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thursday july 19, lOll vol XXIII issue 29 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

9 How do you feel about kids on sheep? 12 Oh Betsy, we hardly knew thee 24 Jemma is Fantastic 29 Reggae Moves On 32 Deciphering Dronkers


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 5 7 9

Mailbox Poem

Death Waits

News

Romper Rodeo

12 Blog Jammin’ 13 Get Out!

A Room with a View

14

On The Cover Manure Maneuver

18 Home & Garden Service Directory

21

McKinleyville Arts Night

Friday, july 20, 6-8 p.m.

Arts Ferndale

saturday, july 21, 6-9 p.m.

22 Stage Matters Woody’s Cabaret

24 The Hum

Folk in the Cyber Age

26 Music & More! 28 Calendar 32 Seven-o-Heaven

cartoon by andrew goff

32 Filmland

Got It Down Cold

33 37 37 38

Workshops Sudoku Crossword Field Notes

38 41 42

Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

Diets for Losers?

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

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Objections, Your Honor Editor: In the judge’s order (“Judge Backs Caltrans on Richardson Grove,” Blog Jammin, July 12) he found that, “the STAA truck restriction is not (his emphasis) the most important constraint on business development in Humboldt County. And, it appears that lifting the restriction may only prevent further economic losses; it would not generate significant new growth.” The judge seems unaware, or simply ignores, the fact that STAA trucks do have access to Humboldt County over Highway 101 from the north and also potentially via Highway 299 from the east. His main analysis of the adequacy of the EIR concerns whether the project will or will not have a significant environmental impact to potentially ruin the profound aesthetic experience provided by the old growth redwoods. He accuses those who oppose the project of making false claims that old growth redwoods would be taken down. This is not true. Opponents of the project have repeatedly stressed that the concern is for the health of the trees and the endangered species that depend on them. The judge disclosed that Bryan M. Plumley is the investment advisor to him and members of his family. Mr. Plumley is married to Kim Floyd, the project manager for Caltrans. The judge claims not to have met Ms. Floyd and has a business-only relationship with her husband. However, he has, on occasion, loaned his vacation home in Oregon to the couple. The plaintiffs’ attorneys did not to ask the judge to recuse himself over this apparent conflict. Mr. Plumley wrote a “My Word” [Times-

Standard opinion piece] in favor of the project, one of six orchestrated by the county’s economic development division. Since the judge finds that STAA access is not the key to Humboldt’s economic growth and Caltrans admits that the project will not make the grove “safe,” why are we spending $10 million on this project? Barbara Kennedy, Weott

Huh? Editor: Ryan Burns’ article “Gasoline Kings” (July 5) is a prime example of the engineered decline of the American economy and the abolishment of the middle class. The left tends to blame corporations and the right tends to blame government for our economic problems; the left and the right are the chipped wings of the freedom bird. The problem with our economy is lack of freedom. Mussolini defined fascism as government and corporation cooperation. Most Americans are unaware that in 2011 the U.S. exported more oil to foreign nations than it imported. There is a rapid shift in the global order wherein China will soon replace the United States as the primary economic driver. In the past decade China has built 25 new oil refineries. America has not constructed a new oil refinery since 1976. In the past five years major oil companies have been closing oil refineries in America. Sunoco is in the process of closing its two Pennsylvania refineries and ConocoPhillips will soon shut down its refineries in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The Bush administration claimed oil from Iraq would pay for the war. Thus far the American people have not seen this happen. It’s a slap in every American’s face.

Cartoon by joel mielke

To date, the U.S. has spent a trillion dollars on the Iraq war, with nearly 4,500 casualties and tens of thousands wounded. Meanwhile Americans are falsely told that our economic system is capitalism and it’s a bad thing. Nations are not defined by capital; they are defined by who controls the capital: the state or the people. In America we have a private free enterprise system; its real name is freedom. Gene Owens, Fortuna Editor: With regard to the recent article on gas prices in Humboldt County, there are a few things you missed. To quickly summarize, assume a crude oil cost of 84 dollars a barrel, which is two dollars a gallon. Assume gas is selling for $3.50 a gallon before sales tax to make life easy. The transportation cost to the refinery from the Middle East is probably near 10 cents a gallon. You assume 15 percent refining cost, which is another 30 cents. Federal and state excise taxes are 53.7 cents a gallon (source: energyalmanac. ca.gov/gasoline/gasoline_taxes.html). Net

Leading Where? Editor: Chief Justice John Roberts did indeed show “leadership,” but in the wrong direction (“On Leadership,” July 5).

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between producer and consumer is $3.50 $0.537 = 2.963. You said that refining costs about 15 percent, which is about 45 cents. Distribution cost is about 10 percent, which is another 30 cents. Total cost to the delivering station is about $2.963 + $0.45 + $0.30 = $3.72 a gallon. Sales taxes are 7 ¼ percent on gross sales cost. Sales tax at 7 ¼ percent is 27 cents, so the pump price before any profit to pay costs of the station is about $3.99. This indicates that no one is making much money on gasoline — except the crude oil suppliers. If you want to gripe about them, I welcome you, but don’t blame anyone except the producers themselves. Marvin Chapman, McKinleyville

continued on next page

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4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


July 19, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 29

North Coast Journal Inc.

continued from previous page

www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Zach St. George zach@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

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on the cover:

Photo by Zach St. George.

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Like Owen Roberts in 1937, he rescued the court from the charge of right-wing obstructionism. But see what he extracted in return: In denying that the health plan could be justified under the Commerce Clause, he undercut the constitutional basis of most progressive federal regulation. And by allowing states to opt out, he resurrected the principle of state nullification of federal laws. This was an issue in Andrew Jackson’s time, in the long run up to the Civil War. Georgia tried it, Jackson threatened to send in the army, and the union held for another quarter century. Now, it seems, we’ll have to re-litigate American history. Lee Wakefield, Arcata

Fight for Your Right-of-way Editor: Here’s a thought on the recent railbanking discussions (“We Have a Plan,” June 28) and planning efforts: Between Arcata and Eureka, it’s likely that the Highway 101 corridor needs to rise considering future sea level rise. Caltrans, with great skill and foresight, is adept at planning 100-plus years ahead (just look at all the 101 bridge replacement going on with room, if push comes to shove, for three lanes each way). Considering Caltrans’ need to upgrade, raise and/or expand our roadways, it might be good for the North Coast Railroad Authority and Caltrans — and maybe the cities of Eureka and Arcata, and private landowners — to increasingly huddle and negotiate some splitting and “lot line adjusting” of property lines. A possible outcome is to relocate the NCRA corridor within Caltrans’ right-ofway and locate a new, Caltrans-managed trail (built up) within the old NCRA corridor. This way the public gets its trail right along the bay (where it should be); the NCRA/Timber Heritage Association get a vastly improved future rail corridor between Eureka and Arcata; and Caltrans gets a higher/dryer/safer highway corridor, a trail that completes — in full — its

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Death Waits   Perched in a fir tree Above the cemetery Longing for sunshine.

I am also waiting For a break in the clouds, So I can finish my jog And take a hot bath. Sitting patiently Beneath the Cascara Next to the graves, Out of the rain, My heart slows quickly As I look to the treetops And follow the duff Down to the soil. I lose track of time, Wondering if the storm Will ever let up, So I can go home. — Kirk Gothier

transportation mandate, and an upgraded levee feature (via trail construction) to help protect sections of Highway 101 from high-tide storm surge.  Yes, there are commerce-related private property issues, adjacent slough- and estuary-levee issues, bridge issues, and more. But the alternative is everyone (Caltrans, NCRA, trail users, the THA, cities, the county, landowners and businesses) going it alone or, at best, in pairs, amid sea level rise at greater cost. If we can’t figure it out in the short term there’s always that

Write a letter!

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other, more evolutionary alternative: In 200 years, Caltrans can build, via eminent domain, a still higher highway near the Old Arcata Road corridor, with rail folk and trail folk left splashing around to the west.  Chris Turner, Arcata Editor: The $4 million figure for the trail is inaccurate. Much more work needs to be put in to fix the prism [the rail bed]. Further, an entirely new easement must be bought, as though the railroad was never there. Otherwise it is an unconstitutional taking of land, according to an unbroken string of federal court cases on the matter. In one court case, trail users cut down the trees for campfires and were sued by the government for the loss of trees. In each court case, the government had to pay fair market value, as though the railroad was never there, and interest. Railbanking is a legal process of abandonment. The process is not automatic, even for landowners. It is a long process that allows people and shippers to have their say to prevent abandonment, as a check against corporate power. During this time, another company can submit a plan to take over the railroad operations. With various groups working to revive freight rail, the Surface Transportation Board is unlikely to approve the abandonment necessary to railbank the line, even if NCRA approved railbanking. The NCRA is not the bad guy here, folks. The trail folks have yet to submit to the NCRA a single plan for trails between Bracut [Lumber Yard] and Eureka. The NCRA approved all the trail plans that were submitted to its board. That includes the Blue Lake-to-Arcata rails-to-trails, rails with trails within Arcata to Bracut, and rails with trails down in Healdsburg. The ball is in the hands of trail folks for the two NCRA-approved trail plans here in Humboldt. The east side of the highway would make a better trail. It is more protected. It can connect directly to Bayside, Freshwater and the north edge of Eureka using old railroad right of ways. Lawrence LaBranche, Eureka

Please try to make it no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

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8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


one youngster displays proper riding form ...

