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thursday sept. 27, 2012 vol XXIII issue 39 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

State laws are putting more criminals on our streets. We go inside local efforts to deal with them By Ryan Burns

8 Mission: White House 10 Bohn puts faith in legal system 21 Urban adventure 23 Alison Krauss! 29 Knights and stuff 35 Walking on (sort of) hot coals


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2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, sept. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 5 5 7 8

Mailbox Poem

Another California Poem

Publisher

One More Step

News

Imagine All the Voters …

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover To Redeem a Felon

14

Home & Garden Service Directory

20 Gotta Dance

Barn Full of Dancing

21

Get Out!

An Urban Kayak Adventure

22 In Review a cd

22 Stage Matters Fore Play, Anyone?

Gray Matters

Special Insert

23 The Hum O Sister

24 Music & More! 26 Calendar 30 Filmland

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The Physics of Firewalking

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Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, sept. 27, 2012

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4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


Editor: Reflecting upon Mormon Mitt Romney possibly becoming president and the hardships his policies could bring, Becky Peterson (Mailbox, “Missionaries, Not Troops,” Sept. 13) brilliantly addressed the issue of government attempting to impose a particular religious doctrine on its multi-cultured populace. While Becky explained that corporate manipulation of innocent sinners is typically advanced by Christain soliders, one should also note that the failed “war” on drugs has been used during the past 40 years to advance America’s corporate-right economy, and gangsterism is covertly supported to maintain illicit drug distribution nationally. Remember the Iran-Contra scandal? The adverse influ  ence some drug traffickers california makes me nervous and have upon U.S. communities, such as perpetuating racism its not the palm trees or and homophobia, can’t be the eucalyptus or overlooked. robert mitchum up at bishop Near the end of her letter, Becky asserted judgment of or mammoth lakes — life automatically produces a or the way a plymouth, a 38, grinds type of hell for many, which to the bottom was questionable because, of the rock strewn canyon whether unconscious or deliberate, nearly all of us or tears through a guardrail judge or are judged whenevand falls to the sea — er we socialize or engage in but it feels like these business transactions. Their cushy lifestyle evidently like maybe allows “one percenters” to i need a forty-one caliber pistol tucked in make fewer and less stressful judgments, but for everymy waistband. one else judging daily life is like a night lit by stars that inescapable. turn the break white And considering family or the casual bank of dull green planning experts have placed much emphasis lately on jets that circle and land and take flight. couples having good care   —we’ve seen the space age fall giving skills before becomto dust. ing parents, I can’t agree that consuming beer or we dont say pot or having a child out of what we see — wedlock doesn’t sometimes also produce a type of hell we say on earth. what will Because these are leisure not break the spell. rather than work-related bewe say oh that’s fine and watch the sand flow — haviors, shouldn’t the question be asked: Who pays? we take a bird down to the beach and let the box go. Bradley Mack, Eureka    

Another California Poem

Cartoon by joel mielke

Uh …

Correction

Our “Best of Humboldt” cover article last week incorrectly described the Humboldt-ness of author Natasha Wing. She now lives in Fort Collins, Colo. l

— Monte Merrick

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

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Oh What a Night

n Friday, a subcommittee of the North Coast Railroad Authority will meet at 10 a.m. in the Eureka City Council Chambers with one agenda item: to learn from an engineer, a railroad expert, about the current condition of the 101 corridor right of way around the bay from Eureka to Samoa. Why do I care and why will I be in the audience to listen? Readers of this column may recall that in March I began working with a small group of friends to advocate anew for a Humboldt Bay Trail, a safe, off-highway path for bikes and pedestrians between Arcata and Eureka. (There have been many other efforts by others in the past.) After all, we concluded, don’t we already have a public asset that has been unused and neglected for 15 years — the NCRA-owned right of way — that could be used for a trail until the railroad someday resumes freight and passenger service? We started calling ourselves the Bay Trail Advocates and we made a plan: to ask our elected city and county officials to ask the NCRA to consider using the right of way for a trail. The NCRA only meets in Eureka a few times a year, so we circled two dates on the calendar, July 11 and Nov. 14, and we began lobbying. Some good things — or bad, depending on your point of view — happened along the way. We learned that such a trail would greatly enhance the prospects of Caltrans’ 101 Corridor project. And we learned that with little or no repair for 15 years, the railroad prism was melting into the bay. Those two facts helped to get the attention of county supervisors and other elected officials and to improve the chances for a trail. This subcommittee — Humboldt County Supervisor Clif Clendenen (current chair of the NCRA), Mendocino County Supervisor John McCowan and Bill Kier of Blue Lake — has its work cut out. It will receive a report Friday about the corridor condition and what it will take to fix it. (The rail prism also protects Highway 101 from storm surge.) At the next meeting on Oct. 12, it will learn about trail opportunities. On Oct. 26, it will get an update on any and all potential freight or passenger projects that may be in the works. And finally, it has promised to deliver a summary report and recommendation to the full NCRA board by Nov. 14. All those who have worked on trails in the past are looking forward to the subcommittee’s findings and report.

B

– Judy Hodgson

hodgson@northcoastjournal.com MORE PHOTOS ON FACEBOOK

ig thanks to everyone for a super-fun 2012 Best Of Humboldt Party last Friday — from the ticket/ T-shirt printers and sellers (Scrappers Edge, Blackjack, The Works, Missing Link Records) to the broomwielding cleanup crew (Eureka Theater volunteers and Journal staffers). In between tickets and brooms was a night of great music (Huckleberry Flint, The Trouble, Missing Link’s Matt n’ Adam, and soundman Tim Jarrells), good food (Rita’s, Paul’s Live From New York, Pho Thien Long, Six Rivers Brewery), and awesome libations (Amy Stewartdesigned signature Journal cocktail, plus local brews and wine). Congratulations to all the Best of Humboldt winners! — J.H.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012

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or an hour on a Monday night, a few hundred people imagined a different America: one where no one went bankrupt because he got sick, where homeowners were bailed out instead of bankers, and where the military was used for defense, not offense. Standing at a podium at Humboldt State University, a small, slim woman promised she’d deliver just that — if only Americans could break free from the fear that the only real choices for president are two lousy choices. “There’s just plenty of devastation here that would be wrought by both parties,” said Dr. Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate for president. “To go into the voting booth and vote for either Wall-Streetbacked candidate, that is the definition of throwing away your vote.” Stein is the only presidential candidate likely to visit Humboldt in what’s left of the election season. She’s a Harvard-trained physician, but for the last 10 years or so she’s been losing for the Greens — for governor of Massachusetts, for secretary of state, for state representative. Greens are used to losing, but they keep at it with that same wistfulness some people get when they sing the lyrics to “Imagine.” On Monday night, Stein urged around 300 people (Green Party count: 328) to talk to their Democratic friends about the Greens the way they would to a friend caught in an abusive relationship. Stop

saying President Barak Obama is wellintentioned and doing the best he can. Help your friends really look at the drone strikes, the trampling of civil rights, the pathetic performance on jobs and health care. Remind those Democrats, “part of being trapped is apologizing for their abuser.” And then, Stein said, start believing that this time is different for the Greens. This time people are more focused than they have been in decades on the problems targeted by the Occupy movement. This time people have seen what other mass movements can do. “If it took three weeks in Tahrir Square, imagine what we could do in seven weeks,” Stein said. “… Let’s go viral and give them the run of their life that they are not expecting.” Imagine that: People sharing Stein speeches like a Gangnam Style video. Stein on Saturday Night Live. Stein at the presidential debates. Right. Stein knows better. After jill stein her talk, she acknowledged that if even Ralph Nader, with his vast name recognition, couldn’t put the party over 3 percent of the vote nationwide, she probably isn’t going to win this. “I’m not holding my breath that we’re going to get to the White House,” she told the Journal, “but I’m not ruling it out.” Her campaign manager, Ben Manski, was even blunter earlier Monday, in a call from Green Party headquarters in Madison, Wis. In California, where an average of major polls now shows Obama leading


Mitt Romney 56 percent to 36 percent, he said, “Jill Stein has as much chance of winning California as Mitt Romney does.” And anxious voters worried that a huge Stein surge could still give the state to Romney should relax, he said, because so far Stein is attracting “old-style conservation Republicans” as well as Democrats. Stein has around 2 percent of the vote in national polls, right around the same as Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, a former Republican governor of New Mexico, Manski said. He expects she’ll do better in California, maybe even double that. Four percent. Wow. Then Manski got that Imagine tone again. Every extra vote Stein gets, he said, is a vote that sends a message that people aren’t willing to keep accepting the lesser of two evils. “Nobody in California should vote for Obama or Romney unless they absolutely agree with their policies,” he said. “If they agree with drone strikes, extrajudicial assassinations and bailing out Wall Street they should vote for Barak Obama, and if they agree that 50 percent of us are leeches, they should vote for Romney.” If they want jobs, if they want to bring home U.S. troops, if they want to end corporate control of the political system, Manski said, then they should vote for Stein and her party’s “Green New Deal.” Stein is on a four-day, 11-campus swing through colleges in California, starting Monday at College of the Redwoods and wrapping up on Thursday at Pierce College in Los Angeles. Before that, she’d stopped in at one progressive event after another, joining Cornell West on his Poverty Tour, visiting with Chicago teachers as their strike wound down, and speaking at the first anniversary of Occupy Wall Street. A movie director could cast Stein as the first woman president: She’s elegantly thin, her silver hair cut in a luxuriant bob, her smile warm, her voice just deep enough to rob sexists of the word “shrill.” Casting might prefer a little more height, but other than that, she’s a shoe-in. Until you listen: “We need to end this racist and dangerous war on drugs.” “Nuclear abolition is the solution.” “We can solve the foreclosure crisis right now.” “Our First Amendment rights are absolutely being shredded.” “We’re calling for health care as a human right” (OK. Obama said much the same in a debate and got elected anyway.) Mostly, these are not shoe-in sentiments. In Arcata, at HSU, they got Stein a standing ovation after a 50-minute talk punctuated by round after round of applause. But in the voting booth? All across America? We’ll find out in November. l

Sept. 27, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 39

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Scottie Lee Meyers contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

• on the cover:

Photos by Ryan Burns.

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Blog Jammin’ READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

BOOKS, CRIME, HUMBOLDT, MARIJUANA / BY HEIDI WALTERS / SEPT. 24, 3:01 P.M.

ADVICE, CULTURE, INDIAN COUNTRY, TRINITY RIVER / BY HEIDI WALTERS / SEPT. 21, 5:53 P.M.

Pot Adventure Debut

Quit It, Idiots

In the new novel Deadman’s Bust, former Humboldt grower Cory Marchese has written what Blogcritics. org calls “a real page-turner” about two brothers growing pot in the Humboldt hills in 1992: “The adventure takes us right into the heart of George H. W. Bush’s ‘War on Drugs,’ the Medellin cartel, rogue cops and a huge pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.” It’s Marchese’s first novel. According to his biography on his own site, corymarchese.com, Marchese moved from Minnesota to Humboldt in 1991 “to grow pot and learn to surf.” Yeah, he’s a bit of a cliché, but one many locals no doubt would cotton warmly to. As he writes: “Having been raised solo by a progressive mother in a not-soprogressive place — a cold, hard, bleak, God forsaken place — he felt an immediate affinity to Humboldt’s people and culture. For years, he spent his time surfing, growing, and generally enjoying life until the DEA, like a drunk angry father, put the leather belt beat down on it. That bust would become a defining moment.” Marchese spent 2½ years in prison after he was busted. After that, in 1998, he started a construction company in the Bay Area, which he is still running today. And, he notes, these days he is “crime free, drives like a granny, and has a perfectly healthy fear of authority.” He’s a novelist, now, too.

The Two Rivers Tribune reported recently that certain rock-headed word wags have been sneaking onto the broad river bar that swings into the Trinity River outside of Hoopa and rearranging the “Fish On” that for years has been spelled out in large rocks there. Yes, they’re making cute little cuss words. Notes the TRT: The first occurrence the rocks were rearranged by an unknown party to read “F&%$ On,” the second “F&^% Off,” and the third “F&%$ Off” again. Each time the Carpenter family and friends have fixed the vandalism by placing the rocks to spell “Fish On” again. The rock-spelled “Fish On” is not some groovy kickback sentiment, not a simple “Rock on, dude” kinda deal. Rather, as the TRT‘s Manuel “Warrior” Sanchez noted in a 2009 story in the TRT, it’s a symbol of the 1970s fish wars in which tribal families had to fight the federal government for their traditional fishing rights. An excerpt from Sanchez’ story underscores the seriousness of those sometimes deadly events that “Fish On” memorializes: “The biggest and bloodiest part of the fight happened on the Klamath River. Federal agents were stopping people from gill-net fishing in the mouth of the Klamath River. There were people being beaten with billy-clubs, their boats were being swamped by federal boats, and some lost their lives.” See? Not funny to mess with that. Vandals, educate yourselves.

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


ARCATA, BUSINESS, FOOD / BY BOB DORAN / SEPT. 20, 4:43 P.M.

Ice Cream You Scream The ice cream parlor/restaurant Bon Boniere, a longtime institution on the Arcata Plaza, abruptly closed up shop and said goodbye yesterday. Owner Kellen Moore, who took over the business in 2001 with several partners, is not leaving the ice cream business completely; her staff will still be selling ice cream cones and sandwiches out of Bon Boniere’s Old Town Eureka location. And the business is not leaving Arcata entirely; its ice cream production facility is in the Foodworks Culinary Center in Arcata’s Aldergrove Industrial Park. Moore said she decided to focus on just one operation, and, after crunching some numbers, determined that the Eureka location was more profitable. She explained that three of the four owners are currently working on degrees in non-ice cream related areas and the time it took to run two businesses was getting to be an issue. “It was a tough decision. We were still making money [in Arcata], but you have to look at the hours it takes — it becomes the quality of life issue. Life won.” An educated guess would suggest that competition was coming from the new Ultimate Yogurt shop on another corner of the Plaza and the very successful Arcata Scoop, winner in the “Best Ice Cream/ Yogurt” category in this week’s Journal readers’ poll. ● CRIME, GOVERNMENT / BY SCOTTIE LEE MEYERS / SEPT. 20, 12:20 P.M.

Bohn Underscores Faith in Cops, Law Newly appointed County Supervisor Rex Bohn said Thursday that his only child’s arrest on kidnapping, assault and other charges shouldn’t interfere with his

political duties, and he stressed that he has faith in the system. “I have full faith in the legal system and law enforcement,” Bohn said in a phone interview with the Journal. “Family is what we’re all about, and I’ll stand by my son. Am I happy? No. Is he my son? Yes. That’s first and foremost.” Bohn’s son Trevor could not be reached immediately for comment. Officers confiscated his phone before he was released on bail last night, his father said. Rex Bohn didn’t bail his son out and doesn’t know yet what arrangements he’s going to make for an attorney. “He’s a 27-year-old who lives in his own house.” Bohn was elected in June to represent the county’s First Supervsiorial District but was appointed last month to begin his term early in the wake of Jimmy Smith’s resignation. Bohn has said he is still working on learning the job and recently expressed interest in getting a clearer explanation of the county’s general plan update because it is so complicated and he is new to the board. Still, he said the arrest should have no impact on his job. “I know it doesn’t affect county business. This is a family matter, but I understand people are going to talk.” Trevor Bohn was one of four men arrested in Fortuna yesterday morning and booked on suspicion of burglary, felony child abuse, kidnapping, assault with a deadly weapon and false imprisonment, according to Fortuna Police. Police say the four broke into an apartment, assaulted adults and children inside with bear pepper spray and tried to kidnap one of them in a dispute over stolen marijuana. “I am certainly pleased there were no guns involved,” Rex Bohn said. The Fortuna Police press release is on our website. ●

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11


To Redeem a Felon State laws are putting more criminals on our streets. We go inside local efforts to deal with them. By Ryan Burns

C

alifornia has a serious prison problem: By 2006 the state had locked up so many people that its prison system was bursting at the seams. The number of inmates in California’s 33 prisons had ballooned to an all-time high of 173,000, more than double the capacity they’d been designed to hold. Inmates were squeezed into triple-bunk beds in hallways, gymnasiums and program rooms. And still there wasn’t enough space. Riots and melees increased. So did assaults on prison staff and fellow inmates. The suicide rate among inmates approached one per week, nearly 80 percent higher than the average in prisons nationwide. California prisons started suffering regular blackouts because their electrical systems were so overloaded. Their wastewater systems overflowed, spilling thousands of gallons of sewage into the environment. They were the subject of multiple lawsuits. Their medical program was placed in federal receivership. This was a full-blown crisis. On Oct. 4, 2006, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emer-

gency, noting that severe overcrowding had created “conditions of extreme peril” in California’s prison system. This declaration, which remains in effect to this day, gave the state a legal loophole allowing it to send nearly 10,000 prisoners to private facilities in Arizona, Mississippi and Oklahoma. These facilities are run by the country’s largest for-profit prison company, Corrections Corporation of America, which is charging California taxpayers roughly $318 million per year — more than $33,000 per inmate. Even that didn’t solve the overcrowding crisis, which is made worse by a 70 percent recidivism rate, the highest rate of repeat offenders in the United States. (A nation with the highest incarceration rate in the world, by the way.) In May of last year the U.S. Supreme Court stepped in and with a 5-4 vote affirmed a ruling by the Eastern and Northern U.S. District Courts, which found conditions in California’s prisons so outrageously bad that they violated the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment. Examples were cited: A prisoner who’d been held in a cage for nearly 24 hours

INSIDE THE JAIL’S GENERAL POPULATION HOUSING UNITS, INMATES CAN READ, SLEEP OR SOCIALIZE AS LONG AS THEY REMAIN IN THEIR DESIGNATED AREAS AND BEHAVE. PHOTO BY RYAN BURNS

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

was observed “standing in a pool of his own urine, unresponsive and nearly catatonic.” Another, who was literally bleeding from his eyeballs and suffering high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney failure, was referred to a specialist, but the consultation never happened and he died three months later. The ruling quoted a lower court’s finding that people were effectively being executed through systematic neglect: “An inmate in one of California’s prisons needlessly dies every six to seven days due to constitutional deficiencies in the medical delivery system.” Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing the Supreme Court’s majority opinion, said that California’s prison system “is incompatible with the concept of human dignity and has no place in civilized society.” The court ordered California to reduce its prison population by more than 60,000. By June 27 of next year, the number of inmates must be down to 110,000. That would still represent 137.5 percent of the design capacity for these facilities, and yet state corrections officials recently conceded that they probably won’t be

able to hit that target by the deadline. They asked the court to increase the cap to 144 percent of design capacity. The state’s prison population has declined, though, from 173,000 to 133,590 as of Sept. 12. (That’s counting the 13,635 inmates housed in private facilities or serving in fire camps.) Those numbers have fallen because of “public safety realignment,” a solution devised by the state assembly and signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown. Effective since Oct. 1 of last year, Assembly bills 109 and 117 mandate that people convicted of certain non-serious, non-violent and non-sex-related felonies will serve their sentences in local jails rather than state prisons. The responsibility for supervising these offenders, along with other “low-risk” offenders being released from prison, now falls to county probation departments rather than state parole. These local offices, including the one here in Humboldt County, have been directed to use programs that have proven effective in treating and rehabilitating offenders — assessment tools, behavioral therapy groups, job

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training programs and more. Analysts have called it the most sweeping change to California’s criminal justice system in more than 50 years. By Monday, the program will have been in effect for a year. What’s changed here in Humboldt County? Earlier this month, KIEM opened its evening news broadcast with a dramatic report. The camera focused in on an Arcata woman, shot from the neck down because she feared for her safety. She’d recently had her money, credit cards and keys stolen, just one of “hundreds of victims of theft in Humboldt County.” Property crimes have seen a “staggering” increase in the past year, a “direct effect” of realignment, the report claimed. Reporter Kelly May gave no information about the perpetrator of the Arcata theft. But she interviewed Arcata Police Sgt. Todd Dokweiler and Eureka Police Chief Murl Harpham, both of whom blamed realignment for an alleged crime wave. A 20 percent increase in property crime in both Eureka and ArINMATES CAN NOW BE SENTENCED TO SERVE UP TO THREE YEARS IN THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY CORRECTIONAL FACILITY. PHOTO BY RYAN BURNS

cata. Thefts up 12 percent in Eureka. Car thefts up 102 percent. “I’ve never seen it this bad,” said Harpham, who at age 78 has served 55 years with the Eureka Police Department. The report cut to May standing in front of the county jail. Police, she said, say the issue leads back to this building. “There’s not enough room to house offenders that would otherwise have been housed, so they walk out the front doors and back to the life of crime that they know,” May said somberly. Making matters worse, according to Harpham, law-breakers aren’t afraid of getting caught anymore. “There’s no deterrent,” he said, his hands crossed and brow furrowed. Is this what realignment has wrought? A society where crime runs rampant and criminals go unpunished? After speaking with a broad crosssection of people working on realignment in Humboldt, we found the issue continued on page 15

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to be far more complex than that. We found a community that’s attempting a monumental transition — from a criminal justice system based on punishment and confinement to one based on intervention and rehabilitation (or at least the potential for rehabilitation). A community that tries to address the causes of criminal behavior rather than writing off its criminals and shipping them to prisons hundreds of miles away. Noble (or naïve) as that may sound, it’s a transition borne less of strategy than of desperation and necessity. And its implementation thus far has been frenzied. California didn’t have the luxury of careful planning; the Supreme Court’s deadline is rapidly approaching. One thing is clear: Fewer of the people who commit crimes in Humboldt County will be whisked away and locked in distant cells. More will remain here, among us. The question now is how we’re going to deal with them.

