Voters Calif. Nurses Association (CNA) Calif. National Association for Women (NOW) Calif. Planned Parenthood Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association Calif. Retired Teachers My Vote:

TI ON EC

2

EL

ample ballots are going out and the advertising twist ‘n’ spin is on! Watch out for some of those ads — big money knows how to tell big lies, and there is some big, big money being spent this year on some of the 11 statewide ballot measures. You can find plenty of information, including details on campaign donors, on the Secretary of State’s website at www. sos.ca.gov. Meanwhile, we’re reprinting this HOPE Coalition summary of the stands being taken by different groups and political parties. You can also find our recent coverage of Props. 30, 37 and 38 on our website. Prop. 30: Raises taxes temporarily to fund schools and some state programs. Prop: 31: Changes state budget cycle; O I T N C

201

Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y N

N N N N Y N Y N

Y Y Y N N N N Y N

N Y N Y

Y

N Y N

Y N Y

N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y

Y N N Y N N N Y N N Y Y N N Y N Y N N N Y N Y Y Y N N N N Y N N N Y Y N N N Y Y Y N Y N Y N

Y

Y Y Y N Y N N Y N Y Y N N Y N

Y

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Y Y

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Y Y

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Proposition 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

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Blog Jammin’

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

ELECTIONS / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / OCT. 16, 9:48 A.M.

received similar letters. These federal crackdowns on state lawabiding dispensaries run counter to public statements by President Barack Obama and his attorney general, Eric Holder. But, as noted by The Huffington Post, the judge wouldn’t allow Sandusky to use those statements in his defense. Sandusky’s sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 7.

Give Us the Slime, the Lies …

REDWOOD ACRES

FLEA MARKET Sunday, October 21 8am-3pm

Redwood Acres Fairground

... the wretched masses from your election-teeming mailbox. Because we’re hunting for the most scurrilous, most distorted campaign material making the rounds in Humboldt. It’s a contest! When you see a campaign whopper, drop it off at our office at 310 F. St. in Old Town Eureka, with a little note about what you think is misleading or downright false. You’ll get extra points if you cite sources and include URLs where we can research the truth. And we’ll need your real name, address and phone number so we can contact the winners. Or fax the ad(s) and your note to us at 442-1401. Or take a picture of the offending material, with good enough resolution that we can read all the fine print, and email it with your comments to editor@northcoastjournal.com. Put “election ad contest” in the subject line. We’ll post some of the worst offenders on our blog between now and Election Day. (Don’t worry, we won’t put up your address or phone number — just your name and the city you live in.) And we’ll crown the grand prize winner, the Supreme Spotter of Sleaze, soon after the election. The fine print: Just keep it Humboldt. We’re looking for the worst of the worst that’s being circulated here, in our community. But the topic can be any issue on the November ballot — local, state or national — as long as the campaign material lands here. Mostly we’re expecting mailers, but if you want to send us locally aired audio or video or other media, go right ahead.

Admission Fee: 50¢ After 9am Kids 12 & Under FREE Early Birds $2

OBITS / BY ANDREW GOFF / OCT. 15, 3:22 P.M.

For Reservations Call Dayton (707) 822.5292

A memorial sprang up in front of the Clarke Musuem soon after Eureka resident John Tutuska died on Sunday. The endearing, highly visible Old Town character could often be seen shirtless and deep in meditation in front of the museum. Here is what the Journal’s Heidi Walters wrote when she declared him “Best Old Town Sunbather” in our 2010 Best Of Humboldt issue: The sun comes out — when it comes out, oh, praise the sun! — and out comes John Tutuska. Skinny legs in baggy jeans cinched tight. Sandaled feet smoothbrown. Bare torso, creased arms and serene face baked to madrone. Tutuska sits in a chair or stands beside it — a dark,

northcoastjournal

@ncj_of_humboldt

Old Town Sunbather John Tutuska Has Died

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

COMMERCE, ECONOMY, HOUSING / BY RYAN BURNS / OCT. 12, 5:22 P.M.

In August, Homebuyers Won JOHN TUTUSKA IN 2010 PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

still exclamation against the white, white, eye-shattering white wall of the Clarke Museum. Ah, but he does not worship the sun. He is not here to work on his tan. “My primary purpose is to meditate,” says the gentle Tutuska. “The sun serves as a jump start to the light within.” You understand, don’t you? The light glowing in the closed eyelids? “And once you find the light within, that’s all you have to do. That’s where your social questions get answered. That’s where all your questions get answered. And that’s a place of true healing.” But why this place, this wall? Well, says he, when the wind is blowing off the water, this is the warmest spot. Shop owners and workers in Old Town remembered Tutuska fondly on Monday, telling stories of his thoughtfulness and spirit. His cremation is being handled by Humboldt Cremation and Funeral Service. Update: His friends are planning a memorial for 11 a.m. Nov. 2 at Clarke Plaza, on E Street right across from the museum. COURTS, LAW, MARIJUANA / BY RYAN BURNS / OCT. 15, 1:41 P.M.

SoCal Dispensary Owner Could Face Life in Prison That’s correct: A cannabis dispensary owner could wind up serving the kind of prison term that’s typically reserved for society’s most heinous and violent criminals. Aaron Sandusky was operating three medical marijuana dispensaries in compliance with state law, but over the weekend a federal jury convicted him of a handful of drug-related charges that carry a minimum sentence of 10 years to life in prison, according to the L.A. Weekly. Last October, Sandusky received threatening letters from the U.S. Attorney’s Office, as did many other dispensaries across the state, as the Journal noted at the time. Local dispensary owners and their landlords have

“Now is a great time to buy a house,” a Realtor said every single day since the dawn of Realtors. And until The Great American Housing Bubble, they were usually right. Houses were good investments … until Wall Street started using them as tokens in its rigged casino games. The housing market has been out of whack for roughly a decade now (see chart below), but the latest numbers from the Humboldt Association of Realtors suggest that prices are settling back down to historical norms. And so, like broken clocks that waited patiently for the return of the hour hand, Realtors may once again be correct: Now just might be a great time to buy a house. Yesterday, the Humboldt Association of Realtors released its countywide stats for August home sales. Here’s where we stand: The median price of homes sold in Humboldt County was $220,390, which is where they seem to have plateaued. (The median has been within $20,000 of that mark for almost a year now.) Combine that value with a median household income of $45,409, plus a record-low mortgage rate of just 3.7 percent, and you get the most affordable monthly house payments in more than a decade. Let’s get specific: Say you purchased this hypothetical median-priced home in August, with the standard 20 percent down. Your monthly payment, including principal, interest, taxes and insurance, would be $1,048.45. And say that, by some remarkable coincidence, your household also happened to earn the county’s median household income. Your mortgage payments would eat up 28 percent of your income. When’s the last time house payments took such a small bite of local incomes? Go ahead and guess; we’ll wait. It was April 1999 — 13 years and four months ago. Between then and now, the local bubble peaked (in March 2006) with median-priced home selling for $349,500. The monthly payment on that home would have consumed more than two-thirds (67 percent) of the county’s median income. If you bought a house back then, condolences. But the rest of us can be grateful


325,000 300,000 275,000 250,000 225,000 200,000

that the long free fall has brought prices back down to earth. In case you’re curious, here are the median August home prices for Eureka, Arcata, Fortuna and McKinleyville. And just so you can revel at how far out of whack we got, we’ve also included the high-water mark for each town: Eureka — $176,100 (high — $345,000 in Feb. 2006) Arcata — $235,000 (high — $608,000 in April 2006) Fortuna — $201,500 (high — $465,000 in Oct. 2007) McKinleyville — $230,000 (high — $418,000 in April 2007) It should be noted that individual markets have pretty small sample sizes from month to month, so the highs can be skewed dramatically by the sale of one or two very expensive homes. Still, we’re nowhere near these levels anymore. ACTIVISM, REGGAE / BY ANDREW GOFF / OCT. 11, 2:47 P.M.

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Project Censored The expanding police state tops the annual list of stories underreported by the mainstream media By Yael Chanoff

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

eople who get their information exclusively from mainstream media sources may be surprised at the lack of enthusiasm on the left for President Barack Obama in this crucial election. But that’s probably because they weren’t exposed to the full online furor sparked by Obama’s continuation of his predecessor’s overreaching approach to national security, such as signing the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act, which allows the indefinite detention of those — even U.S. citizens — accused of supporting terrorism. We’ll never know how this year’s election would be different if the corporate media adequately covered the NDAA’s indefinite detention clause and many other recent attacks on civil liberties. What we can do is support independent media sources that do cover these stories. That’s where Project Censored comes in. Project Censored has been documenting inadequate media coverage of crucial stories since it began in 1967 at Sonoma State University. Each year, the group considers hundreds of news stories submitted by readers, evaluating their merits. Students search Lexis Nexis and other databases to see if the stories were underreported, and if so, the stories are fact-checked by professors and experts in relevant fields. A panel of academics and journalists chooses the Top 25 stories and rates their significance. The project maintains a vast online database of underreported news stories that it has “validated” and publishes them in an annual book. Censored 2013: Dispatches from the Media Revolution will be released Oct. 30. For the second year in row, Project Censored has grouped the Top 25 list into topical “clusters.” This year, categories include “human cost of war and violence” and “environment and health.” Project Censored Director Mickey Huff told us the idea was to show how various undercovered stories fit together into an alternative narrative, not to say that one story was more censored than another. “The problem when we had just the list was that it did imply a ranking,” Huff said. “It takes away from how there tends to be a pattern to the types of stories they don’t cover or underreport.” In May, while Project Censored was

working on the list, another 2012 list was issued: the Fortune 500 list of the biggest corporations, whose influence peppers the Project Censored list in a variety of ways. Consider this year’s top Fortune 500 company: ExxonMobil. The oil company pollutes everywhere it goes, yet most stories about its environmental devastation go underreported. Weapons manufacturers Lockheed Martin (58 on the Fortune list), General Dynamics (92), and Raytheon (117) are tied into stories about U.S. prisoners in slavery conditions manufacturing parts for their weapons and the underreported war crimes in Afghanistan and Libya. These powerful corporations work together more than most people think. In the chapter exploring the “Global 1 Percent,” writers Peter Philips and Kimberly Soeiro explain how a small number of well-connected people control the majority of the world’s wealth. In it, they use Censored story number six, “Small network of corporations run the global economy,” to describe how a network of transnational corporations are deeply interconnected, with 147 of them controlling 40 percent of the global economy’s total wealth. For example, Philips and Soeiro write that in one such company, BlackRock Inc., “The eighteen members of the board of directors are connected to a significant part of the world’s core financial assets. Their decisions can change empires, destroy currencies, and impoverish millions.” Another cluster of stories, “women and gender, race and ethnicity,” notes a pattern of underreporting stories that affect a range of marginalized groups. This broad category includes only three articles, and none are listed in the top 10. The stories reveal mistreatment of Palestinian women in Israeli prisons, including being denied medical care and shackled during childbirth, and the rape and sexual assault of women soldiers in the U.S. military. The third story in the category concerns an Alabama anti-immigration bill, HB56, that caused immigrants to flee Alabama in such numbers that farmers felt a dire need to “help farms fill the gap and find sufficient labor.” So the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries approached the state’s Department of Corrections about making a deal for prisoners to replace the fleeing farm workers. But with revolutionary unrest around the world, and the rise of a mass movement that connects disparate issues together into a simple, powerful class analysis — the 99 percent versus the 1 percent paradigm popularized by Occupy Wall Street — this year’s Project Censored offers an element of hope.


It’s not easy to succeed at projects that resist corporate dominance, and when it does happen, the corporate media is sometimes reluctant to cover it. Number seven on the Top 25 list is the story of how the United Nations designated 2012 the International Year of the Cooperative, recognizing the rapid growth of co-op businesses: organizations that are part-owned by all members and whose revenue is shared equitably among members. One billion people worldwide now work in co- ops. The Year of the Cooperative is not the only goodnews story discussed by Project Censored this year. In Chapter 4, Yes! Magazine‘s Sarah Van Gelder lists “12 ways the Occupy movement and other major trends have offered a foundation for a transformative future.” They include a renewed sense of “political self-respect” and fervor to organize in the United States, debunking of economic myths such as the “American dream,” and the blossoming of economic alternatives such as community land trusts, time banking, and micro-energy installations. They also include results achieved from pressure on government, like the delay of the Keystone Pipeline project, widespread efforts to override the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling, the removal of dams in Washington state after decades of campaigning by Native American and environmental activists, and the enactment of single-payer healthcare in Vermont. As Dr. Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed writes in the book’s foreword, “The majority of people now hold views about Western governments and the nature of power that would have made them social pariahs 10 or 20 years ago.” Citing polls from the corporate media, Mosaddeq writes: “The majority are now skeptical of the Iraq War; the majority want an end to U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan; the majority resent the banks and financial sector, and blame them for the financial crisis; most people are now aware of environmental issues, more than ever before, and despite denialist confusion promulgated by fossil fuel industries, the majority in the United States and Britain are deeply concerned about global warming; most people are wary of conventional party politics and disillusioned with the

mainstream parliamentary system.” In short, he writes, “There has been a massive popular shift in public opinion toward a progressive critique of the current political economic system.” And ultimately, it’s the public — not the president and not the corporations — that will determine the future. There may be hope after all. Here’s Project Censored’s Top 10 list for 2013:

1. Signs of an emerging police state President George W. Bush is remembered for his role in curbing civil liberties in the name of his “war on terror.” But it’s President Obama who signed the 2012 NDAA, including its clause allowing for indefinite detention without trial for terrorism suspects. Obama promised that “my administration will interpret them to avoid the constitutional conflict” — leaving us prey to the whims of future administrations that may interpret them otherwise. Journalist Chris Hedges, along with co-plaintiffs including Noam Chomsky and Daniel Ellsberg, won a case challenging the NDAA’s indefinite detention clause on Sept. 1, when a federal judge blocked its enforcement. But her ruling was overturned on Oct. 3, so the clause is back. Another law of concern is the National Defense Resources Preparedness Executive Order that Obama issued in March 2012. That order authorizes the president, “in the event of a potential threat to the security of the United States, to take actions necessary to ensure the availability of adequate resources and production capability, including services and critical technology, for national defense requirements.” The president is to be advised on this course of action by “the National Security Council and Homeland Security Council, in conjunction with the National Economic Council.”

2. Oceans in peril Big banks aren’t the only entities that our country has deemed “too big to fail.” But our oceans won’t be getting a bailout anytime soon, and their collapse could compromise life itself. In a haunting article highlighted by Project Censored, Mother Jones reporter Julia Whitty paints a tenuous seascape — overfished, acidified, warming — and describes how the destruction of the ocean’s complex ecocontinued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012

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continued from previous page systems jeopardizes the entire planet, not just the 70 percent that is water. Whitty compares ocean acidification, caused by global warming, to acidification that was one of the causes of the “Great Dying,” a mass extinction 252 million years ago. Life on earth took 30 million years to recover. In a more hopeful story, a study of 14 protected and 18 non-protected ecosystems in the Mediterranean Sea showed dangerous levels of biomass depletion. But it also showed that the marine reserves were well-enforced, with five to 10 times larger fish populations than in unprotected areas. This encourages establishment and maintenance of more reserves.

3. Fukushima information blackout A plume of toxic fallout floated from Japan after the tragic Fukushima nuclear disaster on March 11, 2011. Full information about what descended where has been hard to come by, and fears remain about the extent of health risks. Yet the Project Censored system shows its weaknesses in this Top 10 pick. Spread over more than 20 universities, researched by students and overseen by sometimes-overwhelmed academics, the system can be vulnerable to knee-jerk reactions and rushed edits. In retrospect, says Project Censored Director Huff, the point he really wanted to make with this chapter was that more needs to be learned about Fukushima’s aftermath — but, sadly, that’s not all the chapter says. It prominently summarizes a study that Huff now acknowledges is “squirrely at best” and then makes things even worse by exaggerating and misstating the

study’s claims. Here’s what happened: A pair of researchers looked at deaths in 122 U.S. cities in the 14 weeks after Fukushima, the 14 weeks before, and the same time periods from the previous year. Then, without inquiring about what normal yearto-year variations might be, they extrapolated a death rate for the entire U.S. — nearly 14,000 more deaths post-Fukushima, including 822 infants — and they pointedly asked if radiation might have caused them. The work is fraught with so many absurdities that Scientific American took it apart in a couple of devastating blogs, amd most mainstream media didn’t cover it — which appears to have gotten someone’s “censored” taste buds salivating. By the time the study by Joseph Mangano and Jeanette Sherman made it into Project Censored’s book, it was dramatically recast — the link to Fukushima was no longer a question, but proven, and the dead were “mostly infants” in Washington state, not the study’s 822 infants nationwide. The Fukushima chapter goes on to document ways that Japanese and American officials downplayed or lied about Fukushima fallout, and Huff says he remains proud of that work. He said he plans to correct this chapter’s errors on the Project Censored website.