Romper Rodeo Toddlers riding sheep — it’s a local sensation. By Ryan Burns

ryans@northcoastjournal.com

J

enny Millsap hoisted her 3-year-old, 30-pound son Richie over the metal railing and lowered him into a corral at the Orick Rodeo. A burly cowboy grabbed him by the armpits and propped him astride an agitated sheep. A rope had been drawn around the sheep’s chest, and the two men who’d squeezed into the corral with the animal helped Richie tuck his little fingers into the soft wool underneath. The chinstrap on Richie’s bulbous bicycle helmet pushed his lower lip into a pout. Motionless and wide-eyed, he stared at the spot between the sheep’s ears. As Alan Jackson’s “Country Boy” blared over the PA system, a teenage girl leaned over the corral gate and offered the toddler some advice: “Now, Richie,” she said, “you gotta hold on really tight, okay?” A moment later, the gate swung wide. For a second the sheep just stood there. Then, like a prisoner who sees his chance, it lurched into a herky-jerky run. Richie’s helmeted head bobbled backward and forward as he clung to the rope. The sheep galloped awkwardly into the arena, kicking up little clouds of dirt as Richie’s

body began to slide off to the right. He tipped further and further until, about 40 feet into his ride, the 3-year-old splayed headlong into the powdery dirt. By the time the adults reached him, offering high-fives and his choice from a box of Tootsie Pops, Richie was already standing up. The left side of his face was dusted with brown dirt. He grabbed the sleeve of an older kid’s shirt to rub the grit out of his eye while a woman in blue jeans leaned down to tell him what a great job he’d done. “Wave to the crowd,” she said. Richie, disoriented, lifted his head, turned in the wrong direction and waved to the forested hills. This event, in which parents set their young kids loose on galloping sheep, is called mutton busting (or “mutton’ bustin’,” as it’s listed for the Orick Rodeo), and in recent years it has grown into one of the most popular spectacles at rodeos nationwide. Some people view this activity as a shocking display of parental irresponsibility. (A friend of mine half-jokingly called it “sanctioned child abuse as spectator sport.”) But for the gritty, rural-living

up he was clearly fighting back tears. families that travel the rodeo circuit, mutOn Sunday (the event stretches over ton busting offers an initiation into their both days of the Orick Rodeo), a kid rough-and-tumble lifestyle. named Eric Jackson slid sideways off his “I was brought up with it,” said Jenny sheep after only a few seconds, but he Millsap, Richie’s mom. She and her family either couldn’t or wouldn’t let go of the live in the small Trinity County town of rope. His sheep dragged him through the Mad River, and for them, riding non-condirt for another 60 feet or more as the senting animals is a family tradition. Last crowd gasped in horror. It looked like he weekend wasn’t even Richie’s first rodeo; was getting trampled under the sheep’s he rode a sheep last year, too — at the hooves. When he finally got loose of the tender age of 2. galloping ruminant, the back of his green Before Richie’s ride last Saturday we flannel shirt was asked Millsap if ripped to shreds, she was worried but Eric was just for his safety. fine. There was She wasn’t. obvious relief in “His dad’s a bull the PA announcrider and his er’s voice as she uncle Jimmy’s declared, “Not a a bull rider and tear shed!” his grandpa’s a Parents can bull rider. He’s get pushy. On ready.” Saturday, a dad Most young held his curlymutton jockeys headed girl in were ready last the crook of his week. Six-yeararm while he and old Jacob Leroy his wife urged from McKinher to compete. leyville claimed “The sheep’s to be the demore scared of fending chamyou than you are pion. (Techniof it,” the mom cally there are promised. Then no winners, or her dad resorted rather every... and another practices her dismount. to bribery. “I’ll one‘s a winner photos by ryan burns give you money,” — each kid he said in a gets a Tootsie sing-song voice. The girl still refused. Her Pop and a T-shirt that reads, “I rode the parents gave up. wild sheep.”) Before the event started, To participate, the kids are supposed to Jacob stood in the arena, squinting into be at least 4 years old and no more than the sunlight as he watched other kids play 60 pounds. (Apparently those guidetug-of-war. He took a Tootsie Roll out lines are negotiable.) Ticki Romanini, the of his pocket, peeled off the wax-paper 81-year-old co-chair of the Orick Rodeo, wrapper and popped it into his mouth. said there’s been just one complaint about We asked for his secret to successful mutton busting since they started doing mutton busting. He thought about it for a it 16 years ago. “‘Barbaric’: That was the bit while chewing his candy. “I dunno,” he word,” Romanini said. But she disagrees. said. After some encouragement from his Like many parents, she said the event dad, Leroy spilled his secret. “To um, um, builds character, and most kids enjoy it. to push with my butt.” “Those little guys come out there and Sure enough, Jacob skillfully rode his they’ve got their little cowboy boots on sheep nearly the length of the arena and their little hats. … And they think before tumbling off. He practices by ridthey’re just as big comin’ outta there on ing the family steers while they’re being a sheep as those bull riders are on a bull,” vaccinated. she said with a chuckle. But not every child proved a natural. As for the rules, she said, they’re A 6-year-old named Wyatt was thrown simple: “Hang on and pray a lot.” when his sheep lurched out of the gate then abruptly stopped. Wyatt tipped  l forward onto his face, and when he stood northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

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10 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


Déjà Rescue

Pelicans covered in fish oil are again overwhelming bird rescuers By Scottie Lee Meyers Recently captured juvenile pelicans wait in a warm room for their intake examination. Photos by Drew Hyland and Bird Ally X

T

he folks at Bird Ally X really like Jim Moore. The retired wildlife biologist knows animals, and he’s always willing to help. Also, he has a van. A big van — the better to transport sick pelicans with. And lately he’s been doing a lot of that. So much that the stubborn stench of smelt will not leave the van’s interior. His coppercolored Honda Odyssey has become a pelican ambulance. Since last Monday, Moore has captured close to 50 ailing brown pelicans from Trinidad and Crescent City and delivered them to the Humboldt Wildlife Care Center in Bayside, where volunteers are working to rehabilitate the birds. By the end of this Monday, the care center had admitted 130 juvenile brown pelicans for treatment and was quickly approaching capacity. It’s déjà rescue for Bird Ally X. Last year the organization rescued more than 50 juvenile pelicans from Shelter Cove, Humboldt Bay and Crescent City. Most of those birds had been contaminated with fish oil. Others had large fish skeletons stuck in their throats. The main problem — then and now — is open fish-waste bins near cleaning stations, which offer easy but dangerous buffets for the young pelicans. They become dependent on this easy food source, and the fish oil compromises the natural waterproof quality of their feathers, making them vulnerable to hypothermia. Without help, oil-drenched pelicans will die of exposure and starvation. “The frustrating thing is that this is entirely preventable and easy to fix,” said Bird Ally X Co-director Monte Merrick, a ponytailed man with narrow eyes and well-worn clothes who describes his religious views on Facebook by suggesting, “Ask a pelican.” On a recent afternoon Bird Ally X staff and volunteers had their hands full. They unthawed the smelt, cleaned the carrier cages, fastened heat lamps, laid down sterile towels, raised a tent for the wash

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station, fixed the netting in the aviary and set up a second intake room to perform basic evaluations — because one is no longer enough. Merrick was the nucleus of the swirling activity. When volunteers were unsure what to do next, they looked for him. Fish oil isn’t the only culprit in recent brown pelican deaths. The problem coincides with the breeding success of California brown pelicans, which have seen resurgent populations since being removed from the endangered species list three years ago. The first-year mortality rate for brown pelicans can be as high as 80 percent, according to the nonprofit International Bird Rescue. The most common cause is starvation. Still, Bird Ally X estimates that 95 percent of the birds that have come to the care center over the last two weeks are suffering from fish waste contamination. Pelicans typically plunge dive into the ocean, open their pouch and gather anchovies, sardines and other small fish, along with about five gallons of seawater. They eject the water and swallow their prey. It’s a skill all fledglings must learn in a very short period of time, and if they’re not initially successful, they grow desperately hungry and come to the docks looking for handouts. Deborah Jaques, a wildlife biologist from Astoria, Ore., said human activity has compounded the pelicans’ natural mortality rate, and she’s confident that mass die-offs are preventable. A good place to start, she said, is by improving the design of fish-cleaning stations. Crescent City has two outdoor stations. Fishermen take their catch to the tables, rinse and cut their filets and toss the waste into large plastic bins. Harbor staff empties the bins daily, said Crescent City Harbormaster Richard Young. The waste is then hauled to a local composting plant. Last year, the bins remained largely uncovered, which allowed pelicans to dumpster dive. Jaques said the Crescent