Realignment may have been a desperate reaction to California’s prison crisis, but the idea wasn’t pulled

Humboldt County chief Probation Officer Bill Damiano Photo by Ryan Burns

out of thin air. In 2009 the state passed the California Community Corrections Performance Incentives Act. This new law awarded funding to county probation departments that proved successful in supervising felony probationers. Specifically, probation departments used evidence-based practices — that is, techniques that had proven effective — to keep probationers on track, and the ones that saw positive results received state funding as an incentive to keep at it.

Humboldt County’s probation office, led by Chief Probation Officer Bill Damiano, was among the successful. “That’s what got the governor and Legislature thinking about realignment, was we [county probation departments] were having some successes with probation,” Damiano said in a recent interview. His office sits in a squat building at the back of a parking lot behind Eureka’s defunct General Hospital. Stern and analytical, with steely eyes and a thick crop of brown hair, Damiano is well-suited to this intervention approach. He worked in mental health before joining Humboldt County’s probation department in 1988. With a degree in psychology from San Diego State, he not only believes in his department’s ability to affect criminal behavior, that’s where he finds meaning in his job. “When the governor saw [our success] he said, ‘Let’s take that a step further. … Maybe the local guys can do a better job.’” Damiano is convinced of it. “I don’t think that we created better citizens by sending them off to prison,” he said. California’s prisons in particular are

notorious for being racially segregated, ruled by gangs and rife with violence, an environment that, according to Damiano, forces people to adopt antisocial values. “We just dip them in antisocial goo. I mean we train them to be antisocial.” The result has been the so-called “revolving door” of our criminal justice system. The department of state government that manages our prisons is called, somewhat redundantly, “Corrections and Rehabilitation,” but in practice it is lousy at both. Damiano, on the other hand, said that in the years since he started in probation, the county department has gotten progressively more sophisticated in identifying characteristics and behaviors that contribute statistically to criminal activity. These factors range from the obvious, like criminal history, substance abuse issues and employment status, to more subtle indicators like attitudes and beliefs. People placed on probation in Humboldt County are assessed using an interview tool called STRONG, which stands continued on next page

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for Static Risk and Offender Needs Guide. With this, probation officers assess how likely each person is to reoffend. On one end of the spectrum, Damiano said, are those bound and determined to live lives of crime. They require monitoring more than intervention. On the other end are those who made a one-time mistake and have learned their lesson. Evidence shows that monitoring this group too closely makes them more likely to reoffend. It’s the big group in the middle that can benefit from intervention and rehabilitation efforts. A couple weeks after our first interview, Damiano offered a tour of the county’s new resource center at 404 H St. in Eureka. Formerly home to a Fidelity National Title office, the building now serves as a “one-stop shop” for people on what’s called post-release community supervision — those released from prison who, prior to realignment, would have been placed on parole. (The distinction is important because people who slip up while on parole go back to prison, adding to the overcrowding there. People who falter on community supervision stay in Humboldt, with added controls.) Staff here also works with people who’ve been given “split sentences,” meaning they serve part of their sentence in jail and part under mandatory supervision. Strategically located near the courts and county jail, the resource center is staffed by probation officers, county health workers, substance abuse counselors and community-based organization workers offering a variety of services: detox and drug treatment, general relief sign-ups, adult education resources, job training info and more. The county’s public defender, Kevin Robinson, said this building alone represents an improvement over the old system. “Part of the problem with people getting out on parole in the past is they didn’t get any help figuring out how to get a job, how to register for services, how to seek out different types of programs. Or if they did they got the runaround — one office one day, another office the next day. It was overwhelming.” Inside the building, Damiano introduced Supervising Probation Officer Paula Sargent. “We just call her ‘Sarge,’” he said. Walking through the resource center,

she pointed out some of the tools used to monitor and manage its charges. Like parents of teenagers, resource center staff employs both encouragement and discipline. Classes are offered — résumé building, computer skills, money management — as are cognitive behavioral groups. Through one wall we could hear murmuring voices — a group therapy session designed to improve moral reasoning skills, Sargent explained. Lest we forget that the people who come here are criminals, Sargent walked into another room where she reached into a drawer and pulled out a plastic drugtest cup. It had a label that changes color depending on the substances present in the urine that will soon splash inside. In another room she brought out a cardboard box from which she pulled an ankle bracelet used for electronic monitoring of people awaiting sentencing. Until realignment, 70 to 80 percent of the county jail’s population was waiting to be sentenced. After sentencing, many were shipped off to prison. Now more criminals are serving their time in the jail instead. Some will spend as long as three years there. To accommodate these longterm residents, room has to be made. This is where Humboldt County Sheriff Mike Downey comes in. The jail, which has a current capacity of 411, is managed by Downey’s department. Working with the courts, the sheriff’s department developed a matrix system to determine who should be released when. “Right now our population is pretty manageable,” Downey said in a recent interview over coffee in Old Town Eureka. “Like this morning,” he said, pulling his Blackberry out of his pocket and punching a few buttons. “We’re at, like, 360.” How is the jail not overflowing like our prisons? In addition to the people now awaiting trial under electronic monitoring, the number of parolees in county jail has also been reduced by working with the state, Downey said. And some inmates are being released before the end of their sentences, “if they haven’t been unruly.”


continued from page 14

Funded through realignment money from the state, the county’s new “onestop shop” resource Center serves as headquarters for managing felons under local jurisdiction.

above Colorcoded labels on urine sample cups reveal the presence of drugs in offenders’ bloodstreams. above right The probation department uses electronic monitoring on some people awaiting trial, one of several techniques to alleviate overcrowding in the jail. Photos by Drew Hyland

Another twist: Under realignment, people sentenced to jail terms get “day-for-a-day” credit, meaning every day they spend in jail counts for two days toward their sentence. As a result, they’re released into the community sooner. Which leads to a very important question: What type of people has realignment unleashed into our community?

As mentioned above, the folks being

handled by the county under realignment have been convicted of felonies deemed non-serious, non-violent and non-sex-related. The most common offenses, Damiano said, are drug-related crimes (possession, possession for sale, transportation), property crimes, burglaries and possession of stolen property. But that doesn’t mean we’re talking about the teddy bears of convicted felons. Realignment sentencing guidelines apply to the current offense being charged; they don’t take criminal history into account. And many people now in the program have long rap sheets, including some with serious and violent crimes in their past. “Roughly 80 percent of the people we’re dealing with under realignment are high-risk offenders, just from the criminal convictions in their backgrounds,” Damiano said. “High-risk” meaning they’re more likely to reoffend. Some have as many as 30 felonies to their names. By comparison, of the total number of felony offenders now under probation’s jurisdiction (a little over 1,700, Damiano said) roughly 40 percent are considered high risk. The group of felons here under realignment is much smaller — currently between 170 and 180 — but twice as likely to commit new crimes. Which brings us back to the scary news report about Humboldt County’s crime wave. Is realignment to blame? Taking a step back, is there in fact a crime wave? According to numbers provided by the Eureka and

Arcata police departments, property crimes through August are indeed 20 percent higher than during the same period last year. Car thefts in particular are up. Through August of last year there were 21 in Arcata and 93 in Eureka. This year so far there have been 58 in Arcata and 127 in Eureka. The county has also seen a jump in property crimes, especially burglaries. The period of May through July of this year saw 139 burglaries in the unincorporated parts of the county, compared to 86 during that stretch last year, a 62 percent jump. (Counter-intuitively, though, assaults dropped by 17 percent and thefts decreased by 7 percent during the same period.) Damiano said those numbers may or may not be related to realignment. “Lots of factors can contribute to arrest data,” he said, from administrative policies (Eureka had a different police chief through the first half of last year) to increased manpower (Eureka’s Measure O has boosted tax revenues for public safety) to methods of policing and, of course, the actual number of crimes being committed. “Affixing causation isn’t possible without more information,” Damiano said. Sheriff Downey agreed, pointing out that crime rates are affected by social and economic factors, too. “Crime has gone up because people are out of work and there are a lot of pressures in our society as a whole,” he said. Looking closer at the numbers, it doesn’t appear that our streets are any more dangerous than they were before realignment. “We’ve actually seen a few decreases in violent crime,” particularly assaults, said Arcata’s Sgt. Dokweiler. In Eureka, violent crime numbers are essentially unchanged since last year. Assaults and rapes have both decreased. And at the county level, during the three-month windows of 2011 and 2012 provided to the Journal, violent crime was down this year by 23 percent.

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Damiano said he wasn’t suggesting that criminals under his office’s purview aren’t committing new crimes. “We know they are,” he said. But these guys were committing new crimes before realignment, too. “That’s why they were going back to prison. I mean, these are the highest-risk offenders. It’s exactly what I would expect from them. … “I know cops are concerned with having more criminals in the community,” Damiano continued. “I share that concern. My response to that is, ‘Great. Work with me as a partner.’” The law enforcement community, the courts and the corrections system all need to work together if the community hopes to change criminal behavior, he said. Realignment has been organized to encourage just such cooperation. Each county has a multi-agency Community Corrections Partnership that meets regularly to analyze data and update approaches to managing the program. Humboldt County’s partnership currently includes Damiano, Downey, District Attorney Paul Gallegos, Public Defender Kevin Robinson, Health and Human Services Director Phillip Crandall, Court Executive Officer Kerri Keenan and Ferndale Police Chief Bret Smith.

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are hardly the only challenge presented by California’s drastic reshuffling of its criminal justice system. The changes are straining everything from health care to social services to jail management. Phillip Crandall, the county’s health and human services director, said many of the people coming out of prison have substance abuse disorders and severe mental illnesses that have

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gone undiagnosed and untreated. Prison “certainly exacerbated” the problems, Crandall said. Funding and management of 12 health and human services programs have been shifted from the state to counties, but not nearly enough time was allotted to smooth such an ambitious and complicated transition. Crandall said that providing health services to the jail is now considerably more difficult. He’s trying to figure out how to upgrade staffing for psychiatric evaluations, medication delivery and crisis evaluations, among other challenges. Inside the jail, more serious criminals are locked up for much longer stretches of time.  “Our county facilities are not meant for long-term housing. They’re not designed that way,” Sheriff Downey said. “We don’t have the recreation yards or the ability for them to get out like in a state facility.” As the jail serves the purpose of a prison, it has started to see more prisontype problems. In one of the jail’s direct supervision units, which houses 60 peo-

ple, inmates have been expressing more racially motivated anger. Altercations have been breaking out. On a tour of the jail, Sheriff’s Department Lt. Dean Flint said guys who’ve spent years in prison are now implementing prison rules in jail. For example, a white inmate recently was beaten by other white inmates for taking potato chips from a bag after a black inmate. Another rule: Whites should never take the bottom bunk if a black inmate is on the top. It’s considered submissive and will get you “socked up.” If you miss an opportunity to sock up a child molester, you will get socked up. “We’re struggling with it right now,” Flint said. Jail staff is being taught to engage with inmates and keep them busy. One technique is to hold contests — football pools or NASCAR brackets with candy bars for the winner. Flint used an analogy to describe the Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Monday - Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. Sunday Noon to 8pm

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Lt. Dean Flint shows a room with racks of bags holding inmates’ clothes and belongings. Photo by Ryan Burns

effects of prison. “When I was a kid, I spent a month in Canada, and when I came back I sounded Canadian. You spend 10 years in prison, you’ll come out with a prison accent.” He described the prison accent as “racism and hate.” For county officials trying to manage realignment, the most frightening part is not knowing if the state will continue funding the program sufficiently. In last year’s tense, down-to-the-wire budget negotiations, money for realignment was allocated legislatively. But so far, Gov. Brown has not signed a constitutional amendment guaranteeing funding into the future, as he promised to do. With the state hovering on the brink of insolvency, Brown is urging voters to pass Proposition 30, which would increase sales tax from 7.25 percent to 7.5 percent and raise income taxes on people making more than $250,000 per year. Damiano worries that if the tax measure doesn’t pass, legislators may be forced to weigh public safety against other fundamental priorities like educa-

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tion and health care, and realignment funding might end up gutted. Crandall is worried, too. “Now the counties have got the tiger by the tail, so to speak, financially,” he said. If realignment had been a policy-driven transition rather than a frenzied budgetary move, Crandall believes the county could have been more successful with the first wave of offenders. He and his staff are still trying to set up the supportive structures necessary for this new challenge — initial screenings, supportive housing and treatment programs. “Given the adequate resources and the time,” he said, “I’m absolutely convinced that counties can do a better job than the state.”

This belief in the potential of

realignment hinges on belief in rehabilitation, in the potential for change in an individual and a community. This optimistic attitude doesn’t come easily to the people on the front lines of law enforcement, the ones who see criminals day in and day out, arresting some of the same people again and again. Eureka Police Chief Murl Harpham remains convinced that realignment was a bad idea, one that grants get-out-ofjail-free cards to criminals hardwired to reoffend. The only solution, in his mind, is to lock them up. “If they’re in prison, they’re not committing crime. That’s the bottom line,” he said. “They’re there for punishment. They’re not there as a reward.” Asked if rehabilitation is even possible, Harpham sounded skeptical. “There have been some cases,” he allowed. “I haven’t seen a lot of ‘em over the years.”

When Sheriff Downey was asked if the county has a better shot than the state at affecting rehabilitation, he had to think about it. He repeated the word slowly — “rehabilitation” — like it was the name of someone he hadn’t thought about in years. Does he believe rehabilitation is possible? “Um,” he said. After a long pause he answered, “Early on. Early on.” If you wait until they’ve taken a few trips through the revolving door it’s too late. Downey told a story from before realignment about a guy he’d known for some time, who he found locked up in the jail waiting to be shipped off to state prison. This was a guy who’d served several prison terms already, and Downey couldn’t understand why he was back. “I said, ‘What are you doing here again?’ He goes, ‘It’s no big deal. I’ll go do 18 months. It’s no big deal.’” Prison. No big deal. So much for the idea that it’s a deterrent, at least for this type of career criminal. “It’s nothin’ for them,” Downey said. “It’s almost like a respite from the street.” The anecdote clearly said something important to the sheriff. Toward the end of our conversation in the coffee shop he said this about realignment: “I think it’s going to be a good thing. It’s going to make us sit back and look at what we’re doing with our prison system in California.” District Attorney Paul Gallegos said that when people break the law they will still be prosecuted, but the post-conviction options may look different. Some will be given the opportunity to make amends. Rather than becoming a further drain on the community, getting three square meals and a bed in jail, they might

agree to volunteer for local nonprofits. “I’m not saying I appreciate the challenges that [realignment] has thrown at me, at this community,” Gallegos said. “But we have to work with it. … I think that, at the end of the day, collaborative, cooperative problem-solving helps. And we have a lot of good people working on this.” Back at his office, Damiano said he recognizes the difficulty of the challenge facing the county’s Community Corrections Partnership and the community at large. A variety of local professionals are meeting with offenders one at a time, trying to tease out the underlying causes of their criminal behavior and then help them change old patterns through everything from detox and ankle bracelets to therapy, education and on-the-job training. It’s a lot of work, and Damiano admits that in many cases the efforts will probably prove futile. But unlike others in law enforcement, Damiano said unequivocally, “People can change.” He has proven techniques for doing so and tools that show who’s likely to be most receptive. “Granted, not a lot of them change rapidly. And there’s no on-off switch for criminal behavior. … People are a whole hell of a lot more complex than that.” But it’s possible. Like any systemic change this large and complex, it will no doubt take years before the full impacts of California’s public safety realignment are clear. As the state tries to emerge from the nightmare of barbaric mass imprisonment, and sets its eyes toward redemption, much will depend on its ability and willingness to fund such an enormous social experiment. l

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n the Veteran’s Hall in Arcata on a crisp September night, feet were skipping, sliding, stamping and turning. They moved swiftly in cowboy and cowgirl boots, work boots, an occasional Ugg or Keen, sandals, running shoes and the wayward pair of flip-flops. All kinds of feet were promenading all over the place at the Humboldt Folklife Society’s monthly barn dance, which draws young, old and in between. The Folklife barn dances bring out packs of Humboldt State students — even on a weekend night in a college town abundant with partying options. People urge their friends to come — you’ve gotta try it, they insist — parents bring their kids, and no one has to show up with a partner or know any steps when they arrive. A recent Friday night dance started slowly, but at 7:45 p.m. caller Sue Moon strode to the center of the hall, clapped her hands and shouted out, “Let’s start! Others will come.” And come they did. Before Moon finished leading the first arrivals in a circle dance, a multi-generational stream of Humboldtians began to flow into the hall, with a growing clatter of heels clacking on the hard wood floor. Moon directed attendees to form squares

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

of eight people, four couples each. One woman coming through the door barely had time to take off her jacket and throw it on a chair before Moon urged her to complete the fourth square so the dance could begin. Moon walked people through each dance right it before began, and continued teaching throughout each number, plowing through the merrymakers to corral, explain and repeat as needed. Dressed in striped tights, a silky black skirt splattered with flowers and a widestriped tee-shirt, she called out verbal cues in her distinct British accent. When waltzing, “tuck up to your partner. And in later dances: “Snuggle up and make a basket.” “Don’t look at your feet.” “Make a star if you all figure out your same right hand.” “It’s 16 — are you counting?”  Moon grew up in Dorsett, England, dancing English and Scottish country dances “from the tradition of the English farming people.” She is one of the callers who appear regularly at the monthly Folklife Society barn dances, where dance styles include contra, square, English, Irish, French, and American social dancing, basically partner folk dancing. Musicians and callers can

vary; when the Striped Pig Stringband plays, the emphasis is on square dancing. At the early September dance that Moon called, a fiddle and a piano filled the hall. The first notes that came from Blake Ritter’s fiddle sounded like they were drawn from a deep well of water. Ritter’s teacher, Sam McNeill, was on piano, the pair pouring out rich melodies that made people want to get up and dance the work week away. It was easy to forget that only two instruments were being played. As the crowd grew to more than 100 people, bevies of cowgirls in swirled in flowered dresses, bare-kneed above leather boots, with brown beer bottles in hand. White-haired folk danced with partners in skinny jeans and tank tops. A covey of sixth graders laughed as they joined bigger folks on the dance floor. “We like being with all the people we don’t know yet. It’s really fun because you don’t have to know what you’re doing,” said 11-year-old Nigella Bauer, who lives down the street from the hall. She brought her sleepover friend, Chloe Stempler, to the dance. In the middle of one of the contra lines, a plaid-shirted man traded smiles with a blonde-braided woman as the skirt on her hips swished past his jeans. His hands wrapped around her waist and their torsos curved in toward each other, a perfect arc in time. Then, on to the next line and a new partner. During a break on the floor an HSU student who’d been to a few barn dances said it’s always a fun night, and then scooted off to the next coaching session, following his date, who kept tugging on his hand. What a great first or second date. Lots of physical contact. No commitment. Regular attendees say they love the range of ages, the energy and the chance to meet new people. It’s wholesome, said 22-year-old Michelle Wynkoop — “Better than a bar and we can still have a beer. It’s cool to interact with all different ages.”   Hoofing it barn dance style is an exhilarating workout that demands stamina. The only agenda is to have fun, and have it together as shifting collages of people grab hands, swing each other around, move apart and come together — all in time to the music.l The Folklife Society puts a barn dance every month with varying callers and bands. September is a lucky double. On Saturday, Sept. 29, Moon will be calling again, this time with the Wild Rumpus Band, headed by McNeill at the Manilla Community Center. Find out more at, www.humboldtfolklife.org.