4. FBI agents responsible for terrorist plots Here is Project Censored back to one of the things it does best — cast light on well-researched, well-documented explo-

rations of abuses of power. We know that FBI agents go into communities such as mosques, both undercover and in the guise of building relationships, quietly gathering information about individuals. This is part of an approach to finding what the FBI now considers the most likely kind of terrorists, “lone wolves.” Its strategy: “seeking to identify those disgruntled few who might participate in a plot given the means and the opportunity. And then, in case after case, the government provides the plot, the means, and the opportunity,” writes Mother Jones journalist Trevor Aaronsen. The publication, along with the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California-Berkeley, examined the results of this strategy, 508 cases classified as terrorism-related that have come before the U.S. Department of Justice since the 9/11 terrorist attacks of 2001. In 243 of these cases, an informant was involved; in 49 cases, an informant actually led the plot. And “with three exceptions, all of the high-profile domestic terror plots of the last decade were actually FBI stings.”

5. Federal Reserve loaned trillions to major banks The Federal Reserve, the United State’s quasi-private central bank, was audited for the first time in its history this year. The audit report states, “From late 2007 through mid-2010, Reserve Banks provided more than a trillion dollars … in emergency loans to the financial sector

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to address strains in credit markets and to avert failures of individual institutions believed to be a threat to the stability of the financial system.” These loans had significantly lower interest and fewer conditions than the high-profile TARP bailouts, and were rife with conflicts of internet. Some examples: the CEO of JP Morgan Chase served as a board member of the New York Federal Reserve at the same time that his bank received more than $390 billion in financial assistance from the Fed. William Dudley, who is now the New York Federal Reserve president, was granted a conflict of interest waiver to let him keep investments in AIG and General Electric at the same time the companies were given bailout funds. The audit was restricted to Federal Reserve lending during the financial crisis. On July 25, 2012, a bill to audit the Fed again, with fewer limitations, authored by Rep. Ron Paul, passed the House of Representatives. HR459 is expected to die in the Senate, but the movement behind Paul and his calls to hold the Fed accountable, or abolish it altogether, seem to be growing.

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6. Small network of corporations run the global economy Reporting on a study by researchers from the Swiss Federal Institute in Zurich didn’t make the rounds nearly enough, according to Censored 2013. The researchers found that, of 43,060 transnational companies, 147 control 40 percent of total global wealth. The researchers also built continued on page 16

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continued from page 14 a model visually demonstrating how the connections between companies — what it calls the “super entity” — works. Some have criticized the study, saying control of assets doesn’t equate to ownership. True, but as we clearly saw in the 2008 financial collapse, corporations are capable of mismanaging assets in their control to the detriment of their actual owners. And a largely unregulated super entity like this is vulnerable to global collapse.

7. The International Year of the Cooperative Can something really be censored when it’s straight from the United Nations? According to Project Censored evaluators, the corporate media underreported the U.N. declaring 2012 to be the International Year of the Cooperative, based on the coop business model’s stunning growth. The U.N. found that, in 2012, one billion people worldwide are coop member-owners, or one in five adults over the age of 15. The largest is Spain’s Mondragon Corp., with more than 80,000 member-owners. The U.N. predicts that by 2025, worker-owned coops will be the world’s fastest growing business model. Worker-owned cooperatives provide for equitable distribution of wealth, genuine connection to the workplace, and, just maybe, a brighter future for our planet.

8. NATO war crimes in Libya In January 2012, the BBC “revealed” how British

Special Forces agents joined and “blended in” with rebels in Libya to help topple dictator Muammar Gadaffi, a story that alternative media sources had reported a year earlier. NATO admits to bombing a pipe factory in the Libyan city of Brega that was key to the water supply system that brought tap water to 70 percent of Libyans, saying that Gadaffi was storing weapons in the factory. In Censored 2013, writer James F. Tracy makes the point that historical relations between the U.S. and Libya were left out of mainstream news coverage of the NATO campaign. Tracy adds, “Background knowledge and historical context confirming Al-Qaeda and Western involvement in the destabilization of the Gadaffi regime are also essential for making sense of corporate news narratives depicting the Libyan operation as a popular ‘uprising.’”

9. Prison slavery in the U.S. On its website, the UNICOR manufacturing corporation proudly proclaims that its products are “made in America.” That’s true, but they’re made in places where standard labor laws don’t apply, with workers often paid just 23 cents an hour to be exposed to toxic materials with no legal recourse. These places are U.S. prisons. Slavery conditions in prisons aren’t exactly news. It’s literally written into the Constitution; the

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

13th Amendment, which abolished slavery, outlaws “slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.” But the article highlighted by Project Censored this year reveals the current state of prison slavery industries and their ties to war. The majority of products manufactured by inmates are contracted to the Department of Defense. Inmates make complex parts for missile systems, battleship antiaircraft guns and landmine sweepers, as well as night-vision goggles, body armor and camouflage uniforms. Of course, this is happening in the context of record high imprisonment in the United States, where grossly disproportionate numbers of African Americans and Latinos are imprisoned and, in some states, can’t vote even after they’re freed. As psychologist Elliot D. Cohen puts it in this year’s book: “This system of slavery, like that which existed in this country before the Civil War, is also racist, as more than 60 percent of US prisoners are people of color.”

10. HR 347 criminalizes protest HR 347, sometimes called the “criminalizing protest” or “anti-Occupy” bill, made some headlines. But concerned lawyers and some politically active Americans worry that it could have disastrous effects

for the First Amendment right to protest. Officially called the Federal Restricted Grounds Improvement Act, the law makes it a felony to “knowingly” enter a zone restricted under the law, or engage in “disorderly or disruptive” conduct in or near the zones. The restricted zones include anywhere the Secret Service may be — places such as the White House, areas hosting events deemed “National Special Security Events,” or anywhere visited by the president, vice president and their immediate families; former presidents, vice presidents and certain family members; certain foreign dignitaries; major presidential and vice presidential candidates (within 120 days of an election); and other individuals as designated by a presidential executive order. These people could be anywhere, and NSSEs have notoriously included the Democratic and Republican National Conventions, Super Bowls and the Academy Awards. So far, it seems the only time HR 347 has kicked in is with George Clooney’s high-profile arrest outside the Sudanese embassy. Clooney ultimately was not detained without trial — information that would be almost impossible to censor — but what about the rest of us who exist outside of the mainstream media’s spotlight? ● Yael Chanoff wrote this article for the San Francisco Bay Guardian, and North Coast Journal Editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg contributed to the reporting on censored story No. 3. A book release party will be held at Moe’s Books, 2476 Telegraph, in Berkeley, on Nov. 3. You can listen to Huff’s radio show Friday morning at 8 p.m. on KPFA.


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Rootz N Creation (reggae) no cover 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Loose Gravel (classic rock) no cover 9pm

Loose Gravel (classic rock) no cover 9pm

Blues Jam 9pm

Lizzie & the Moonbeams 9pm

www.barflypub.com

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

DJ Masta Shredda & DJ Itchie Fingaz no cover 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 8:30pm

EUREKA INN 518 7th St.

Bradley Dean (cowboy music) 7pm

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521 Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons 9:30pm $12

River Valley Mud, Liquid Kactus (funk) 9pm $5

Owl Paws, Strix Vega 9pm

Old Skool Hip Hop w/ DJ Red 9pm

Grateful Dead Movie Night Meadowlands, NJ 10/16/89 8pm Eddie Izzard 8pm $55 The Record Company 9pm

LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata

HSU Guitar Group 7pm

Brian Post (jazz) 7-10pm

Jim Silva (guitar) 7-10pm

LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Compost Mtn Boys (bluegrass) 6pm

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad

MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER Redw.

Taqueria La Barca 4-7pm Basstoberfest 8pm $10

Barleywine Party! Roach Gigz 8pm $20

MISSING LINK RECORDS Arcata ’90s Dance w/ Pressure/Anya 10pm $5

NOCTURNUM Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

Huayllipacha @ Henderson Center

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

9am-2pm Arcata Plaza

Buddy Reed and The Rip It Ups (blues) 7pm

Located in beautiful Old Town

Musaic (Balkan folk) 7pm

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600

Dine with us at Lunchtime Present this Form Be Eligible for our Weekly FREE Lunch Drawing

Official Entry Form Offer expires 10/31/12

Name: _____________ Phone: _____________ Open Daily for Lunch and Dinner, 11:30am - 10pm • Extended Bar Hours

Reservations Recommended (707) 407-3550 1911 Truesdale Street Eureka Off Broadway behind the Best Western Bayshore Inn

NEW HUMBOLDT DESIGNS JUST ARRIVED, AND THEY WILL GO FAST SO COME IN TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SALE:

BUY ANY 2 HOODIES SAVE $10 BUY ANY 2 TSHIRTS SAVE $5 BUY ANY 2 HATS/BEANIES SAVE $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

18 North Coast JourNal • thursday, oCt. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Live DJ (dance music) 10pm

Live DJ (dance music) 10pm

Jessie Ruben with Johnny Walker/ Josephine Johnson 7-10pm

Joani Rose, Francis Vanek, Jim Wilde, Damien & Michael 7pm

Tara Linda and Michelle 7pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

Gunsafe, Wax Catastrophe 9pm

I-Taweh & the Reggae Lions 10pm $10

Open weekdays from 3-9pm

Check our Facebook page for happenings!

Weekends noon-9pm

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

West African Drum & Dance 5:30-7pm

Flow Arts: Poi and more! 7-8:30pm

Bolokada Conde Drum Workshop 2:30-4:30pm, $20 John Lee Hooker, Jr. (blues) 9pm $15

Irish Music 7:30pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

The Latin Peppers 7pm $6

SEWELL GALLERY Eureka SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Live music 8-10pm

Live music 8-10pm

SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

Come in for a great Dinner! Tater Famine (alt country) 8pm

THE SHANTY Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Kindred Spirits (jazz) 7pm

Karaoke 7-10pm MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Rude Lion (reggae DJ) 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Joe Griffin 9pm

Band Behind Your Hedge (rock) 9pm

Jimi Jeff & the Gypsy Band (blues/funk) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 9pm

Boss Levelz (DJs) 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

Throwback Thursdays

BLUE LISTINGS IN THE HUM RED LISTINGS IN THE CALENDAR


Lost in the Trees Tuesday at the Arcata Playhouse

sun 10/21

mon 10/22

tues 10/23

wed 10/24

www.thealibi.com

Your friend on the Plaza.

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Women of the Northwest 2pm $10 Men in Black 5:30pm $5 Rated PG-13 Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Lost in the Trees 8pm $10 Giant Monday Night Football Doors 3:30pm free all ages

Find our calendar at www.arcatatheaterlounge.com

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Sci Fi Pint & Pizza Night ft. The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra 6-10pm All ages Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Holdem’ Tournament 6:30pm Quiz Night 7pm

No Limit Texas Holdem’ Tournament 6:30pm

A chance to win $1,000,000

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Monday Night Football on the big screen + Flat Screen giveaways

Jimi Jeff & the Gypsy Band (blues/funk) no cover 9pm

$0.25 Wings on Wednesday!

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 7pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool Night!

Record Swap Meet 10am $1

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

John Brown’s Body Jon Wayne & the Pain 9pm $12 Macklemore & Ryan Lewis 10pm $20

A chance to win $1,000,000

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Not your average pub grub. Brother Ali 9pm $15/$10 100 Watt Mind, The Small Axe 9pm Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

Repeat: We got beer.

Becoming Relics (indie) 9pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Football! www.madriverbrewing.com

Growler Monday $3 off refills

Spindrifters (bluegrass) 6pm

World Series!

Online at humfarm.org

Dale Wignet @ Old Town Eureka

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

Miss Lana Rebel 8pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM) All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

Sit and sip.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Ask us about hosting your event

Gary Stuart (singer/guitarist) 7pm

Happy Growler Day! Special pricing on growler fills!

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed 6pm

Happy Hour? Happy Day!

Dry Hop Wednesday Special Release Day!

Bolokada Conde Drum Workshop 11:30-1:30pm, $20

Monday Swing Night 7pm class, 8pm dance

Argentine Tango Int 7:15pm, Beg 8:15pm

West Coast Swing Wednesdays 7:30pm Lesson, 8:30pm Dancing

Find us on Facebook

Who’s ready for a new restaurant?

The Good Taste tasting room

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature Cocktail in the bar!

Great lunch specials! 11:30-4:00

Check out the Sunset from our bar! White Manna, Midday Veil 8pm

Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Greg Camphus Duo: Unplugged 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Secret Password Hint: South of St. Charles Avenue

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

Rump Shaker Wednesdays 9pm

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

BLUE LISTINGS IN THE HUM RED LISTINGS IN THE CALENDAR

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, oCt. 18, 2012

19


1 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


Lost in the Trees Tuesday at the Arcata Playhouse

sun 10/21

mon 10/22

tues 10/23

wed 10/24

www.thealibi.com

Your friend on the Plaza.

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Women of the Northwest 2pm $10 Men in Black 5:30pm $5 Rated PG-13 Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Lost in the Trees 8pm $10 Giant Monday Night Football Doors 3:30pm free all ages

Find our calendar at www.arcatatheaterlounge.com

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Sci Fi Pint & Pizza Night ft. The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra 6-10pm All ages Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Holdem’ Tournament 6:30pm Quiz Night 7pm

No Limit Texas Holdem’ Tournament 6:30pm

A chance to win $1,000,000

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Monday Night Football on the big screen + Flat Screen giveaways

Jimi Jeff & the Gypsy Band (blues/funk) no cover 9pm

$0.25 Wings on Wednesday!

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 7pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool Night!

Record Swap Meet 10am $1

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

John Brown’s Body Jon Wayne & the Pain 9pm $12 Macklemore & Ryan Lewis 10pm $20

A chance to win $1,000,000

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Not your average pub grub. Brother Ali 9pm $15/$10 100 Watt Mind, The Small Axe 9pm Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

Repeat: We got beer.

Becoming Relics (indie) 9pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Football! www.madriverbrewing.com

Growler Monday $3 off refills

Spindrifters (bluegrass) 6pm

World Series!

Online at humfarm.org

Dale Wignet @ Old Town Eureka

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

Miss Lana Rebel 8pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM) All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

Sit and sip.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Ask us about hosting your event

Gary Stuart (singer/guitarist) 7pm

Happy Growler Day! Special pricing on growler fills!

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed 6pm

Happy Hour? Happy Day!

Dry Hop Wednesday Special Release Day!

Bolokada Conde Drum Workshop 11:30-1:30pm, $20

Monday Swing Night 7pm class, 8pm dance

Argentine Tango Int 7:15pm, Beg 8:15pm

West Coast Swing Wednesdays 7:30pm Lesson, 8:30pm Dancing

Find us on Facebook

Who’s ready for a new restaurant?

The Good Taste tasting room

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature Cocktail in the bar!