City Harbor District mesh roof over the didn’t work quickly structure, which was enough to fix the already surrounded bins, so she went by a chain-link fence. to Bird Ally X. The The pelicans now organization inhave no way of getstalled trapdoor lids ting to the tables. — a simple solution But even if that’s still in place Shelter Cove’s fishtoday. cleaning station was But Young has fortified in iron, the heard complaints waste-discharge pipe that people are presents another removing the tiedthreat to pelicans. down lids to grab Unlike Crescent fish scraps for crab City’s fish stations, bait, and then not Shelter Cove’s bothering to replace doesn’t have waste Monte Merrick prepares to transport them. He speculates bins. Instead, the an oiled pelican from the trinidad pier. that this year’s bumwaste gets ground per salmon season is producing more fish up by harbor district staff and discharged waste and bringing more people to the three-to-four times a day directly into harbor, many of whom may be unfamiliar the ocean. Berman said the waste is with harbor rules. discharged during high tide in order to “People think it’s cute to feed the minimize the potential of an oily showerpelicans, but it’s a disservice and dangerpour on pelicans. ous,” Young said. He’s posted about 10 The pipe has been there for more laminated signs around the dock to teach than 20 years, Berman said, but last year people about pelican safety. was the first time there were reported Harbor district employees work from incidents of birds becoming contaminated 7 a.m. until 3:30 p.m., and a watchman is near the pipe. on duty during the late-night hours. But The grinder pipe is unpopular with Bird there are periods when the harbor is unAlly X, and the State Water Board wants monitored. “We can’t be everywhere and I it gone too. Berman said the district has can’t station a person at the fish-cleaning begun to seek funding for an alternative station all day,” Young said. system. But with other priorities, like planMoore, the pelican ambulance driver, ning to accommodate the bay’s projected said the Crescent City Harbor District’s efrising sea level, the fish station is not the forts are helping, but more could be done: district’s top priority. Still, when a pelican The signs could be bigger, the lids better problem arises, Berman said, “We try to monitored — and really, how hard would drop things right away and fix it.” it be to put a net structure around the It cost Bird Ally X thousands of dollars stations to keep pelicans out completely? to rehabilitate the pelicans last year. To The fish-cleaning station at Shelter donate to this year’s efforts, visit www. Cove is now completely enclosed. Dan birdallyx.blogspot.com. The money helps Berman, director of conservation for pay for fish, medical supplies, temporary the Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation housing and other operating costs. For and Conservation District, learned last more information or to volunteer, call Wednesday that the oiled pelicans were 822-8839. back. Two days later he sent staff to put a l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

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Blog Jammin’ ANIMALS, CORRECTION / BY HEIDI WALTERS / JULY 16, 3:10 P.M.

Sorry, Wee Marty

BY RYAN BURNS / JULY 12, 3:51 P.M.

Betsy Lambert Out at KIEM Betsy Lambert, the controversial, viralvideo-producing news director for KIEM “News Channel 3,” has been shown the

Fastest Route From A to E Are you sitting down? Because we just put the squash on an age-old Humboldt County debate: What is the fastest way to get to Arcata from Eureka? The safety corridor takes it. No contest. Samoa Boulevard is slower. Though at times Highway 101’s 50-miles-per-hour speed limit can feel constricting (my station wagon putters in protest, its four mighty cylinders begging for more gas) that straight safety stretch is definitely the quicker option, says California Highway Patrol Officer Chase Adams. “Both time-wise and in mileage.” Measured from the highway patrol station at the southern edge of Arcata to the

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

ACTIVISM, COURTS / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / JULY 11, 11:28 A.M.

No Crime Here, Jury Says In the first trial test of a new law, a Humboldt County jury decided this morning that the three people who lit candles outside the county courthouse after 9:30 p.m. did nothing illegal. The verdict comes despite the county’s attempt to ban most people from being on courthouse grounds between 9:30 p.m. and 6 a.m. “I think it will send a message,” said Deputy Public Defender Casey Russo. “This decision shows that it will be very difficult

to prosecute these cases.” Russo said one of the jurors told him after the verdict that the jury relied heavily on one particular instruction from the judge. The judge had explained that if the people holding the candlelight vigil truly believed they were exercising their First Amendment rights of free speech and assembly, then they would not have the mental state required to commit a crime in this case. Russo said he hopes county supervisors will revise the law, which was written during the Occupy Eureka protests. ● BY ANDREW GOFF / JULY 10, 4:23 P.M.

HCSO Seeks Missing Teen UPDATE 7/12 9:00 a.m. She came home. Press release from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office: Missing juvenile Donnaya Bell, 16 years safely returned home to her residence on her own on 07-11-12. She was a voluntary missing juvenile. Original post. Press Release from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office: On 07-10-2012, approximately 9:30 a.m. the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a missing juvenile. The grandmother of the juvenile reported she last saw her granddaughter, Donnayah Brichae Bell, nickname of “Naya,” 16 years old, on Saturday, 7-7-2012, approximately 7 p.m. when she left her Roanne Avenue, Eureka residence for Arts Alive in Eureka. The grandmother, who is her legal guardian, has not seen Donnayah since. However, she did receive a text from her cell phone on 7-9-2012, about 7:30 p.m., stating she was fine. Donnayah has medical issues which she needs medication for. ●

READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

BY ZACH ST. GEORGE / JULY 13, 1:48 P.M.

Pachanga Mexicana restaurant in Eureka, where Highway 101 meets state Route 255, the safety corridor route is 7.4 miles and takes 10 minutes to drive, according to the Google machine. The back route, through Manila, is 9.3 miles long, and takes 16 minutes. The speed limit there is a heartpounding, sweat-palming 55 miles per hour. The speed gap is likely to close in the future, making the safety corridor comparatively even quicker. During a conversation in March, 3rd District County Supervisor Mark Lovelace said that Caltrans is working on a plan to lower the speed limit through Manila. It’s unclear when the slow-down will occur. Anyway, that’ll be sweet for all those people with the “I drive 45 in Manila” signs and bumper stickers, and any other supporters of public safety. As for which way is the pleasanter drive: “It’s completely subjective,” Officer Adams says. “It depends whether you like dunes or eucalyptus trees.” Populace, now informed: Go forth and commute. ●

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

Wildlife biologist Ric Schlexer, with the U.S. Forest Service office in Arcata, called today to correct an outlandish mistake we propagated in a previous post about the wee Humboldt marten. In the post, “Bite You in the Face” — about the Center for Biological Diversity’s Endangered Species Act-related lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect the marten — we repeated something the Center said in its news release: that Martes americana humboldtensis bites porcupines in the face. It ain’t so, says Schlexer: “The fisher bites porcupines in the face,” he said. “Martens have never been known to do that. A porcupine is three or four times the size of an adult marten.” The two species are in the same family — Mustelidae, which also includes weasels, otters, wolverines and badgers. And while fishers and martens might seem quite similar — as opposed to otters and badgers, say — the fisher weighs between eight and 13 pounds while the Humboldt marten weighs between 1.2 and 3.4 pounds, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Now, you tell us, who’s gonna be more likely to take on a 15- to 20-pound lunker of a porcupine? It’s possible the Center for Biological Diversity news release writer confused the critter with its big bro the Pacific fisher, over whose lack-of-protection status the Center also has sued.

door. From her Facebook page: To all my loyal viewers and supporters. I no longer work for KIEM. My contract ran out and the general manager decided to not renew. I want to thank all of you for your support and love. My husband and I have fallen in love with the North Coast and we plan on staying. We will continue to stay involved with baseball, community events and fundraisers. Again, we cant thank you all enough from the bottom of our hearts for making us feel so welcome here. –Betsy ●


GET OUT! Reserving a Lookout  

Bear Basin tower overlooks a sweeping landscape. Photo by Chris Dant

A Room with a View By Rees Hughes

outdoors@northcoastjournal.com

W

hat is it about fire lookouts that gives them such an aura of romanticism? The isolation? The simplicity? Gary Snyder, who spent a couple of summers as a fire spotter high above the upper Skagit River in the North Cascades, celebrated the ascetic nature of the lookout: “fewer the artifacts, less the words           slowly the life of it a knack for nonattachment” Perhaps it is the sense of danger and risk that comes from being so vulnerable to lightning strikes or buffeted by ridgetop winds? The magnificent 360-degree views?  “Woke up this morning on an island in the sky, surrounded by clouds,” wrote Edward Abbey from his post in Arizona’s Atascosa fire lookout. Philip Connors, whose recent book Fire Season recalls his decade of staffing a fire tower in New Mexico, talked about “the impressive stage set for a drama of the self.” For me, it is certainly possible that my attraction is about compensating for a quarter of a century of being limited to scanning the flatlands of Kansas. Or maybe I hope to join the literary pantheon who found their muse in a remote lookout retreat — Snyder, Abbey, Jack Kerouac, Norman Maclean, and, well … Hughes? Fire lookouts are fast going the way of the typewriter, Kodachrome and the handwritten letter. According to Connors, 90 percent of American lookout towers

have been decommissioned with only a few hundred remaining, mostly in the West and Alaska. Not surprisingly, there was a time when high spots throughout inland Humboldt County were dotted with lookouts. They stood atop places like Brannan Mountain, Cold Spring, Iaqua Buttes, Mt. Pierce and Somes Mountain. Now most functional Humboldt County fire lookouts, like Grasshopper Peak, Schoolhouse Peak, Brush Mountain and Orleans Mountain, are staffed only in situations of extreme fire danger. They command incredible views and are worth a visit on a beautiful North Coast afternoon. Grasshopper Peak has become a favorite destination for masochistic mountain bikers. Schoolhouse Peak is a nice turnaround after a drive along Bald Hills Road in Redwood National Park (or join the Redwood Parks Association there on Aug. 11-12 to watch the Perseid meteor shower — call 707-464-9150 to make a reservation). Brush Mountain Lookout, the only one fully staffed in Humboldt County (June through mid-October), welcomes visitors and is easily accessible from Friday Ridge Road southeast of Willow Creek. Much of this change reflects not only improvements in technology but a philosophical shift in the role that fire plays in forest ecology. Not all fires are bad. It has been increasingly recognized that our ecosystem has evolved so that periodic fires are critical to the maintenance of a healthy balance among plant communities. Along the North Coast, for example, without natural fires the inland prairies and native oak woodlands are quickly