GET OUT!

An Urban Kayak Adventure By Amy Cirincione

outdoors@northcoastjournal.com

I

am not an adrenaline junkie.  offers free morning tours of the hatchery If the idea of hurling yourself during spawning season (usually January through icy waves under gray skies through March).  For now, give yourself appeals to you, then you’re lucky to a tour. Then grab your kayak, paddle and live in an area where you can kayak dry bag (see packing list on this page) and year round. All you need is the right gear follow the trail upriver past the parking (dry suit, booties, gloves) and a bad atlot. You will quickly see a short rocky trail that leads down to the river — this is your titude, and you can paddle the big, cold water of the Smith or the Trinity all winter put-in. Just downstream from the put-in is a long. If you’re more like me, your idea of a lowhead dam, so when you get on the good kayak trip is a lazy Sunday on melwater, paddle upstream and around the low water, with the sun on your face and gravel bar to get across the river and a beer at the end. If you’re more like me, avoid the dam. Right away you’ll come then your days of kayaking are numbered. to a perfect swimming hole and small The days are still beach. When we warm but the water were there, a few levels are falling, families with little so September and children were playearly October are ing in the shallows   probably your last and building sand Kayak: Borrow a kayak from a friend or chances to expericastles. Idyllic. I rent one from Bigfoot Rafting Co. in Willow highly recommend ence true, local Creek or Pacific Outfitters in Arcata or Eureka. summer paddling.  stopping right here I prefer inflatable kayaks for this kind of short and swimming, as A perfect expedition, because they pack up small and example of this you won’t come light.  kind of kayaking across another In your dry bag: A chain bike lock (for is paddling the good swimming locking up your kayaks while you run/bike Mad River in Blue hole for a while. your shuttle), two plastic water bottles (one Lake from the fish The next few for water and one to fill with blackberries at hatchery to the Mad miles are the most the put-in), sunblock, sneakers if you plan to River Brewery. This mellow padrun, a small towel, your ID and $20. stretch is only a few dling I’ve done in Partner(s) in Crime: When exploring a new miles long, and very Humboldt. This stretch of river, choose your crew carefully. flat. The water level time of year there Try to find fun, flexible, and patient folks. at the end of the a plenty of shallow Sometimes even the most mellow float can summer is low, so areas. If you’ve got go wrong, or just long. Only adventure with be prepared to hop river reading skills, people who can appreciate the journey. out of your kayak you can manage to Drink: Mad River Brewery is located at 101 and wade through keep your kayak in Taylor Way in Blue Lake.  some shallows. To the deeper water    — A.C. call these sections by sticking close to portages would be a the banks and pickstretch — it’s more ing the right lines like walking your kayak.  Since the stretch around the gravel bars. But you’re not out is so short, you can easily (and literally) run here to test your skills, remember?  You’re your own shuttle.  Or you can leave a car in no rush. There is something incredibly or bike near the bridge at the take out. relaxing about wading through clear water Start your adventure at the Mad River on a hot day, finding pretty river rocks and Fish Hatchery, which is open to the public tugging your kayak behind you like a large, daily from dawn to dusk. Take a moment lazy puppy.   Toward the end of the run there is a long, to explore the pools and fish ladders.  Fun deep swimming hole that seems to draw fact: The Department of Fish and Game

Outfit Yourself

fishermen, too. If you’re so inclined, you can cast a line from your kayak or pull up on the sand bar. If not, take a dip in the water and keep paddling around the bend and under the bridge to the large beach and take-out.  From here you can choose your own adventure. We chose to ask a friendly looking family Amy Cirincione enjoys a relaxing float. to watch over our kayaks photo by Jon O’Connor while we put on running shoes. Then we ran the 1.5 miles back to the fish hatchery to get our car. The run is flat, exposed, and beautiful. We got to check out our kayaking run from another angle and feel like tri-athletes. When we reached the hatchery, we hopped in the car and drove back to the bridge. We thanked the family, rolled up our now-dry kayaks and tossed them in the trunk.  If you are not interested in the running portion of this event, someone in your crew needs to hop on that bike or car you parked by the bridge and go fetch your other vehicle from the fish hatchery (a five-minute drive, tops). However you organize your shuttle, your adventure will not be complete until you have walked half a block from the take-out to the Mad River Brewery to celebrate your sweet success. I recommend the Super Chili Madness for this purpose (my paddling buddy would like you to know he prefers the Steelhead). Sitting at one of the brewery picnic tables with wet hair and a little sunburn, laughing with your friends is the perfect way to spend a Sunday in September. And on Monday morning when one of your co-workers is bragging about an “epic weekend,” just remember that sometimes, Offer expires 10/31/12 adrenaline is overrated.  Sometimes low, quiet water and a seasonal ale are the Open Daily for Lunch and Dinner, perfect adventure. l 11:30am - 10pm • Extended Bar Hours

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Come in for Lunch, have a Specialty Appetizer on us! 11:30 to 4:00 daily

If you would like to write a Get Out! Column, please email Journal editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg at carrie@northcoastjournal.com

Reservations Recommended (707) 407-3550 1911 Truesdale Street Eureka Off Broadway behind the Best Western Bayshore Inn

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

21


cd O’ Be Joyful By Shovels and Rope Shrimp Records

  Couplings in music, ones that blur the personal  and the artistic, are rarely fortuitous. Just ask  Johnny Cash and June Carter or George Jones and  Tammy Wynette. Their relationships traveled down  many pothole-laden roads and hairpin turns. But  though early in their journey, fortuitous just may  be the apt term for Charleston, S.C.-based singersongwriters Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent  and their union. Since their first collaborative 2008 recording, Shovels & Rope, Hearst and Trent have been  prolific, releasing excellent individual solo records  (under their respective names). The now-hitched  duo has released its second collaborative recording, O’ Be Joyful, under the moniker Shovels and  Rope, a name that stuck with them. It’s a record  filled with an explosive combination of country,  folk, rockabilly and garage rock executed with a  revival-like delivery. In contrast to their debut, which leaned toward  the atmosphere of Hank Williams Sr.’s slower,  darker lost highway, O’ Be Joyful lives up to its  title. It may be a hand-clappin’ and foot-stompin’  revival, but it’s one meant for a Saturday night. The  gospel is the music informed by their respective  roots, played with a sincere exuberance and, most  importantly, belief. As evidenced in her 2011 solo  work, Lions & Lambs, Hearst exhibits a naturally  powerful voice that echoes Loretta Lynn, Kitty  Wells and Tammy Wynette. Trent comes to table  with a sweeter dish, one that comes from the  alt. folk-country-pop that initially rose from the  Saddle Creek stable  — artists such as Conor  Oberst and Rilo Kiley. In “Cavalier,” Trent sums  up, as if directly addressing his partner, “You are  a country singer, and I’m a cavalier.” However, this  particular chemistry proves to be copacetic. From  the revved-up rockers like “Hail Hail” to the hootenanny stomper “Kemba’s Got the Cabbage Moth  Blues” to the slower, moodier songs like “Lay Low,”  Hearst and Trent’s vocals intertwine, complementing one another as a singular voice. Serving as the producer, Trent adds subtle, nice  touches to O’ Be Joyful, building on the foundation  of a “live” sound. He cleverly inserts a cheesy organ  in place of strings in the gothic “Shank Hill St.”  And the inclusion of New Orleans-style horns in  “Hail Hail” and the sexually tense “Ticking Bomb”  enlarges those arrangements, but does so without  overwhelming the compositions.  Judging from their summer gig at The Arcata  Playhouse (opening for Midtown Dickens), Shovels  and Rope are at ease performing their music with  a fire-and-spit spirit. And this new recording O’ Be Joyful successfully captures that spirit, backed with  talent from two gifted songwriters.  — Mark Shikuma

Phil Zastrow as Dickie, Anders Carlson as Bingham in NCRT’s The Fox on the Fairway courtesy of NCRT

Fore Play, Anyone? A Golfing Farce at NCRT By William S. Kowinski williamkowinski@northcoastjournal.com

I

t was a chilly summer here on the North Coast but the early autumn is warm and sunny, so maybe it’s appropriate that the North Coast Repertory Theatre in Eureka has begun its 29th season with a summer stock comedy about golf, The Fox on the Fairway. This 2010 play by Ken Ludwig is given the full farce treatment by director David Moore, especially with lots of doors entering onto scenic designer Calder Johnson’s set. (Though the game is golf, the action is inside.) People running in and out of doors, chasing and avoiding each other, entering unexpectedly and leaving inconveniently — it’s the signature of stage farce. It’s also basically the same setup as in NCRT’s 2009 production of Ludwig’s more famous Lend Me a Tenor. In this story, Bingham (played by Anders Carlson) runs a country club that holds an annual golf tournament with a rival club run by “Dickie” (Phil Zastrow). The two make a huge bet on the outcome. But the player Bingham was counting on has changed sides, and all seems lost until Justin (Michael Pietrelli), the callow young man Bingham has just hired as his assistant, turns out to be a golf prodigy. But of course complications ensue, involving Bingham’s business manager, Pamela (Jennifer Trustem), his wife, Muriel (Gloria Montgomery) and a club waitress and Justin’s fiancé, Louise (Kyra Gardner).

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

These descriptions soon turn out to only scratch the surface of their tangled relationships. Their pasts are prologue to the quickly unfolding events. Director Moore keeps it all moving fast whenever possible. The dialogue scenes depend on the comedic characterizations of the actors. Jennifer Trustem’s Pamela is straight out of a 1940s movie, the sweetly hard-drinking and wittily sensual woman with an innuendo for every occasion. Michael Pietrelli is the energetic movie juvenile and Kyra Gardner the winsome ingénue: Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland, but with modern neuroses. At the center of the action and the story is Anders Carlson. He had a key role in Lend Me a Tenor but this production completely revolves around his performance. He plays Bingham with a controlled, rolling frenzy, as a man of constant outrage reminiscent of “the boss” character in TV sitcoms from the ‘50s onward. It’s a physical and vocal tour de force, and the wonder isn’t just that he pulls it off, but that he does it without becoming insufferable. This seems to be accomplished partly by his genuine interactions with the other actors. Together they manage to make something human out of a cascade of contrivances. That includes the contributions of the always believable Gloria Montgomery in her few scenes, and Phil

Zastrow, who seems to play Dickie as an affected pretend Englishman breezily unaware of his malapropisms or terrible taste in sweaters. The pleasures of the production and the wit of the script (with contrivances from Oscar Wilde as well as I Love Lucy) must race past basic credibility problems, like everything hinging on a bet for very high stakes witnessed by nobody. (And who exactly is the fox of the title?) Some of the revelations are at least foreshadowed (pretty obviously), but some developments seem like a child’s improbable improvisations while inventing a story with dolls or action figures (possibly waving golf clubs). The appeal of Pietrelli and Gardner as the young lovers, and the older four as the love springs eternal ones, mostly overcome the clichés. As a farce, this play adds nothing new except perhaps greater latitude in naughty talk. For farce that actually expands the form, something from early Tom Stoppard or Joe Orton’s What the Butler Saw more nearly fit the bill. But there are enough laughs here, plus charm and skill in this production, to extend a summery mood. Jenneveve Hood designed the strange and striking costumes. Michael Thomas designed the inventive sound, which is crucial to the story. The Fox on the Fairway continues at North Coast Rep Fridays and Saturdays through Oct. 13 at 8 p.m., with a Thursday evening performance on Oct. 11 and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. on Sept. 30 and Oct. 7. Coming Up: The San Francisco troupe called the Pi Clowns returns to the Arcata Playhouse with a new show, The Good the Bad and the Stupid, a Wild West romp with acrobatics, high speed horse races, dramatic duels, juggling, eccentric dance and live music. Members of the Pi Clowns include Bruce Glaseroff from Arcata and Tyler Parks from Fortuna. Performances of this all-ages show are at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 28 and 29, and 2 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 30. Arcata Playhouse impresario David Ferney cautions that last year’s shows sold out, so better advance tickets than sorry, at Wildwood Music, Wildberries, or 822-1575. The Laramie Project is onstage in the Eureka High Auditorium starting on Thursday, Oct. 4, and running weekends until Oct. 20, with shows at 7:30 p.m. (except Oct. 13, which is a matinee due to homecoming). The play by Moises Kaufman and members of the Tectonic Theater Project is about reaction to the 1998 murder of University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard, who was beaten and left to die for being gay. This production by Eureka High School’s EHS Players honors his memory, and the efforts towards hate crime legislation.  l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, sept. 27, 2012

21


Allison Krauss and Union Station

O Sister

Alison Krauss, Deerhoof, Maria Minerva, Mos Generator and Bass Harvest By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

Y

ou hear a lot of old-time music from the American South today. It’s hard to say why variations on early 20th century folk and country rooted in the Appalachians have surged in popularity over the years, but you can point to the soundtrack for the Joel and Ethan Coen film O Brother, Where Art Thou? as an important milestone at the turn of the millennium. When the brothers Coen hired T-Bone Burnett to assemble period music for a story set in the rural South during the Depression, he brought together the best traditional country musicians around and came up with a record that, to the surprise of many, won a Grammy as “Album of the Year” in 2001. At this point it’s sold upwards of 7.7 million copies. An associated concert tour/CD/film by artists from that record, Down from the Mountain, added to the success and to the resurgent popularity of the old time sound. Allison Krauss and her band Union Station were among the musicians whose careers got an O Brother bump. The soundtrack has Krauss singing on her own and alongside Gillian Welch and Emmylou Harris. Union Station guitarist/ mandolinist/vocalist Dan Tyminski dubbed the singing parts for fictional Soggy Bottom Boy George Clooney on “Man of Constant Sorrow” and other songs. Every member of Union Station appeared on the record: ace dobro player Jerry Douglas (who has a strong career on his

own), banjo/guitar picker Ron Block and bassist Barry Bales. Not that that was the start of Krauss’ career — she was a contest-winning fiddler as a child and made her first record for Rounder while still a teenager. She won her first Grammy in 1991; she’s been nominated for 41 and taken home 27, more than any living artist. Five years ago Raising Sand, her collaboration with ex-Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant, won her six of those Grammys (again with Burnett producing). Her latest disc with Union Station, Paper Airplane, finds her returning to old time country roots with a somewhat modern sheen. Good stuff. Krauss and the boys are at the top of their game, which is why their CenterArts show at the Van Duzer is among the season’s most expensive. Catch her if you can. The post-genre alt. something music of Deerhoof is hard to describe. Wikipedia pigeonholes the quartet as “noise music,” perhaps because the instruments are often distorted, making sounds unlike typical rock. (Isn’t all music based on noise of some sort?) The band’s latest album, Breakup Songs, covers familiar territory, relationships and the like, with Tokyo-born vocalist Satomi Matsuzaki singing to herky-jerky rhythms that somehow seem totally danceable. The local alt. crowd will be out in full force Sunday to see Deerhoof at the Depot with Brooklyn alt. duo Buke and Gase (aka Arone Dyer and Aron Sanchez) opening

the show with some loopy music made without loop pedals. The Works presents an evening of esoteric experimental music Saturday with Starving Weirdo Brian Pyle‘s solo sonic collage project Ensemble Economique, guitar/laptop looper Swimming, EDM by Astro Tarot and headlining, Maria Minerva, from Estonia via London, who has a new album, Will Happiness Find Me?, out on Not Not Fun Records. Maria creates cool, dreamy lo-fi dance tracks with a cut-and-paste method, layering effects and drenching her vocals in reverb. She explains cryptically in her personal blog, “Maria Minerva is myself as my own little sister, born out of need to do whatever. Maria Minerva has not heard that postmodernism is passé. Maria Minerva wishes she was born in the 1980s and born again in the 1990s. They call it lo-fi, I call it 21st century folk music.” The Trouble rocked our “Best Of” party — hard — this weekend. The band plays three times this weekend: Thursday at the Mad River Brewing Tap Room, and Friday and Saturday up at Cher-Ae Heights. The Northwest has long been a hotbed for heaviness and it doesn’t get much heavier than Mos Generator, a stoner rock trio out of Port Orchard, Wash. The band’s upcoming release, Nomads, is due out later this month, but is currently available at live shows such as one coming up Saturday at Humboldt Brews. Humboldt heavies Lord Ellis open with a roar.    On the EDM front you have the massive overnight Bass Harvest party starting at noon Saturday at Dean Creek Resort near Redway. The line up is dominated by M.I.A. (Murda in America), a drum and bass collective out of Chicago, Danny the Wildchild, M1D1, Xile, MC Questionmark, DJ Oracle among them, but there are plenty of locals including Grasshoppa, DJ iWon (aka DJ Touch), Boss Levelz with Masta Shredda and Itchie Fingaz, Haiku and OnHell. You might warm up Friday night at Nocturnum with some shamanistic sonic alchemy by Heavyweight Dub Champion, who bring a mystical mix of “deep revolutionary audio with support from a revolving crew of co-conspirators,” this time including Resurrector, Sasha Rose, Noah King, Yuin Huzami and iNi. On Tuesday, World Famous returns to the Arcata Theatre Lounge with Brooklyn EDM duo Break Science and Michal Menert, a Polandborn artist now based in Colorado, another from the Pretty Lights stable. The next Whomp Whomp Wednesday at Nocturnum (Oct. 3) has Psymbionic from Austin, Futexture out of Asheville, NC, and Humboldt’s own Psy Fi. C-Baker hosts another über-eclectic “Something for Everyone” showcase Friday at

the Jambalaya including hip hop by The Dirty Rats, reggae by Madi Simmons, Mykal Somer, Judrum and Elephant Dub Brigade Band and comedy by Humboldt’s “Best Comedian” Sherae O’Shaughnessy. Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band hits Humboldt Brews Thursday. The name pretty much nails the oeuvre of the Asheville, NC., crew who update Funkadelic, The Meters and Sly for what the Booty Band calls “nu funk.” Also funky: Motherlode, the horn-heavy, Afro-infused big band playing Saturday at the Jambalaya. The moon is full Saturday night and FuNky FULL Moon IV shines on Ocean Grove with DJ Knutz heading up a vinyl spinning team with most of the Missing Link crew: Mantease, Jaymorg, King Maxwell and Matt (sans Adam). Bay Area-based guitarist Chris Zanardi from Five Eyed Hand switches gears to play some “electronic jamgrass” with High Beamz Thursday at Nocturnum. You get a totally different electronic hybrid from Delhi 2 Dublin, which plays at Humboldt Brews Wednesday, Oct. 3. As the name implies the Canadian band manages to fuse Celtic with Bollywood in a very danceable amalgam. The SoCal duo Wahid combines Dimitris Mahlis‘ oud (a Middle Eastern lute) with Chris Wabich‘s hand percussion on meditative, organic improvisations that take you down long, dusty roads. The destination this time: a show at Arcata Playhouse on Tuesday. Let’s talk tributes. Retro-punk Luicidal, which plays Thursday at the Red Fox, has a name obliquely referencing Suicidal Tendencies, but this is not exactly a tribute. Louiche Mayorga and RJ Herrera played bass and drums in the seminal Venice punk band in the ‘80s, and Mayorga wrote many of the songs on S.T.’s first three albums, so he has a perfect right to sing them even if S.T. founder Mike Muir kicked him out of the band 25 years ago. Real tributes? You have The Miracle Show doing the Dead at Humboldt Brews Friday and Wepeel reuniting to once again play Weezer tunes Saturday at the Alibi. It’s Marley time Wednesday Oct. 3, at the ATL with People Productions bringing in Bob’s boy Stephen Marley and the Ghetto Youths to lay down the positive one-drop reggae. Selecta Prime, Dub Cowboy and Jsun fill in the gaps. Not so positive: the turmoil surrounding the Capleton show at the Red Fox planned for mid-October. The club’s owners and the promoter are standing fast as local gay activists lead a campaign to scuttle the gig due to the dancehall artist’s “murder music” past. How it will play out remains to be seen. More on this as it develops. l