Great lunch specials! 11:30-4:00

Check out the Sunset from our bar! White Manna, Midday Veil 8pm

Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Greg Camphus Duo: Unplugged 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Secret Password Hint: South of St. Charles Avenue

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

Rump Shaker Wednesdays 9pm

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

BLUE LISTINGS IN THE HUM RED LISTINGS IN THE CALENDAR

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012

19


David Johnson from White Manna photo by Bob Doran

Close Your Eyes

White Manna with Howlin Rain, plus Jerry Joseph, Basstoberfest, EOTO, alt. this and that By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

S

ome band had canceled, leaving an open slot at the very end of the North Country Fair. The winners of a drawing held that day took the stage and unleashed a mighty roar, dark soaring chords shot through with feedback kissing the gray sky. The psych-rock noise machine White Manna was in fine form. The band first came together 4½ years ago when guitarist/founder David Johnson returned to Humboldt after a sojourn in L.A. The line-up has been somewhat variable. “Johnny Webb has been with the band for four years; he started on keyboards but now plays bass. Tavan Anderson, the drummer, joined three years ago. It’s been a core with us three and different guitarists and keyboard players,” said Johnson, calling from his home in Manila. Anthony Taibi filled the second guitar slot at the fair and current keyboardist, Dario Marcello, was absent. This summer the band released an eponymous LP for Portland label Holy Mountain (see review page 30). Another record is in the works at Piet Dalmolen’s Universal Balance Studios, with what Johnson said is a similar approach. “It’s a little darker now, but it’s the same spacy, freak-out rock ‘n’ roll. We practiced last night and probably played for 40 minutes without stopping or talking, and it wasn’t any song, just improvised.” Not that they don’t do “songs,” but sometimes, said

Johnson, “We just close our eyes and see what happens.” Tuesday White Manna launches a brief West Coast tour at The Shanty with Midday Veil, a kraut-rock/psych band from Seattle with David Golightly on synths and Emily Pothast out front on “vocals etc.” Former local Ethan Miller’s band Howlin Rain headlines with bong rock and liquor store soul tunes from its new album, The Russian Wilds. The Shanty isn’t a big room — show up early to get in. Then when the music starts, close your eyes and see what happens. Another former local, Jerry Joseph, returns to Humboldt Brews Thursday with his trio The Jackmormons. Joseph left Arcata a long time ago — in the ’80s — he’s never stopped writing deep, powerful songs. You’ll find some of his best on his new double-LP, Happy Book. Basstoberfest, a “basstacular” EDM show Friday at the Mateel assembled by occasional Journal contributor Travis Turner, features Miles “Womp Womp Wednesday” PsyFi, DJ Dirtbag (aka Tim Marsh) playing with guest MC Kelley Mak, plus local producers Cacao and Piper and live visionary art by Roman Villagrana. All proceeds go directly to KMUD to help pay for a tower upgrade that, according to KMUD, “went waaaaay over budget. (It was the rain’s fault, again.)” When String Cheese Incident percussionists Michael Travis and Jason Hann started up a loopy electronic side

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

project a few years back, they called it “End of Time Observatory.” At this point the duo playing live electrojams is simply EOTO. The current “Lotus Experience” tour (so named because of a 3D lotus stage set) comes to the Arcata Theatre Lounge Saturday night. Friday at Humboldt Brews, it’s a relatively new funk/soul combo, River Valley Mud, that drummer Sam Kaplan-Good (from The Trouble) humbly describes as a “semi-supergroup” since the octet draws members from Bump Foundation, Small Axe, Motherlode, SambAmore, The Crab Grass Band and (of course) The Trouble. Arcata blues/funk jamband Liquid Kactus opens. Moody indie rock quartet Owl Paws is up from San Francisco for a Thursday show at the Jambalaya with local “cougar aphrodisiac rock” trio Strix Vega. Humboldt alt. folk is in full flower Friday at The Red Fox Tavern with a show called “Let’s Folk Things Up” featuring Gunsafe, The Plumb Uglies and Sunshine N Yellabird, three outfits that (coincidentally?) have all appeared on a KHSU feature, A Band About Town, hosted by Disc Jockey Knickerbocky. Also on the folked-up bill: The Wax Catastrophe and DJ Raphael Newdiggs Kroshay. Santa Cruz alt. Americana combo Tater Famine hits Humboldt for a couple of shows: Saturday, the trio is at The Shanty with Gunsafe and one-man-acousto-punk band Bored Again. Then on Sunday (starting 7-ish) TF plays an all-ages instore at Missing Link Records with trippy Portland guitar improviser Marissa Anderson and alt. country chanteuse Miss Lana Rebel from Tucson. L.A.-based blues-rock trio The Record Company has a retro sound rooted in American R&B, reminiscent of bluesy ’60s Brit bands like The Yardbirds or The Animals. Don’t hold it against the band, but the marketing plan for its debut EP Superdead is strictly up to date, including placement in a Coors Light commercial and tour sponsorship by Lucky Brand Jeans (which also provided the guys with stylish pants). The Record Co.’s West Coast tour includes a stop at the Jambalaya Saturday with an opening set by The Foggy Bottom Boys, with members of The Bucky Walters and The Nucleus. Ian Hiler, the quiet, steady, diligent force behind countless heavy rock shows (upsidedowncross, HFRC, etc.) celebrates his birthday Saturday night at The Alibi with a blast of diamond-hard rock by Lord Ellis and Greco. Jazz pianist Darius Brotman hosts Third Friday Jazz shows at Westhaven Center for the Arts, typically playing cool bebop with a small combo or on his own (that’s his piano at WCA). This Friday he and his guitarist friend Duncan Burgess shift to electronics to engage in what Brotman describes as “sound

exploration with multiple delays and effects judiciously deployed using the new generation Casio keyboard.” Should be cool, definitely still jazzy.   More jazz that night at Sewell Gallery with The Latin Peppers playing, you guessed it, Latin jazz. Trombonist Jimmy Durchslag from Ponche put the band together and does the arrangements for a variable lineup. This version is a quartet with Tim Randles on keys, bassist Damien Roomets and Orlando Morales on congas, timbales and other percussion. Straight-up funny hip hop lyricist Macklemore and beatmeister Ryan Lewis bring The Heist tour to the Depot Tuesday, but unless you already have a ticket, forget it. Wednesday, Oct. 24, same HSU location, Brother Ali is here behind his new Mourning In America and Dreaming In Color album with raps inspired by Arab spring and a trip to Mecca (he’s Muslim), and by the Occupy movement. Backed by a full band, Blank Tape Beloved, he’s joined by guests Homeboy Sandman, DJ Sosa and The Reminders. Old school hip hop? DJ Red, Gabriel Groom and Spaceman Spliff spin it at the Jambalaya Friday night. (Addicted to vinyl? Hit the Record Swap Meet Sunday during the day at Humboldt Brews.) In the Civil War variation on “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” “John Brown’s body lies a-moldering in the grave” (but his soul is marching on). The Boston-based roots reggae band John Brown’s Body is not moldering at all. In fact the combo just released a new disc for Easy Star, JBB on Dub, with a half dozen classic dubwise instrumentals plus “The Grass,” a fan fave with vocals by JBB founder/frontman Elliot Martin. JBB’s long march brings it to Humboldt Brews on Tuesday with Midwestern reggae-tronic dub trio Jon Wayne and The Pain. Ashland’s 100 Watt Mind is based around the longtime collaboration between vocalist Brynna Dean, who has a touch of Janis Joplin in her delivery, and guitarist Skyler Squglio, whose leads harken back to the same psychedelic rock era. Add a rhythm section and you have a neo-classic rock band. Local support for a Wednesday, Oct. 24, show at the Jambalaya comes from The Small Axe, which I once erroneously described as “bluesy.” Since the instrumentation includes French horn, bassoon and trumpet (along with the usual guitar, bass and drums), the ensemble prefers the term “orchestral,” claiming to be “truly beyond common description” genre-wise. So, to repeat, not bluesy. And speaking of orchestral, Lost In The Trees, a Chapel Hill alt. folk music collective led by Ari Picker, returns to the Arcata Playhouse Tuesday with a new album, A Church That Fits Our Needs, on a tour with fellow North Carolinans Midtown Dickens and songwriter Dana Buoy. l


HARVEST SALE OUTFIT YOURSELF FOR WINTER TODAY WITH OUR LOWEST PRICES OF THE YEAR ON CARHARTT APPAREL! SALE: OCTOBER 17 - 28, 2012

Reg. $5699

3499

$

Original Fit Double-Front Washed Loggers

Reg. $1899 ea.

2

2399

$ FOR

Workwear Pocket Short Sleeve T-Shirts

Reg. $3499

2688

$

Hooded Pullover Sweatshirts

Reg. $3999

2688

$

Hooded Zip-up Sweatshirts

MANY MORE SPECIALS

WOMEN’S CARHARTT & WRANGLER WEAR Reg. $7999

5888

$

Men’s or Women’s

Detroit Jacket

88 58 Glacier

$

Reg. $8999

In the clothing department of McKinleyville Home & Garden Center. *Discounts do not apply to clearance items or those already on sale or listed as Everyday Low Price. In stock items only.

Rain Jacket

Entire Selection of Carhartt for Kids! BUY TWO OUTFITS, GET A THIRD FREE! Free outfit must be of equal or lesser value.

Kids Club Event

Saturday, October 27th. Pumpkin Face Painting 3pm - 5pm. Paint it up and take it home! Sign up in store today. HUMBOLDT’S HELPFUL HOME CENTER northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 18, 2012

21


ALL BBQs ON SALE

278

3999

$

$

cs370 16” Echo Chain Saw

Craftsman Electric Blower/Vac

Professional grade 33.6cc Powerboost Engine. I-30 starter requires 30% less pulling effort. (105900)

9

$ 88

12 amp motor. Multi-position handle. 2 speeds. 230 MPH air speed. Mulch capable - WVAC kit included. 14:1 mulch ratio. 1.2 bushel bag capacity. Weighs 9.3 pounds. 2 year warranty. (7306764)

Stack and Store

168

$

Steel bracket used to hold 2x4’s together. Racks can be built to any length. Easy fast assembly. (4305082)

Gas Blower

125B. 28 cc. 1.1 hp. Auto return stop switch. Cruise control, fan speed can be set for easier handling. Adjustable tube length. 16.91 fl oz fuel tank volume. (7237142)

13999

Craftsman 16” Gas Chain Saw

3999

$

38cc full crank engine. 16” low kickback bar. Tool - less chain tensioning. Dual-post chain brake handle. Automatic oiler. Carrying case for storage and protection. 2 year warranty. (7306772)

Black & Decker Hedge Trimmer

18” dual-action blade. Powerful 3.5 amp motor. Cuts branches up to 5/8” diameter. (7301575)

8

$ 88 Ace Blue or Brown Tarp Medium duty polyethylene tarp. Finished Size: 7’4” x 9’6”. Rust resistant aluminum grommets every 3 feet. Heat sealed rope reinforced hems. UV treated. (73191, 75907)

9

$ 99

9

Ace Gallon Chain Saw Oil

9

Ace 2 Cycle 3.2oz. 6pk. Up to 50:1 mix. One bottle per gal. of gas. 6/pk bottles. (7001969)

9

$ 88 EPA Gas Can 1 gal. 1 gallon 4 oz. Red poly gas can. Meets CARB and EPA requirements. Extra capacity for mixing oil. Spill proof spout shuts off automatically when tank is full. (7309982)

8

$ 88

Indoor/Outdoor Broom (10540)

$ 99

$ 99

Little Chief Smoker 250 W. Assembled 20 lb. capacity. Includes recipes. Not for indoor use. Aluminum and stainless steel. 1 year warranty. Natural UL wiring. Display box. (84435)

$

For all chain saws. Remains fluid in cold. Low “sling off”. (74134)

9888

$

“LITTLE CHIEF” Hickory wood chips. 1.75 lb. bag. For smokers and barbecues. (84431 - 8061871)

9

$ 99

Spring Brace Rake. 22” wide head, 54” hardwood lacquered handle. 22 tine spring brace. (74978)

1299

Soft Touch Pruning Snip Micro-Tip Micro-Tip blades give you top of the line precision and control. Can be used either right or left handed. Long lasting fully hardened stainless steel blades. PVC cover protects the blades when closed. Spring loaded handles. Lifetime warranty. (7218357)

1488

$

Contractor Bags 42 gal. 3.0 mil. 33”W x 48”H. Twist ties. (6038574, 6093082)

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Smokehouse Wood Chips & Chunks

Ace Leaf Spring Rake

$

From our Rental Department: Rent a log splitter for 24 hours for a 4 hour rate.

4

$ 98

From our Rental Department: Rent a chipper shredder for 24 hours for a 4 hour rate.

Kingsford Briquets 16.6lb 16.6 pounds. Now better than ever. Ready even faster and burns longer. New shape and enhanced formula. More edges and surface area to catch the flame quickly. Deeper groves provide air,channels for fast heating and even burning. (8263501)

6

$ 99

“Grillmark” Cedar Wood Planks

Cooking on cedar plank offers a sweet, spicy, mild smokiness to your foods. Versatile for fish to veggies. Soak for 20 minutes in water and place on preheated grill. Foods will baste in their own juices, creating a subtle, smokey flavor. No fat or oil should be added as the moisture from the plank keeps your food juicy and flavorful with no nutrient loss. 3 planks in one set: 5”x 15”,5”x 9” and 5”x 6”. (8274664)

Checkout our selection of seasonings, sauces and grilling books.

We are your BBQ Headquarters! Available here, propane cylinder exchange station!

Always have a full tank ready to grill


Ace Royal Interior Green Wise Paint

188

$

88

Dehumidifiers Unit dimensions: 20”H x13 3/8”W x 10”D. 30 pints per day. 1000 sq ft coverage. 5 liter tank volume. 4.3 amps/ 420 watts. Relative humidty range: 35%-80%. Digital humidistat. Digital readout. Auto shut off. Washable air filter. Perfect Aire dehumidifiers meet all Energy Star dehumidifier standards. Warranty covers all defects in material and workmanship for one year from the date of purchase. (4350088)

Eggshell (1969146)

Flat (1969146)

Satin (1964667)

21

$

(1965425)

25

24

88 $

1999

$

Semi-tgloss

88 $

88

Zinsser Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Primer

Water based. Indoor/outdoor. Binds chalky surfaces without power washing. Adheres to slick, hard to paint surfaces without sanding. Seals porous surfaces. Blocks most stains. Topcoat in 1 hour. Prevents moisture (16890) caused paint peeling. 1 Gallon. (16890

1288

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24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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northcoastjournal.com

5. BLAKE’S BOOKS, 2005 Central Ave. Hal Work, photographs. 6. CHURCH OF THE JOYFUL HEALER, 1944 Central Ave. Community dance with music by the Bret Harte Breakers; Old bodies of work by dead artists. 7. CURVES, Miller Business Park. Steve Lewis, travel photography; Shari Miller, handmade llama wool hats and scarves. 8. KNITTER’S LANE, 1225 Central Ave., #14. Janice Diller, handmade cards and wreaths. Knitter’s circle until 10 p.m. ●

OCT. 2012

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1. EUREKA-ARCATA AIRPORT. Humboldt County artists, coordinated by the Redwood Art Association. 2. SILVER LINING, 3561 Boeing Ave., #D. Music by Hot Wings from 7-10 p.m. 3. MCKINLEYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL, 1300 Murray Road. The ArMack Orchestra presents the 1926 silent film The Black Pirate. 7 p.m. $5. 4. MCKINLEYVILLE FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER, 1450 Hiller Road. David Cronkright, fine point sharpies, Old Growths Forgotten.

McKINLEYVILLE

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012

25


More than Humboldt Honeys Illuminating local history through women’s lives at Arcata Playhouse By William S. Kowinski williamkowinski@northcoastjournal.com Characters sing about posing as men to do the work they love. Photo by Maia Cheli-Colando

W

omen of the Northwest, on stage at the Arcata Playhouse, celebrates 14 or so individual women in local history. But in performance, the lively, inventive and relatively brief vignettes about them do something more: They shine a different light on that history itself. Many of these women are appropriately remembered for individual accomplishments. Elta Cartwright, a track star at Eureka High (which itself made history by becoming the first high school to allow girls to run races in shorts) became the first woman in America to qualify for the 1928 Olympics. As mayor of Eureka from 1926 to 1931, Emily Jones was the first female mayor west of the Mississippi. After Martella Cone Lane moved to Fortuna with her husband in 1899, she revealed the redwoods to the world in her paintings. Emma Freeman was a prominent photographer who chronicled Eureka and Humboldt scenes from 1907 to 1920. Known as “The Lady of the Hills,” Margaret Smith Cobb lived in the wilderness near Garberville in those years, and wrote poems and romantic novels that were championed by Jack London. Susie Baker Fountain, a columnist for the Arcata Union and the Blue Lake Advocate through the 1950s, collected a century of Humboldt County history.

Humboldt State claims her as its first graduate in 1915, and houses her historical records in its library. Stella Patterson, who came north after the San Francisco earthquake, had a full life but found herself alone in 1946 at age 80. She decided to live in an isolated cabin in the mountains on the Klamath River west of Happy Camp, where the two miners who were her nearest neighbors called her simply “Dear Mad’m.” That became the title of her book about the experience, which is still available. “I have lived the life I wanted,” she says in this play, “and the life I’ve loved.” The core cast of 12 actors presented aspects of these women’s lives, and storyteller Charlene Storr honored her grandmother, Sadie Gorbet (Tolowa), who at the age of 72 was the only Native American in the California delegation to the 1972 Democratic National Convention. She counseled her family to take the good parts of their tradition and of the modern world, and throw the rest away. Besides historical figures, the play depicts some mythical ones as well as composite characters and representative figures (a telephone operator, prostitutes, suffragettes.) Historical material was gathered and shaped by Jackie Dandeneau, Edith Butler and Tammy Rae Scott, but the presentation was created by the actors. They came up with an entertaining,

very theatrical combination of monologues, dialogues, dramatic and comedic scenes, music and movement, plus bustling and lyrical meditations on themes such as food and motherhood. The first act was mostly a mosaic of lives, ending with a memorable moment. Members of the Native Women’s Collective sang some of the songs associated with the Flower Dance, a coming-of-age ceremony for girls that local tribes basically have in common. Reviving this dance has been a priority for at least 15 years, as I recall. They also spoke of the needs it addresses to restore a sense of self-respect, support and belonging to young women.   The second act had more thematic threads, culminating in a final evocation of childbirth and motherhood, children and the lineage of women. Though the actors typically played several roles each, there were strong individual moments. With that peculiar 1930s diction, Dandeneau conveyed the scary if somewhat comic authority of Mayor Jones. Laura Munoz moved easily from an American Indian woman known only as one of Emma Freeman’s favorite photographic subjects to Antoinette Chartin, a cultured French woman who became one of the first nonNative pioneers in Blue Lake of the 1870s, opening a hotel there with her husband. Ali Freedlund was a spirited Elta Cartwright. The most amazing feature of

Siena Nelson’s performance as a cowboy who was secretly female (a not uncommon subterfuge) wasn’t her perfect gait and vocal cadence: it was the hardness in her eyes. There were vivid performances by Jada Owen and Ciara Cheli-Colando in the final thematic sections. Musicians Julie Froblom, Jill Petricca, Dharla Curry and Jan Bramlett joined the action as needed. Other onstage participants were Tammy Rae Scott and Rebecca Zettler. These roughly two hours did not offer complete portraits, nor were all ethnic groups and occupations represented. But by including themes from women’s lives that influence common events, this production as a whole evokes in dynamic fashion a dimension of experience often neglected in the usual histories. From a rhythm of life revealed by cooks for a lumber camp to the “river of blood” of childbirth, the play suggests a perspective it is vital to include. Set design is by Siena Nelson, lighting by David Ferney and costumes by Lydia Foreman. Women of the Northwest continues at the Arcata Playhouse Friday and Saturday (Oct. 19-20) at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. before shows in Petrolia Oct. 27 and Briceland Oct. 28.          