overwhelmed by young coniSix Rivers National Forest as well as the other availfers. It is estimated that about a able lookouts in southwestern Oregon and Northern third of Humboldt County’s oak California use ReserveAmerica (www.reserveamerica. woodland acreage has disapcom) for bookings and payment. Some national forest peared since 1850. lookouts can also be booked by phone at 1-877-444-6777 These days there are ways for or online through www.recreation.gov. Reservations must us to have a little taste of this be made at least one day in advance, and can be made top-of-the-world experience up to 180 days before arrival. Rates vary from $35 at Bald without being hired for a fire Knob Lookout to $75 per night at Little Mt. Hoffman season. Some of the lookouts Lookout, Girard Ridge Lookout, and others. have been converted to mounIn the case of Bear Basin, the lookout and cabin are tain penthouses and are available rented as a pair and may be reserved for one to four for rent. There are three in Shasnights between June 1 and Sept. 30. The rental rate is ta-Trinity National Forest and $75 per night for one to eight people, and $5 for each another four in the Rogue River additional person, up to a maximum of 12 people. National Forest in southwest — R.H. ern Oregon. And there is one extraordinary lookout perched high above the Smith River drainage in Six Rivers National Forest — Bear Basin Lookout (and the Pierson Cabin). We spent an early July weekend at the Bear Basin Lookout, early enough that we had to park below the remnant snow drifts and lug lace) laid out before us. In the absence our gear, food and water along the access of traffic noise and the subtle drone of road to the panoramic top of Bear Basin civilized life, I became more attuned to Butte. We quickly ran out of superlatives. the whisper of wind rolling up and across Stunning. Incredible. Breathtaking. Awethe mountainside, the call of the redsome. Fantastic.  tailed hawk riding afternoon thermals, the The lookout itself is actually the melody of this wild country. reconstructed Camp Six Lookout, which And then there is the miracle of nighthad been on the top of a much taller time. If the cycle of the moon is right, tower a couple of ridges to the west. you will experience real darkness, as Bear That lookout was initially built by the Basin Butte is far from the star-obscuring Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 at the ambient light of civilization. Environmensixth construction camp for the French tal writer Paul Bogard reports that an Hill Road (hence Camp Six). It operated estimated two-thirds of Americans live into the 1990s. Later, it was moved to with such light pollution that they no lonBear Basin Butte and a new cabin modger experience real night and that children eled after the old Conservation Corps born in the United States today only have cabins was built nearby with the help of a one in 10 chance of seeing the Milky the Pierson Building Center. This is where Way in their lifetime. It only takes one most contemporary visitors stay. Beclear night at Bear Basin to understand tween the lookout and the cabin, eight the difference. people can be accommodated (up to 12 Buoyed by this experience, I quickly are permitted but there is an extra fee).  reserved a night at Bald Knob Lookout in There are three double beds in the cabin the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest. and a futon in the lookout. I assured my family as we made the long You have to bring your food (it would drive inland from Gold Beach that we be a good hour and a half round trip to would soon be basking in the sunshine go buy the milk you forgot to bring), your high above this tenacious layer of coastal bedding and all of your water. There is no stratus. My meteorological savvy failed me electricity and, mercifully, no Internet. that day, as my wife is still quick to remind There remain a few sacred places. me. “But even surrounded by clouds,” I Even in our brief two-night stay, with valiantly tried to convince my daughters, no television or Internet, time did slow. “isn’t this amazing? It is like living in a ball We took walks along nearby forest service of cotton.” roads, imagined locating a distant wisp of I loved that experience too. l smoke with the Osborne fire finder, sat   mesmerized as day succumbed to night. I If you would like to write a Get never tired of just sitting and watching the Out! Column, please email Journal spectacle of the Klamath Knot (the term editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg at for our unique geological and ecological carrie@northcoastjournal.com region, popularized by David Rains Walnorthcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

13


e r u n a M A r e v u Mane North Coast dairy farmers are knee-deep in new runoff regulations Story and photos By Zach St. George

HOLSTEINS HANG OUT NEXT TO A STREAM IN THE ARCATA BOTTOMS. WHILE THE NEW REGULATIONS DON’T BAN COWS FROM STREAMS, THEY WILL SUGGEST CREATING FENCED-OFF BUMPER ZONES IN MANY CASES.

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

herd of Holsteins, roused from their carefree ruminations, stand one by one and saunter up to the wire fence on the edge of a dirt road in the Arcata bottoms. The black-and-white cows whiff the air, bat their luxurious eyelashes and flick their ears, bouncing numbered yellow earrings. Their swiveling jaws creak quietly. The tall grass along the fence rustles in the breeze, and the sound of the ocean carries over the flat pastureland. One charmer rests her diamond-spotted head on her neighbor’s back. So languid. So peaceful. She lifts her tail in a graceful arch, and poops. Splat. Splat. Splat. Cows can’t control themselves. They just go. Here in Humboldt, most of the pooping happens out in the pasture. That’s fine, because the grass likes the nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium that the poop contains. But when ol’ Bessie poops in the barn, in the milking parlor, or on any other paved area, the farmer needs to keep an eye on the pile, lest it find its way into a puddle, stream or irrigation ditch. In years past, it was farmers’ responsibility, and ultimately their choice, to keep

the waterways dung-free. Clean water meant a clean conscience. Starting this year, however, the authorities are stepping in with a new program that aims to stamp out any wayward crap. Both farmers and regulators agree that the new rules, which force dairy farmers to document their manure-management and possibly make corrections in the field, aren’t likely to reduce pollution too much. By most accounts, local dairies are already doing a pretty good job keeping those pies in line. For the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board, the new runoff regulations were a legal necessity. All of California’s other water boards already had runoff oversight programs in place, and the new program will bring the North Coast into compliance with both state and federal clean water laws. In the eyes of many local dairy farmers, though, the new regulations are anything but necessary. They say that they’re already self-regulating, and that the new program will mostly just mean more paperwork, more time away from the field, and more costs in a business where profit margins are already thin as skim milk.


DENVER NELSON AT HIS FARM NEAR FERNDALE. THE ORGANIC DAIRY DOESN’T USE ANY FERTILIZER — JUST MANURE.

Denver Nelson

trudges out of his office, past the barn, and stops in front of a wire. It’s electric. “Don’t NELSON’S MILLION-GALLON CONCRETE TANK. THE touch it,” he says, gravel-voiced. TANK HOLDS ALL THE MANURE AND CONTAMINATED Then he changes his mind. He’s WATER COLLECTED AT THE DAIRY, WHICH IS THEN touched it before, he says. “It’s SPRAYED ON THE FIELDS. THE TANK IS SO BIG, NELSON not a big deal. Go ahead and EXPLAINS, BECAUSE IT NEEDS TO BE ABLE TO HOLD touch it.” (No, thanks.) DIRTY WATER AND MANURE DURING THE WET Nelson is here on the family SEASON, WHEN THE PASTURES ARE TOO WET TO ABSORB THE MANURE-WATER. farm outside of Ferndale. He’s a gentleman farmer, he says. A retiree and member of the county planhours, and they want to be milked, Nelson ning commission, Nelson owns the land, says. They spend most of their time in but his son-in-law actually runs things. He the pasture, he says, often as much as 350 stops by when he’s feeling like it or when days a year, more than double the 120 days his family needs his help. required by federal law to qualify as an To Nelson’s left is a small fenced area organic dairy. with a dozen calves lounging on wood“This area is the ideal pastureland,” Nelchips or in plastic cow kennels. On his son says, gesturing out across the Eel River right is another fenced area with a dozen Valley. The climate, the rich river soil, and full-grown cows. They’re Jerseys, relatively the high rainfall make the land some of the small cows — usually between 800 and most productive in the country. His dairy 1,000 pounds, compared to 1,500-pound has around 500 cows on more than 220 Holsteins — but the milk they produce is acres, or around two cows per acre — far rich in butterfat, making it a good base for less than the land could support, he says. cheese or ice cream. They’re shaped like Like on many local dairies, the cows on drunken rectangles, and they’re the color this farm are rotated among fields. Once of Timberland boots. The sound when one field is grazed out, the cows move on they pull up mouthfuls of grass is like a to the next. The farmers mow the first field brush dragged through frizzy hair. to even it out, then, depending upon the In front of Nelson, over the electric time of year, either water it or spray it with wire, is a dirt road that curves a half-mile manure-water slurry. After that they let or so out along the edge of the pasture. the grass grow for at least a couple weeks It’s fenced on both sides, and at the far before allowing the cows back on it. end is a gate. A couple hundred cows The bovine caravan approaches, dragare gathered around the gate, and when ging a cloud of dust. It’s a disorderly an employee on an ATV opens it, they bunch. Taken by a whim, some cows stop meander onto the road. for a bite of grass along the fence, causing They’ve been out in the field for 12 the whole train to stop. Others decide to

THE REARVIEW. THE COWS ON NELSON’S DAIRY ARE MILKED EVERY 12 HOURS. THANKS TO A LARGELY AUTOMATED SYSTEM, ONE WORKER CAN MILK 250 COWS IN 1 ½ HOURS, NELSON SAYS.

turn against traffic, motivation unknown. One sidles up behind a fellow she-cow and jumps on for a quick hump. “That’s how you know they need to be bred,” Nelson says, pointing to the unperturbed humpee. The cow in front reaches Nelson and halts, staring at him. He stares back. “They’re lovely creatures,” he says. The cow turns its googly gaze and continues toward the barn and the milking parlor, pushed onward by the cows behind. Most of the contaminated water on the farm comes from the barn and milking complex. The manure that cows leave in the barn while en route to the milking parlor gets skid-steered into a pit at the end of the building. The contents of the poop-pit, and the water used to clean the milking parlor and the milk-holding tank, are both pumped into a million-gallon concrete tank outside. The reason the concrete tank is so big, Nelson says, is because it needs to be able to hold four months’ worth of manure and contaminated water. If the dairy sprayed the slurry on the field during the rainy season, when the ground is already saturated, then it would be more likely to run off into nearby surface water. Plus, because the manure-water is the only fertilizer that the organic dairy uses, applying it during the wet season would be a waste of nutrients and a waste of money. continued on next page

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15


A JERSEY NEXT TO THE 100-YEAR-OLD HOLGERSEN BARN.