 

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

23


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

see The Hum pg. 23

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com

thur 9/27

fri 9/28

sat 9/29

Dirty Dancing Thursdays w/ Pressure Anya 10:30pm $3

Find us on Facebook

Wepeel (Weezer tribute) 11pm $5

Pi Clowns Physical Theater 8pm $10

Pi Clowns Physical Theater 8pm $10

The Big Lebowski Doors 8:30pm $5 Rated R

Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban Doors 5:30pm $5 Rated PG

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

The Big Lebowski Doors 7:30pm $5 Rated R

BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

NEW HUMBOLDT DESIGNS JUST ARRIVED, AND THEY WILL GO FAST SO COME IN TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SALE:

Open Mic 7pm

BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Hunks the Show 7:30pm $20

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

BUY ANY 2 HOODIES SAVE $10 BUY ANY 2 TSHIRTS SAVE $5 BUY ANY 2 HATS/BEANIES SAVE $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata

2 1 + O N LY

LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake NOCTURNUM Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748 RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Trouble (Americana) no cover 9pm

The Trouble (Americana) no cover 9pm

Orjazzmic (jazz) 7pm Seabury Gould 7pm

Paul Fowler 6pm

Paul Fowler 6pm

Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close! Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band (funk) 9:30pm $10 Pianist Young-Hyun Cho 8pm

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger The Miracle Show (Dead tribute) 10pm $5

Happy Hour All Day! Mos Generator, Lord Ellis (stoner rock) 9:30pm

Acufunkture (funk) 9pm

Allison Krauss & Union Station 8pm “Something for Everyone” CBaker 9p

Richard Thompson 8pm $35 Motherlode (funk/Afrobeat) 9pm

Summer Hours: until 9pm Monday Thursday, 10pm Friday & Saturday

Blue Lotus Jazz (jazz) 7-10pm no cover

Ali Chaudhary & Tim Randles (jazz) 7-10pm no cover

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

Taqueria La Barca 4-7pm

23rd Aniv. w/ Asha Nan, Cadillac Ranch, The Usual Suspects noon

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif The Trouble (Americana) 6pm

Chris Zanardi, His High Beams 9pm $8 Heavyweight Dub Champion 10pm $15 Huayllipacha @ Henderson Center

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

Buddy Reed and The Rip It Ups (blues) 7pm

Sci Fi Club Readings of Dr. Seuss on the Anniversary of his death 7pm

Located in beautiful Old Town

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Guerrilla Takeover Sound (dance music) 10pm

Live DJ (dance music) 10pm

Damien Roomets, Michael Curran and Greg Goad (folk) 7pm

Joani Rose (jazz) 7pm

www.persimmons.net

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street Eureka, CA  443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm

BayfrontRestaurant.net

King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

Luicidal (punk rock) 9pm

Rump Shakers w/ Pressure Anya 9pm

Rasco, Cali Agents, Playa Rae 9pm $10

Tasting room temporarily closed

New Construction Hours for growlers, kegs and merchandise

Saturday noon-9pm

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am $5 Uptown Kings (blues) 9pm no cover

Learn more at www.RedwoodRaks.com

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

9am-2pm Arcata Plaza The Delta Nationals 10am FuNky FULL Moon IV w/DJ Knutz 9pm

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600

CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923

Dubtonic Kru (dub) no cover 9pm

LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM

Sierra Rose Band (folk) 8pm Aces Up (country) Wave 9pm Glow Party - Sapphire 8pm

Bass Harvest (EDM) noon

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521 GALLAGHER’S Eureka 442-1177 HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Billy Allen and the Roadhouse Rockets (classic rock) no cover 9pm

Gunsafe, The Plumb Uglies 8pm

EUREKA INN 497-6093

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

G RVIN E S NOW & WINE BEER

707 (rock) no cover 9pm

DEAN’S CREEK RESORT Redway

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

Nightly 6pm-3am

www.barflypub.com

Blues Dance Night Lesson 8pm, Dancing 9pm $5 Irish Music 7:30pm Falling Rocks (country swing) 8-10pm

Find us on Facebook

Zuzu’s Petals (jazz) 7pm

Live music 8-10pm

Come in for a great Dinner!

Karaoke 7-10pm MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Rude Lion (reggae DJ) 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Brews and Blues Jam 9pm

Seed 9pm

Uptown Kings (blues) 9pm

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 9pm

Boss Levelz (DJs) 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

SOPAI’S CAVE 535 5th St Eureka THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS THE WORKS 210 C St., Eureka

Throwback Thursdays

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials Lyndsey Battle (uke songs) 7pm

www.fabuloustiptop.com Maria Minerva, Ensemble Economique


s

Deerhoof Sunday at The Depot

sun 9/30

mon 10/1

tues 10/2

wed 10/3

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Giant Screen NFL Football Doors at 12:45pm Free All ages

Giant Monday Night Football Doors at 5:15pm Free All ages

Break Science & Michal Menert Doors at 9:30pm $17.50/$15 21

Stephen Marley w/Ghetto Youths Doors at 9pm $30/$25 21+

Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm Quiz Night 7pm

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

A Chance to win $1,000,000

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Monday Night Football on the big screen + Flat Screen TV giveaways

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

$0.25 Wing Wednesday

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool & $3 Wells

Wahid (world music) 7pm $12/$10

A Chance to win $1,000,000

NEW ARRIVALS!

Hemp Hoodlamb Jackets

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long!

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com Deerhoof, Buke & Gase 9pm $15 Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Humboldt Beer Week: Sierra Nevada Tap Takeover 5pm

Firestone Walker Beer Trivia Night 7pm

Call In Your Order: 822-8433 Delhi 2 Dublin (electronic/world) 9:30pm $15

Blues Night 7pm

Silent Giants, Josephine Johnson 8pm

Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza

Happy Hour 6-8pm Monday - Thursday, $1 off wine by the glass

Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm no cover

Upcoming: Wine Appreciation Course on Wednesdays in Oct. $25 per.

Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

Book your band 444-1344

Repeat: We got beer.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

www.madriverbrewing.com

Beer Walk (like a cake walk) 5-7pm

Jeff Siedschlag (old time Cajun) 6pm plus, human checkers

Pints For Non Profits for Clowns without Borders 6pm

Online at humfarm.org

MC Bruce @ Old Town Eureka

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm

Psymbionic, Futexture, Psy Fi 9pm All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

Sit and sip.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Ask us about hosting your event

Chris McCurdy (folk) 7pm

Sunday noon-9pm

New Weekday Hours M-F 3:30pm to 9pm

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Find us on Facebook.

Breakdancing with Rex 5-7pm $10

Belly Dance with Shoshanna New session 5:30-7pm $10

Argentine Tango Int. 7:15pm Beg. 8:15pm

Hoop Dance with Nicole Beg 5:30pm, Int. 6:30pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Spoken Word Night 8pm

The Good Taste tasting room

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature Cocktail in the bar!

Great lunch specials! 11:30-4:00

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Women Only Food & Beer Pairing 6pm Ali Marcus (folk) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Secret Password Hint: South of St. Charles Avenue

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

SOLUTIONS

HEMP • RECYCLED •ORGANIC

858 G ST., On the Plaza • ARCATA • 822-6972

Rump Shaker Wednesdays 9pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012

25


SAN FRANCISCO’S ZANY PI CLOWNS RETURN TO ARCATA WITH A NEW SHOW, THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE STUPID, A WILD WEST ADVENTURE INCLUDING INCREDIBLE CIRCUS ACROBATICS, HIGH SPEED HORSE RACES AND DUELS TO THE (OVERLY DRAMATIC) DEATH. THE SHOW RUNS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS AT 8 P.M. AND SUNDAY AFTERNOON AT 2 P.M. AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE.

INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED PIANIST YOUNG-HYUN CHO CELEBRATES KEYBOARD MASTERS IN HSU’S FULKERSON RECITAL HALL ON FRIDAY EVENING IN A PROGRAM INCLUDING BEETHOVEN’S SONATA NO. 30 IN E MAJOR, DEBUSSY’S “ESTAMPES,” LISTZ’S BALLADE NO. 2, AND “VINGT REGARDS SUR L’ENFANT JESUS” BY THE FRENCH COMPOSER OLIVIER MESSIAEN.

SONGWRITER LYNDSEY BATTLE IS FEATURED AT WOMEN’S MUSIC NIGHT AT THE WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS WITH CORY GOLDMAN JOINING HER ON BANJO AND GUITAR. THE SATURDAY EVENING PROGRAM ALSO INCLUDES JAZZ VOCALIST MARTHA MEADE WITH LES CRAIG, SONGWRITER SOPHIE ROBERTS, AND SINGING BY SAJ EDEN WITH DAUGHTERS ELYSIA AND ELAYNA. BATTLE WILL LEAD A SONGWRITING WORKSHOP THE FOLLOWING SATURDAY, OCT. 6, AT WCA. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN.

27 thursday THEATER

Circle Mirror Transformation. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. When Marty leads the first ever drama class in a Vermont town, she has no idea how hula-hooping and wacky acting games will change lives. $10. redwoodcurtain.com. 443-7688.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

MUSIC

Tenor David Powell. 7:30 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets in Eureka. Farewell concert by tenor who starred in Dell’Arte productions and local musical theatre. $15.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Huayllipacha. humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farmfresh produce every Thursday. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

ETC.

Imagine Humboldt 2050. 5:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. What will Humboldt look like in 40 years? How will we handle growth? Share your vision for the future. Led by the Humboldt County Association of Governments. imaginehumboldt.com. 444-8208. Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods downtown site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills for a career in maintenance. Get your OSHA certification and learn basic electrical and plumbing skills. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627.

28 friday EVENTS

Biodiversity Conference Kickoff. 7 p.m. Goodwin Forum, HSU. Screening of A Wild American Forest, introduced by Dr. Dominick DellaSala. Group discussion afterwards. humboldt.edu/biodiversity. 826-5105.

THEATER

The Good, The Bad and The Stupid. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Quirky Pi Clowns physical theater comedy troupe tells a western tale using elements of mime, acrobatics, juggling, eccentric dance, improvisation and puppetry with live music. 822-1575. Fox On The Fairway. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. NCRT presents a new farce by Ken Ludwig. $15/$12 students and seniors. ncrt. net. 442-6278. Circle Mirror Transformation. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Sept. 27 listing.

MUSIC

Alison Krauss and Union Station. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Bluegrass, country, rock and Americana icon and her band with special guest Jerry Douglas. $85/$75 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. Young-Hyun Cho. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. International (and Internet) pianist performs Debussy, Beethoven, Liszt and Messiaen. $8/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928.

DANCE

World Dance Lessons. 8-11 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. www.humboldtfolkdancers.org. 822-8045.

ART

Down the Hill Home: Art by Rick Bartow. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

Native American Arts Gallery, HSU. Drawings, paintings and prints by Batow, a member of the Wiyot tribe on loan to HSU from the Froelick Gallery in Portland. Show runs through Dec. 1.

MOVIES

Genetic Roulette. 6 p.m. Garberville Veteran’s Hall, 483 Conger. SoHum Label GMOs group presents film on the science, health concerns and politics of genetic engineering. 223-3469.

MEETINGS

Science Fiction Club of Humboldt. 7 p.m. Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, Second and F streets, Eureka. Reading of Dr. Seuss stories in commemoration of the 21st anniversary of his passing. sfchum@suddenlink. net. 442-8600.

29 saturday EVENTS

Excalibur Medieval Tournament and Market Faire. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mad River Hospital, 3800 Janes Road, Arcata. Witness the clash of steel as armored knights joust for honor and glory! Celebrate the fall harvest with music, dancing, food, local artisan booths and period games. $8. excaliburfaire.org. 502-6290 F Street Beer Fest. Noon-5 p.m. The Local Beer Bar, 516 F St., Eureka. Kickoff for Humboldt Beer Week features specialty local beers as well as live music, vendors and local food stands in parking lot. 970-977-0307. Biodiversity Conference. 10 a.m. HSU. World experts in ecology, biology and conservation headline two-day event. Keynote speakers include insect pollination

expert Scott Hoffman Black, forestry author Dominic DellaSala and herpetologist Tyrone Hayes. Full schedule online. humboldt.edu/biodiversity. 826-5105.

THEATER

Murder Mystery. 7:50 p.m. Hotel Arcata, 708 Ninth St. Before the final dessert is served at a wedding reception, someone is going to die. Interactive mystery includes dessert tastings, music and prizes. $25/$20 adv. murderbydessert.com. 223-4172. Circle Mirror Transformation. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Sept. 27 listing. Fox On The Fairway. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. See Sept. 28 listing. The Good, The Bad and The Stupid. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See Sept. 28 listing.

MUSIC

Richard Thompson. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Celebrated British singer-songwriter and guitar magician performs. $35/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/ centerarts. 826-3928. Women’s Music Night with Lyndsey Battle. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Featuring music by uke-playing singer/songwriter Lyndsey Battle with Cory Goldman, flautist Les Craig and singer Martha Meade. $3. 677-9493. Carl Tosten Guitar Workshop. 1 p.m. Mantova’s Two Street Music, 124 Second Street, Eureka. Free guitar clinic with modern, acoustic singer/songwriter. Covers expressive guitar techniques including tapping, multiple opening tunings and capos. 445-3155.

DANCE

Manila Barn Dance. 8-11 p.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive, Arcata. With caller Sue Moon

continued on next page


SEPTEMBER 29 - OCTOBER 7TH

Visit WWW. HumboldtBeerWeek.com lor detailed descriptions

Saturday Sept. 29th

m

SCHEDULE

11 :OOam - Eel River Brewing Company Brewer's Flight Weekend 12:00pm - F Streets Beer Fest. The Local & Humbordt Beer Works bring you f st excuse to drink outside. 12:00pm - Humboldt Homebrewers Homebrew Lounge & Iron Brewer Challenge! 5:30pm - Mad River Brewing Company's 23rd Anniversary Party

ERUPTION PRODUCTIONZ

Sunday Sept. 30th

10:00am - BEER BREWING 101 at Humboldt regeneration brewery! (must pre-register) 11 :OOam - Eel River Brewing Company Brewer's Flight Weekend 2:00pm - Ladies Night aaand Guys Night at The Local

EruptionProductionz.com

Mondav OCt. 1st

11 :OOam - Drink Pink at Six Rivers Brewery All Month Long! 11 :OOam - Humboldt Regeneration Brewery Open House 4:00pm - Beer & Cypress Grove Chevre Cheese at The Local 4:00pm - Redwood Night at Eel River Brewing Company 5:00pm - Sierra Nevada Tap Take over at Humbrews 5:00pm - Beer Walk at Mad River Tap Room

Tuesdav OCt. 2nd

11 :OOam - Beer-N-Brats at Eel River Brewing Company 4:00pm - Belgian Beer Night at The Local 4:00pm - Tapas and BeerPairing at the Lost Coast Brewery Pub 5:30pm - Human Checkers at Mad River Tar Room 7:00pm - Firestone Walker Beer Trivia Nigh at Humbrews

Wednesday OCt. 3rd

11 :OOam - Octoberfest Celebration at Eel River Brewing Company 4:00pm - Sour Night at The Local 4:00pm - Pints For Non Profits Mad River Tap Room 6:00pm - Women's Only Food & Beer Pairing at Six Rivers Brewery

Thursdav OCt. 4 4:00pm 4:00pm 7:00pm 8:00pm

- Beer & Bread at Eel River Brewing Company - TAP TAKEOVER: Heretic Brewing at The Local - Humboldt Homebrewers Monthly Meeting - Humbrews Presents Beer Pong Tournament

Fridav Oct.5th

1:OOpm - Crazy Beer Shirt at Mad River Tap Room 4:00pm - Hop Friday at The Local 6:30pm - Beer & Buffet at Humbrews featuring all Humboldt County Breweries!

Saturday Oct.6th _...- ~IF'

11 :OOam - Apple Harvest Weekend at Eel River Brewing Company 12:00am - Humboldt Homebrewers demonstration brew at Hoptoberfest 1:OOpm - Humboldt Hoptoberfest 2012 at Perigot Park in Blue Lake 4:00pm - Humboldt Beer Works Grand Re-Opening and Arts Alive

Sunday Oct.1th

14th Annual Humboldt Brewers cUf Disc Golf Tournament ._Il.__ 8:30am -- Anderson Val Presents Disc Gol Awards At Humbrews northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

27


continued from previous page and The Wild Rumpus Band. No partner or experience needed. Sponsored by the Humboldt Folklife Society. $6. 269-2061. Swing Dance. 7 p.m. Fortuna Veterans Hall/Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Music by Donna Landry and Swing Set. Sponsored by Fortuna Senior Services. 496-9886.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Arcata Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at parking lot at end of South I Street. Birding with Cindy Moyer, rain or shine. 442-9353. Trinidad Ivy Bash. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Houda Point area near Trinidad. Volunteers help with invasive plant removal. First 25 new volunteers to sign up in advance receive free work gloves. oganc@sbcglobal.net. 442-9353. Waterfowl Hunt Blind Brush-Up Volunteer Workday. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Meet at Salmon Creek Unit, Richard J. Guadagno Headquarters and Visitor Center, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Help prepare hunt blinds for upcoming waterfowl hunt season. Bring water and gloves if you have them. Tools and lunch provided. 733-5406. Ferndale Family Bike Rodeo. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Ferndale Fireman’s Pavilion, 100 S. Berding St. Learn and practice bicycle safety education. 269-2061.

FOOD

Arcata Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by The Delta Nationals. humfarm.org. 822-5951.

SPORTS

Third Annual Blessing of the Bikes. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Pacific Outfitters, 737 G St., Arcata. Bicycles blessed, riders who have been injured or died during the past year remembered with bicycle bells rung in celebration. Based on a tradition begun at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in NYC and popularized around the country, stalbansarcata.org. 822-4102.

ETC.

Transportation Issues Update. 11 a.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Speakers Marcella Clem, Jack Crider and Jacqueline Debets discuss local transportation issues. $14. 444-9252. Humboldt Health Fair. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Mad River Hospital, 3800 Janes Road, Arcata. Exhibits and demonstrations for better nutrition, fitness and wellness. 826-8201.

30 sunday EVENTS

Humboldt Beer Week. Celebration of the craft brew industry, focused on but not limited to local and regional craft beers. Multiple nightly sudsy events at local establishments. See full schedule online. humboldtbeerweek.com. Humboldt County Restaurant Week. Participating local, independent restaurants in Arcata and Eureka offer special discount meal deals all week. See complete list online. humboldtrestaurantweek.com. Excalibur Medieval Tournament and Market Faire. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mad River Hospital. See Sept. 29 listing. Biodiversity Conference. 10 a.m. HSU. See Sept. 29 listing.

THEATER

Fox On The Fairway. 2 p.m. North Coast Rep. See Sept. 28 listing. The Good, The Bad and The Stupid.. 2 p.m. Arcata

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

Playhouse. See Sept. 28 listing.

MUSIC

Deerhoof. 9 p.m. The Depot, HSU. Psyche rock by bassist/vocalist Satomi Matsuzaki, Greg Saunier on drums, John Dieterich and Ed Rodriguez on guitars. $15/$10 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. Tenor David Powell. 2 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, Eureka. See Sept. 27 listing.

ETC.

Dharma Talk. 9:30 a.m. Aikido Center, 890 G St., Arcata. Arcata Zen Group hosts Soto Zen priest Mark Lancaster. Meditation begins at 8 a.m. 826-1701. Guiding your Spirit, Finding your Joy. 11 a.m. Unity Church of the Redwoods, 1619 California St., Eureka. Life coach Dianne Sherman leads workshop. $20 love offering suggested. dianne@guidingyourspirit.com. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242.