Coming Up: Redwood Curtain opens the comedy Dusty, and the Big Bad World with a preview on Oct. 25. l

 

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26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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THE UNIVERSE’S GREATEST LEFTIST, MUSLIM, ALBINO HIP HOP ARTIST RETURNS! FRESH OFF A STINT IN JAIL FOR PARTICIPATING IN MINNEAPOLIS OCCUPY PROTESTS, BROTHER ALI WILL DROP SOME WISDOM ON THE DEPOT AT HSU ON WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24. HE APPEARS IN SUPPORT OF HIS NEW ALBUM MOURNING IN AMERICA AND DREAMING IN COLOR.

18 thursday EVENTS

The Great California ShakeOut. 10:18 a.m. Humboldt will join millions of people across the state to test earthquake preparation plans at exactly the same time. Learn more at shakeout.org. 826-3254.

THEATER

The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium, 1915 J St. Theatrical performance honoring the legacy of Matthew Shepard who, in 1998, was beaten and left to die tied to a fence in the outskirts of Laramie, Wyo., for being gay. $6. E-mail emmonsn@eurekacityschools. org. 206-276-5744.

MUSIC

The Black Pirate. 7-9 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. ArMack Orchestra performs the original score and amusing sound effects for the silent pirate adventure film starring Douglas Fairbanks. Cheer for the hero! Boo the villain! $5. armack.org. 822-5453.

ART

IGNITE! The Art of Sustainability. 4-6 p.m. Reese Bullen Gallery, HSU, Arcata. Opening reception for show featuring artists hailing from six different regions of the state, bringing perspectives on the environmental issues within their areas. now.humboldt.edu. 826-3629. Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

MOVIES

Genetic Roulette . 7:30 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Learn more about the controversy surrounding genetically engineered food at this free screening. 822-9998.

FOOD

Free Produce Market. Noon-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Income eligible folks are invited to pick out fresh fruits and vegetables and sample recipes using available produce. Sponsored by Food for People. www. foodforpeople.org. 445-3166.

LOVERS OF TIGHT FOUR-PART AND/OR DEFIANTLY THROWING FOOD EXOSKELETONS ON THE GROUND REJOICE! THE HUMBOLDT HARMONAIRES RETURN WITH THEIR ANNUAL BEER AND PEANUT SHOW TAKING PLACE TWO CONSECUTIVE NIGHTS — FRIDAY, OCT. 19, AT THE EUREKA INN AND SATURDAY, OCT. 20, AT THE FORTUNA RIVER LODGE. GO NUTS!

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. humfarm. org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farmfresh produce every Thursday. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

MEETINGS

Audubon Society Monthly Meeting. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Come discuss local and bigger-picture conservation topics with others interested in environmental issues. 442-9353.

ETC.

Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills for a career in maintenance. Get your OSHA certification and learn basic electrical and plumbing skills. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627. Start Smart Teen Driving. 5-7 p.m. Redway Elementary, 344 Humboldt Ave. Driver safety education class that targets new and future licensed drivers between the age of 15 to 19, their parents and/or guardians. 923-2155.

19 friday EVENTS

HSU Homecoming and Family Weekend. 11 a.m. Humboldt State University, Arcata. Clubs carnival, games, prizes, appearances by the Marching Lumberjacks, free photo booth, face painting, campus tours. humboldt. edu/homecoming. 826-3132. Spaghetti Feed Fundraiser. 5-7:30 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Six Rivers Running Club hosts a fundraiser for the three women runners and their families involved in the tragic Sept. 27 hit and run accident in Freshwater. Tickets available at the Jogg’n Shoppe in Arcata. $10/$5 kids. 845-0001.

McKinleyville Arts Night. 6-8 p.m. Various locations throughout McKinleyville. Celebration of local artists and their works. 834-6460.

ENJOY GREEN ART (IN MANY COLORS) WHEN IGNITE! THE ART OF SUSTAINABILITY TAKES OVER THE REESE BULLEN GALLERY. CALIFORNIA ARTISTS FROM DIFFERENT REGIONS USE THEIR ART TO HIGHLIGHT VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES. THERE WILL BE AN OPENING RECEPTION FROM 4 TO 6 P.M. ON THURSDAY, OCT. 18. THE SHOW RUNS THROUGH NOV. 15.

THEATER

Women of the Northwest. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Actor/writer Jacqueline Dandeneau, researcher Tammy Rae Scott and historian Edith Butler present this new historical production, a montage of women’s lives behind the redwood curtain. $10/$8 students and seniors. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play). 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. Set at the turn of the last century in a prim upper class Victorian home, a gentleman doctor has innocently invented a most extraordinary and mysterious device for treating “hysteria” or “congestion of the genitalia.” Contains brief nudity. $16/$14 students and seniors. ferndale-rep.org. 599-7587. The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium. See Oct. 18 listing.

MUSIC

2012 Beer and Peanuts Oktober Fest. 6:59-9:30 p.m. Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Humboldt Harmonaires’ 33rd annual event features tight barbershop harmonies and complimentary “beer” (it’s actually soda, kids), peanuts and popcorn. $12. www.humboldtharmonaires.com. 442-2857. Basstoberfest. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Music, art and multimedia benefit featuring Psyfi, Cacao, Dirtbag and Haiku. All proceeds from the show will go directly to KMUD to help pay for the new tower upgrades. $10. mateel.org. 923-3368. The Latin Peppers. 7 p.m. Sewell Gallery of Fine Art, 423 F. Street, Eureka. Local Latin band spices up the gallery. $6. sewellgallery.com. 269-0617. Third Friday Jazz. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Featuring experimental music by pianist Darius Brotman and electronics by Duncan Burgess. $5/$10 sliding scale. 677-9493. The Black Pirate. 7-9 p.m. McKinleyville High School. See Oct. 18 listing.

DANCE

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. 839-3665.

ETC.

Eureka Sequoia Garden Club. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. First Covenant Church Carriage House, 2526 J St., Eureka. Monthly meeting. This month’s program features Pete Haggard, author of Insects of the Pacific Northwest. E-mail mgoodwin@northcoast.com. 442-1387.

20 saturday EVENTS

HSU Homecoming and Family Weekend. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt State University, Arcata. Performances and exhibits, pre-game barbecue and tailgate party, Golden Graduate brunch and lively talks by HSU faculty in Classes Without Quizzes. See complete schedule online. humboldt.edu/homecoming. 826-3132. Eddie Izzard. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Dude, it’s Eddie Izzard! He’s hilarious! $55/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. “Bank of Eureka” Centennial Celebration. 5-7 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Celebrate 100 years since the construction of the historic Old Town Eureka building. Historical presentation by Chuck Petty of the Heritage Society and short talks by Councilmember Marian Brady and Supervisor Virginia Bass. 443-1947.

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012

27


Do It continued from previous page JustUs League Bingo. 5:30 p.m. Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Join the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence for Humboldt’s most unusual bingo. Superhero costume contest. Benefits Boys and Girls Club. $20. 834-5937. Kneeland School Fall Festival. 5-8 p.m. Kneeland Elementary School, 9313 Kneeland. Games, prizes, cupcake and bookwalk, silent auction. Dinner at 5 p.m. Haunted house at 6 p.m. 442-5472.

THEATER

Til Death Do Us Part: Just Desserts. 7:50 p.m. Hotel Arcata, 708 Ninth St. Before the final dessert is served at a wedding reception, someone is going to die. This interactive mystery includes dessert tasings, music and prizes. $25/$20 adv. murderbydessert.com. 223-4172. The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium. See Oct. 18 listing. Women of the Northwest. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See Oct. 19 listing. In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play). 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Oct. 19 listing.

MUSIC

Roach Gigz. 9 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Hip hop artist performs as part of his Bugged Out Tour with guests IAMSU!, Green R. Fields, A1, Baby E and Nima Fadavi. $20. mateel.org. 923-3368. EOTO: The Lotus Experience. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. World Famous Productions presents the sensory overloading electronic duo. $25/$20 adv. 822-1220. 2012 Beer and Peanuts Oktober Fest. 6:59-9:30 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge. See Oct. 19 listing. The Black Pirate. 7-9 p.m. McKinleyville High School. See Oct. 18 listing.

DANCE

‘90s Dance Party. 10 p.m. Nocturnum, 206 West Sixth St., Eureka. Pressure Anya spins ‘90s hits. $5.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Jude Power. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Trail Stewards Work Day. 9-11 a.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help maintain the trails and grounds around the nature center. Wear closed-toed shoes and bring drinking water. friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Manila Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Morning of invasive plant removal. Bring water, wear comfortable work clothes. Tools, gloves and cookies provided. 444-1397. Nature Story Time. 2 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Cen-

Last year, my willpower sputtered out at mile 23. A runner behind me wept as she shuffled along. That 26.2 miles is a long way. “One foot in front of the other,” I told myself. This was awful. But 20 minutes later, the announcer was saying my name as I crossed the finish line a human puddle. “Never again. I’m done. Put a checkmark in that box,” I told my only cheerleader with quivering limbs and lips. It was my third, and last, marathon. The Humboldt Redwoods Marathon is this Sunday, Oct. 21, and I can’t wait to do it again. I mean, I Can. Not. Wait.

ter, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Geared for ages 3-6, story time focuses on local wildlife and includes a simple craft project. RSVP. friendsofthedunes.org. Eel River Recovery Project Retreat. 8 a.m. Emandal Farm, east of Willits. Agenda includes presentations and stream-side monitoring demonstrations as well an afternoon session planning 2013 events to help foster Eel River recovery. eelriverrecovery.org. 223-7200.

FOOD

Arcata Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. humfarm.org. 822-5951.

SPORTS

Humboldt State vs. Dixie State. 6 p.m. Redwood Bowl, HSU. Foot. Ball. Homecoming game. $10/$8 Non-HSU/ kids. hsujacks.com.

BOOKS

Book Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Friends of the Arcata Library host the sale of vinyl recordings, hardcover books, paperback books, videos and CDs. Books are a “buck a bag” from 2 p.m. onward. 822-5954.

FOR KIDS

Snoozapalooza. 4-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Pajama party in honor of the 50th anniversary of Dr. Seuss’s Sleep Book. Includes story readings, games and prizes. Bring a pillow. 822-2834. Adventure Afternoon. 2 p.m. Discovery Museum, 517 Third St., Eureka. Nature Joe gives a presentation about animal classification. Features tarantulas, cockatoos, snakes and chinchillas! discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

ETC.

The Big Bang. 9 p.m.-5 a.m. Location revealed to ticket holders. Impropriety Society celebrates 4½ years with

Recent events assure an emotionally charged event this year, but I feel solidarity amid the tragedy. We are going to run together. Running is bigger than ever. Over 500,000 Americans ran a marathon last year. Why? It’s hard, time-consuming, hurts like hell, and to pay for it seems downright mean. But I’m signing up again and my only cheerleader is running the half marathon. She doesn’t understand why, either. Here’s why. Something powerful happens when the starting gun cracks. As the throng spreads down the Avenue of the Giants, everyone wants you to succeed. Whoops of encouragement from runners and spectators alike pull you toward the finish. I got passed by a woman with one final bang. Primer from 4–6 p.m. at Redwood Raks day of event. $45. www. humboldtimps.com. 496-6167. Food and Wine Pairing and Art Auction. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Lost Coast Rotaract Club of Eureka event supports Story in the Soil, providing earthquake relief to Yushu, located in the Tibetan region of China, by providing funds for school building and disaster awareness. $50. 621-5130. Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Meditation. 9-10 a.m. Arcata Holistic Health Center, 940 Ninth St. Dalai Ani Kunzang Drolma leads meditation sessions. E-mail structuralthomas@gmail.com. 825-1088.

21 sunday EVENTS

Humboldt Redwoods Marathon. 9 a.m. Along the Avenue of the Giants in the scenic Humboldt Redwoods State Park. Six Rivers Running Club hosts annual marathon, half marathon and 5K. Register online. redwoodsmarathon.org. 444-8636.

THEATER

In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play). 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Oct. 19 listing. Women of the Northwest Matinee. 2 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See Oct. 19 listing.

MUSIC

Festival of Music. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Performances by Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir, the Marching Lumberjacks,

a fake leg, and it was amazing. Speaking as a casual (read: slow) runner, to be among Real Runners is to glimpse our ancestors who supposedly outran deer. These women and men hold a pace with grit and precision. Some run HRM as training for their next 50 miler. Others, to qualify for the prestigious Boston Marathon. But hands down, the beginners are my favorite. Training has messed up their lives. Their feet hurt. Just by showing up, they’re exerting ferocious drive. They bit off more than they could chew. So here I go again, my fourth-annual Last Marathon Ever. You should come too. — Mike Dronkers (2011 HRM Finisher 4:34:07) For more info, including complete course and registration info, hustle over to redwoodsmarathon.org. the Babes, HLO KidCo, Chubritza and the Arcata School District’s Community Choir and Community Band. Fundraiser for music programs at Arcata Elementary and Sunny Brae Middle School. $3. E-mail mbell@humboldt. k12.ca.us. 822-5988. Open Jazz Jam. 2-4:30 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Guitarist and vocalist Dave Wilson performs followed by an open jam. 442-0278.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society SoHum Field Trip. 9 a.m. Southern Humboldt Community Park, 934 Sprowl Creek Road, Garberville. Meet in the parking lot just off Kimtu Road. Naturalist/writer Tom Leskiw leads a monthly two- to three-hour bird walk. 986-1112. Audubon Society Eureka Marsh Field Trip. 9 a.m. Meet at parking lot at foot of West Del Norte St., Eureka. Spend one to two hours on a flat loop through a variety of habitats, from bay and mudflat to riparian and marshland. Led by Ralph Bucher. 839-4365. Edible and Medicinal Plants. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Learn about edible and medicinal plants with experienced botanist, herbalist and educator Allison Poklemba. $25. 444-1397.

FOOD

Dow’s Prairie Monthly Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. All proceeds fund grange projects. $5. E-mail dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100. Breakfast in Bayside. 8 a.m.-noon. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Quarterly tasty gourmet breakfast featuring music by SquarPeg, fiber arts demonstrations by members of the Humboldt Handweavers and Spinners Guild and lively conversation. $8/$5 kids. 822-9998. Lasagna Dinner Fundraiser. 4-6 p.m. Six Rivers Masonic

The Latin Peppers Friday, Oct. 19 th 7:30 pm $8 admission

Damien Roomets • Jimmy Durchslag • Orlando Morales • Tim Randles

423 F Street, Eureka 95501 • (707) 269-0617 • sewellgallery.com

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

Custome r Fa Firecrac vorite: ker Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

Caffé Italia BreakFaSt•eSpreSSo lunCh•dinner•Catering

444-2421

3220 Broadway, Suite 8 • eureka (Behind Big 5 Sporting goodS)

M-F 9aM-10pM • Sat. 11:30-10pM • CloSed Sun.


Lodge, 251 Bayside Road, Arcata. Arcata Job’s Daughters benefit. $8/$5 kids. 442-9080.

ETC.

Record Swap Meet. 10 a.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Thousands of vinyl LPs, 45s and CDs. Live music. $1. humbrews.com. 444-0105. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Buddhist Study Group. 6 p.m. Arcata Yoga Center, 890 G St. Weekly gathering practices the Chenrezig sadhana and Dorje Yang Dron. 822-4756. Flea Market. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Lots o’ stuff! $0.50. 822-5292.