FROM LEFT: ANNE AND CURTIS HOLGERSEN AND THEIR DAUGHTER DEBBIE NICKOLS IN THE HOLGERSEN’S KITCHEN NEXT DOOR TO THEIR LOLETA DAIRY. CURTIS’S GRANDPARENTS, WHO IMMIGRATED FROM DENMARK, STARTED THE DAIRY MORE THAN 100 YEARS AGO.

CURTIS HOLGERSEN POINTS TO THE HOUSE WHERE HE WAS BORN AND RAISED, ACROSS FROM THE DAIRY, AND JUST A COUPLE HUNDRED FEET FROM WHERE HE CURRENTLY LIVES. continued from previous page

Across the field is a yellow pump with two wheels and a spool of black hose. Underground lines run from the concrete tank to that pump and others scattered across the farm. From there, the hoses run out to mobile sprinklers. Nelson points to the tank. He commissioned two artists to paint an enormous American flag on its side. “This is a great country,” he says. The last of the cows trail past, and Nelson heads to the milking parlor. It’s a long concrete room with rows of feed troughs along both walls. A 4-foot-wide trench runs the length of the room, dividing it in two. As cows walk down the aisles on either side of the trench, metal gates swing out and separate the cows into their own stalls, head in the trough, udders towards the trench. The cows are in place. The pumps above the trench start to click rhythmically, tick tick tick tick ticka ticka tick, and the vacuum turns on with a howl. Two milkers hurry along the trench, attaching the pumps to each cow’s four teats before moving to her neighbor. The pumps bounce slowly on the teats as if breathing — up … down … up … down. Milk squirts into the clear bowls on the bottom of the vacuums, whirling against the sides before disappearing off through the pipes and

into the holding tank. In less than five minutes, the milking is over. The vacuums die and the suctions drop from the teats and swing away. The cow on the end isn’t quite done. The rear teat on her left side squirts a stream of milk on the floor. It pools and runs toward a drain. Nelson looks at the row of cows, now licking up the last bits of grain from their troughs. “Pretty neat, huh?” he says.

A COW POOP MULTIPLICATION TABLE, GIVEN TO THE HOLGERSEN’S BY A REPRESENTATIVE FROM THE CALIFORNIA DAIRY QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM. SOME COWS CAN PRODUCE MORE THAN 100 POUNDS OF MANURE EVERY DAY.

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Almost everyone

agrees that keeping cow poop out of the water is a good thing. In the American Midwest, where most dairies are massive and corporate-owned, with barn-bound cows, agricultural runoff has been linked to high levels of nitrates in the groundwater, which can cause birth defects. The groundwater in California’s Central Valley

also has unhealthy levels of nitrates, possibly because of ag runoff. Here on the North Coast, where most dairies are small, family-owned, and pasture-based, the biggest threat from cow poop is algal blooms, said Mark Neely of the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board. Those same nutrients that grass likes — particularly nitrogen and phosphorus — can ignite algae blooms, which can raise a waterway’s pH to fishkilling levels and starve the water of oxygen as it decomposes. Some types of algae are poisonous. At least 12 dogs have died after swimming in algae-infested Humboldt waters since 2001. Dairies aren’t the only potential causes of water pollution — runoff from logging, leaky septic systems and non-dairy


level permit: Two were required to do so because they have more than 700 cows; the third has leaked contaminated water in the past. The permit for the third category is actually a waiver. Dairies are granted a waiver if the water board deems them a negligible threat to water quality. Unlike the other two permits, dairies with a waiver permit do not pay an annual fee, which, for the most egregious polluters, can cost tens of thousands every year. The water board hasn’t finished its inspections, and the number of dairies with the second-level permit could still rise, said Neely, but the number of waiver applications indicate that local dairies think they’re already doing a good job. They probably are, he said, acknowledging that for the most part, the new regulations are more about fulfilling legal oversight requirements and less about correcting an existing public safety hazard. “We don’t have any known problems that have driven the program,” he said, adding, “But it may [be] a question of not knowing the problems yet.” The dairy famers have until November to give the water board their paperwork. Farmers applying under the waiver have to submit, among other things, a detailed aerial map of their dairy and a 10-page wa-

Debbie Nickols and her

parents, Anne and Curtis Holgersen, are seated around the dining table at the Holgersen house in Loleta. A binder, given to Nickols at a recent educational meeting, sits next to her on the table. It’s full of instructional materials and forms to fill out — 3½ inches worth. She measured. To Nickols’ right, Curtis Holgersen looks at a map of the family dairy with furrowed brow, marking it with a pen. On the wall in the next room hangs a photograph of Holgersen’s grandparents. They arrived here from Denmark more than 100 years ago and started the dairy. Their son worked here his whole life, and his son, Holgersen, 67, grew up working on the dairy. He’s not happy about the new regulations. “This is like if the water board were to come into your backyard and ask you, by weight, how much crap your dog produces and exactly where it goes,” he says.

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ter quality plan questionnaire. The waiver also requires farmers to be ready to prevent runoff of contaminated rainwater for 24 hours during the biggest storm in a quarter-century, which for some Humboldt dairies could mean 14 inches of rain in one day. Once the waiver application is submitted, farmers have one year to make any necessary changes to qualify for the waiver. The manure that cows leave in the field isn’t as likely to enter waterways in significant quantities as is the manure slurry that gets shot out of sprinklers, or the water running straight off of concrete. Most of the water board’s suggested fixes will probably address those sources of pollution. Solutions include putting up gutters to prevent clean rainwater from running onto soiled concrete, erecting roofs to prevent the rain from hitting the concrete in the first place, creating buffer zones around waterways and building bigger poop-lagoons. Neely said that most dairy farmers already have the answers to the water board’s questions either in their head or on paper, and much of the work will simply be filling in the blanks. Still, a little grumbling is to be expected, he said. “Dairymen don’t like paperwork. They’d rather be out in the field feeding the cows.”

agriculture all put nutrients and sediment in the water. Most of those are probably bigger polluters than dairies, say those who keep an eye on Humboldt waters. While the water quality experts seem to agree that local dairies are mostly doing a good job, they say the new regulations can’t hurt. “There are many sources of pollution to local water, and certainly agriculture is one of those,” said Andrew Orahoske, conservation director at the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC). Dairies in particular are potential polluters because of the way they concentrate manure and contaminated water, he said. He said that in the past, EPIC received more complaints about pollution from dairies, but it seems like they’ve collectively cleaned up their act in the last 10 years. Every once in a while, though, EPIC still gets complaints, he said, and having water quality regulations on the books is a sensible step. Fisheries biologist and Humboldt Bay Harbor Commissioner Patrick Higgins concurred. Like Orahoske, he said that the dairies are much cleaner than they were a decade ago, but that more oversight is a good thing. Although farmers might feel the regulations are onerous and unnecessary, Higgins said, it’s important to remember that the regulations aren’t for the benefit of the dairies — they’re meant to protect public waterways. The new regulations affect roughly 150 dairies and 50,000 cows scattered across Del Norte, Siskyou, Mendocino, Sonoma, Marin and Humboldt counties, and will satisfy both the monitoring requirements of the federal Clean Water Act and state dairy regulations. Neely led the effort to create the new program, officially called (take a breath) “Water Quality Compliance Program for Dairies and Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs).” The program has three categories, with different permits for each. The first category is for dairies that regularly allow a significant amount of contaminated water to run into surface water. Neely said that doesn’t happen at any local dairies. The second category is for dairies that have a high risk of allowing contaminated water to run into surface water, and for dairies with more than 700 cows. Only three dairies applied for the second-

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COW POOP CONTAINS NUTRIENTS THAT CAN CAUSE DEADLY ALGAL BLOOMS IN WATERWAYS. CONTAMINATED WATER IS MORE LIKELY TO RUN OFF OF CONCRETE THAN OFF OF PASTURES, WHERE GRASS QUICKLY ABSORBS THE NUTRIENTS.

continued from page 17

His daughter pulls out a piece of paper. It’s a cow poop multiplication chart. In order to figure “Someone in out how many tons of manure IN Sacramento sees it each cow produces annually, the TH E PA as a potential issue, dairy needs to know the average numS T UR E and they say, ‘Oh, you ber of pounds of milk the cow gives each have to change it.’ They’re sitting in an day. There’s a different set of calculations office somewhere. They’re not out here for cows that aren’t giving milk. when it rains. They’re not out here in Granted, most dogs don’t produce 23 the weather, feeding the cows,” she says. tons of crap in a year, like some of the “It’s pure crap.” more prodigious cows, but Nickols says they have it under control. The dairy is come at their backyard, she says. “We’re consida tough time for dairies. “Most dairy ered stewards of the land, and we don’t farmers today are awash in red ink,” said abuse it at all. There’s no runoff.” Michael Marsh, CEO of the Western Holgersen and Nickols head out to United Dairymen, a trade organization the farm. They walk through a church-like that represents more than 60 percent of wooden barn built by Holgersen’s grandCalifornia dairies. parents 100 years ago, past a small building Low milk prices and high fuel and feed that holds the dairy’s contaminated water, costs mean that this year, most dairy and up to the modern barn, where the farmers in the state are losing money cows sleep when the weather is nasty. every time they milk their cows. Last year There’s some manure on the concrete was better, Marsh said, and some dairies floor, but not much, and it’s mostly dried. broke even in 2010, but 2009 brought They scrape it regularly with a tractor, Hol“wholesale devastation.” In the last three gersen says. or four years, he said, California has lost A couple weeks ago, they volunteered roughly 20 percent of its dairies. to have water board inspectors come out Humboldt has not been spared. In 2001, to the farm. The inspectors didn’t find the county had more than 100 dairies, any serious problems, says Nickols, but according to the California Department they wanted the Holgersens to move a of Food and Agriculture records. In 2009, watering trough and to install a backup there were roughly 80. Today, there are concrete bumper to direct rainwater — around 60. both unnecessary, in her opinion.