1

monday

MEETINGS

Board Leadership Roundtable. Noon-1:30 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. This months’ topic is Advocacy from the Nonprofit Perspective with special guest Zuretti Goosby. $10. northerncalifornianonprofits.org. 442-2993.

ETC.

Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods downtown site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills used in an office setting. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627.

2 tuesday EVENTS

Jean-Michel Cousteau. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Ocean explorer, environmentalist, filmmaker and, yes, Jacques’ son speaks on “The Great Ocean Adventure.” Tickets are free but required and can be snagged at the University Ticket Office. humboldt.edu. 826-3928.

MUSIC

Wahid. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. East quietly meets West in the music of percussionist Chris Wabich and oudist Dimitri Mahlis. $12/$10 members. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

FOOD

Old Town Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, F Street between First and Third streets. Fresh farm-grown produce. Music by MC Bruce. humfarm. org. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371. Wildberries Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Fresh fruit, vegetables and plants from local growers. 441-9999.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Local business people gather for networking. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Shining a Light on Addiction. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Humboldt


What I Learned from Richard Thompson

RICHARD THOMPSON PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

“Who the hell is Richard Thompson?” People asked me that, with a tilt of the head or furrowed brow, when I told them I was going to Frets & Refrains, a weeklong music camp in New York’s Catskill Mountains, to learn from the master guitarist and songwriter. Where do I begin? Thompson has garnered so many awards that it’s amazing so few people recognize his name. Google him if you want stats. He’s been writing songs and making records since the

‘60s when he played with British folk-rock band Fairport Convention. He writes the tenderest of ballads that bring you to tears, and bouncing tunes with clever humor or piercing social critiques, and he can tear through fiery rock ‘n’ roll riffs that burn the house down. Thompson gave two talks per day at camp in a style more like conversations than lectures. He taught us to hear the patterns in music and demonstrated his hybrid picking technique: establishing a steady beat on the bass strings and accenting syncopating rhythm by pulling up on the higher strings, sometimes working in nonstandard guitar tuning. “This gives you more orchestral possibilities, which means you can fire the other guy in the band,” he joked, but he was quite serious. (When he comes to perform here on Saturday, he’ll play solo.) In fact, that’s the thing that Thompson offers that no one else can. He is the only guitarist I have ever seen who, performing alone, sounds as if there are three

4 thursday

Party Like it’s 1199! Hear ye, hear ye! Lords and ladies! Knights, wizards, lute-slingers and plague survivors! ‘Tis once again time to polish up your best full metal suit and remind yourself how to correctly drop “doth” and “thou art” into conversations. Whyest? This weekend marks the return of the Excalibur Medieval Tournament and Market Faire, one Humboldt’s top two Middle Ages-themed festivals, taking place Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 29 and 30, out on Janes Road in Arcata near Mad River Community Hospital. Huzzah! Other than some good Halloween practice, whatest hath the villagers in store? Welleth! The Seattle Knights will provide full-armored “cutting edge” sword fighting and jousting demonstrations for the assembled peasants. Also, saddle up on the world’s largest ridable rocking horse courtesy of Rockinghorseguy. Plus, enjoy the magic vaudeville of The Mystery Brothers, Lynx the Animator and Sabastian Stone. Of course there’ll also be plenty of market booths peddling grub, ale and local artisan goods. The makeshift streets will be filled with the sounds of The Wandering Thistle, minstrels with violins and drums who will make you forget about this week’s dragon attack. Tickets are $8 for grownups, $5 for dragon slayers 5-18, and free for the really wee ones. For lots more info on the Excalibur Faire (and some nice autostarted lute pickin’), head on over to excaliburfaire.org. We’ll remind you, of course, that should you not get your fill of ye olde festival goodness, Coastal Grove Charter School’s 10th Annual Medieval Festival of Courage invades Christie’s Pumpkin Patch in Blue Lake on Oct. 13 and 14. So, thou hath options. — Andrew Goff

people playing. He manages a rhythm, a base line, and a lead guitar part in the same song. And he’s also singing, with this powerful emotional inflection, an often-complicated melody, driven by a lyrical story he has created with wit, wisdom, and often an irreverent twist or two. He talked about developing his focus before performances, like corralling an inner stallion. He coaxes the stallion to permit a connection, gradually, until he’s working with it in unison, and then he’s out there performing, channeling the wildness into stunningly beautiful patterns. You want it to go on forever. Fortunately, you have the opportunity to experience this yourself on Saturday, Sept. 29, when Richard Thompson plays at the Van Duzer Theatre. Showtime is 8 p.m. Tickets are $35, $15 for HSU students. Jan Bramlett is a singer/songwriter from Memphis, now living in Manila. —Jan Bramlett

Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Series of lectures on effects of addiction on families, individuals and communities. $50. www.humboldt.edu/ olli. 826-3731. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Training for volunteer signature gathers for ordinance to require Eureka employers with 25 or more workers to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Non-denominational prayer group. dlbitte@hotmail.com. 834-5800.

3 wednesday MOVIES

The Last Days. 7-9 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. Steven Spielberg’s Academy Award-winning documentary about five Hungarian Holocaust survivors returning to their hometowns and places where they were imprisoned by the Nazis. www.ferndalemuseum. com. 786-9196.

ETC.

Eel River Valley Founders BNI. 7:30-9 a.m. Victorian Inn, 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale. Meeting of local business owners. 407-6827.

HUMBOLDT COUNTY RESTAURANT WEEK SEPTEMBER 30th through OCTOBER 7th

THEATER

During Humboldt County Restaurant Week, participating local, independent restaurants will feature a special, discounted menu to encourage you to come out and dine with them for breakfast, lunch and dinner!

MUSIC

This is the perfect opportunity to try that spot you’ve had your eye on for some time, or use it as a great excuse to visit an old favorite. Either way, it’s a proactive, direct way that you can support your local economy!

The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium, 1915 J St. EHS Players present a play honoring the legacy of Matthew Shepard who, in 1998, was beaten and left to die tied to a fence on the outskirts of Laramie, Wyo. for being gay. $6. 206-276-5744. SEATTLE KNIGHT PHOTO BY LAURAVEN DODD

Announcing the Inaugural

Rufus Wainwright. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The son of legendary folksingers Loudon Wainwright and Kate McGarrigle has followed his unique vision with a dizzying array of projects pairing poignant, captivating lyrics with imaginative pop flair. $45/$22 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

continued on next page

Participating Restaurants: Abruzzi Plaza Grill Moonstone Grill Sushi Spot Kyoto Sushi Restaurant 301 Folie Douce Naan Of The Above Avalon Bizou Burger Pita Grill Luke’s Joint The Other Place Humboldt Hot Dogs Hum Brews

Join Jaya Lakshmi & Ananda at Om Shala Yoga

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Kirtronica “Ecstatic Dance” Friday 10/5, 8-10pm $15 Advance/$18 door & Kirtan Saturday 10/6, 7-9pm $15

www.humboldtrestaurantweek.com

858 10th Street, Arcata | 825-YOGA (9642) www.omshalayoga.com

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012

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Movie Times

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

continued from previous page

Eight Days of Brew We love our beer here in Humboldt — the thriving local microbrew industry shows it. And what better time to honor the magic potions made from hops and grain than the beginning of fall as local brewers, amateur and professional, celebrate the first ever Humboldt Beer Week. Saturday begins an eight-day beer-a-thon with more brew-related activities than any one drinker can handle. It starts at noon with the F Street Beer Fest in the parking lot across from The Local, a beer lover’s paradise with 26 taps, maybe a hundred different bottled beers and more in a beer cellar downstairs. “Beer Week is a new thing for us, but other cities have been doing it for a while,” said The Local owner Darren Cartledge. “We’re going crazy at our place and everybody’s doing something.” The Local is collaborating with Humboldt Homebrewers and the brewer’s supply house Humboldt Beer Works on the fest, offering “an excuse to drink outside,” as they put it none too subtly. They’ll have beer making demonstrations, all sorts of ales, beers, etc., food and music by Gunsafe, The Plum Uglies, The Wax Catastrophe and DJ Gabe Pressure. “We’re also doing the Iron Brewer Challenge, sort of like Iron Chef,” said Cartledge. “We’ll unleash some ingredients and a homebrewer will go head-to-head with a pro brewer.” On any given day during Beer Week you can visit some Humboldt brewery or pub and get your brew on. For example, Eel River Brewing Company in Fortuna launches a “Brewer’s Flight Weekend” Saturday, offering tastes of various brews. Mad River Brewing Tap Room begins a week long “Hoppy Hour” that day and celebrates its 23rd anniversary with a party that night starting at 5:30 p.m. The new Humboldt Regeneration Brewery CSA offers “Beer Brewing 101” Sunday morning at 10 (pre-registration required). Then on Monday, the McKinleyville brewery hosts an open house starting at 11 a.m. Also on Monday, at 5 p.m., Mad River Tap Room has a “Beer Walk” while Humboldt Brews hosts a Sierra Nevada tap takeover and The Local offers beer and Cypress Grove Cheese pairings. Food pairing continues Tuesday, Oct. 2, with Eel River Brewing’s “Beer-N-Brats” and Lost Coast Brewery’s tapas and beer. Meanwhile The Local hosts a Belgian Beer Night and HumBrews has a Firestone Walker Beer Trivia Night at 7 p.m. Eel River Brewing celebrates Octoberfest Wednesday, Oct. 3, while Mad River Tap Room has

* = sAt./sUn. EARLy sHOws

Humboldt Folklife Society Group Sing Along. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Joel Sonenshein leads. 839-7063.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See Sept. 27 listing.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. See Sept. 27 listing. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. See Sept. 27 listing.

Heads Up…

Make Masks! The masks are gathering again for The Ink People Center for the Arts’ annual Maskibition. The entry date for this annual exhibition of masks is Saturday, Sept. 29. Contact exhibition curator Kathryne DeLorme at 442-7850 or mythicfaces@juno.com for more info. Make Junque! Humboldt Arts Council will be accepting entries for the 18th Annual Junque Arte Competition and Exhibition taking place Wednesday, Sept. 26. To be eligible, artwork must be made of 100% recycled materials. Review detailed entry guidelines available at the Museum or at humboldtarts.org. Make Words. The Great Intenders, a Northern Humboldt prose-writing group, has openings for two new members. For more information, visit sharonlevy. net/tgi ●

its weekly Pints For Non Profits. It’s Sour Night that night at The Local with eight different sour beers, including some rare ones in bottles you can take home. And the women-owned Six Rivers Brewery hosts a “Women Only” food and beer pairing starting at 6 p.m. (Is excluding men even legal?) Thursday, Eel River Brewing pairs beer and bread. The Local has Heretic Brewing Company up from Pittsburg, Calif., for a tap takeover. HumBrews hosts a Beer Pong Tournament (8 p.m.) and Libation has a German Octoberfest beer tasting and meal. (The Plaza wine shop also carries lots of exotic beers.) On Friday, Oct. 5, HumBrews hosts a beer and buffet dinner at 6:30 p.m. Friday is also “Crazy Beer Shirt Day” at Mad River Tap Room, whatever that might mean. Finally, on Saturday, Oct. 6, 15 breweries and four bands converge on Perigot Park in Blue Lake for Humboldt Hoptoberfest, a benefit for Blue Lake Education Foundation. And that’s just a taste of what’s available. See the complete Beer Week calendar at www.humboldtbeerweek.com for more imbibing possibilities. — Bob Doran

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 9/28- 10/04 unless otherwise noted. LOOPER wOn’t BACk dOwn HOtEL tRAnsyLvAniA 3d HOtEL tRAnsyLvAniA 2D tROUBLE witH tHE CURvE dREdd 3d dREdd 2D HOUsE At tHE End Of tHE stREEt End Of wAtCH REsidEnt EviL: REtRiBUtiOn 3d REsidEnt EviL: REtRiBUtiOn 2D findinG nEMO 3d findinG nEMO 2D tHE POssEssiOn LAwLEss PARAnORMAn 2D tHE BOURnE LEGACy HOPE sPRinGs

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 9/28 - 10/4 unless otherwise noted. LOOPER HOtEL tRAnsyLvAniA 3d HOtEL tRAnsyLvAniA 2D End Of wAtCH REsidEnt EviL: REtRiBUtiOn 3d REsidEnt EviL: REtRiBUtiOn 2D findinG nEMO 3d findinG nEMO 2D dREdd 3d dREdd 2D tROUBLE witH tHE CURvE HOUsE At tHE End Of tHE stREEt

*12:10, 3:00, 5:55, 8:50 *12:00, 3:15, 8:05 *12:50, 5:45 *12:40, 3:20, 6:00, 8:40 9:20 1:20, 3:45, 6:10 * 1:30, 4:10, 6:45 8:30 *2:20, 7:10 4:45, 9:35 *12:55, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 *2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

Minor theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 9/28 - 10/04 unless otherwise noted.

tHE MAstER sLEEPwALk witH ME tROUBLE witH tHE CURvE

*2:10, 5:20, 8:30 *2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 *1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00

fortuna theater

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 9/28 - 10/04 unless otherwise noted. HOtEL tRAnsyLvAniA 3d *12:40, *2:50, 5:00, 7:10, 9:20 HOtEL tRAnsyLvAniA 2D *1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:45 HOUsE At tHE End Of tHE stREEt *1:30, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35 End Of wAtCH *1:40, 4:15, 7:05, 9:40 tROUBLE witH tHE CURvE *1:20, 4:00, 6:40, 9:20 findinG nEMO 3d *1:10, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30

Garberville theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville tBA Journal • THURSDAY, Thursday, SEPT. Sept. 27, 27, 2012 2012 •• northcoastjournal.com NORTH Coast COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com 30 North

12:25, 3:25, 6:20, 9:15 12:15, 3:05, 5:55, 8:45 12:55, 5:45, 8:10 12:10, 3:20 12:40, 3:30, 6:10, 8:55 2:00, 7:00, 9:30 4:30 2:05, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35 12:50, 3:40, 6:25, 9:05 9:20 12:45, 3:10, 5:35 1:20, 4:00, 6:40 8:00 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 5:30, 8:20 12:20, 2:50 3:00, 8:35 12:30, 6:05

Good Cop, Badass Cop

Ayer crafts a gritty ode to the LAPD while Dredd puts its reboot in your ass By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

DREDD 3D. Remakes — or reboots, as they’re euphemistically called these days — tend to be pretty depressing. From either lack of imagination or cost-cutting in the creative department, Hollywood usually rushes out a hack version of a recent foreign hit (Vanilla Sky, The Ring). Or someone might ill-advisedly take a crack at improving a classic (Gus Van Sant’s bizarre Psycho, last year’s Straw Dogs). It is exceedingly rare for a studio/filmmaker to get it right, to revisit a movie with a strong premise that didn’t quite work in the execution. Steven Soderbergh pulled this off with the Ocean’s movies, as did Tarantino (sort of) with his Inglourious Basterds. Now little-thought-of director Pete Travis (Vantage Point) and screenwriter Alex Garland (28 Days Later) add Dredd to the short list of remakes that outshine their lamentable predecessors. Dredd opens with a brief sketch of the burned-out husk that was once the world. Some apocalypse has decimated civilization, and North America is a poisonous wasteland dotted with dark, horrible mega-cities. Judges, iron-fisted soldiercops with sentencing and execution privileges, are the only deterrent to anarchy and unchecked violence. In Megacity 1,

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012

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Previews

SLEEPWALK WITH ME. Comedic storyteller Mike Birbiglia, whose recent tour included a winning performance at HSU, co-wrote the screenplay for this film with This American Life‘s Ira Glass. “Birbigs” also codirects this “sweetly melancholic” comedy based on his own sleepwalking misadventures. A Journal pick o’ the week. Not Rated. 90m. LOOPER. Joseph Gordon-Levitt reunites with director Rian Johnson (Brick) for a sci-fi mob story. JGL plays a hit man whose job is to whack guys who have been sent from the future. When the future version of himself appears (in the form of Bruce Willis), well, that’s what you call a conundrum. R. 118m. HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA. Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) runs a posh, monsters-only hotel, catering to the likes of Frankenstein (Kevin James) and the Mummy (CeeLo Greene). But when a human boy shows up and falls for Drac’s daughter, he thinks it sucks, so to speak. PG. 91m. WON’T BACK DOWN. Inspirational public school drama alert! The premise sounds painfully familiar: A teacher and mom fight against complacency and bureaucracy in a failing inner-city school. Can a trio of great actresses (Viola Davis, Maggie Gyllenhaal and Holly Hunter) sidestep the clichés of this sub-genre? PG. 121m.

Stay out of Malibu, Lebowski! The Coen brothers’ Raymond Chandler-onweed comedy/pop culture juggernaut The Big Lebowski comes shambling back to the Arcata Theater Lounge for a twonight engagement this Thursday (8 p.m.) and Friday (9 p.m.), with White Russian drink specials, of course. I can think of no smooth transition to Saturday night’s family-friendly film, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004), for my money the best of the boy-wizard series. 6 p.m.