22 monday EVENTS

Days of Action Against Police Brutality. Noon. March begins at Clarke Plaza. Speak out at the corner of Clark and Summer streets at 3 p.m. Sit-in protest at the Gazebo in Old Town at 5 p.m. Culminates in dinner/vigil at Humboldt County Courthouse at 7 p.m. Check online for more details. redwoodcurtaincopwatch.net. 633-4493.

DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy

Eddie Ran

While Humboldt prepares for another scenic marathon this weekend, don’t expect megastar/running enthusiast Eddie Izzard to lace up. He needs a break. In May, the English actor/comedian traveled to South Africa to raise money and awareness for South African charities. The angle? Izzard aimed to run 27 marathons in 27 days in tribute to the 27 years Nelson Mandela spent as a political prisoner, all the while filming a documentary and speaking to locals about Mandela’s life and legacy. Well, he didn’t make it. After only a respectable four marathons, Izzard found himself hospitalized due to the “severe terrain, humidity and altitude” of the region. Yeah, that makes sense. But amazingly, Izzard announced on his website that he plans to return to South Africa and complete his exhausting endeavor. “I owe that to Nelson Mandela who has inspired the world to struggle and succeed no matter what

dancing with live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Jogging Interpretive Tour. 5:30 p.m. Meet at Klopp Lake parking lot at foot of South I Street. Four- to five-mile evening jog around marsh led by Megan McCue. 633-6226.

ETC.

Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills used in an office setting. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627. Healing from Violence, Dismantling Prisons. 6 p.m. Goodwin Forum, HSU. Activists Oya Sherrils and Aqeela Sherrils speak. Sponsored by Critical Race, Gender and Sexuality Studies and the HSU Office of Diversity and Inclusion. 826-3148.

23 tuesday MUSIC

Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. 10 p.m. The Depot, HSU. Pacific Northwest hip hop duo drops rhymes. New Orleans based DEE-1 and Xperience open. $20. humboldt. edu/aspresents. 826-3928.

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obstacles are thrown at us,” he writes. Dude’s hardcore. In the meantime, Eddie will stroll through the much more temperate climates of Humboldt when he graces HSU’s Van Duzer Theatre on Saturday, Oct. 20. This is a remarkably intimate venue for the artist at this stage in his wildly successful career. Just last month, he released Stripped, a concert film recorded live at New York’s Madison Square Garden. In the event that you weren’t able to secure a (pricey $55) ticket, Izzardphiles can look forward to his heavily made-up take on “Grandpa” in Mockingbird Lane, NBC’s reboot of the ’60s sitcom The Munsters. The pilot episode, which still has not been greenlighted to be a series at this point, airs on Friday, Oct. 26. For more info, head to humboldt.edu/centerarts and/or eddieizzard.com. — Andrew Goff

Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

822-2227

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012

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cd White Manna By White Manna Holy Mountain  

There’s a unique  duality to White Manna, the Arcata-based psychrock band, which makes odd sense. Though it is  partially named after a surviving ’50s burger joint in  Hackensack, N.J., the word “manna” refers to the wafers eaten by ancient Israelites, wafers that also can  produce sensations akin to psilocybin mushrooms  or peyote. This duality, one that joins greasy burgers  and ancient mind-altered spirituality, has served the  band extremely well. And its self-titled full-length release by the prestigious UK label, Holy Mountain, is a  sheer sonic force and arguably the finest 2012 debut  to be released so far. White Manna draws inspiration from ’70s Detroit  bands like MC5 and The Stooges, who constructed a  musical framework influenced by factory-like rhythm  and sound, then filters that through ’90s psych-rock  and garage influences. The approach is focused, while  allowing for rough edges. “Acid Head,” the slowburning opening cut, sets the tone of the record,  building from hum to blast, with neither purely  chaotic nor slickly orchestrated heaviness; instead, it  feels oddly organic and methodical. If those Detroit  predecessors took inspiration from the metallic  sounds of once-thriving auto factories, then White  Manna draws from the slower, burning-orange glow  of the melding process of metal. As opposed to a band like the Bay Area’s Black  Rebel Motorcycle Club, with whom it shares a few  obvious influences, there’s a constant undercurrent  of energy that keeps the music buoyant, elevated  instead of ambling into some type of void. The work  of locally based recording engineer Peter Dalmolen  (from The Nucleus) and mastering engineer Brian  Pyle (of Starving Weirdos/Ensemble Economique)  masterfully captures the band’s raw sound while providing clarity in the overall mix, allowing the listener  to hear each distinct instrument. There are no gratuitous solos or any other distractions bringing attention to one particular instrument or part. There’s an unusual Zen-like discipline  to the execution; it propels and gives natural arcs to  these five lengthy, yet dense, compositions that flow  from one song into the next. Vocalist, guitarist and  bandleader David “J” Johnson, bassist Johnny Webb,  drummer Tavan Anderson, keyboardist Nate Clement  and guitarist Cody West all contribute to the unified  arrangements. (Dario Marcello and Anthony Taibi  have subsequently replaced the latter two members.) With the release this impressive debut, White  Manna joins an unspoken collective of current  Humboldt-based bands, such as Starving Weirdos/ Ensemble Economique and Ash Borer, that have  garnered considerable attention, nationwide and  abroad for challenging, uncompromising work that  runs underground, below the celebrated mainstream.  True to its namesake, White Manna, by drawing from  an industrial, blue-collar aspect of musical history,  rises to a powerfully engaging trance-like plateau.  — Mark Shikuma See White Manna on Tuesday, Oct. 23,   at The Shanty.

MOVIES

Lady in the Lake (1947). 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Screening of the Robert Montgomery-directed Philip Marlowe classic starring Montgomery, Audrey Totter and Lloyd Nolan. Hosted by Michael Logan. Part of the Based on the Book film series. humlib.org. 269-1910.

FOOD

Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Group of local business people who get together once a week to give and receive referrals. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Volunteer training meeting for those interested in gathering signatures for a proposed ordinance that would require employers with 25 or more workers in Eureka to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Nondenominational prayer group. E-mail dlbitte@hotmail. com. 834-5800.

24 wednesday EVENTS

Domestic Violence Awards Luncheon. Noon-1:30 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. Humboldt County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council presents its outstanding achievement awards to Leslie Colegrove, Madison Evans, Kim Schneider, Vicky McCully and to Humboldt Housing NOW. E-mail SusanGSMcGee@ aol.com. 601-6042. Punishment on Trial. 6 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Learn about Prop. 34 which, if passed, could end the death penalty in California. Featuring local DJs, Scott Langley’s Death Row Photography Project, a film compilation and speakers. $5. E-mail losmediapoets@ gmail.com. 822-1575.

MUSIC

Brother Ali. 9 p.m. The Depot, HSU. CenterArts presents the planet’s foremost albino Muslim rapper. Special guests Homeboy Sandman with DJ Sosa and The Reminders. $15/$10 HSU students. www.humboldt.edu/~carts. 826-3928.

DANCE

North Coast Dance Membership Gala. 5:30 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Presenting the Halloween-inspired work, “March of the Ballet Zombies.” RSVP. arkleycenter.com. 442-1956.

SPOKEN WORD

Storyteller Duffy Hudson. 3 and 6: 30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Nationally known storyteller/actor performs as Dr. Seuss at 3 p.m. and returns as Edgar Allan Poe at 6:30 p.m. humlib.org. 269-1910.

ETC.

Eel River Valley Founders BNI. 7:30-9 a.m. Victorian Inn, 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale. Meeting of local business owners. 407-6827. Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Oct. 22 listing. Orchard Field Trip. 10 a.m. Clendenen’s Apple Orchard, Fortuna. Kids and parents tour the orchard, learn about

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

the different types of apple trees, hear about how the apples are picked, see where the apples are stored, and enjoy a cider tasting. Sponsored by North Coast Parents. northcoastparents.org. Food Day 2012. 6 p.m. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. Screening of HBO series Weight of the Nation with discussion to follow. Sponsored by Community Nutrition Action Partners. foodforpeople.org. 445-3166.

WELLNESS

Eureka Mindfulness Group. 7:15 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Led by Cindee Grace. Topic: “Beating the Blues.” Fragrance free, please. $3/$6 free will donation. 269-7044.

25 thursday EVENTS

All Species Ball. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Come dressed as your favorite plant or animal. Costume contest and music by Sour Mash Hug Band, Kindred Spirits and Missing Link DJs Matt and Adam. Proceeds benefit the Northcoast Environmental Center. $15/$10 adv. 822-1575.

MUSIC

EPROM. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. World Famous presents the diverse, funky and energetic soundsmith, blending live remixing and manipulation of hiphop and dubstep with bass-heavy neurcrunk. Event also features Slugabed, KiloWatts and MikeyDataBlend. $20/$15 adv. 822-1220. The Black Pirate. 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. See Oct. 18 listing.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See Oct. 18 listing.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. See Oct. 18 listing. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. See Oct. 18 listing.

LECTURE

Who Will Feed Us in a Planet in Crisis? 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, BSS Room 166, Arcata. Sustainable Futures Speaker Series continues with UC Berkeley agroecology professor Dr. Miguel Altieri. E-mail pjs26@ humboldt.edu. 826-3653. Prosperity! For The Aspiring Entrepreneur. 5:30-8 p.m. Siemens Hall, HSU. Economic Fuel workshop covers the basics of economic development strategy. www. economicfuel.org. 476-2780.

ETC.

Parent/Son Discussion Group. 6-8 p.m. Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Six Rivers Planned Parenthood presents a discussion group for parents and their sixth- to eighth-grade sons. Topics include puberty, communication, relationships and responsibility. $5. 445-2018. Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Oct. 18 listing.

Heads Up…

Ride the Voter Bus. Persons with disabilities and seniors in the greater Eureka area will have an opportunity to get a free ride to cast their vote in the upcoming Nov. 6 election. Reservations are required and potential bus riders are asked to call the Humboldt Community Access and Resource Center at 443-7077. Call for Entries. Redwood Art Association is seeking art for its second Winter Exhibition. Entry is open to RAA members and will be held Oct. 20 between the hours of 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the RAA gallery at 603 F St., Eureka. More info at redwoodart.org. ●

The Black Pirate

It’s a tradition. Every year the ArMack Orchestra, comprised of students from McKinleyville and Arcata high schools, heads out on a journey to play a concert and learn more about music someplace far away. Last year it was London. The next big trip is to New York City where the orchestra will compete in a music festival and perform at no less than Carnegie Hall. How do you get to Carnegie Hall? The answer to the old joke is “practice, practice, practice,” and you can be sure that’s part of the plan. But getting there also requires a fair amount of fundraising. That leads us to another ArMack tradition, the annual not-so-silent movie. Every year Maestra Carol Jacobsen selects some silent film classic and puts together a score as a soundtrack (along with sound effects cues) to be performed by the student orchestra. This time out the film is a Douglas Fairbanks swashbuckler from 1926, The Black Pirate. The high seas adventure begins with pirates looting and sinking a ship, assuming that they’ve killed all aboard since, “Dead men tell no tales.” What they don’t know is that an old man and his son made it to shore. When his father dies, the son (Fairbanks) vows vengeance. There’s plenty of what you’d expect from a pirate flick: sword fights, buried treasure, wooden legs, a touch of romance. Those attending are invited to dress up in pirate garb, boo the villains, cheer the hero and say things with extended “rrr” sounds. Arrre you ready for popcorn? A two-weekend run of The Black Pirate starts Oct. 18 at McKinleyville High with shows at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday and an extra Saturday matinee at 2 p.m. The same schedule (including the matinee) repeats the following weekend, Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 25-27, at Arcata High. Admission is just $5. Bring extra booty since there will be snacks available. For more information call 822-5453 or go to armack.org. — Bob Doran

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, oCt. 18, 2012

21


That dude from the “Bennifer” headlines makes one of the year’s best movies By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

ARGO. Ben Affleck spent most of his thirties getting kicked around by trolls and bottom-feeders who dragged his personal life and professional accomplishments through the mud. I’ve never understood why so many people saw fit to pile on the guy; he’s always seemed likeable enough to me. So it’s been satisfying to watch him become an accomplished filmmaker and push his middle fingers up at his detractors. Affleck demonstrated extraordinary poise and restraint behind the camera with his first two features — Gone Baby Gone (2007) and The Town (2010). The former, a grim kidnap drama, and the latter, a taut bank robbery romance, both showcase insightful performances, restrained pacing and honest, emotional storytelling. In hindsight they seem like practice runs for his most masterful effort yet. With Argo, all of the attributes that make Affleck a noteworthy filmmaker come together in one of the most satisfying and expertly made movies of the year. It’s set during the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-80. After the American-installed Shah of Iran falls ill and seeks treatment/ asylum in the U.S., revolutionaries take to the streets of Tehran. Protesting the Shah’s westernizing influence and rule-by-

torture, they eventually overrun and occupy the American embassy. All but six of the embassy staff are captured and held captive. Those six diplomats, sheltered by the Canadian ambassador, become the object of a contentious, secret rescue operation. It falls to C.I.A exfiltration expert Tony Mendez (Affleck) to construct airtight false identities for them and smuggle them out of the country. With some Hollywood help, he devises a plan: He and the diplomats will pose as a Canadian science-fiction film crew scouting locations in Iran. Seems implausible, right? Kind of harebrained and ludicrous? You’re not wrong, and yet it really happened. Argo opens with the overthrow of the embassy and then takes us methodically through the planning and execution of the rescue operation: from the smoky backrooms of Langley, where spooks argue over the efficacy of even less practical plans, to the B-list Hollywood studios where the fake movie has its real offices, and eventually to Tehran for a breathlessly tense climax. As a director, Affleck goes admirably old-school. He knows how to frame a shot and move the camera, but he’s not out to dazzle us with style. When appropriate, as in the frenzied scenes that open

not be the movie we are currently watching. It’s a post-modern movie-within-amovie concept: a clever idea, but a little wanting in the execution. Martin’s loony best friend (Sam Rockwell) operates an apparently profitable dog-napping enterprise with a business partner (Christopher Walken). When they ransom the shih tzu of an unbalanced crime boss (Woody Harrelson), they have to go on the run to avoid reprisal. The trailer implied brisk and madcap, but it’s as bleak and deliberately paced as McDonagh’s previous feature. It’s also punctuated by an excess of gratuitous bloody violence and a number of plot elements that should have stayed in the notebook they were culled from. On the plus side, the actors, across the board, are very good. Walken gives one of his finest performances in years. And some of the dialogue crackles and surprises, but that just highlights the lines that don’t work. And that’s a snapshot of the movie’s overall lack of follow-through. The script is full of clever, entertaining ideas, but they’re diminished by overcrowding. Given some sure-handed editing in the early stages, Seven Psychopaths could have been a classic, but it will probably be forgotten. R. 110m. —John J. Bennett

Previews

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4. Hey, look! It’s another Paranormal Activity movie! The fourth one! Probably the paranormalest yet! R. 88m. ALEX CROSS. Tyler Perry, of Madea fame, steps into the lead role in this adaptation of author James Patterson’s serial killer thriller series, with Matthew Fox (Lost) as the villain. PG13. 101m. The Arcata Theater Lounge is gearing up for Halloween with one of the most pants-wettingly scary movies of all time, William Friedkin’s 1973 classic The Exorcist, Friday at 8 p.m. If you go to the theater continued on next page

Oct. 19 Oct. 24

NEW & USED

www.wildwood.ws

Affleck’s Revenge

the movie, he goes gritty and handheld, using quick cuts to reinforce the unrest. But when the action pulls back and calms down, so does the camera. For most of the movie, it moves slowly and judiciously, giving us an opportunity to take in the exquisitely detailed sets and costumes. And as the story builds, the camera’s presence becomes less and less discernible. This efficient camerawork is an impressive sign of self-confidence. Affleck believes in his script, his actors and his own grasp of the production strongly enough to settle down and just do the work. This story wouldn’t benefit from crazy camera tricks or slam-bang editing, so he eschews them. The result is a movie that is epic in scope but focused and economical in method. Argo is also filled with tremendous performances. In the lead role, Affleck acquits himself admirably, bringing to Mendez an utterly convincing mix of sadness, resignation and self-confidence. As his immediate superior, Bryan Cranston is excellent as usual, and John Goodman and Alan Arkin share a number of great, funny scenes as the Hollywood operators backing Mendez’s play. This is a masterful movie, a throwback of sorts, refreshingly devoid of irony or sarcasm. It’s a history lesson, a potent thriller and a meditation on trust and commitment. It is also very much about the excitement, humanity and cross-cultural currency of the movies. R. 120m. SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS.  I was ready to love the latest from writer/director Martin McDonagh (In Bruges). The cast is spectacular, the premise is original, and the trailer promised violence and jokes in equal measure. It sounded almost obscenely good. But it isn’t. Certainly not bad, but maybe even more disappointing in light of “what might have been.” Colin Farrell plays Martin, a drunken Irish screenwriter living in LA and struggling to write his next movie. That movie is called 7 Psychopaths and may or may

Fri Oct 19 - The Exorcist (1973) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Sun Oct 21 - Men in Black (1997) Doors 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG-13 Mon Oct 22 - Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors at 5:15 p.m. Free All ages Wed Oct 24 - Sci Fi Night ft. The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages Free

Folk Instruments Books & Accessories

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St. northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

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Movie Times

* = sAt./sun. eArly sHows

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 10/19- 10/25 unless otherwise noted. PArAnormAl ACtivity 4 Alex Cross Argo Hotel trAnsylvAniA 3D Hotel trAnsylvAniA 2D sinister FrAnkenweenie 3D FrAnkenweenie 2D seven PsyCHoPAtHs Here Comes tHe Boom tAken 2 PitCH PerFeCt AtlAs sHruggeD: PArt 2 looPer

12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10 12:15, 3:10, 6:05, 9:00 12:55, 5:45 11:55, 3:20, 8:05 2:10, 4:35, 7:00, 9:30 12:05, 4:55 2:30, 7:20, 9:45 1:10, 3:50, 6:35, 9:15 12:20, 3:00, 5:40, 8:20 1:30, 3:55, 6:20, 8:45 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 8:55 11:55, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00 12:10, 3:05, 5:50, 8:40

mill Creek Cinema 707-839-3456

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 10/19 - 10/25 unless otherwise noted. PArAnormAl ACtivity 4 Alex Cross Hotel trAnsylvAniA 3D Hotel trAnsylvAniA 2D sinister tAken 2 Argo FrAnkenweenie 3D FrAnkenweenie 2D PitCH PerFeCt looPer Here Comes tHe Boom

*1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 *1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 *3:15, 8:05 *12:50, 5:45 *1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30 *12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 *12:35, 3:25, 6:15, 9:05 2:50 *12:30, 5:00 7:00 9:20 *12:25, 3:10, 5:50, 8:30

minor theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 10/19 - 10/25 unless otherwise noted.