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stainless steel parlor. “This is one of the last glass lines in the county, maybe in the state,” she says, pointing to a tube leading from Farmers can the milking stations. If it ever do little to avoid broke, there’d be no replacing it. the cost of fuel Holgersen demonstrates the and feed, nor can N IN T HE BA R operation, pantomiming without a cow. they control the price The setup requires the milker to bend of their product. Milk is sold down next to the cows to hook up the from the dairy to the consumer through vacuum pumps. It’s slow, he says, and hard a network of middlemen, and prices on the knees. Hired hands do most of the are set by the California Department of milking now — he’s not able to bend like Food and Agriculture, which calculates he used to. He’s thought about upgrading its prices based on rates at the Chicago to a more modern system, but decided he Mercantile Exchange. Currently, dairies couldn’t afford it. are getting roughly $14 per 100 pounds They walk back outside. “That’s where of milk, or around $1.17 per gallon. By the I was born and raised,” Holgersen says, time it gets to the store, that gallon costs pointing to a beige two-story house between $3 and $4. across the dirt road from the parlor. He Despite the low milk prices, Neely moved from there into the house where said that the water board needed to go Debbie lives now, just a couple hundred forward with the program. It had already feet away. Later, he moved next-door into delayed implementing the regulations for his and Anne’s house. His next home, he a couple years following the 2009 Humhopes, will be with God. boldt Creamery scandal (see Creamgate, The dairy will go on. Nickols left the Feb 26, 2009). Even in a good year, he said, family farm for a few years to go to veterifarmers wouldn’t exactly welcome new nary school, but returned and plans on regulations, and the water board’s job is to staying. “It’s in the blood,” she says. “It’s enforce the law. a rough life, it is, but I wouldn’t do it if I didn’t love it.” and DebOn their way back to the house, Holgbie Nickols walk from the new barn down ersen and his daughter walk through the a path to the milking parlor. The 60-yearlong grass next to the old barn, scuffing old wood-roofed concrete room bears the manure from their boots. ● little resemblance to Denver Nelson’s

Curtis Holgersen

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North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


northcoastjournal.com

MckinleyvilL MckinleyvilLee aRts Night Third Friday McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, July 20, 6-8 p.m.

THE ARCATA/EUREKA AIRPORT IN MCKINLEYVILLE FEATURES AN ONGOING EXHIBITION OF HUMBOLDT SCENES BY LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHERS INCLUDING THIS SHOT, “END OF THE DAY,” BY RICK GUSTAFSON. SEE THE SHOW ON MCKINLEYVILLE ARTS NIGHT OR ANY TIME.

ELAINE BENJAMIN OF BLUE CHAIR PRESS IN BLUE LAKE SHOWS AN ECLECTIC COLLECTION OF WORK AT BLAKE’S BOOKS INCLUDING ART BOOKS, WHIMSICAL MINIATURE CHAIRS, PRINTS AND THIS NATURE STUDY TITLED “WARBLERS ON WOOD.” MEET THE ARTIST AT THE ARTS MCKINLEYVILLE OPENING FRIDAY AT 6 P.M.

is presented by members of the McKinleyville business community and is open for all McKinleyville businesses to display the work of local artists. Join us for our community’s celebration of local art and artists for music, food and fun. Receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are from 6-8 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Call 834-6460 or visit www.mckinleyvilleartsnight.com for more information.

Arts Ferndale Saturday, July 21, 6-9 p.m. Ivanhoe, 315 Main St. Art by Megan Hensley and Michael Norton, music by Riding Double. Valley Grocery, 339 Main St. Artisan cheese and bread from Loleta Cheese and Loleta Baking Company. The Painters Gallery, 425 Main St. Gala opening featuring the art of Patrick Mauney, Amy Leon and photography of Jackie Cory. Times Remembered, 431 Main St. Photography by Dan Tubbs Jr. Golden Bee Candle Works, 451 Main St. Sand sculpture candle art by Brian Barbata. Ferndale Repertory Theatre presents Woody Guthrie’s American Song at 8 p.m. Tickets at www.ferndale-rep.org. The Gazebo, 475 Main St. Art by Chelsea Hoff. Abraxas, 505 Main St. Leather art and jewelry. Ferndale Arts Co-op, Corner of Main and Shaw streets. Art by Rosalinda Brainerd, Pat Cahill, Sue Cartwright, Barbara Davis, Peggy Dickinson, Matt Filar, Ben Green, Anita Punla, Kym Hansen, Melanie Kasek, Joan Katri, Bruce Keller, Lois Keller, Kathleen Klatt, Leon Porter, Camille Regli, Laura Rose, Laura Wellman.

Eureka-Arcata Airport, Artwork by Humboldt County artists, coordinated by the Redwood Art Association and sponsored by the Headwaters Fund. Silver Lining, 3561 Boeing Ave., #D. Music by Joe Garceau Trio. North Coast Gallery and Picture Framing, McKinleyville Shopping Center. Antoinette Magyar, paintings. McKinleyville Family Resource Center, 1450 Hiller Rd. Family arts night, collaging and drawing. Blake’s Books, 2005 Central Ave. Elaine Benjamin of Blue Chair Press, framed prints and bird prints on wood. Curves, Miller Business Park. Meredith Aldrich, watercolor paintings. ●

Try our New Lunch Menu and be eligible for our 2 for Lunch Monthly Drawing! 316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

LEFT PAINTINGS BY CHELSEA HOFF AT THE GAZEBO. FAR LEFT MIXED MEDIA WORK BY AMY LEON AT THE PAINTERS GALLERY’S GALA OPENING ALONG WITH THE ART OF PATRICK MAUNEY AND PHOTOGRAPHY OF JACKIE CORY.

Folk Art, 580 Main St. Art by Karen L Howard. Kinetic Museum, 580 Main St. The art history of Kinetics. Lost Coast Café, 460 Main St. Metal art by Karl Stupka. Music by Sarah Fay and Eli Jimenez. Matias, 468 Main St. Music by Pepe. The Kitchen Store, 452 Main St. Cooking demos and product sampling. Girlie Girls, 444 Main St. Art by Bailey Renae. Abraxas Shoe Shop, 430 Main St. Art by Chuck Chan. Above the Shoe Shop, 436 Main St. Humboldt

Hospitality and Deadwood Entertainment present “All You Need Is Love <3” a showing of the art of Justin Love, music by Arkitech and Dj FX. After party following Arts Ferndale, for information go to facebook.com/ humboldthospitality. Foggy Bottoms Yarn, 350 Main St. Learn the Art of Yarn. Ferndale Volunteer Fire Department, Blood Mobile: Give the gift of life, donate blood. Surrey on the Fringe, Pedal around Ferndale in style! ● northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012

21


northcoastjournal.com

MckinleyvilL MckinleyvilLee aRts Night Third Friday McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, July 20, 6-8 p.m.

THE ARCATA/EUREKA AIRPORT IN MCKINLEYVILLE FEATURES AN ONGOING EXHIBITION OF HUMBOLDT SCENES BY LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHERS INCLUDING THIS SHOT, “END OF THE DAY,” BY RICK GUSTAFSON. SEE THE SHOW ON MCKINLEYVILLE ARTS NIGHT OR ANY TIME.

ELAINE BENJAMIN OF BLUE CHAIR PRESS IN BLUE LAKE SHOWS AN ECLECTIC COLLECTION OF WORK AT BLAKE’S BOOKS INCLUDING ART BOOKS, WHIMSICAL MINIATURE CHAIRS, PRINTS AND THIS NATURE STUDY TITLED “WARBLERS ON WOOD.” MEET THE ARTIST AT THE ARTS MCKINLEYVILLE OPENING FRIDAY AT 6 P.M.

is presented by members of the McKinleyville business community and is open for all McKinleyville businesses to display the work of local artists. Join us for our community’s celebration of local art and artists for music, food and fun. Receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are from 6-8 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Call 834-6460 or visit www.mckinleyvilleartsnight.com for more information.

Arts Ferndale Saturday, July 21, 6-9 p.m. Ivanhoe, 315 Main St. Art by Megan Hensley and Michael Norton, music by Riding Double. Valley Grocery, 339 Main St. Artisan cheese and bread from Loleta Cheese and Loleta Baking Company. The Painters Gallery, 425 Main St. Gala opening featuring the art of Patrick Mauney, Amy Leon and photography of Jackie Cory. Times Remembered, 431 Main St. Photography by Dan Tubbs Jr. Golden Bee Candle Works, 451 Main St. Sand sculpture candle art by Brian Barbata. Ferndale Repertory Theatre presents Woody Guthrie’s American Song at 8 p.m. Tickets at www.ferndale-rep.org. The Gazebo, 475 Main St. Art by Chelsea Hoff. Abraxas, 505 Main St. Leather art and jewelry. Ferndale Arts Co-op, Corner of Main and Shaw streets. Art by Rosalinda Brainerd, Pat Cahill, Sue Cartwright, Barbara Davis, Peggy Dickinson, Matt Filar, Ben Green, Anita Punla, Kym Hansen, Melanie Kasek, Joan Katri, Bruce Keller, Lois Keller, Kathleen Klatt, Leon Porter, Camille Regli, Laura Rose, Laura Wellman.