Continuing

THE BOURNE LEGACY. Jeremy Renner replaces Matt Damon in the action franchise based on Robert Ludlum’s international thriller novels. PG13. 125m. FINDING NEMO 3D. Nine years after its release, the beloved Pixar movie returns to theaters with an extra dimension, hoping to lure a new generation of fans. Get it? Fish. Lure. Groan. G. 100m. HOPE SPRINGS. Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones play an aging couple trying to rekindle the fire in their 30-yearold marriage. PG13. 100m. HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET. A divorced mom (Elisabeth Shue) and her teenage daughter (Jennifer Lawrence) move into a house furnished with a psycho. PG13. 101m. LAWLESS. Prohibition-era tale about the moonshining Bondurant brothers features a great cast (Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Guy Pearce) but doesn’t hold together. R. 115m. THE MASTER. Director Paul Thomas Anderson’s challenging and ambitious drama about a charismatic cult leader (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and the troubled Naval veteran he entices (Joaquin Phoenix). R. 137m. PARANORMAN. A misunderstood boy tries to save his town from zombies in this pretty if bland stop-motion film from the makers of Coraline. PG. 93m. THE POSSESSION. Available for rent: body of young girl. Tenant must be malevolent spirit who can freak parents out by making girl convulse and puke locusts. PG13. 91m. RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION. Milla Jovovich’s fifth turn in the critically reviled, commercially boffo zombie-slaughter franchise. Mmm, brains! R. 95m. TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE. How does Clint Eastwood follow up his rambling indictment of a ghost-Obama at the Republican National Convention? With this drama about an elderly baseball scout bonding with his adult daughter (Amy Adams). PG13. 111m. —Ryan Burns l

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Sept. 27 Oct. 1 Thurs Sept 27 - The Big Lebowski (1998) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Fri Sept 28 - The Big Lebowski (1998) Doors at 8:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Sat Sept 29 - Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG-13 Sun Sept 30 - Giant Screen NFL Football Doors at 12:45 p.m. Free All ages Mon Oct 1 - Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors at 5:15 p.m. Free All ages

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

THE

cartel. Not to be dismissive, but the plot of End of Watch isn’t the most important element at work here. Ayer and his actors do the bulk of their work developing the relationship of the main characters and, in the process, establishing an air of everyday authenticity. Where many of his past characters represented the larger-than-life, mythological aspect of policing (Denzel Washington’s Alonzo Harris in Training Day is a prime example), Gyllenhaal and Peña play regular guys in distinctly irregular circumstances, good people uncomfortable being labeled heroes. Their relationship is complex and genuine, alternating between laugh-out-loud funny and devastatingly poignant. End of Watch is shot partially in a found-footage style, with Gyllenhaal’s character filming the action for a nightschool filmmaking class. The rest of the action is photographed with the toopopular handheld, rapid zoom, motionsickness cam. This is the only thing I disliked: The photography and editing are frenetic to the point of distraction. But for the most part, the action and performances are so compelling I could forgive the intrusion. R. 109m. —John J. Bennett

population 800 million, the judges fight a losing battle against brazen, murderous gangs and the brain-boiling future drugs they peddle. Enter Judge Dredd (Karl Urban), an apparently invincible death-dealer, legendary among cops and criminals alike. On an unexceptional workday, after Dredd blasts his way through some street toughs and bathes a mall in their blood, his supervisor tasks him with assessing a rookie on the verge of losing her job (Olivia Thirlby). They take a routine triple-homicide/ torture/drug vendetta call to one of the city’s roughest housing blocks, where they run afoul of ex-prostitute gang boss MaMa (Lena Headey), and end up having to blast their way through 200 stories of murderers. The movie’s premise sounds simplistic and familiar, and it is. There have been too many dystopian future cop actioners to count, but this one stands out. Dredd is far better than it should be. Garland’s script avoids unnecessary exposition, instead cranking up the action and tension from the jump. The structure is simple, but he populates it with distinct, compelling characters. Even some of the bad guys get developed identities. The most remarkable thing about Dredd may be the fact that it feels like a director-driven movie. All too often, action movies just hit the marks, blow stuff up, wind down to the end, and are easily forgotten. But Travis makes this movie his own, shooting it in an alternately gritty and lyrical style that is both original and completely in keeping with the tone of the story. I’m not familiar with the serialized British comic strip launched in 1977 that was the source material for the earlier Sylvester Stallone Judge Dredd. But this is what I want to see in a comic book adaptation: wall-to-wall action, compelling characters and stimulating visuals. R. 95m. END OF WATCH. Writer/director David Ayer’s latest makes an interesting addition to his catalog of LA cops-and-criminals stories. In the past, he mainly focused on the corrupting influence of power and the sometimes indiscernible difference between the forces of law and lawlessness. This time out he has made an unapologetic paean to the men and women in blue, the LAPD in particular. At first blush the reverent tone might put off some viewers, but Ayer backs it up with such a heartfelt, authentic story that only the most hardbitten among us won’t be won over. Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña play best friends and partners going about the business of LAPD patrol men. They goof around, take a few routine calls, get in shootouts and inadvertently find themselves in the crosshairs of the Sinaloa

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

31


SPIRITUAL BUT NOT RELIGIOUS. Nearly 30 percent of Americans identify themselves as spiritual but not religious. Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Sept. 30, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek. org for more info. (CMM-0927) EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION & INTERACTION. A management workshop. Gain insight into your own and others’ orientations, priorities and motives in carrying out work and relating to others. Learn how to adapt your approach to communicate and influence more effectively. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., Oct. 5, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $100 (includes materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 8263731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMM-0927)

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

PHOTO TO PAINTING. Making your memories into Art: Learn how to turn your favorite photos into either a watercolor or acrylic painting. Sat.’s, Sept. 29–Nov. 17. 9:30 a.m.–Noon. Fee $99. CR Eureka Downtown Site. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 834-5702 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link (AC-0927) SATURDAY WITH KATHY LEE. Keeping the art of hand needle work alive. Presenting a variety of 3 hour classes. 1-4 p.m. $40 plus $8 supply fee. Classes include: Intro to English Smocking, Intro Ribbon Embroidery and Intro to Doll Making. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0927) THURSDAY EVENING WITH KATHY LEE. Keeping the art of hand needle work alive. Presenting a variety of 2 hour classes.6-8 p.m. $30. Min. 2/Max. 6 students. Projects include: Wonderful world of fabric yo yo’s and intro to shadow quilting. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0927) TUESDAY SEWING WITH TINA. OFFERING A VARIETY OF BEGINNING SEWING PROJECTS. Every Tues., 6-8 p.m. $35. Projects include: Lined tote bag, Custom chef apron, Pillow cases and For baby. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0927) LEARN TO KNIT SOCKS CLASS AT YARN. Thurs. Oct. 4 - 25, 5:30-7 p.m., Cost $60 Knit socks are fun to knit and a joy to wear. Learn how to knit socks using a short-row method to turn the heel. Call 443-YARN to register and for info. (AC-0927)

Communication

CONCIOUS PARENTING. Learn the four step system to create a happier healthier home life now. Uncover the hidden treasure of negative emotions; your own and your child’s. Create and maintain age appropriate clear boundaries delivered with kindness. And so much more! Parents of all age children are welcome. Parents only please. Four classes: Mon.s Oct. 8-29, 6-7:45 p.m., in Eureka. Cost is $80 payment options available. Call or text 775-313-7332 to register. (CMM-1004)

COMMUNITY MEDIATOR TRAINING. Annual course at Humboldt Mediation Services. Two-week, 34-hours, weekdays, Oct. 1, 2, 4, 9 and 11, 5:15- 9 p.m., and Sat., Oct. 6 and 13, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Facilitate meaningful discussion, deal with strong emotion, validate and reframe concerns, and reconcile differences to reach and draft workable agreements. Certifies participants to mediate disputes in Community Boards style of mediation. Discounts available for volunteers, students, seniors, and those who sign up with a friend (or foe). Contact HMS office, (707) 445-2505, email janet.s@ humboldtmediationservices.org or visit www.humboldtmediationservices.org (CMM-0927

Computers

INTRO TO ADOBE DREAMWEAVER. Learn essentials of website design in a step-by-step exploration of this dynamic web design application. With Annie Reid. Tues./Thurs., Oct. 9-23, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0927)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

DANCE TANGO! Practica Fri. Sept. 28, 7-9 p.m., $6, Studio of Dance Arts, Eueka. Humboldttango.org. NO SUMMER CLASSES (DMT-0927) SONGWRITING WORKSHOP WITH LYNDSEY BATTLE. Sat., Oct. 6, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $10. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 South Westhaven Dr., Call 677-0459 for more info. (DMT-0927) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Fitness

NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1227) KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./ Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-0927) PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-0927) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0927) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227)

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1227)

Home & Garden

BASIC HOME REPAIR. Join us for a fun, practical class and learn basic plumbing; electrical; painting; window, door, and wall repair. Mon.’s, Oct. 8-Oct. 29, 6-8:30 p.m. Fee $65. CR Off Campus Site. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 834-5702 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (HG-0927) GARDENING SCHOOL. First of a series of 4. Course 1 offered by the Humboldt District of California Garden Clubs, Inc. Oct. 12 -13, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m, Eureka. Speakers Deborah Giarud on Basic botany for gardeners and the parts of a plant. Sam Polly on Improving your Soil. Also Dr. Colette Beaupre and Donna Brink on House Plant Care and Plant propagation with hands on project. Maria Krenek with plants for sale and explain how to care for them. Those completing the series will be entitled to be Gardening Consultants. Fee $40 for one day or $75.00 for two days. Lunch is included each day. Study guide provided with course. Call 442-1387 or email mgoodwin@ northcoast.com for more information and a registration form. (G-0927)

Kids & Teens

CREATIVE DANCE FOR LITTLE FEET. Little ones are full of creative and physical energy, in this class kids learn to express themselves through dance as they fly like a bird, stretch like a cat and touch rainbows. Mon.s, Oct. 22-Nov. 12, 9:45-10:30 a.m., $25/$35 non-residents. For more information contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit www.cityofarcata.org/rec (K-0927) JUNIOR ARCATA SPORTS CLUB. Ages 4-6 years. Introducing a new sport each week including basketball, baseball, floor hockey, soccer and kickball. Emphasis on skill development and having fun! Tues.s, Oct. 6-Nov. 13, 3:15-4:00 p.m. Arcata Community Center, $40/$50 non-resident. For more information contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit www.cityofarcata.org/rec . (K-0927) RAIN FOREST CANOPY TOUR. Experience the Redwoods like never before as you climb, zip and rappel through the Humboldt Skies. Sat., Oct. 21, 9 a.m. OR 2 p.m., Redwood Park, Arcata. For participants ages 12 and older. Discover the Redwood Canopy from a whole new perspective! $49 / $59 non-residents. For more information contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit www.cityofarcata.org/rec (K-0927) THE G.U.L.C.H. TEEN PROGRAM. Teens ages 12-17 are invited to skateboard at the EurekaSkatePark, Play Disc Golf, Learn filmmaking & music production, or just chill and meet new friends! Tues.s & Thurs.s, 4-6 p.m. starting Oct. 16, 1720 10th St. in Eureka! Teens must have a waiver on file signed by their parent/ guardian. Please call 441-4240 for more information. (K-0927) CRAFTY KIDS AFTER SCHOOL FELT CLASSES. With Bequin. Tues.s or Thurs.s, 3:15-5:30 p.m. $20 + $5 material fee per day. Min. 3/Max. 6 students. Intro to the wonders of felting wool fibers with several projects created to take home. Includes materials. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (K-0927)


ROWING. Humboldt Bay Rowing Association is forming its competitive Junior Crew Team for ages 12 and up. No experience necessary, must know how to swim. Contact Scott at 845-4752 or hbrajrscoach@ me.com or visit www.hbra.org. (K-0927)

Over 50

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

BOTANICAL DRAWING. Learn basic fundamentals of drawing plants while focusing on line, shape, value and texture. With Tim Clewell. Thurs., Oct. 18-Nov. 15, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1011)

Language

INTRODUCTORY RUSSIAN LANGUAGE & CULTURE. For those with little or no knowledge of the Russian language. Natalia Novikova will help you become familiar with the Cyrillic alphabet, basic reading and writing, and everyday communication. You’ll also learn Russian history, arts and literature along the way. Beginning: Mon., Oct. 8-Dec. 3 (no class Nov. 19), 5:30-7:30 p.m. Intermediate: Wed., Oct. 10-Dec. 5 (no class Nov. 21), 5:30-7:30 p.m. Fee for each session: $100. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (L-0927)

Lectures

DISASTERS DON’T WAIT. Have Your Supply Kits Ready. Get your supplies ready for response to an earthquake, tsunami or severe weather. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Wed., Oct. 24, 6-8 p.m., Azalea Hall, McKinleyville. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/supplykits or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at (707) 8263731. (L-1011) LIVING ON SHAKY GROUND. How to Survive Earthquakes & Tsunamis in Northern California. A free class. Thurs., Oct. 18, 6-8 p.m. at Pacific Union School, Multipurpose Room, Arcata. Pre-registration required: Call (707) 499-0754. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness (www.humboldt.edu/rti). Funding provided by the Calif. Emergency Management Agency Earthquake and Tsunami Program. (L-1011) DISASTER PREPAREDNESS IS EVERYONE’S BUSINESS. Our region relies on its local businesses to remain open after a disaster to help the community quickly recover. This course provides a simple but effective plan to identify and mitigate hazards, create a sensible business disaster plan, prepare disaster supplies kits, identify and strengthen building weaknesses, plan to reduce injuries and save lives. Instructor: Judy Warren. Wed., Oct. 10, Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, Eureka (next to Adorni Center), 6-9 p.m. Fee: $50. For more details, fees and to register: www.humboldt.edu/rti or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at 707-826-3731. (LE-0927) DYNAMIC WRITING. The Creative Life Adventure. A workshop on writing styles and techniques, exercises and publication mechanics with Jesse Austin. Sat., Oct. 6-20, Noon-3:30 p.m. $55. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (LE-0927) FOOD SAFETY. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Wed., Oct. 17, 6-8 p.m., Trinidad City Hall. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-1004)

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227)

HOUSING HUMBOLDT’S HISTORY. An Insider’s Look at Local Museums. Hear an introductory presentation by Jerry Rohde, and then visit the Blue Lake, Ferndale, Fortuna Depot and Trinidad museums, where directors and staff will conduct tours. Sat., Oct. 20-Nov. 17, 1-3 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1011) THE LIVES & TIMES OF FOUR FOREFATHERS OF EVOLUTIONARY THEORY. Join Dr. Robert Rasmussen, Emeritus Professor of Botany at HSU to discuss Carl Linnaeus, Alexander von Humboldt, Charles Darwin and Brother Gregor Mendel. Wed., Oct. 24-Nov. 14, 3-5 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1011) THE UNIVERSAL WORD CARD DECK. Open new worlds of possibility for prose, poetry and visual art by making your own deck of word cards, following the instructions of iconic poet Michael McClure. With Stephanie Silvia. Tues., Oct. 23-Nov. 13, 3:30-5:50 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1011) 2012 & THE END OF THE AGES. Explore the reasons behind the interest in the Mayan Calendar and 2012 End of the Age predictions with Laurent Cleenewerck. Thurs., Oct. 11-25, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1004) BOOK LOVERS UNITE, JANE AUSTEN. Join a lively conversation about Jane Austen, one of English literature’s most valued and beloved writers. Discuss her life and her books, including Price and Prejudice, with author Marie Raphael. Wed., Oct. 17, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004)

GENTLE YOGA FOR OLLI. Focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Stephanie Perrett. This course is held at Timber Ridge in McKinleyville. Tues., Oct. 16-Nov. 13, 10-11 a.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) MEMOIR, WRITING YOUR LIFE STORY. Explore and write about pivotal experiences that shaped you. With Sharon Ferrett. Wed., Oct. 10-Nov. 14, 4-6 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0927) PILATES PLUS. Build a stronger, healthier body. Improve posture, balance and flexibility with the elegant and flowing movements of Pilates. With Joanne Fornes. Wed., Oct. 3-Nov. 7, 10:30 a.m.-Noon. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880 (O-0927) PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS & THE ORIGINS OF THE PARTISAN DIVIDE. Partisan politics are nothing new. Discuss how mass media, the Internet, and the infusion of unlimited sums of money have affected the system the framers of the Constitution envisioned. Relive the creation of the Electoral College, and the election of 1800 with author Ray Rafael. Wed., Oct. 17, Thurs., Oct.18 and Wed., Nov. 7, 4-6 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880.(O-1004) TAI CHI FOR EVERYONE. With Glenda Hesseltine. Learn a short version of Tai Chi in these beginning sessions. Mon., Oct. 15-Nov. 19, 3-4:30 p.m. $70/ OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) THE ZOO & YOU. Learn about the history, exhibits, people and projects of the Sequoia Park Zoo. Includes a zoo tour and animal encounters. With Gretchen Ziegler, zoo manager, and Amber Neilson, zoo education coordinator. Fri., Oct. 5-19, 9 a.m.Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0927) WEAVING GREAT TALES, THE ART OF STORYTELLING. Captivate and inspire listeners of all ages when you discover and tell great stories. With Seabury Gould. Thurs., Oct. 11-Nov. 1, 1-3 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1004)

CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING WINE. Join winemaker Joe Collins for an evening focused on the creation and production of champagne and sparking wine. Thurs., Oct. 11, 6-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004)

YOGA FOR OLLI. A gentle yoga class with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., Oct. 15-Nov. 5, 1:30-3 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1004)

EINSTEIN & BEYOND. Understanding the Quantum Revolution and Its Legacy. An overview of the Einsteinian revolution of physics with emphasis on quantum theory, and discussion of classical physics and relativity at the speed of light with Laurent Cleenewerck. Tues., Oct. 9-23, 10 a.m.-Noon. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0927)

FRIENDLY FIRE, THE HISTORY & ROLE OF FIRE IN REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK. Join ranger Jim Wheeler and prescribed fire manager John McClelland for a presentation and discussion of the role of prescribed fire in maintaining both historical landscapes and native plant communities in Redwood National Park. Includes a field trip to the Bald Hills above Redwood Creek. Thurs., Oct. 18, 1-3 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 20, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1011)

ELECTIONS 2012, THE MEDIA AS WATCHDOG. Discuss the role of the news media in the 2012 Presidential election with Maclyn McClary. Fri., Oct. 12 and 19, 10 a.m.-Noon. $40/OLLI members, $65/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) EXPLORING NORTH COAST FOLKTALES. Discuss theory of local folklore and hear a team of professional storytellers share some North Coast stories. With Renee Ross and Seabury Gould. Sat., Oct. 6 and 13, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0927) FINGERPAINTING ON YOUR IPAD. An introduction to iPad painting using the ArtStudio app, with local artist Claire Iris Schencke. Wed., Oct. 3-24, 6-8 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880 (O-0927)

Pets/Animals

PUPPY MANNERS & BASIC DOG OBEDIENCE. Two classes to help bring out the best in mans best friend. 6 Week Classes start 10/7, Sun.’s, Puppy Manners 1011 a.m. and Basic Dog Obedience from 11am-Noon. Puppy Manners $55, Dog Obedience $65. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or visit The Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. 441-4244. (P-0927)

Spiritual

SUNDAY SCHOOL ST. BERNARD PARISH. Grades K-8. For more information call (707) 442-6466 or visit saintbernards.org (S-1011)

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227) HOW KARMA COLORS OUR LIFE. Sat., Oct. 6, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Buddha’s teachings on karma explain the relationship between our mind, our actions, and our experiences. Karma is like gravity; it’s not personal, it’s not singling us out. If we trip and fall we don’t get angry with gravity. Understanding how karma functions puts us in control of our life. We can learn to transform, and avoid difficulty, thereby creating lasting happiness. Everyone is Welcome. $20, includes a snack break. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside, CA. www.meditateinolympia. org (S-0927) continued on next page

TO PRUNE OR NOT TO PRUNE WITH

MARY BARBER

Learn the Do’s and Don’ts of Fall Pruning Sat., Sept. 29th 10:00 a.m. FREE! Call 839-1571 X5 to reserve your space

1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville Mon.-Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 • millerfarmsnursery.com

Needle Felting Applique 10/6 Ever want to add that little bit of pizzazz to a knit or felt project? In this class we’ll be learning how to needle felt appliqué onto a pre-felted notions bag/ Needle felting uses a barbed needle to interlock wool fibers together. We’ll be going over planning and transferring your design,preparing your fiber, and needle felting. Cost is $50.00 does not include materials.