PArAnormAl ACtivity 4 Argo PitCH PerFeCt

*2:15, 4:35, 7:00, 9:25 *12:50, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00 *1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10

Fortuna theater

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 10/19 - 10/25 unless otherwise noted. PArAnormAl ACtivity 4 Argo Here Comes tHe Boom tAken 2 Hotel trAnsylvAniA FrAnkenweenie PitCH PerFeCt

12:50, 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, 9:45 1:20, 4:05, 6:50, 9:40 1:30, 4:25, 7:05, 9:30 1:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:45 1:40, 4:15 6:45, 9:25

garberville theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville looPer

10/19 - 10/25: 7:30 EXCEPT 10/24: 6:30

continued from previous page with any bejesus in you, this movie will scare it right out. Sunday’s feature should be easier on your blood pressure: Barry Sonnenfeld’s sci-fi comedy Men in Black (1997) represents Hollywood escapism at its finest. 6 p.m. Staying with the comedic alien theme, next Wednesday’s Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night features The Lost Skeletons of Cadavra, a spot-on 2001 spoof of sci-fi B movies from the ’50s, featuring mad scientists, a seductive beatnik and an alien named Kro-Bar. That will be followed by The Eye Creatures, a half-assed 1965 flying saucer flick. MST3K quips sold separately. Next Tuesday, the Humboldt County Library’s “Based on the Book” series continues its retrospective of classic noir films based on Raymond Chandler’s hard-boiled private eye Philip Marlowe. This time out it’s Lady in the Lake (1947), with Robert Montgomery as Marlowe. The screening will be hosted by Michaeal Logan.

Continuing

ATLAS SHRUGGED PART 2. Critics and audiences got in on the shrugging, too, the former calling this adaptation of Ayn Rand’s propaganda novel “a disaster” and the latter staying away in droves. PG. 112m. FRANKENWEENIE. Tim Burton directs this black-and-white stop-motion film about a quixotic boy who resurrects his dead dog. PG. 87m. HERE COMES THE BOOM. Kevin James panders to two audiences as a high school biology teacher trying to rescue the music program (bleeding hearts) by competing in mixed martial arts (red-meat eaters). PG. 105m. HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA. Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) runs a posh, monsters-only hotel, catering to the likes of Frankenstein (Kevin James) and the Mummy (CeeLo Greene). PG. 91m. LOOPER.  Joe (Joseph Gordon Levitt) is a mob hitman in the future who’s supposed to kill an older version of himself (Bruce Willis), sent back from the future’s future. Smart, trippy sci-fi. R. 118m. PITCH PERFECT. Anna Kendrick heads the cast in a music-drenched tale of an all-girl a capella group striving to win a championship. PG13. 112m. SINISTER. Ethan Hawke stars as a truecrime novelist who accidentally unleashes some bad supernatural juju that was minding its own business in a box of old home movies. Oops. R. 109m. TAKEN 2. An ex-CIA agent proficient in the whupping of ass (Liam Neeson) has to protect his family from kidnappers. PG13. 90m. —Ryan Burns

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012 northcoastjournal.com North COAST Coast Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, Oct.11,18, 2012•• JourNal JOURNAL OCT. 2012 northcoastjournal.com 31 32 NORTH 32

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

CASCADIA LEADERSHIP PROGRAM. Cascadia Center for Leadership is accepting applications for the 2013 ten-day Leadership Program. A program of the Humboldt Area Foundation, Cascadia is led by Mary Gelinas and Roger James, who also co-direct GelinasJames, Inc., an international consulting and training firm. They offer cutting-edge leadership concepts and tools to emerging and seasoned organizational and community leaders. 2013 session dates are Jan. 1718; Jan. 31 & Feb. 1; Feb. 21-22; April 4-5; April 25-26.The $1,750 participant fee includes meals, materials, and tuition. Limited partial scholarships available. Apply on-line at www.cascadialeadership.org. Questions, email info@cascadialeadership.org or call Heather Equinoss, (707) 442-2993. Space is limited and the application deadline is Fri., Oct. 26. (CMM-1025)

Computers

INTRO TO ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR CS5. Learn the drawing program used to create logos, technical and free-form illustrations, banners, posters, web graphics and more. With Annie Reid. Tues.s/Thurs.s, Oct. 30-Nov. 13, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (C-1025)

CREATING TUMBLERS & MUGS. Ongoing, weekly the first and third Mon., 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Create whimsical ceramic mugs for our fundraising events. All ages welcome. Attend 3 workshops and receive a final product free. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. 707-826-1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-1018)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

Communication

LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227)

DOES GOD HAVE A PLAN FOR YOU? Questions about life’s purpose and divine intervention discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Oct. 21, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-1018) FREE PARENT/SON DISCUSSION GROUP. HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your son how to become a healthy & responsible young man, then who will? The Media ? His Peers? Not likely. He needs you! Six River Planned Parenthood Presents this interactive workshop for 6th- 8th grade boys and his parents, focusing on responsibility, peer pressure, and the changes to look forward to during puberty. Thurs., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m, Six River Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (CMM-1025) MOTIVATION, EXPECTATIONS & CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK. A management workshop. Develop your staff and increase motivation with clear communication of roles, responsibilities and boundaries, while delivering timely feedback. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $85 (includes materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended (C-1101) I AM… SAFE ZONE LGBT ALLY DEVELOPMENT TRAINING. Oct., 22, 8:30-4 p.m, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, Eureka. $75 register at www.iamsafezone.com.Want to better serve your LGBT clients and community? Join local resident and nationally recognized trainer, Jessica Pettitt, for this local training to learn about Heterosexual, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender stereotypes, power and privilege dynamics, and how your own life can make you the best ally ever! Reduce stigma, misunderstanding, and isolation and increase collaboration, advocacy, and empowerment. CEUs are available. Sliding scale scholarships available. Got ?’s jess@iamsocialjustice. com or (917) 543-0966. (CMM-1018)

DJEMBE & DUNDUN DRUM WITH BOLOKADA CONDE. True Djembe master comes to Arcata!!! Oct. 20, 2:30-4:30 p.m., Oct. 21, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Redwood Raks, 824 L St., Arcata. Please bring a Djembe, some will be available also. $20 (DMT-1018)

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

ADORNI FITNESS CENTER MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL. Exclusive offer available only in Oct.! Start a new fitness membership & pay no initiation fee! Membership includes Unlimited Group Fitness Classes, Free Personal Trainers & more! Hurry in to take advantage of this special by signing up by Oct. 31, 2012. Visit the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive or call 441-4248. (F-1018)


HARD STYLE LIFTING. With Levi Rivas. Learn the kettlebell basics. Tues.s and Fri.s, 6 p.m., in Fortuna. Sign up for classes online at http://www.kjhanzfitness.com or contact Levi Rivas at LeviLrivas@gmail. com. Personal training sessions available. (F-1101) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1227) KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./ Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1025) PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1025)

AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0927) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-0110) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227)

Holiday

HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL STORYBOOK ADVENTURE. What would your favorite storybook look like if it came to life? Come to a Storybook Adventure at Eureka Recreation’s Annual Halloween Carnival on Wed., Oct. 31, 5:30-7:30 p.m at the Adorni Center. A safe alternative to trick-or-treating for youth 12 & under accompanied by an adult. $2/child, adults are free. Call 441-4244 for more info. (H-1025)

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Kids & Teens

BASKETBALL & SOCCER CLASSES FOR KIDS. Eureka Recreation offers basketball and soccer classes for kids ages 2-7 years starting Oct. 19. Learn the basics & sharpen gross motor skills in a fun, nurturing environment. Days & times vary by class. $25-30.Call 441-4244 for more info., or Register online at www. eurekarecreation.com (K-1018) CREATIVE DANCE FOR LITTLE FEET. Children, 3-5 years, express their creative and physical energy through dance as they fly like a bird, stretch like a cat and touch rainbows. Mon.s, 9:45-10:30 a.m. Contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit www. cityofarcata.org/rec. (K-1018) DANCE CLASSES FOR KIDS. Eureka Recreation offers a variety of dance classes for kids ages 1½ - 12 years , from Music & Movement, So You Think You Can Dance, Tiny Tutus Beginning Ballet, Hip Hop, Fiesta Kids and more! Classes starting Oct. 20. Days & times vary by class. $20-30. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-1018) continued on next page

Sock Knitting 10/20 & 10/27 If you can knit & purl, you are ready to knit a sock! In this class you will learn the basic construction of a top down sock, including two stretchy cast-ons, how to join & knit in the round, all parts of a sock progressively in two sessions. FIrSt session – we will cast-on, learn tricks of knitting in the round, ribbing & leg of sock, with a preview of the heel flap, completed at home. Second session – turning the heel (a truly magical event), shaping the gusset on your sock, practice shaping a toe & learn the Kitchener stitch. cost is $50.00 (includes materials)

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

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continued from previous page GYMNASTICS. Classes available for 15 months–adult, offered various days/times. All skill levels welcome. Drop-in classes for 15 months-4 years Sat.s, 10-10:45 a.m. & Fri.s, 5:30-7:30 p.m. for 6-12 years. Contact Arcata Recreation 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org/rec (K-1018) LITTLE BUDDHAS YOGA. Children’s Yoga Series. Fri.s, Nov. 2-Dec. 14 (no class Nov 23). Ages: 3-6, 4:15-5 p.m. Ages: 7-10, 5-5:45 p.m. Location: Redwood Raks. $50/6-week series. www.littlebuddhasyoga.com/ children (K-1101) KIDS CLIMBING AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM. Learn climbing technique, safety, and build confidence at Far North Climbing Gym. Mon./Thurs., 3:30-5 p.m. Ages 6-12. $70 for 4 days. Corner of 10th and K St., Arcata. (707) 495-2774. (K-1129) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

Lectures

MYSTERIES, RUINS, & REMINDERS OF THE NORTH SPIT. Between Humboldt Bay and the ocean there is a concentration of evidence of times past. See it all on a 3-1/2 hour field trip. Sat., Nov. 3, 1-4:30 p.m. Call (707) 269-4000 to register or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (L-1018)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) THREE ANCIENT MYSTERIES. Explore King Arthur, the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World and the demise of the dinosaurs with Barry Evans. Wed., Nov. 7-28, 1-3 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1101) CREATIVE JOURNAL WRITING. For both experienced diarists and anyone who has been thinking of writing a journal, this course with Lorraine Miller-Wolf will help you explore new depths of yourself through various journal writing approaches. Tues., Nov. 6 & 13, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1025) MANAGING YOUR ESTATE, AN OVERVIEW. Learn about estate management through the use of powers of attorney for health and finances, trusts, conservatorships and wills with Kip Roberti. Mon., Oct. 29 and Nov. 5, 6-8 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025) MUSHROOM WALK. Learn to identify a broad variety of local fungi. Includes field trip transportation and lunch. With Dick Wild. Thurs., Nov. 1, 6-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1025) SHARE A STORY, RECORD A STORY. Oral History That Lasts. Do you or someone you know have a story to tell? Learn the basics of interviewing and recording oral histories with Renee Ross. Sat., Nov. 3-17, 10 a.m.Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025) TAKE IT SLOW, TAKE THE TRAIN. Learn the ins and outs of train travel with Louise Bacon-Ogden and David Ogden. Tues., Oct. 30, 5:30-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025)

SPIRITUALITY VS. PSYCHOSIS. Bringing Psychology’s New Paradigm into the 21st Century. Where can the line be drawn between “madness” and “mystery”? How does “faith” and “superstition” survive a secular and scientific world view? Explore with Bonnie Shand. Tues., Oct. 30-Dec. 11, 1-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1025)

Spiritual

SHAMANIC RITUAL HEALING CIRCLE, KARMIC BALANCING. A welcome gathering with shrine building, song, prayer, drumming, etc.! For more info call Scott Sherman 445-1018. Suggested donation $10-15 per participant. Sat., Oct. 20, 8:30-10 p.m., Sacred Palace, 516 5th. St, Eureka. www.humboldtpsychotherapy.com, shamanicvisionpsychotherapy. blogspot.com. (S-1018) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation

DROP-IN SPORTS AT ARCATA COMMUNITY CENTER. Join community members of all ages, and get active. Basketball, Tues.s & Thurs.s, 8-10 p.m. Volleyball, Wed.s, 7-9 p.m. Badminton, Sun.s, 4-7 p.m. & Tues.s & Thurs.s, 6-8 p.m. Table Tennis, Mon.s & Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. Contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/rec (SR-1018) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1227)

Therapy/Support

TYPE 1 DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP. meeting the 3rd Tues. of each month, 6-7:30 p.m, at the Foundation of Medical Care, 3100 Edgewood Rd. Eureka.Contact 443-0124. (TS-0214) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, M.A., and Carolyn Albee, M.A. Fri., Nov. 2, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., $30 fee includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre-registration is required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 8263731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V-1025)

Wellness/Bodywork

TUES. & THURS. AFTERNOON MASSAGE WITH DIANE DAVIS. Enhance your Pilates or yoga practice or just unwind and relax with a massage session at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Nationally certified since 1997, Diane is trained in Hawaiian Lomi Lomi, Myofascial Release, Swedish, Craniosacral, Acupressure and Reiki. Questions? Call (707) 268-8926 to schedule an appointment. (W-0110)

Coast Journal • Thursday, NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY,Oct. OCT.18,11,2012 2012• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 3434North

5 ELEMENTS OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Five Elements (Wu xing) is an ancient Chinese worldview that has relevance today in Traditional Chinese Medicine, as well as in our day-to-day living. Explore what each of the Five Elements embody and how they relate to our health today. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., Nov. 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-1101) FIND YOUR CENTER AT OM SHALA YOGA! Come practice in a supportive and conscious community. We offer a wide-range of classes for all levels and ages, taught by skilled and dedicated teachers in a warm, light-filled studio in the heart of Arcata! Enjoy a free sauna, showers and lounge with each class. Our gorgeous retail boutique offers yoga apparel, props, books, music and gifts. Yoga styles include: Anusara, Vinyasa, Forrest, Kundalini, Restorative, Prenatal, Kids and more. Discounts for seniors, students and beginners. Take a breath. Enjoy the world. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (W-1018) LOWER BACK, HIPS & SACRUM WITH ROBYN SMITH. Learn yoga therapy techniques to relieve your pain. No experience necessary. Includes handouts. Sat., Oct. 20, Noon-2:15 p.m. Community Yoga Center, 890 G St, Arcata Plaza. www.innerfreedomyoga.com. (W-1018) INTRO TO TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Curious about acupuncture? Want to know how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) works and what conditions it might benefit? This 2-hour class will explore basic TCM theory and tools of the medicine, including acupuncture, herbs, dietary therapy and more. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., Nov. 1, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-1025) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Herbal Clinic Class. Jan. 14-April 15, 2013, Refine and expand your herbal counseling skills. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.-Nov. 2013. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in-depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Bothwell & Rosemary Gladstar, Nov. 14-23, 2013. More information to come soon. Get in touch to be on the interested list. Register online at www. dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-1101) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1025) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Jan. 22, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

classified@northcoastjournal.com

FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT

Is holding a public hearing on the Strategic Plan Update 2012. The public hearing is being held on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 from 6 p.m to 7 p.m ., at Humboldt County Office of Education, Sequoia A conference room, 901 Myrtle Ave. Eureka. The public is invited to attend. For more information about First 5 Humboldt, visit our website at www.humkids.org or call our office at (707) 445-7389 10/18/2012 (12-300)

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at a public auction by competitive bidding on the 2nd of November 2012, at noon, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini-Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as follows. Items to be sold include but are not limited to the following: Unit #118 Mary Oliva - stereo & speakers, floor jack, vacuum, luggage, boxed items Unit #205 Laura Boatsman - furniture, heater, infant seat, boxed items, toys Unit #213 Jack Sarter - TV, cooler, dresser, table, microwave, boxed items Unit #224 Theresa Simmons - gun cabinet, couch, desk, dresser, boxed items Unit #277 Heather Gant - luggage, bike, helmet, dresser, misc boxes Unit #333 John Dickerson - sewing machine, stereo & speakers, coffee table, rugs, boxed items Unit #503 Clarence Wren - TV, bed set, electronics, boxed items Unit #507 Larry Seminoff - fishing rods, dresser, boxed items Unit #722 Peggy Silva - old baby carriage, VCR, boxed and bagged items Unit #874 Michael V Rogers - guitar, misc bagged and boxed items Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items are sold “as is” and must be removed from the premises within 24 hours. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Bring a flashlight and padlock(s) Dated this 17th and 24th day of October 2012 CA BOND NO. 0336118 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-298)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00582

The following person is doing business THE CLOTHING DOCK & K STREET ANNEX at 1109 11th St., Arcata, CA 95521. Susan D. Paul 1403 Chester Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual.