Eureka-Arcata Airport, Artwork by Humboldt County artists, coordinated by the Redwood Art Association and sponsored by the Headwaters Fund. Silver Lining, 3561 Boeing Ave., #D. Music by Joe Garceau Trio. North Coast Gallery and Picture Framing, McKinleyville Shopping Center. Antoinette Magyar, paintings. McKinleyville Family Resource Center, 1450 Hiller Rd. Family arts night, collaging and drawing. Blake’s Books, 2005 Central Ave. Elaine Benjamin of Blue Chair Press, framed prints and bird prints on wood. Curves, Miller Business Park. Meredith Aldrich, watercolor paintings. ●

Try our New Lunch Menu and be eligible for our 2 for Lunch Monthly Drawing! 316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

LEFT PAINTINGS BY CHELSEA HOFF AT THE GAZEBO. FAR LEFT MIXED MEDIA WORK BY AMY LEON AT THE PAINTERS GALLERY’S GALA OPENING ALONG WITH THE ART OF PATRICK MAUNEY AND PHOTOGRAPHY OF JACKIE CORY.

Folk Art, 580 Main St. Art by Karen L Howard. Kinetic Museum, 580 Main St. The art history of Kinetics. Lost Coast Café, 460 Main St. Metal art by Karl Stupka. Music by Sarah Fay and Eli Jimenez. Matias, 468 Main St. Music by Pepe. The Kitchen Store, 452 Main St. Cooking demos and product sampling. Girlie Girls, 444 Main St. Art by Bailey Renae. Abraxas Shoe Shop, 430 Main St. Art by Chuck Chan. Above the Shoe Shop, 436 Main St. Humboldt

Hospitality and Deadwood Entertainment present “All You Need Is Love <3” a showing of the art of Justin Love, music by Arkitech and Dj FX. After party following Arts Ferndale, for information go to facebook.com/ humboldthospitality. Foggy Bottoms Yarn, 350 Main St. Learn the Art of Yarn. Ferndale Volunteer Fire Department, Blood Mobile: Give the gift of life, donate blood. Surrey on the Fringe, Pedal around Ferndale in style! ● northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012

21


Kelsey MacIlvaine as the Emcee and Elena Tessler as Sally Bowles in Ferndale Rep’s Cabaret. photo by Matt Knowles, Aesthetic Design and Photography

Woody’s Cabaret 1930s Berlin and America in alternating Ferndale Rep shows By William S. Kowinski williamkowinski@northcoastjournal.com

F

ledgling American small town writer Cliff Bradshaw (played by Charlie Heinberg) comes to Berlin in 1929, and falls into a relationship with British singer Sally Bowles (Elena Tessler), first seen in the infamous cabaret, the Kit Kat Club, where the androgynous Emcee (Kelsey MacIlvaine) presides over a

carnival of decadence. Meanwhile, Bradshaw’s landlady (played by Rae Robison) is courted by an equally late middle-aged fruit grocer (JM Wilkerson.) Their relationships with each other and several other characters are the principal focus of the first act of the musical Cabaret, as produced at Ferndale Reper-

“The library is inhabited by spirits that come out of the pages at night.” -- Isabel Allende

Used Books

• New Books

Special orders welcome for new books! 402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

tory Theatre. But the realities of a country moving toward Nazi rule intrude in the much shorter Act II. Elena Tessler’s vitality, her strong and supple voice, are again evident, though the role of Sally Bowles is less prominent on stage than in the Liza Minnelli movie. MacIlvaine is energetic and magnetic, Heinberg is winsome, Robison and Wilkerson are charming and convincing. Among the capable supporting cast, Caitlin McMurtry is again incandescent. The band is especially important and especially good. Additional cast members are Jeremy Webb, Jessie Shieman, Linnea Hill, Julia Giardino, Zoey Berman, Dante Gelormino, Qaiel Peltier, Jeffrey Ray Kieser and Jaison Chand. The orchestra is Dianne Zuleger, Justin Ross, Tamaras Abrams, Stephanie Douglass, Michael Lewis, Gina Piazza, Amber Grimes, Monica Dekat and John Petricca. Director Ginger Gene, musical director Dianne Zuleger and choreographer Linda Maxwell have constructed a fluid production, while lighting by Liz Uhazy and costumes by Erica Fromdahl match the moods. The songs are by the team of Fred Ebb and John Kander, who later wrote the songs for Chicago. The sexuality it portrayed was still scandalous when Cabaret became a Broadway sensation in 1966, and there were many who remembered the actual 1930s (in fact, the original cast included Lotte Lenya, famous for singing in Brecht and Kurt Weil productions in Berlin at the time this musical is set). The original production (and the 1972 film) emphasized the grotesque elements of this Berlin with theatrical techniques new to Broadway. But today in Humboldt County, nothing much of the show’s sexuality is unfamiliar, let alone shocking. The textures of those times and that place — even as then known through media filters — are mostly remote, replaced by a few symbols and images. So this show could now be considered a cautionary tale about the peril of ignoring political dangers. Or it could be seen as sentimentalizing a complexly horrible time, while approximating a style that has lost its edge. Or you can see it as both, which is pretty much my view. Cabaret resumes its run at Ferndale Rep Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. July 27-28, and again on Aug. 10-11 and 24-25, with Sunday matinees on July 29, Aug. 12 and 26. In roughly the same period that Cabaret takes place, the Great Depression was taking hold in the U.S. just as an ecological disaster called the Dust Bowl was driving thousands of already poor farmers from Oklahoma and other states, principally to California. An itinerant self-taught musician named Woody Guthrie joined their journey and wrote songs about the experience. Five of those songs, collected on Guthrie’s

first commercial album, are among the 19 featured in Woody Guthrie’s American Song, the show that alternates with Cabaret this summer at Ferndale Rep. Woody Guthrie collected folk melodies and chronicled the 1930s and ’40s, “from California to the New York island” (as his famous song says). Some of his songs (like “This Land is Your Land”) are so ubiquitous that many listeners today probably don’t know he is their author. Those old enough to remember the folk revival of the ’60s (and the smaller ’90s revival) are likely to recall songs like “Bound for Glory,” “Pastures of Plenty” and “Hard Travelin’” as done by Peter, Paul and Mary, The Kingston Trio, Pete Seeger or by Woody’s son, Arlo Guthrie, or more recently by Bruce Springsteen. Guthrie’s songs do reflect America but not in a generic way, and their relevance recurs in our time. Just as Cabaret may remind us that beyond the repugnant noise of politics truly dangerous forces may be on the march, Guthrie’s lyrics reveal the human costs incurred by the rich exploiting the rest, masked by the smiley face of fake patriotism. That songs like “Union Maid” and “Deportee” (both in this show) are again topical in 2012 should be the real shock. Members of the ensemble performing these songs at Ferndale Rep are Devin Galdieri, Jo Kuzelka, Steve Nobles, Dianne Zuleger, Jeremy Webb, KJ Jusefczyk and Roger Vernon. Pete Zuleger, Val Leone and Larry Hudspeth are the accompanying band. Woody Guthrie’s American Song is directed by Dianne Zuleger, with lighting design and technical direction by Liz Uhazy. It plays Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. on July 20-21, Aug. 3-4 and 17-18, with Sunday matinees on July 22, Aug. 5 and 19.  Elsewhere: The Rangeelay Theatre Ensemble’s IN’ Tents: A Conservation Comedy in the Great Outdoors plays Thursday, July 19, at 8:30 p.m. at the Elk Prairie Campground in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. This is a collaboration by several actors from Dell’Arte, Meghan Frank and Pratik Motwani, who produced the death and dying rumination, Exit 101, and director Janessa Johnsrude, who was in the cast of Mary Jane: The Musical (as was Motwani). Their Chaplin-esque educational comedy details the misadventures of first-time camper Chipotle (Motwani) who is schooled by park ranger Patricia Pinky (Frank) on how to camp out without messing up our natural spaces. After a local run, including a show Friday, July 20, at Jedediah Smith Campground, the show goes national with stagings in Yosemite, Grand Canyon and Rocky Mountain national parks. More details at intents. snappages.com. Coming Up: On July 26, North Coast Repertory Theatre opens the comedy The Red Velvet Cake War. l


Kelsey MacIlvaine as the Emcee and Elena Tessler as Sally Bowles in Ferndale Rep’s Cabaret. photo by Matt Knowles, Aesthetic Design and Photography

Woody’s Cabaret 1930s Berlin and America in alternating Ferndale Rep shows By William S. Kowinski williamkowinski@northcoastjournal.com

F

ledgling American small town writer Cliff Bradshaw (played by Charlie Heinberg) comes to Berlin in 1929, and falls into a relationship with British singer Sally Bowles (Elena Tessler), first seen in the infamous cabaret, the Kit Kat Club, where the androgynous Emcee (Kelsey MacIlvaine) presides over a

carnival of decadence. Meanwhile, Bradshaw’s landlady (played by Rae Robison) is courted by an equally late middle-aged fruit grocer (JM Wilkerson.) Their relationships with each other and several other characters are the principal focus of the first act of the musical Cabaret, as produced at Ferndale Reper-