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com

NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

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continued from previous page

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation

COACHES COMMUNITY WORKSHOP. HSU Coach Steve Kinder & CR Coach Doug Oliveira share valuable coaching tips & run basketball drills! Whether you’re an experienced coach, have only thought about youth coaching or just love basketball, don’t miss this FREE Community event! Workshop attendees must be over 18 and out of high school. Sun., Oct. 7, 1-3 p.m. at The AdorniCenter, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Email Brian at bmillett@ci.eureka.ca.gov or call 441-4240 for more info. (SR-0927) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1227)

Therapy/Support

TYPE 1 DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP. meeting the 3rd Tue. of each month, 6-7:30 p.m, at the Foundation of Medical Care, 3100 Edgewood Rd. Eureka.Contact 443-0124. LIFERING ADDICTION RECOVERY. Face-to-face meetings every Wed., 7 p.m. in McKinleyville. An abstinence-based network for people seeking to reclaim life and end cycles of alcohol and drug addiction. Information at http://www.youtube.com/ user/humboldtslifering or LifeRingHumboldt@gmail. com. (TS-1004) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

CAREGIVER TRAINING. Area 1 Agency on Aging offers FREE 42-hour course in Eureka. Prepare for new career, take better care of loved ones, request employment referrals. Sessions held Tues.s and Thurs.s, 6-9 p.m., Oct. 16-Nov. 13. Homework due at first session. Call Caregiver Services at (707) 443-4363 to schedule registration. (V-1011) SUICIDE INTERVENTION. Examine suicide statistics, attitudes, indicators and predictors to assess level of risk and kind of intervention necessary. MFT/LCSW CEUs available. With Rebecca Porteous, LCSW. Fri., Oct. 12, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $40 includes lunch. $25 additional for credit or MFT/LCSW/nursing CEUs. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended (V-1004)

Wellness/Bodywork

AYURVEDIC WELLNESS COUNSELOR PROGRAM. with Traci Webb. Meets five weekends (Fri.-Sun.) Oct. 12-Jan. 20, Part I of three part Practitioner Certificate. Includes: Aromatherapy, Colortherapy, Mental Constitutions, Yoga/Ayurveda Psychology, Ayurvedic Diagnostics, Panchakarma Theory, $1500 by Sept. 30 ($1,600 after), OR $350/month. Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601-9025. (W-0927)

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Herbal Clinic Class. Jan. 14-April 15, 2013, Refine and expand your herbal counseling skills. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.-Nov. 2013. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in-depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Bothwell & Rosemary Gladstar, Nov. 14-23, 2013. More information to come soon. Get in touch to be on the interested list. Register online at www. dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-1101) INNER FREEDOM YOGA FULL-TIME STUDENTS AND SENIORS 65+. Discounts year round: $9 each, 6 for $45 - $55. Community Yoga Center, Arcata Plaza. www.innerfreedomyoga.com (W-1011) INNER FREEDOM YOGA SPECIALS. For anyone new to IFY: 8 classes $68, 16 for $125, through Oct. 1, when you mention this ad. Classes valid 90 days. Community Classes for everyone, year-round prices: $7-$12 each: Tues./Thurs. 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Community Yoga Center, Arcata Plaza. www.innerfreedomyoga. com. (W-0927) LEARN ORTHO-BIONOMY® WITH SARA SUNSTEIN. Common sense bodywork that creates comfort, relaxes tensions, and activates self-healing and wellness. Weekend seminar begins Nov. 2, 7 p.m., Arcata. Register by Oct. 2. www.sarasunstein.com/ classes.html (W-0927) EVERY PART OF YOU HAS A SECRET LANGUAGE, YOUR HANDS AND YOUR FEET SAY WHAT YOU’VE DONE. Rumi. Learn their language. Reflexology classes start Oct. 15. Early registration discount. www. reflexologyinstruction.com (707) 822-5395 (W-0927) AROMATHERAPY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM & ESSENTIAL OIL DISTILLATION. With Traci Webb. Two Weekend Immersions, Oct 12-14 & Oct. 26-28, $900 (or $475/weekend), Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-1011) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-0927) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Jan. 22, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

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GENERAL CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS

Hospice of Humboldt, a private, non-profit corporation, is seeking general contractors to provide pre-construction services, with an option to be exercised at Hospice’s discretion to act as general contractor for construction, for a 10-acre planned development to include three buildings encompassing ~33,000 SF, associated site work and offsite improvements to be located in Eureka, California. The RFP is available for uploading from our website: www. hospiceofhumboldt.org, click on the General Contractor RFP link on the right side of the main page; or contact Hospice of Humboldt, 2010 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, (707)445-8443, bbishop@hospiceofhumboldt.org. Proposals submitted in response to the RFP are due by 5 p.m. Monday, October 22, 2012. 9/27/2012 (12-270)

  NOTICE OF NEW HEARING AND ORDER ON REISSUANCE CASE NO CP120330

Name of Person Asking for Protection: PAULA KAYE STEVENS Address: 1201 Angel Heights Fortuna, CA 95540 Name of Person to Be Restrained: CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON New Hearing Date: A new hearing date is scheduled because: The person CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON was not served before the current hearing date. Order for Continuance and Notice of Hearing: The Notice of Court Hearing (Form DV-109), filed on July 25, 2012 with the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt is reset for hearing in this court on this NEW DATE: October 29, 2012, at 1:30 p.m., at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 6. Reissue Temporary Restraining Order: The request to reissue the temporary restraining order is GRANTED. The attached Temporary Restraining Order (Form DV-110) is reissued. Any orders listed on that form remain in effect until the end of the hearing on October 29, 2012. Warning and Notice to CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON If the request to reissue the Temporary Restraining Order is GRANTED, you must continue to obey the attached Temporary Restraining Order until the end of the hearing. Expiration Date: October 29, 2012 Service of Order: A copy of this Order must be served on CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON at least 5 days before the hearing, along with all other documents requesting domestic violence restraining orders. If the reissuance

is denied, a copy of the Temporary Restraining Order must not be attached or served. Dated: September 10, 2012 Filed: September 11, 2012 DV-109 Filed: July 25, 2012 s/: JOYCE D. HINRICHS JUDICIAL OFFICER SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-263)

  NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is about to be made. The name(s) and business address of the seller are: Many Hands Gallery 438 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501 Phil & Lunel Haysmer Doing business as: Many Hands Gallery All other business name(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s) witin the past three years, as stated by the seller(s) are: None. The location in California of the chief executive office of the seller is: 438 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501 The name and address of the buyer(s) are: Astra Burke 438 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501 The assets being sold are generally described as: Gallery. The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: Dockal & Assoc. CPA P.O. Box 618 Eureka, CA 95502 And the anticipated sale date is October 31, 2012. The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2. The name and address of the person with whom claims may be filed is: Phil Haysmer 1037 F St. Eureka, CA 95501 And the last day for filing claims by any creditor shall be October 31, 2012 which is the business day before the anticipated sale date specified above. Recorded: 9/24/2012 /s: Astra Burke, Buyer. 9/27/2012 (12-278)

 PUBLIC SALE

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien on said property pursuant to sections 21700-21716 of the Business and Professions Code, section 2328 of the UCC section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 6th day of October, 2012 at 9:30 AM on the premises where

the said property has been stored and which is located at Mad River Storage Center, 1400 Glendale Drive, Arcata CA. County of Humboldt the following: # 140 Natasha Ferguson # 272 Michelle Bandy # 297 Ed Lott # 304 Aaron Henderson # 310 Aaron Henderson # 331 Frank Madison Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in prior to 9:30 AM on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as-is, where is and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in event of settlement between the owner and the obligated party. Auctioneer: Don Johnson, bond # 9044453 Dated this 27th day of September and 4th day of October, 2012 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-276)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00531

The following persons are doing business as MYOPIA PRESS at 90 Sunny Brae Center, Arcata, CA 95521, 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A, Arcata, CA 95521. Jeff Jensen 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A Arcata, CA 95521 Ruth Jensen 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jeff Jensen, Ruth A. Jensen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 6, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-271)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00546

The following persons are doing business as ENERGY LIFE CENTER at 616 Wood St., Eureka, CA 95501. Forty Four Financial Corp. 1102 5th St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/13/12. /s Jennifer Oliver, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-269)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00557

The following person is doing business as B.V.’S TREES at 6743 West Ave., Fields Landing, CA 95537, P.O. Box 332, Fields Landing, CA 95537. Brian Nelson Viale 6743 West Ave. Fields Landing, CA 95537 The business is conducted by An Individual.


PUBLIC NOTICE PROPERTY TAX DUE John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, gives notice that regular secured tax bills will be mailed on or before October 1, 2012, to all property owners, at the addresses shown on the tax roll. If you own property in Humboldt County and do not receive a tax bill by October 20, contact the Tax Collector’s office, 825 Fifth Street, Room 125, Eureka, Ca. 95501 or call (707) 476-2450. Failure to receive a tax bill does not relieve the taxpayer of the responsibility to make timely payments. The FIRST INSTALLMENT of 2012-13 taxes are due and payable on November 1, 2012, and will become delinquent if not paid by 5 p.m. on December 10, 2012; thereafter a 10% penalty will be added, plus any applicable fees. The SECOND INSTALLMENT will be due on February 1, 2013 and, if not paid by 5:00 p.m. on April 10, 2013, a 10% penalty and $20 cost charge will be added, plus any applicable fees. BOTH INSTALLMENTS MAY BE PAID when the first installment is due. SUPPLEMENTAL TAX BILLS are an additional tax liability due to a reassessment of your property value and are due on the date the bill is mailed to you. Please check the supplemental tax bill delinquent dates to be sure to pay the taxes in a timely manner to avoid penalties & costs. Payments may be made by mail sent and made payable to the Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 Fifth Street, Room 125, Eureka, Ca. 95501 and must be U. S. Post Office POSTMARKED BY THE DELINQUENT DATE to avoid late penalties. Payments may also be made in person at the County Tax Collector’s office, 825 Fifth Street, Room 125, Eureka, Ca. 95501, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and Noon, and 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, holidays excepted. John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Date: 9/20/12

9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-273)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00562

The following persons are doing business as MEGA MINI FARM at 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12, Eureka, CA 95501. Andrew Gill 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12 Eureka, CA 95501 Leeann Gill 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Andrew Gill. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 20, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-275)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00570

The following person is doing business as JB MARYN GIFT CONCIERGE at 1685 Hideaway Ct., #A, McKinleyville, CA 95519, P.O. Box 2334, McKinelyville, CA 95519. Jodie Jean Marynowski 1685 Hideaway Ct., #A McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to

transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/24/12. /s Jodie Marynowski. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 24, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-277)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00539

The following persons are doing business as OWNS at 670 16th St., Arcata, CA 95521. Robert De Jesus Morales 670 16th St. Arcata, CA 95521 Shawn Lavelle Dean II 670 16th St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Robert Morales, Shawn Dean. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 10, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-261)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00541

The following persons are doing business as HUMFRESH at 4859 Starlund Ct., Eureka, CA 95503, P.O. Box 4662, Arcata, CA 95518. Bryan Smothers 4859 Starlund Ct. Eureka, CA 95503 Anand Tripp 2266 Redwood, Apt. B Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by Copartners.

Field notes

9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-264)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00545

The following person is doing business as AMERICAN PRIDE ROOF CLEANING at 6028 Avalon Dr., Eureka, CA 95503. Pride H. Brooks 6028 Avalon Dr. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/12/12. /s Pride H. Brooks. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-266)

9/20, 9/27/2012 (12-265)

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/19/2012. /s Brian Viale. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 19, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Bryan Smothers. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 11, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00549

The following persons are doing business as EUREKA! EUROBOXERS at 3010 Cedar Lane, Eureka, CA 95503. Emily Dalton 3010 Cedar Lane Eureka, CA 95503 John Dalton 3010 Cedar Lane Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/15/2012. /s Emily Dalton. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-268)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00515

The following person is doing business as MADRE ILLUMINATION HEALING at 975 Shirley Blvd., Arcata, CA 95521. Jennifer Wiest 975 Shirley Blvd. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/5/07. /s Jennifer Wiest. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 29, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-260)

legal NOTICES continued on next page

Fire walking in Sri lanka, 2006 Photo courteSy oF aidan JoneS, wikimedia commonS

The Physics of Firewalking By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

“W

e discourage people from walking over hot coals.” When the usual year-end lists come out in December, I hope this will make it into the “Ten Best Quotations of 2012.” It comes from Reggie Williams, captain of the San Jose Fire Department, commenting on the 21 people who were treated for burns following their barefoot walk over hot coals in a Tony Robbins “Firewalk Experience” event there in July. What went wrong? Interviewed by the San Jose Mercury News while recovering from his burns, participant Andrew Brenner said that he “didn’t get into the right state and got burned. I knew I wasn’t at my peak state.” Peakness, in this case, involves visualizing the hot coals as cool moss. Not getting burned, apparently, is a matter of “right attitude.” So not getting burned when I put my hand into a hot oven must be due to my positive disposition, which presumably turns negative (instantly!) if I touch anything in the oven. Seriously folks. We’re looking at basic physics. The reason I don’t feel pain in the 400-degree air of the oven, or that (most) firewalkers don’t get burned is that there’s virtually no energy transfer between the air/coals and skin. Skin, whether on hand or sole of foot, is mostly water; hot coal is mostly air. The “specific heat capacity” of water is about four times that of air. A body’s specific heat capacity determines how fast it will heat up or cool down when in contact with a hotter or cooler body. Oven mitts, for instance, insulate well due to their high specific heat capacity. The specific heat capacity of well-burnt hot coal is

nearly the same as that of air. So firewalkers don’t get burned because very little energy transfers from the hot body (coal) to the cool body (feet). Kjetil Kjernsmo, a curious and brave physicist from the University of Oslo, proved this for himself a few years ago, while setting a new record — 230 feet — for length of fire walked. He arranged for an infrared camera to record the temperature of the coals immediately before and after he walked across them with bare feet. Even though the camera could register very small temperature differences (0.1 degree K), he saw no discernable difference, proving that negligible energy was being transferred from coals to feet. He also surmises that any heat energy that is transferred to the soles quickly dissipates, thanks to the rich flow of (high thermal conductivity) blood in our feet. So the keys to firewalking are: (1) don’t linger (the thermal conductivity of the coals will eventually “catch up” to your skin); (2) don’t run (you’ll push too deep into the embers, exposing the sensitive skin on top of your feet); (3) do wait for the coals to burn thoroughly (coals contain water, which increases both their heat capacity and thermal conductivity, so you want the water to be completely evaporated before prancing on them). I’m betting they neglected that last one in San Jose. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) would take the challenge if the opportunity presented itself — after checking the coals had burned for a goodly long time.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

35


continued from previous page.

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00516

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

ACROSS

28. 1965 Roy Lichtenstein painting that depicts an angry dog 32. Rm. coolers 35. Flemish painter Jan van ____ 36. Without breaking a sweat 37. Theatergoer’s choice 39. Actress Cates and others 40. How Rome wasn’t built 41. Tiki torch setting 42. Ballpark fig. 43. Line delivered by Jennifer Lopez in “Gigli” just after she says “It’s turkey time” 46. “As I Lay Dying” father 47. Preschool basics 48. They’re plucked at a 41-Across

52. It’s plucked in “Norwegian Wood” 54. Battle line 55. Addition to a musical staff 59. Lyric repeatedly heard in the 1978 hit song “Werewolves of London” 61. Conceived of 62. Prevailed 63. USPS delivery 64. Word appearing in the first sentence of the bestselling novel “The Secret Life of Bees” 65. Trailblazed 66. Witness

21. Pleasant diversion 23. One that’s hard to find at a tearjerker 24. Scottish tongue 25. “Survivor” unit 26. City on the Rhone 27. Romantic rendezvous 29. Kidney-related 30. Dries out, in a way 31. “High Sierra” director Walsh 32. Guadalajara girlfriend 33. Church law 34. Pierces 38. “____ delighted!” 39. Journey from bar to bar 41. 2009 Shakira hit whose English version is titled “She Wolf”

44. Like some communities 45. It began circulating in 2002 49. Cigarettes once pitched by a cartoon penguin 50. Cybermemo 51. Bodega, e.g. 52. ____ bath 53. “Mockingbird” singer Foxx 54. Enamored (of) 55. Show ____ 56. Carpenter’s tool 57. Ian Frazier book “On the ____” 58. ____-Boy recliner 60. Weed whacker

1. Org. of Cubs and Eagles 4. Tip ____ 7. TV show named after the sound donkeys make 13. Paddle 14. Suffix with Taiwan 15. Arugula alternative 16. 1973 horror flick about humans who change into snakes 18. Refers (to) 19. “Ask me anything” 20. Buster of ESPN 22. “Life of Pi” author Martel 23. Couple 24. Coup d’____

DOWN

1. Giving orders 2. One of the Obamas 3. Bad lighting? 4. Kid around 5. Balloonhead 6. It may be renewable 7. You can dig it 8. “Little” girl in “David Copperfield” 9. Mer flow 10. Squirreled away 11. What a Tennessee cheerleader asks for a lot? 12. “Rushmore” director Anderson 15. Time off, casually 17. “Yesterday” or “Tomorrow”

EASY #15

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

The following person is doing business as BLISSFULLY BAKED at 1025 Bonnie Ct., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Chandra Murray 1025 Bonnie Ct. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Chandra Murray. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 29, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-257)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00510

The following person is doing business as HUMBOLDT HOMEMADE MEALS, THE LIGHTHOUSE GRILL at 355 Main Street, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 902, Trinidad, CA 95570. Sherry Vanderpool 707 Underwood Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Sherry Vanderpool. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/6, 9/13, 9/20, 9/27/2012 (12-249)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00519

The following person is doing business as BEDLINERS PLUS at 1326 Koster St., Eureka, CA 95501. Victor George Blanc 261 Summit View Lane Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Victor George Blanc. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 30, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/6, 9/13, 9/20, 9/27/2012 (12-254)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120532 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: SARA LOUISE CAMP TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: SARA LOUISE CAMP for a decree changing names as follows:

Present name SARA LOUISE CAMP to Proposed Name SARA LOUISE CAMP SCHREMMER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 10, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: August 24, 2012 Filed: August 27, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 9/6, 9/13, 9/20, 9/27/2012 (12-255)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CHARLOTTE M. STERNBERG, aka CHARLOTTE MARGARET STERNBERG and CHARLOTTE STERNBERG CASE NO. PR120224

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLOTTE M. STERNBERG, also known as CHARLOTTE MARGARET STERNBERG and CHARLOTTE STERNBERG A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ALFRED L. UPTON in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ALFRED L. UPTON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 18, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K MORRISON S.B. #30716 MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-272)

  NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF NEIL EDWARD FERGUSON, aka NEIL E. FERGUSON, aka NEIL FERGUSON CASE NO. PR120222

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NEIL EDWARD FERGUSON, aka NEIL E. FERGUSON, aka NEIL FERGUSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JANET LEE JORDAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JANET LEE JORDAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 18, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and


9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-267)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF NIELS CHRISTIAN LORENZEN CASE NO. PR120207

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NIELS CHRISTIAN LORENZEN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JAMES C. LORENZEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JAMES C. LORENZEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 11, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inven-

tory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN B. PALLEY SBN# 173469 MEISSNER, JOSEPH & PALLEY 1555 RIVER PARK DRIVE, SUITE 108 SACRAMENTO, CA 95815 (916) 920-5983 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-262)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ELLIS CORKERN CASE NO. PR120209

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ELLIS CORKERN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by KENNY L. SMITH in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that KENNY L. SMITH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 11, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: BRADFORD C FLOYD SBN 136459

LAW OFFICE OF BRADFORD C FLOYD 819 7TH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-9754 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/13, 9/20, 9/27/2012 (12-256)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF GLENNA SOPHIA ROBERTSON, AKA GLENNA S. ROBERTSON CASE NO. PR120214

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GLENNA SOPHIA ROBERTSON, aka GLENNA S. ROBERTSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by GAIL BERGSTROM WRIGHT in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that GAIL BERGSTROM WRIGHT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 4, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOSHUA R. KAUFMAN STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP.

381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

the

the

9/13, 9/20, 9/27/2012 (12-259)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOSEPHINE MURIEL FIELDER, FORMERLy KNOwN AS JOSEPHINE MURIEL STEART CASE NO. PR120212

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSEPHINE MURIEL FIELDER, formerly known as JOSEPHINE MURIEL STEWART A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CAROL A. PEARCE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CAROL A. PEARCE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 18, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CATHERINE M. KOSHKIN CSB#149503 LAW OFFICES OF CATHERINE M. KOSHKIN 1116 ELEVENTH STREET ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-2800 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/13, 9/20, 9/27/2012 (12-258)

Employment

CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JASON M. GARLICK SBN# 193725 1805 CENTRAL AVENUE MCKINLEYVILLE, CA 95519 (707) 840-0909 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

Admin. Document Control Specialist General Reception • CPA Tax Acct. Professional Media Sales Graphic Artist 10-15/hr (will train) Professional Outside Sales Industrial Electrician • Financial Loan Servicing Full Charge Bookkeeper CPA Director of Creative Designs (Marketing) Insurance Agent P&C Emphasis Commercial Lines

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

Inventory Management

Responsible for assisting the Inventory and Shipping departments with scheduling, inventory transfers, cycle counts, and other day to day activities. The ideal candidate will have a proven track record of successful inventory management, preferably in a wholesale environment. Must be organized, detail-oriented, proficient in basic MS office products, e-mail, and basic computer skills. Full-time position with competitive wages and benefits. Please email resume to hr@tomasjewelry.com

County of Humboldt

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE

$4,861 - $6,238 monthly, plus excellent benefits, including 2.0% @ 55 PERS Retirement

Under general supervision, provide a full range of public health nursing services relating to prevention and control of diseases and adverse health conditions, including teaching, health assessment, and counseling services in homes, clinics, schools, community centers and similar locations. Must possess a valid license to practice as a Registered Nurse in the state of California and a valid California State Public Health Nursing Certificate. Valid CA driver’s license also required. Final Filing Date: October 4, 2012. For application materials contact Humboldt County Human Resources, 825 5th St., Eureka, CA, (707) 476-2349, or apply on-line at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

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northcoastjournal.com Coast Journal • Thursday, SEPT. 2012 • North Coast JourNal • thursday, sept. 27,27, 2012 northcoastjournal.com • North


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

Employment

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN I/II City of EurEka

$2,824 - $3,976 per Month + Excellent Benefits under supervision, performs a variety of specialized paraprofessional engineering field and office duties in support of professional engineering staff. researches engineering topics and prepares basic engineering calculations; provides technical advice to the public; coordinates plan submittals; issues permits; maintains plan files and engineering records; prepares reports. for a complete application packet, (1) contact our Personnel Department at 531 k Street, Eureka, (2) call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request that one be mailed to you, or (3) apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. recruitment closes 5:00 p.m. on friday, october 5, 2012. EoE

ASSISTANT PLANNER City of EurEka $3,864 - $4,675/month

the City of Eureka is looking for a customer service oriented individual to perform a variety of professional and technical routine to complex activities in the field of current and advanced planning, including review of development and land use applications. a combination of education equivalent to an accredited four-year college with major coursework in planning, or a related field. No directly related professional experience is required but related internship experience is desirable.

Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Smog Tech ASE Journeyman Mechanic CPA Outside Sales Office Assistant Loan Officer

SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT City of EurEka

$2,813 - $3,421/month Plus benefits including 2.7% at 55 PErS retirement Duties include office administrative, secretarial and general clerical support activities for an assigned City department, as well as providing assistance to the public regarding the department to which assigned. the current vacancy is in the Community Development Department however, the eligibility list created from this recruitment may be used to fill other City departments should they arise. any combination of experience and training equivalent to high school graduation, supplemented by college or other courses sufficient to provide the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities, and at least three years of clerical/administrative support experience is desired. final filing Date: friday, September 28, 2012 at 5:00 pm application materials are available at the City of Eureka Personnel Department 531 k Street, Eureka, online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov or call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request that an application be mailed to you. EoE

for a complete job description and application packet visit: Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. recruitment closes at 5:00 pm, friday, September 28, 2012 EoE

Code enforCement Program manager City of EurEka

$4,363 - $5,306/month + excellent benefits

COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER CiTy Of EurEka

$2,991-$3,638/month + excellent benefits Would you like the opportunity to make a difference, save lives, and make our community a better place to live? Our dispatchers work in a positive and professional environment that provides opportunities for growth. The City’s modern dispatch center includes 6 dispatch consoles with a user-friendly computerized dispatch system. This is an entry-level position, no experience is needed, and onthe-job training will be provided. Tasks include taking 911 calls and dispatching police, fire and medical personnel following prescribed procedures, and other related duties. The ability to multi-task and work with others in a fast-paced environment is beneficial. for a complete job description and application packet: visit the Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov application packets must be received by 5:00 pm, friday, October 19, 2012. EOE

the City of Eureka is looking for an administrative professional to perform a variety of advanced journey-level work in coordinating, implementing, and maintaining community improvement projects, and programs. this individual provides budgetary, grant, training and work-flow support, acts as liaison for the City with a variety of private, public and community organizations and regulatory agencies; researches, develops recommendations for action; provides professional assistance to City management staff in the area of Code Enforcement. an associate’s Degree in Construction technology, Planning, Public administration, Criminal Justice, or a related field; four (4) to six (6) years of increasingly responsible experience in building inspection, code enforcement, public safety, or related fields; and two (2) years of supervisory experience is required. for a complete job description and application packet: visit the Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. recruitment closes at 5:00 pm, Monday, 10/15/2012. EoE

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, SEPT. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

POLICE RECORDS SPECIALIST I/II City of EurEka

$2,231- $2,980 per Month + Excellent Benefits this position performs a variety of general clerical and customer service duties involved in the maintenance, processing, and distribution of Police records; serves as call-taker and/or assists in dispatching units; performs directly related work as required. Must be able to type 40 words per min. Desirable qualifications include a combination of training and experience equivalent to a High School Diploma or equivalent and at least one year of related experience. for a complete application packet, (1) contact our Personnel Department 531 k St. Eureka, (2) call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request an application or (3) apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. recruitment closes until 5:00 p.m. on friday, october 5, 2012. EoE

$75,000 INCOME OPPORTUNITY ABSOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU! Provide Discount Pharmacy Cards to Uninsureds Call Now Receive 5,000 FREE Cards. 877-308-7959 Ext231 www.freerxadvantage.com (E-0927) AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2423214. (E-0927) EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. The Eel River Valley Multigenerational Center (The MGC) Board of Directors is seeking a qualified and dynamic Executive Director committed to supervising, directing and promoting the multigenerational community center to the residents of the Eel River Valley. This position will start as part-time , 15-25 hours per week. Salary range is $20-$25 an hour, commensurate with experience. For a complete job description and application, please visit our Facebook page at Eel River Multigenerational Center. Applications will be accepted until Oct. 15, 2012. (E-0927) FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED!!! Enriching Lives is seeking committed individuals interested in opening their home and caring for children with developmental disabilities. Initial & continuing education, 24-hour professional support and a monthly stipend of $1000-4000 provided. Call 268-8891 today! (E-1025) LOOKING FOR NAIL TECHNICIAN. $15-23/hr plus tips. Full time or part time available. Bring resume to Soul to Soul Spa at 854 10th Street Arcata (E-0927)

HOOPSTERS YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES. Calling all coaches! Volunteer opportunities available to teach youth sports skills and provide positive, fun experiences. Help the youth of our community reach their full potential through recreation basketball. Applicants must be over 18. No experienced needed, will train. Email Steve at senes@ci.eureka.ca.gov or call 4414245 for more info. (E-0927) OFFICE MANAGER. Redwood Coast Music Festivals seeks an office manager with typing and MS office skills. Hours and wages to be determined , send resume by Monday Oct. 8, to RCMF P.O. Box 7071 Eureka 95502, EOE. (E-1004) SEASONAL UTILITY/DELIVER PERSON. 40 hrs per week. Prefer person with commercial CDL and HAZMAT endorcement, but may train right candidate. Apply at 625 K Street, Arcata. (707) 822-2188. (E-1011) YOUTH ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION COORDINATOR. Humboldt County Office of Education. MA in Business Admin. Or BA in related field; not less than 1 year experience in advanced training in entrepreneurial education; small business development; work with adolescents and/or community groups focusing on entrepreneurship or similar education and experience to demonstrate. F.T., M-F, 7.5 hrs./day. Eligible for employer paid medical, dental, vision and PERS retirement. $2842.23-$3627.00/Mo., Entry DOE. Application available at HCOE or online: www.humboldt. k12.ca.us Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501. Closes: 10/03/2012, 4 p.m. (E-0927)


Employment

Rentals

CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

Real Estate

Rental Helpers

Offers the largest listing of homes, apartments, condos and rooms for rent in Humboldt County! 4 Seventh Street, Suite A

(707) 443-HELP TheRentalHelpers.com

Humboldt County’s only DRE Licensed Listing Service!

Corner 7 th & A of St.

PRA02054

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Surveillance Officer Crown Club Rep Valet Janitorial Security Officer Busser/Host Bingo Inventory Clerk Deli Worker Server, PT (Sunset) Bingo Admit Clerk Gift Shop Clerk Gift Shop Clerk/Candy Cart Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria

Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN) (E-1115) BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) HELP WANTED!!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com (AAN CAN) (E-0927) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com (AAN CAN) (E-1220) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3222 17th St., Unit C. W/S/G Paid, MtM, Cat OK, Spacious, Garage, Rent $775, Vacant 10/16. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2266 Redwood St.,Unit B. W/S/G Paid, Near Park, PO & Stores, W/C Cat, Rent $760, Vacant 10/1. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 1926 Mesa Ave. Ocean View! Garage, MtM, Pets Considered, Rent $1200. Vacant 9/28. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 17 W. 14th St. 6 Month Lease, W/C Pets, Den & DR, New Paint, Garage, Rent $975, Vac 10/3. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2275 Summit Ridge Rd. Humboldt Hill, MtM, Pets Considered. Rent $1200. Vacant 10/3. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) EUREKA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 3175 Cottage. MtM or 12 Month Lease, Garage, Pets Considered, Rent $1325 Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

hiring?

place your ad ONLINE @www.northcoastjournal.com

FORTUNA 3+BD/3BA HOUSE. 58 Tompkins Hill Rd. Panoramic Views, Pet Considered, MtM, Rent $2200, Vacant Soon. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE . 1245 Haven Ln.,Unit B. W/S/G Paid, SEC 8 OK, MtM, Small Pet Considered, Rent $750, Vacant 10/12. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/ 1BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Paid, 6 Month Lease, Small Pets OK, Rent $765. Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0927) ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, parking, some utilities. $650, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-0927) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carport, dishwasher, some utilities. $795, (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-0927) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Fireplace, garage, yard, laundry hookups. $1335. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R0927) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Fridge, stove, all utilities paid. $600. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0927) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM APT. Carport, storage, onsite laundry. $775. (707) 443-8227, www.TheRentalHelpers.com.(R-0927) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Fireplace, 2 car garage, pets considered, yard. $1300. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0927) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM APT. Laundry hookups, some utilities. $795. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0927) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard w/care, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1300. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-0927) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer included, sun room, $1395. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R0927)

LIVE AMONG THE ELK & THE REDWOODS FOR LESS

• PRIVATE FISHING LAKE • Clean bathrooms, free hot showers • Full hookups, laundromat • Campfires allowed • 2 Well behaved pets OK • Dry Lagoon Beach & market nearby • $400/mo. plus electricity • ASK ABOUT MOVE-IN SPECIAL! • RETIREES, HSU STUDENTS, FULLTIMERS WELCOME

• Must have RV on trailer Call 707-488-2181 or write bobmccormick@etahoe.com for details

ROOM FOR RENT. Redwood Terrace Condominiums. With roommate. No Pets/Drugs/Smoking. Close to Myrtletown Shopping. Access to kitchen/patio. $450/ month, $300/deposit, 1/2 utilities. Clarence 362-2443. No Calls after 9 p.m. (R-1018) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Dishwasher, shared laundry, some utilities, $895. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R0927) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates. com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

Business Rentals RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-1011) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail. com. (BR-1227)

MOVE TO THE SUNSHINE. 2200 sf., 4 bedroom, 3 bath, Mt. Shasta view, 1.62 acres. Fruit Trees, garden area. Will consider trade in Eureka. $235K. (530) 475-3875 (RE-0927) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www. chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-1025)

Auto 2004 VOLKSWAGON PASSAT. GLX Wagon 68,000 miles. Loaded, Leather, 5-speed. $7,800 obo. Call (917) 656-3402. (A-1011) CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-1004) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227) overwhelmed with sTuff? Have an extra fixer up cars in the driveway? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC

Buy/Sell/Trade 400AMP CUTLER HAMMER. Transfer switch $1200 NEVER USED! Cost new was $1800. Buyer picks up. Call: (707) 445-9691 (BST-1004) ART, CRAFT & SEWING SUPPLIES 1/2 OFF! Stock up now for you winter projects! Plus Blue Tagged Clothes only 25¢ each! Sep. 25-29. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. Providing Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-0927) DIRECTV SPECIAL. Offer. 2012 NFL Sun. Ticket included for FREE. $34.99/month (1yr.) Free HD/DVR. Call 888-881-3313 (BST-0927)

PUBLIC AUCTION THURS. SEPT. 27TH 5:45 PM Furniture incl. counter height table set, solid oak furniture, sofa chaise sleeper, duck decoys, BackSwing, treadmill, Honda rear bag mower (clean), coin collection, lot brand NEW patio furniture, vintage tools. Special lot of newer furniture from office closure (proceeds benefit a local nonprofit) incl. upholstered chairs, settee, desks, files, work stations, conference table & chairs + MORE! BIG SALE!

ADVANCE NOTICE: NEXT AUCTION THURS. OCT. 11TH 5:45 PM Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

Real Estate FSBO HUMBOLDT HILL 3BD/2BA 1120 SF. $165,000. Quiet Neighborhood. Tiled kitchen counters, oak cabinets, dishwasher, windows, sliding glass door upgraded, furnace 11 years old, fireplace with insert, large fenced yard, new deck, attached garage, new water heater, new laminate floor, all appliances. 442-0373. (RE-0927)

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, SEPT. 27, 2012

39


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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Buy/Sell/Trade

Pets

FLASHBACK

2 MINI MALE DACHSHUND PUPPIES. (dapple) Rare, gray, white, black with brown trim 506-5302. (P-1004) LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues & Sun

Weekly specials available on Facebook

SALE:

3954 Jacobs Ave. Eureka 443-7397

As is Zombies HUGE MOVING SALE. Sat., Sept. 29, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Honda 50, bed, dresser, pottery, miscellaneous, much more! 1515 Whitmire, McKinleyville. (BST-0927) SLOW INTERNET? Exede offers download speeds 4 times faster! Call now and save $100 on set-up fee. Call (888) 797-6977 (BST-0927) *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL ! * Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945. (BST-0927)

Vintage Clothing Furniture, Housewares & more! THE

CLOTHING DOCK &

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

ROOF CLEANING SERVICE

(707) 616-7552

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

822-8288

American Pride

Yard Sale

K STREET ANNEX

11th & K Streets, Arcata

Services

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com BE A LIFE SAVER! Your blood donation is always needed!! Call the Northern California Community Blood Bank. Call for Bloodmobile schedule. 2524 Harrison St., Eureka, 443-8004

• Grooming & Boarding by Linn •

Manufactured in Humboldt County

Micronized Compost Tea & MICRO-ORGANICS line Go Green-Tranzition-Blissful Bloom

www.sensational-solutions.com

NEW

LO

in ION CAT

Old

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • 826-0903

Custom Pet Portraits

n Tow

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

by Sophia Dennler • For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

License #8349

DIRECTV SPECIAL. Offer. 2012 NFL Sun. Ticket included for FREE. $34.99/month (1yr.) Free HD/DVR. Call 888-881-3313 (S-0927) SLOW INTERNET? Exede offers download speeds 4 times faster! Call now and save $100 on set-up fee. Call (888) 797-6977 (S-0927) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use solar energy to heat your home-a proven technology-reasonably priced-CA license #972834- (707) 502-1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S-0927) CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207) DIRECTV OR DISH NETWORK. LOW INTRODUCTORY RATES. Commitment and Credit/Debit required. LOCAL CALL NOW! 826-0203 (S-0927) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-1004)


Legal Services

Services CAPTURING YOUR DAY IN THE WATER.

Music

Community

home & gar

SPIRITUAL BUT NOT RELIGIOUS. Nearly 30 percent of Americans identify themselves as spiritual but not religious. Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Sept. 30, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www. campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0927) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124) Too many tubas, overwhelmed with sTuff? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC

Greg Rael Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976

drewhylandstudio.com/surf Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y at

(707) 445-9666

Music

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0927) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded #3860. Summer Cleaning Special! (707) 444-2001. (S-1011) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808)

FD1963

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

1026 Third Street Eureka

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-1122) SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707822-7819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839-1518. (S-1227) MCKEEVER ENERGY AND ELECTRIC. McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc. Electrical Contracting, Renewable Energy, Planning & Design. Contact Nate McKeever at 707.822.0100, info@ mckeeverenergy.com, or www. mckeeverenergy.com. Lic # 965286. (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227) Too many tubas, overwhelmed with sTuff? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1115) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1108) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-1122)

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT:

service direc

Law Offices

SET UP YOUR SHOOT TODAY:

CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

home & gard 1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

Need some help home around the house?

& gar

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

ser

home & garden

service directory service directory see page 14

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, SEPT. 27, 2012

41


body, mind ▼

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

&Spirit

Open house oct. 13th 10am-3pm

CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE

Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage.

We understand your personal needs and provide care for every phase of a woman’s life. 825-0200 | 822-9664 | 3798 Janes Rd., Ste. #10 in front of the Mad River Emergency Room

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com KICK BUTTS! Become nicotine free with Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist and Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). (707) 8453749. www.ManifestPositivity. com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB0927)

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY Weekend Massage Clinic Special ½ hour $30 1 hour $45

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

WHY CRANIOSACRAL BODYWORK? Migraines, deeply-held emotions, chronic pain, and more greatly benefit from this gentle reconnection of your body’s circuitry. Bodyworker since 1979. Cecilie Hooper 6773969. (MB-1018) EVERY PART OF YOU HAS A SECRET LANGUAGE, YOUR HANDS AND YOUR FEET SAY WHAT YOU’VE DONE. Rumi. Learn their language. Reflexology classes start Oct. 15. Early registration discount. http:// www.reflexologyinstruction. com/ (707) 822-5395 (MB-0927)

BREATHE LOVE, AXIS MUNDI ASTROLOGY INTEGRATED WITH YOUR SUBTLE ENERGY. Gain clarity for self-empowerment. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 845-1450. www.sacredenergyspace.com (MB-1122) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0927) MIDLIFE MASSAGE & BODYWORK FOR WOMEN. Danielle Jeanne, CMP (CAMTC #26673) 269-0514. (MB-1011) COLON HYDROTHERAPY WITH MOLLY LEUTHNER. At Jade Dragon Medical Spa. Closed System. Using an F.D.A. approved medical device, warm water is gently inserted into the colon. When the colon contracts, the water is flushed out through the device. Take an internal bath! 822-4300. (MB-1011)

It’s here! The 2012 Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt. View it online on our Special Publications page.

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Looking for testers for a new poison oak treatment. FREE SAMPLES

Open Mon- Sat

GIT YER VALSSAGE!

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

GOT POISON OAK?

Energy Life Center

do TERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719 (MB-1115) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124) NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 268-0929. (MB-1025) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227)

INSI DE

Venues Jewelry Gowns and Tuxedoes Flowers Bakeries And More

Redwood Pharmaceuticals 2107 Harrison Eureka, CA 502-3616

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com CD releaSe party for Denise payne-Ollivier’s first album, Sounds For Healing Volume I,the Opening

October 7th, 4:30 pm at Hum Spa in McKinleyville Be the first to experience these healing meditations. Denise will finish with live playing of singing bowls and other ancient instruments. CDs will be available to purchase. Space is limited, call 707-839-9540 for more info.

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 4424240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (MB-1227) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup.org. (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@salinarain.com, www. salinarain.com. (MB-1227) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) BE A LIFE SAVER! Your blood donation is always needed!! Call the Northern California Community Blood Bank. Call for Bloodmobile schedule. 2524 Harrison St., Eureka, 443-8004


■ ARCATA

PRICE

2850 E St., Eureka

REDU

CED!

(Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

real estate

this week Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

VERY, VERY PRIVATE! This 3 bedroom, 1 bath older home with approximately 1520 sqft, is located on over 2 acres off West End Rd. It feels far-out but is really close-in to town and all conveniences. Needs some fixing! mls #236216 $239,000

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

this week

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

$349,000

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

5 bed, 2 bath, 2,600 sq ft West End Road home in private setting, evergreen forest, large living room w/wood stove, dining room & big kitchen, new carpet, nice wrap-a-round deck, peaceful

real estate

this week

$345,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1400 sq ft beautiful well cared for McKinleyville home on a corner lot, nice remodeled kitchen w/oak cabinets, granite counters, wood stove, RV garage & extra side parking

$249,000

4 bed, 2 bath, 1,500 sq ft Arcata home on a dead-end street, open floor plan, breakfast bar, family room and fireplace, attached double car garage

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Ferndale Land/Property

+/-160 acres off of Centerville Road near Ferndale. property boasts beautiful ocean views, open meadows, standing timber, a pond, year round springs, fruit trees, gardening sites, small rustic cabin and more.

Looking for a prime space in Downtown Eureka? The landmark Gross Building at 5th and F Streets has commercial space and office suites available. This iconic building has been carefully and meticulously restored to its historical splendor. Modern updates include seismic rehabilitation, a sprinkler system and complete handicap access {including restrooms and elevator}. Contact us for a private tour and view the Melvin Schuler Court Gallery in the upstairs outdoor mezzanine.

Gross Building 427 F St. Eureka (707)444-9056

$699,000

Barry Summit Land/Property

Willow Creek Land/Property

$350,000 each

$450,000

Four +/-160 acre parcels located 45 minutes from arcata near Barry Summit. properties boast timber, breathtaking views, water, deeded access and close to county road. owner will carry!

+/-250 acres near Waterman Ridge, only a half an hour from Willow Creek. property boasts Southern exposure, timber, two large year round springs, great access and multiple developed building sites.

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 2012

43


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North Coast Journal 09-27-12 Edition