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00574

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/30/1999 /s/ Susan Paul This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-301)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00586

The following person is doing business as PURE MAKEUP at 609 E Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Maria Darlina Brandon 3199 Mitchell Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Maria Brandon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-297)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00616

The following persons are doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE at 531 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501. Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 Lane Thomsen Po Box 275/1045 Hawk Hill Rd. Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy /s/ Lane Thomsen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-302)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00617

The following person is doing HUMBOLDT HARDWARE WHOLESALE at 531 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501, 1340 Marsh Rd, Eureka, CA. 95501 Patrick Murphy 1340 Marsh Rd Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/12/2012 /s/ Patrick Murphy

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/2012 (12-303)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00585

The following person is doing business as CURTIS WILSON CA FISHING GUIDES at 1140 Q St., Arcata, CA 95521. Curtis Wilson 1140 Q St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Curtis Wilson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-290)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00601

The following persons are doing business as CHARLIE ROSS INSTALLATIONS at 2848 Campton Heights Dr., Fortuna, CA 95540. Charles Kingsland Ross, Jr. 2848 Campton Heights Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 Mary Lu Ross 2848 Campton Heights Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/1/96. /s Charlie Ross. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 4, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-291)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00604

The following persons are doing business as STEVE AND DAVE’S BAR at 200 First St., Eureka, CA 95501. Bryan and Kadiver Inc. 200 First St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s David Kadiver, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-292)

The following person is doing business as STITCHES-N-BRITCHES at 1225 Central Avenue, McKinleyville, CA 95519, 360 Cedar Hill Lane, Arcata, CA 95521. Kristin Aleen Anderson 360 Cedar Hill Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/01/12. /s Kristin A. Anderson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-280)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00575

The following person is doing business as MANY HANDS GALLERY at 438 2ND St., Eureka, CA 95501. Astra N. Burke 836 3rd St., #B Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/24/2012. /s Astra N. Burke. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-282)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00576

The following persons are doing business as PINE MOUNTAIN LOGGING AND CONSTRUCTION at 25090 Alderpoint Rd., Blocksburg, CA 95514, P.O. Box 170, Blocksburg, CA 95514. Randy Hoisington 25090 Alderpoint Rd. Blocksburg, CA 95514 Dawnita Rose Hoisington 25090 Alderpoint Rd. Blocksburg, CA 95514 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Dawnita Hoisington. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-283)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00587

The following persons are doing business MOM & ME KRAFTY KREATIONS at 2446 18th St., Eureka, CA 95503, P.O Box 91, Willow Creek, CA. 95573. Zena Bushnell 2285 Friday Ridge Rd.

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

Field notes +1 R

H 0

-1

Looking for a Sine

NATURE’S SHAPE! THE HEIGHT OF THE LINE ‘H’ FOLLOWS A SINE CURVE AS THE RADIUS LINE ‘R’ ROTATES THROUGH A FULL CIRCLE. NORTH COAST JOURNAL GRAPHIC

BELOW HUMBOLDT BAY TIDES FOLLOW SINE CURVES. TIDE GRAPH APP FOR THE IPAD

By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

E

ven though we probably grew up in different countries and eras, I bet you and I were introduced to trigonometry the same way: triangles in circles. Draw a triangle inside a circle so that the hypotenuse of the triangle is a radius of the circle, and you can create formulas for the sine, cosine, tangent and all the rest. Unfortunately, this analytic — read static — approach misses the key element of trig, that it’s dynamic. Take the sine. In the context of a triangle in a circle, as the radius line rotates through a full 360 degrees, the value of the sine increases and decreases smoothly between plus-one and minus-one and back again (see graphic). Well yeah, but that’s for scratchy blackboards in dusty classrooms. What the ubiquitous sine really represents is: waves on water; tree branches in wind; inflow and outflow of breath; a child on a swing; stadium waves; to-and fro rocking of an earthquake; phases of the moon through the lunar month; a cyclist standing on pedals pumping up a hill; height of the noonday sun throughout the year; rising and falling of tides. Not to mention sound waves, AC electricity, light and radio waves — the list is endless. The commonality here is oscillation, as some variable swings smoothly from one extreme to the other and back again: The faster it moves, the more the braking force. Here’s a banking analogy, adapted from Kalid Azid’s brilliant mathematical website

“Better Explained” (betterexplained. com). Every week, your weird boss gives you a negative raise based on your bank balance. So if you have $50 in the bank, your raise next week is -$50. Later, when your balance is say -$80, you get a +$80 raise. So as soon as you start making money, your balance is “pulled back” to the mid-point (zero); and as you start losing money, it’s pulled back up. The more you’ve got, the faster you lose it, and the less you’ve got, the faster you gain it. That constant pull towards the mid-point is what keeps the cycle going, represented by the most natural of curves, the sine wave. (By the way, if the shape of a sine wave reminds you of breasts, you’re thinking like an ancient Roman, since etymologically “sine” is cognate with the Latin for “bosom.” This in turn derived from Sanskrit jiva/jya, originally the term for a bow, as in bow and arrow.) The idea for this column came while I was standing on the boardwalk staring at the water. The rhythm of my breath seemed to perfectly match the slow cadence of waves in the bay as I pictured my smoothly changing inhalation and exhalation, slowing to nothing at maximum inand maximum out-breaths. The sine wave: nature’s repeating refrain that tells us we’re not separate from the universe. ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) believes that a life without sines is not worth living.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

35


County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 24, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

continued from previous page.

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-277)

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

1. “Kubla Khan” river 5. Nasal partitions 10. Roth ____ (nest egg option) 13. Modern, to Mahler 14. Evermore (1) 15. ____-pah band 16. Words before date or record 17. Sprite alternative 18. Vietnam’s ____ Dinh Diem 19. Decompose 21. More of a fuddy-duddy 23. Only band to have an album titled “1” reach #1 on the Billboard charts 27. HIV-treating drug 28. Prefix with dermis

DOWN

1. Part of a Q&A: Abbr. 2. ____ shore (12) 3. Store (13) away 4. Core (14) 5. Olympus OM-1, e.g. 6. Females who respond sheepishly? 7. Yore (15) 8. Tickle Me Elmo manufacturer 9. “What ____ state of affairs!” 10. Charge, to a physicist 11. Webster’s shelfmate 12. 1991 Color Me Badd hit “I Adore (16) Mi ____” 14. Following 20. The “O” in GOP

29. Bore (2) 31. Lore (3) 33. Spice Girl Halliwell 35. Rave music 37. Author of “The Raven,” a poem featuring the twenty rhyme words indicated in this puzzle’s clues including the name Lenore (4) 42. Country whose warlord was the subject of the viral video “Kony 2012” 43. Room in la casa 45. Responded sheepishly 47. Explore (5) 50. “Michael, ____ the Boat Ashore” (6)

51. Network absorbed by the CW 52. Actress Kurtz 54. Nevermore (7) 59. Suffix with buff 60. Private ____ 61. Los Angeles’ ____ Tower 63. What a door (8) might be 67. Some MIT grads 68. Fishing nets 69. The Who’s “____, Reign O’er (9) Me” 70. Banned bug spray 71. Wore (10) 72. Opposite of more (11)

22. Lively dances in duple time 23. Implore (17) 24. Fencing sword 25. “Stiff News” crime novelist Catherine 26. Lucifer 30. Neuters 31. “____ Carter III” (bestselling album of 2008) 32. Mrs. Mitt Romney 34. Tree-climbing lizard 36. Sculptor Oldenburg 38. “____ before (18) beauty ...” 39. “Gnarly!” 40. Rowers 41. “The Time Machine” people 44. Floor (19)

45. Kept afloat 46. Most appropriate 48. Furry “Return of the Jedi” creatures 49. 1974 hit “Rock and Roll, Hoochie ____” 53. Firing ____ cylinders 54. Scholarship basis 55. Outpour (20) 56. On a cruise 57. Footnote abbr. 58. iPod model 62. All-Star relief pitcher Robb 64. Pesci of “GoodFellas” 65. School media depts. 66. Hi-____ graphics

EASY #15

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Stormie Freeman-Dare 2446 18th St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s/ Zena Bushnell This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25 (12-286)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00590

The following person is doing business as NATURE’S SERVING at 3750 Harris St., Eureka, CA 95501, 138 B Rocky Creek Rd., Bayside, CA 95524. Leira V. Satlof 138 B Rocky Creek Rd. Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Leira V. Satlof. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-288)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00531

The following persons are doing business as MYOPIA PRESS at 90 Sunny Brae Center, Arcata, CA 95521, 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A, Arcata, CA 95521. Jeff Jensen 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A Arcata, CA 95521 Ruth Jensen 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jeff Jensen, Ruth A. Jensen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 6, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-271)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00546

The following persons are doing business as ENERGY LIFE CENTER at 616 Wood St., Eureka, CA 95501. Forty Four Financial Corp. 1102 5th St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to

transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/13/12. /s Jennifer Oliver, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-269)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00557

The following person is doing business as B.V.’S TREES at 6743 West Ave., Fields Landing, CA 95537, P.O. Box 332, Fields Landing, CA 95537. Brian Nelson Viale 6743 West Ave. Fields Landing, CA 95537 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/19/2012. /s Brian Viale. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 19, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-273)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00562

The following persons are doing business as MEGA MINI FARM at 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12, Eureka, CA 95501. Andrew Gill 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12 Eureka, CA 95501 Leeann Gill 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Andrew Gill. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 20, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-275)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00570

The following person is doing business as JB MARYN GIFT CONCIERGE at 1685 Hideaway Ct., #A, McKinleyville, CA 95519, P.O. Box 2334, McKinelyville, CA 95519. Jodie Jean Marynowski 1685 Hideaway Ct., #A McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/24/12. /s Jodie Marynowski. This statement was filed with the

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARY H. RANDALL CASE NO. PR120247

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARY H. RANDALL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SUSAN RANDALL in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SUSAN RANDALL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 15, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DONALD W. BICKNELL S.B.# 83266 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 5TH STREET, SUITE H EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-0878 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-299)


NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF RICHARD G. KUNES CASE NO. PR120246

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ARLENE M. LINDAU-POWELL, DECEASED CASE NO. PR120229

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MATTHEW A. PESENTI A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by RAYMOND R. PESENTI, JR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that RAYMOND R. PESENTI, JR. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 15, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DONALD W. BICKNELL S.B.# 83266 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 5TH STREET, SUITE H EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-0878 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RICHARD G. KUNES A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MADELINE KUNES in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MADELINE KUNES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 1, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES SBN# 67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ARLENE M. LINDAU-POWELL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by HAROLD LINDAU, SON OF DECEDENT in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that HAROLD LINDAU be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 25, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: KENNETH M. BAREILLES, NO. 44816 533 E STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-9338 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

10/18, 10/25, 11/1/2012 (12-296)

10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-295)

10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-281)

classified @northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOSEPHINE MURIEL FIELDER, FORMERLy KNOWN AS JOSEPHINE MURIEL STEWART CASE NO. PR120212

the

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSEPHINE MURIEL FIELDER, formerly known as JOSEPHINE MURIEL STEWART A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CAROL A. PEARCE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CAROL A. PEARCE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 18, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CATHERINE M. KOSHKIN CSB#149503 LAW OFFICES OF CATHERINE M. KOSHKIN 1116 ELEVENTH STREET ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-2800 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-258)

the Employment

CONTINUED ON next page

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MATTHEW ARTHUR PESENTI CASE NO. PR120244

EUREKA Accounts Payable

Full Time busy, 200+ vendor AP desk. Must have analytical and customer service skills and AA Degree in Accounting or equivalent with 1-2 years of AP work preferably in a high-volume setting. Strong resolution skills, exposure to multi-tier accounting software, MS Office required. BS degree in Finance/Accounting desired. $14.50/hr with bonus eligibility and medical, dental, life, fully-vested 401(k) w/ company match, and PTO. Job posting at www.greendiamond.com. Send resume to lzambas@greendiamond.com

Log Accounting

Process sales agreements and invoices; monitor payment activities. Process residuals, log scale/weight ticket data, & quarterly yield tax. Coordinate daily activities of log accounting system. Assist month-end close, prepare JE, reconcile accounts. Must have 4-6 years experience in transaction processing or log accounting in a high-volume, high-accuracy setting. Customer driven, analytical, team player required. BS degree in Accounting or equivalent required. Will consider experience that equates to degree. Strong resolution skills, exposure to multi-tier accounting software, MS Office required. Competitive salary w/ bonus eligibility and medical, dental, life, fullyvested 401(k) w/ company match, and PTO. Job posting at www.greendiamond.com. Send resume w/salary history to lzambas@greendiamond.com.

VOCATIONAL COUNSELOR I

County of Humboldt $2,672- $3,429 monthly plus excellent benefits

Under supervision, provide client assessment, vocational counseling and job development support for a variety of adult and youth employment training and placement programs. Requires knowledge of principles and practices of vocational assessment and development of employment plans, and skill in managing client caseloads. Desired education and experience would include the equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university with major coursework in psychology, social science or a closely related field. Final Filing deadline: October 26, 2012. For more information and application come to Humboldt County Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 24 hr. Jobline (445-2357) www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

3737

northcoastjournal.com Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 2012 • North • North Coast JourNal • thursday, oCt. 18,18, 2012 northcoastjournal.com


Employment

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

Now Hiring: We are hiring up to 20 full time production workers for various companies! Pay is $10/hr. These are very 14 W. Wabash Ave. physically demanding jobs Eureka, CA requiring heavy lifting and long hours on your feet. Must pass pre-employment drug eurekaca.expresspros.com test and background check. Call today to apply!

268-1866

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

Positions SITE ADMINISTRATOR, 1 F/T Humboldt MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST, 2 F/T McKinleyville MEDICAL BILLER, 2 F/T Arcata RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, 1 F/T Crescent City MEDICAL ASSISTANT , 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 P/T Arcata Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application Call 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

Health Promotion technician ARCATA – F/T Shall work to promote healthy lifestyles within the American Indian community through: presentations, health fairs, community mtgs, individual & team teaching. Will work with youth. Must have a HS Diploma or equiv; 1yr related exp &/or training. Health care Billing Manager (Business Office Manager) Shall oversee the day to day billing & collections functions. Must have Bachelor’s degree & 2yrs supervisory exp in Billing. Exp may be substituted for degree. Certification required for position-see description. contract Health Services (cHS) Manager Shall oversee the day to day planning, program development, administration of a comprehensive CHS program. Must have Bachelor’s degree & 5yrs exp processing CHS & supervisory exp. Exp may be substituted for degree. Grants coordinator Shall be responsible for the full cycle of grant proposals. Bachelor’s degree & 4yrs exp in grant writing & 2yrs exp planning & budgeting. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. Applications at|www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes 10/18/12

Journal Readers are the People You want to Hire! 442-1400 • www.northcoastjournal.com

ACTIVITY COORDINATOR Humboldt Senior Resource Center

Adult Day Health and Alzheimer’s Services Responsible for the management of the Activities Dept. as well as supervision of Activity Dept. Program Aides. Plans the recreational and therapeutic activities for participants in a day program that prevents further mental and physical decline for frail elderly or disabled adults. Requires two years experience in a social, recreational or educational program within the past five years, one year of which was full-time in an activities program in a health care, mental health or disabled program setting. Demonstrated ability to: organize and lead a team, communicate clearly (written and orally), train staff, delegate responsibility to others and remain flexible. Will need CPR within 6 months of hire. Current CA. driver’s license, reliable transportation with proof of insurance required. 40 hrs. /week. M-F. $12.52/ hr. Medical, retirement plan and life insurance after 6 months. Some employee paid benefits. Paid sick, vacation and holidays. To view job description and download an application go to: www.humsenior.org or pick up an application at 1910 California St. Eureka, Ca. 95501 Mon.-Thurs. 9-noon and 1-3pm. Submit application and letter of interest online or mail to HR Dept. /Nancy Corral at address listed. Call 443-9747 Ext. 1257 with questions. Open until filled. EOE.

GENERAL MANAGER

Weott Community Services District seeks a permanent P/T General Manager for Water & Waste Water Treatment facilities, salary to be negotiated. Candidate will supervise the Operations staff in maintaining Water & Waste Treatment services to the community in accord with the regulations of the State of California. Additional duties will include reviewing the performance of the Operations staff, creating a capital improvement plan, applying for grants and reporting to Board of Directors at Monthly meetings. Candidate should reside within commuting distance of the District and have some construction or electrical knowledge. State certification in not required, but courses toward certification will be paid by the District. Submit resume with contact information to: General Manager Position PO Box 29 Weott, CA. 95571

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

RECREATION ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR CITY OF EUREKA (REgUlAR PART-TImE) $2,630 – $3,200/ mO (There are 5 steps in the salary range and an appointment can be made at any step depending on qualifications). Do you enjoy working with children; coordinating activities, after school and summer programs, special events and supervising youth? The City of Eureka is looking for an energetic, motivated individual to join our team at the Ryan Youth Center After School Program. A High School Diploma or equivalent plus one year of experience working in recreation programs and activities, is required. may require a valid CDl. Apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. We will be accepting applications until 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 26, 2012. EOE

Become a Mentor! Seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead an integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and receive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Jamie (707) 442-4500 ext. 14 317 Third St. Eureka, CA 95501

HUMBOLDT AREA FOUNDATION SEEKING. two motivated people dedicated to connecting, engaging and inspiring community members of multiple cultures to work together to find solutions to community problems. The Humboldt Community Leadership Organizer will work with a larger team of organizers in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties supporting grassroots leaders. The Regional Community Leadership Development Manager will develop a bi-county organizing organization and funding system. Position open until filled; interviews will occur in November. For more information and to apply, go to www.hafoundation.org or call (707) 442-2993. (E-1025)

MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS, MODELS. Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 866-339-0331 (AAN CAN) (E-1018) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2423214. (E-1018) BILINGUAL CLIENT ADVOCATE. North Coast Rape Crisis Team has opening for a 40+ hr/wk Bilingual (Spanish/English) Client Advocate w/excellent benefits for a team oriented, self-motivated person who wants to provide in-person and phone support to survivors of sexual assault. Applications due on 10/26/12 at 4 p.m. Call 443-2737 for info. EOE (E-1025) DRIVERS NEEDED!! Delivering phone books. Must have license, insurance & own transportation. Call Now! 1-888-718-8485, www. deliveryofphonebooks.com (E-1101) HELP WANTED!!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram. com (AAN CAN) (E-0228) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (E-1220) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)


Employment

Rentals

Commercial Lines Agent • Construction Labor PT Reception • PT Admin Asst. Refrigeration Tech. • IT Director Coming soon -Graphic Design Artist Technology Sales B2B Part Time Outside Sales Loan Servicing Agent

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Crown Club Rep Janitorial Busser/Host Bingo Inventory Clerk Deli Worker Server (Sunset) Bingo Admit Clerk Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. The Eel River Valley Multigenerational Center (The MGC) Board of Directors is seeking a qualified and dynamic Executive Director committed to supervising, directing and promoting the multigenerational community center to the residents of the Eel River Valley. This position will start as part-time , 15-25 hours per week and then become full time. Salary range is $20-$25 an hour, commensurate with experience. For a complete job description and application, please email us at: themgcfortuna@gmail.com. Applications will be accepted until November 4, 2012. (E-1018) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. (AAN CAN) (E-1025)

FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED!!! Enriching Lives is seeking committed individuals interested in opening their home and caring for children with developmental disabilities. Initial & continuing education, 24-hour professional support and a monthly stipend of $1000-4000 provided. Call 268-8891 today! (E-1025) ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (E-1115) BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Jamie, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) TRAINING COORDINATOR. Temporary & Part-time. FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT seeks training coordinator to assist with the implementation of a current professional development grant initiative serving early childhood educators in Humboldt County. Duties will include maintaining training records, including maintaining an online database of program participants. Up to 20 hours per week at an hourly rate of $20.08 per hour. Proficiency in online computer skills required. BA in Child Development or Early Childhood Education is highly desirable. To apply send a letter of interest and a resume to FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT, 1012 Second St., Eureka, CA 95501. Application deadline is Oct. 29, 2012. For further information about the position call (707) 445-7389. (E-1018) your ideal employee may be a Journal reader. 442-1400 VISA/ MC. Place your ad onlinle at www. northcoastjournal.com

ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, parking, some utilities. $600, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1018) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, some utilities, yard. $770, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1018) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, fenced yard, laundry hookups. $1400. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R1018) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Garage, partial utilities paid, onsite laundry. $600. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1018) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE. Carport, laundry hookups, fenced yard. $725. (707) 4438227, www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-1018) EUREKA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 3946 Harrison, #6. W/S Paid. Double Car Garage, Fenced Patio. Will Consider Cat. Rent $850, Vac 11/08. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Fireplace, 2 car garage, pets considered, yard. $1300. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1018) EUREKA UPSTAIRS 2BD. Most utilities paid. $750/month, $1500 deposit. Coin laundry, No smoking/pets/water beds. (707) 4432540. (R-1018) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE. Dishwasher, garage, washer/dryer included, $795. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1018) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Dishwasher, fireplace, fenced yard, laundry hookups $1195. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1018) FORTUNA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1206 P St. City Views, Yard with Deck. Double car garage. Laundry room with hookups. Rent $1500, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM APT. Laundry hookups, some utilities. $795. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R1018) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard w/care, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1300. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-1018) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2214 Fairfield St., Apt., #6. All Utilities Pd. Rent $615. Cat OK, Vac 10/27. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018)

CONTINUED ON next page

Real Estate HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS. Plaza Point Apartments, 977 8th St., Arcata. 1 & 2 bedroom apartments and also apartments with special design features for individuals with a disability. Inquire as to the availability of rental subsidy. Must be 62 years of age or older; or disabled, regardless of age. Call (707) 822-2770, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-1 p.m. TDD #1-800-735-2929. We are an equal opportunity provider and employer. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY ACCESS. (R-1108) ELK RIVER 2900 SF 5BD HOME. No pets. Call for Details. 443-2246. (R-1101) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1140 E St., # 2. W/S/G Pd., Rent $595. Cat OK, Vac 10/26. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 225 Hillsdale St., Apt. #2. W/S/G Pd. Rent $750. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 11/27. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1018) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3222 17th St., Unit C. W/S/G Pd., MtM, Cat OK, Spacious, Garage, Rent $775, Vac 10/16. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 230 Wabash Ave., Apt. #6, #11, #19. W/S/G Pd. Rent $645. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 10/29. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) EUREKA 2BD/1BA DUPLEX. 2926 California St., Unit B. W/S Pd. Rent $750. Cat OK, Vac 11/01. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 17 W 14th St. 6 Mo. Lease, W/C Pets, Den & DR, New Paint, Garage, Rent $975, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1018)

EUREKA STUDIO APARTMENTS. 1507 5th St., Apt. #7 & #9. W/S/G Pd. $460. Section 8 OK. Cat OK, Vac 10/20. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) EUREKA 1300 SF 3BD HOME. No pets. Call for Details. 443-2246. (R-1101) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 1245 Haven Ln., Unit B. W/S/G Pd., SEC 8 OK. Rent $750, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Pd., 6 Month Lease, Sm. Pets OK, Rent $765, Vacant Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1018) ROOM FOR RENT. Redwood Terrace Condominiums. With roommate. No Pets/Drugs/Smoking. Close to Myrtletown Shopping. Access to kitchen/patio. $450/ month, $300/deposit, 1/2 utilities. Clarence 362-2443. No Calls after 9 p.m. (R-1018) ARCATA CLEAN 1BD. No growing, no illegal drugs, no smoking, no pets. References Required. $840/ month plus deposit. (707) 8227471. (R-1018) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

Business Rentals DOWNTOWN EUREKA OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. Close to Courthouse. Call 443-2246 for sizes and pricing. (BR-1101) RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-1108) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

Eureka Office Building

Commercially zoned Victorian near Ingomar Club. Renovated and up to code from the perimeter foundation to the solar panel roof. $265, 000 www.eurekaoffice4sale.com

20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www. SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN) (RE-1018) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www.chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-1025)

Real Estate

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

39


Auto

Buy/Sell/Trade

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

Come on in!

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Pets

Swains Flat OUtpost Garden Center General Store 707-777-3385

Garden Center 707-777-3513

Back From Illness and Open During Construction HAS

DES

HALLO ITEMS

AND

State Hwy 36 • Milemarker 19.5 • Carlotta • Open 9-6

own ld T

NEW

LO

S

335 E Street Eureka • 445-8079 Tues - Sat 10:30AM - 5PM

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

Vintage Clothing Furniture, Housewares & more!

Buy/Sell/Trade

ESTATE AUCTIONS!

THE

CLOTHING DOCK &

K STREET ANNEX

11th & K Streets, Arcata

822-8288

THURS. OCT. 25TH 5:45 PM THURS. NOV. 8TH 5:45 PM check our website for more info, pictures and preview times. REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL ! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945. (BST-1018)

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

www.carljohnsonco.com

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

BOOKS & MUSIC 1/2 PRICE ! Pink Tagged Clothes only 25¢ each! Oct.16-20, Dream Quest Thrift Store-Providing Opportunities for Local Youth in Willow Creek. (530) 629-3564 (BST-1018) MONEY 4 ALL. 11,011 days! Automated. Easy. 831-238-6448 (AAN CAN) (BST-1108)

FLASHBACK 443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues & Sun

SELECT SALE: As is & Zombies

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Gentle Professional Grooming Since 1989

WEEN

What’s New

in O ION CAT

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

JEAN IGNER

• Grooming & Boarding by Linn •

      

 

Pets

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • groomingbyLinn.com • 826-0903

Custom Pet Portraits by Sophia Dennler •

For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

Services GROCERIES DELIVERED. Order today. Delivered tomorrow. Get paid to help advertise. 831-2386448 (AAN CAN) (S-1108) BOUDOIR PHOTOGRAPHY BY VENUS & APHRODITE. Classy to sassy, comfort and privacy guaranteed. $40 fall special. 2234172. (S-0110)

NEED HELP? I do gardening, landscaping, moving & highest quality painting. 20 years experience. $12/hour. Will travel. (707) 442-2732. (S-1018) DIRECTV SPECIAL. Offer. 2012 NFL Sun. Ticket included for FREE. $34.99/month (1yr.) Free HD/DVR. Call 888-881-3313 (S-1018) SLOW INTERNET? Exede offers download speeds 4 times faster! Call now and save $100 on set-up fee. Call (888) 797-6977 (S-1018) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. rockydrill@gmail.com. Use solar energy to heat your home-a proven technology-reasonably priced-Sunlight Heating - CA lic. #972834-(707) 502-1289. (S-1025) CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207) ANNOUNCE THAT JOB OPENING here. Call 442-1400 to place your ad. VISA/MC

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

CAPTURING YOUR DAY IN THE WATER.

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

SET UP YOUR SHOOT TODAY:

drewhylandstudio.com/surf


Services

Music

Community

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1115) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1108) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-1122) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

HEY PARENTS! If you don’t teach your son how to become a healthy & responsible young man, then who will? The Media ? His Peers? Not likely. He needs you! Six River Planned Parenthood Presents a Parent/Son Discussion Group, Free, interactive workshop for 6th- 8th grade boys and his parents, focusing on responsibility, peer pressure, and the changes to look forward to during puberty. Thurs., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m, Six River Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Call for more information, and to register (707) 442-2961. (C-1025) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice,*Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN) (C-1025) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-1018) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124)

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

Sales

Service

Solutions

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Legal Services FD1963

(707) 443-1104

Kathleen Bryson

No membership required.

DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies

Attorney

humboldtcremation.com

Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-1101) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-1025) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-1122)

Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc. FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM You’ll find searchable back issues, articles, workshops & classes, the calendar, the Menu of Menus, the Wedding Guide...

Music

CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

Community DOES GOD HAVE A PLAN FOR YOU? Questions about life’s purpose and divine intervention discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Oct. 21, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www. campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-1018)

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

41


body, mind

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

&Spirit

SHAWNA BELL

Marriage & Family Therapist, MFC 47122

LOW COST FLU CLINICS

Gambling Treatment • Trauma Recovery Addiction Treatment • Stress Management DOT/SAP

Open to the Humboldt Community $25 cash or check

(707) 496-2856 • shawnabmft@gmail.com 381 Bayside Road, Suite C • Arcata, CA 95521

Flu Clinic Hot Line: 268-2347

norcalrecoveryservices.com

Suite C • 2280 Harrison Ave. Wednesday Oct. 17 & 24

Thursday Oct. 18 & 25

9am - 1pm 2pm - 5pm Suite C

9am - 5pm Suite C

(Brick Red Door)

(Brick Red Door)

Eureka Internal Medicine

Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

Insurance billed for EIM patients.

www.northcoast-medical.com

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY Weekend Massage Clinic Special ½ hour $30 1 hour $45

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

FIND YOUR CENTER @ OM SHALA YOGA! Come practice in a supportive and conscious community. We offer a wide-range of classes for all levels and ages, taught by skilled and dedicated teachers in a warm, light-filled studio in the heart of Arcata! Enjoy a free sauna, showers and lounge with each class. Our gorgeous retail boutique offers yoga apparel, props, books, music and gifts. Yoga styles include: Anusara, Vinyasa, Forrest, Kundalini, Restorative, Prenatal, Kids and more. Discounts for seniors, students and beginners. Take a breath. Enjoy the world. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (MB-1129) LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH, FROM THE INSIDE OUT. Dave Berman, Clinical Hypnotist. (707) 845-3749. www.ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-1018)

GIT YER VALSSAGE! Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage.

WHY CRANIOSACRAL BODYWORK? Migraines, deeply-held emotions, chronic pain, and more greatly benefit from this gentle reconnection of your body’s circuitry. Bodyworker since 1979. Cecilie Hooper 6773969. (MB-1018) BREATHE LOVE, CLAIRVOYANT ENERGY HEALING INTEGRATED WITH AXIS MUNDI ASTROLOGY. Gain clarity for self-empowerment. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 845-1450. www.sacredenergyspace.com (MB-1122) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1025) do TERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719 (MB-1115) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124)

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

Certified Massage Therapist

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 268-0929. (MB-1025) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www. tarotofbecoming.com. (MB-1227) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-1227) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227)

Energy Life Center Open house oct. 27th 10am-2pm Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup. org. (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-1227)


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

real estate

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

this week

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Call 441-1484

Just need someone to talk to?

this w

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real est

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3 bed, 2 bath, 1,436 sq ft private outdoor setting, Trinidad home on almost 4 acres, large wraparound deck, covered porch, vaulted ceilings, woodstove w/slate, wood floors, stunning views

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TRULY A DREAM SETTING WITH EXCEPTIONAL VIEWS! Wraparound deck with a hot tub overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and your own private trails through an acre of forest and redwoods! The interior has Brazilian cherry wood floors with maple accents, vaulted ceilings, and lots of built-ins. $595,000

real estate $140,000

3 bed, 1 bath, 975 sq ft clean, cheery and bright Eureka home, newer windows, roof, forced air heat and remodeled bathroom and kitchen, hardwood and laminate flooring, covered front porch

this week

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW Charlie Tripodi

LCS # 23232

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

Land Agent #01332697

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Do it Legally

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(across from HC Court House)

Talk to us.

The Journal wants to learn about readers like you. Please participate in this quick online survey so we can keep bringing you the best newspaper in town.

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w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com• NORTH COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL •• THURSDAY, OCT. 18, 2012 • NORTHCOAST 2012 northcoastjournal.com

43


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North Coast Journal 10-18-12 Edition