“The library is inhabited by spirits that come out of the pages at night.” -- Isabel Allende

Used Books

• New Books

Special orders welcome for new books! 402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

tory Theatre. But the realities of a country moving toward Nazi rule intrude in the much shorter Act II. Elena Tessler’s vitality, her strong and supple voice, are again evident, though the role of Sally Bowles is less prominent on stage than in the Liza Minnelli movie. MacIlvaine is energetic and magnetic, Heinberg is winsome, Robison and Wilkerson are charming and convincing. Among the capable supporting cast, Caitlin McMurtry is again incandescent. The band is especially important and especially good. Additional cast members are Jeremy Webb, Jessie Shieman, Linnea Hill, Julia Giardino, Zoey Berman, Dante Gelormino, Qaiel Peltier, Jeffrey Ray Kieser and Jaison Chand. The orchestra is Dianne Zuleger, Justin Ross, Tamaras Abrams, Stephanie Douglass, Michael Lewis, Gina Piazza, Amber Grimes, Monica Dekat and John Petricca. Director Ginger Gene, musical director Dianne Zuleger and choreographer Linda Maxwell have constructed a fluid production, while lighting by Liz Uhazy and costumes by Erica Fromdahl match the moods. The songs are by the team of Fred Ebb and John Kander, who later wrote the songs for Chicago. The sexuality it portrayed was still scandalous when Cabaret became a Broadway sensation in 1966, and there were many who remembered the actual 1930s (in fact, the original cast included Lotte Lenya, famous for singing in Brecht and Kurt Weil productions in Berlin at the time this musical is set). The original production (and the 1972 film) emphasized the grotesque elements of this Berlin with theatrical techniques new to Broadway. But today in Humboldt County, nothing much of the show’s sexuality is unfamiliar, let alone shocking. The textures of those times and that place — even as then known through media filters — are mostly remote, replaced by a few symbols and images. So this show could now be considered a cautionary tale about the peril of ignoring political dangers. Or it could be seen as sentimentalizing a complexly horrible time, while approximating a style that has lost its edge. Or you can see it as both, which is pretty much my view. Cabaret resumes its run at Ferndale Rep Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. July 27-28, and again on Aug. 10-11 and 24-25, with Sunday matinees on July 29, Aug. 12 and 26. In roughly the same period that Cabaret takes place, the Great Depression was taking hold in the U.S. just as an ecological disaster called the Dust Bowl was driving thousands of already poor farmers from Oklahoma and other states, principally to California. An itinerant self-taught musician named Woody Guthrie joined their journey and wrote songs about the experience. Five of those songs, collected on Guthrie’s

first commercial album, are among the 19 featured in Woody Guthrie’s American Song, the show that alternates with Cabaret this summer at Ferndale Rep. Woody Guthrie collected folk melodies and chronicled the 1930s and ’40s, “from California to the New York island” (as his famous song says). Some of his songs (like “This Land is Your Land”) are so ubiquitous that many listeners today probably don’t know he is their author. Those old enough to remember the folk revival of the ’60s (and the smaller ’90s revival) are likely to recall songs like “Bound for Glory,” “Pastures of Plenty” and “Hard Travelin’” as done by Peter, Paul and Mary, The Kingston Trio, Pete Seeger or by Woody’s son, Arlo Guthrie, or more recently by Bruce Springsteen. Guthrie’s songs do reflect America but not in a generic way, and their relevance recurs in our time. Just as Cabaret may remind us that beyond the repugnant noise of politics truly dangerous forces may be on the march, Guthrie’s lyrics reveal the human costs incurred by the rich exploiting the rest, masked by the smiley face of fake patriotism. That songs like “Union Maid” and “Deportee” (both in this show) are again topical in 2012 should be the real shock. Members of the ensemble performing these songs at Ferndale Rep are Devin Galdieri, Jo Kuzelka, Steve Nobles, Dianne Zuleger, Jeremy Webb, KJ Jusefczyk and Roger Vernon. Pete Zuleger, Val Leone and Larry Hudspeth are the accompanying band. Woody Guthrie’s American Song is directed by Dianne Zuleger, with lighting design and technical direction by Liz Uhazy. It plays Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. on July 20-21, Aug. 3-4 and 17-18, with Sunday matinees on July 22, Aug. 5 and 19.  Elsewhere: The Rangeelay Theatre Ensemble’s IN’ Tents: A Conservation Comedy in the Great Outdoors plays Thursday, July 19, at 8:30 p.m. at the Elk Prairie Campground in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. This is a collaboration by several actors from Dell’Arte, Meghan Frank and Pratik Motwani, who produced the death and dying rumination, Exit 101, and director Janessa Johnsrude, who was in the cast of Mary Jane: The Musical (as was Motwani). Their Chaplin-esque educational comedy details the misadventures of first-time camper Chipotle (Motwani) who is schooled by park ranger Patricia Pinky (Frank) on how to camp out without messing up our natural spaces. After a local run, including a show Friday, July 20, at Jedediah Smith Campground, the show goes national with stagings in Yosemite, Grand Canyon and Rocky Mountain national parks. More details at intents. snappages.com. Coming Up: On July 26, North Coast Repertory Theatre opens the comedy The Red Velvet Cake War. l


The Other Place & Luke’s Joint believe that actions speak louder than words. During these economically challenging times, we believe that investing & reinvesting in local markets and businesses is essential to the well-being of the greater economy at large. In theory, if the cells are healthy, the body will follow. Below is a partial list of local farms, wineries and businesses with which The Other Place & Luke’s Joint conduct business. Included is the cumulative dollar total that these restaurants have reinvested, as of July 1, 2012. We genuinely appreciate and give thanks to all of our customers who have enabled us to so generously support the local economy - we couldn’t have done it without you! Advanced Security Systems

$1,664.55

Harper Motors

$1,639.22

New Moon Organics

$380.00

All Under Heaven

$403.66

Henry’s Olives

$205.00

Nonna Lena’s Pesto

$878.00

Allens Commercial Appliance

$9,692.02

Hensel’s Ace Hardware

$11,218.63

North Coast Journal

$5,978.00

Anderson, Robinson, Starkey

$1,121.00

Huckleberry Farm

$16.00

North Coast Mercantile, Inc.

$6,517.20

Arcata Chamber

$460.00

Humboldt Beer Distributors

$7,584.25

Northcoast Espresso

$7,673.90

Arcata Exchange

$252.72

Humboldt DEH

$2,967.00

Northtown Books

$209.46

Arcata Eye

$578.00

Humboldt Hotsauce

$1,614.00

Old Growth Cellars

$3,144.00

Arcata Frame

$460.00

Humboldt Recycling

$109.20

Old Town Antique Lighting

$2,064.00

Arcata Garbage

$10,743.07

Humboldt Sanitation Co.

$729.60

Organic Matters Farm

$1,627.00

Arcata Main Street

$1,845.00

Humboldt State University

$200.00

Outdoor Store

$138.53

Arcata Stationers

$3,125.90

Humboldt Termite & Pest

$2,370.00

Pacific Meat & Provisions

$65,724.88

Bigfoot Propane

$272.19

HSU Football

$450.00

Pacific Seafood

$17,922.27

Bob’s Sign Shop

$90.00

HSU Women’s Rugby

$200.00

Pacini Wines

$3,450.91

Briceland Vineyards

$8,492.00

Humboldt Fence Company

$895.00

Patriot Propane

$984.00

Brio Breadworks

$30,503.91

I&I Farm

$169.50

Pierce Family Farm

$87.00

Bubbles

$25.38

KBAE 95.5

$150.00

Pierson’s Lumber

$120.61

Bug Press, Inc.

$2,237.22

Kinetic Koffee

$14,830.05

Planet Chai

$66.50

Cabot Vineyards

$5,422.66

Little River Farm

$29,520.50

Plaza Design

$671.40

Café Brio

$1,661.52

Loleta Bakery

$10,153.95

Post Haste

$255.18

City Of Arcata

$18,042.23

Los Bagels

$1,929.20

Precision Intermedia

$2,555.00

Coates Vineyards

$432.00

Mac’s Refrigeration

$4,533.83

Ramone’s Bakery

$7,186.46

Cypress Grove Chevre

$11,447.22

Mad River Plumbing

$1,496.39

Ray Wolfe Construction

$2,264.00

Dave Hitchcock

$1,420.00

Maggie May Farms

$165.00

Redwood Curtain

$2,440.00

DeepSeeded Farm

$1,144.85

MapleSerivce, Inc.

$465.00

Redwood Meat

$4,996.71

Elk Prarie Vineyard

$528.00

Mendes Supply Company

$645.40

Shakefork Community Farm

$700.00

Emerald City Laundromat

$756.59

Miller Farms Nursery

$2,359.03

Simply Macintosh

$350.54

Eureka-Humboldt Fire

$931.05

Missaiya’s New World Water

$205.40

Stokes, Rowe & Kaufman

$1,015.00

Evans Mechanical

$288.70

Mission Linen

$11,723.41

Times Standard

$499.00

Fabric Temptations

$264.82

Moonrise Herbs

$1,177.75

Trinidad Electric

$133.01

Fieldbrook Winery

$3,166.00

Moonstone Crossing

$4,806.00

Warren Creek Farms

$1,170.00

Flora Organica

$169.00

Mycality Mushrooms

$3,544.00

Willow Creek Farms

$5,051.80

Garden Gate

$1,238.19

North Coast Co-Op

$24,264.72

Winnett Vineyards

$891.00

Green Fire Farm

$3,902.01

Neukom Family Farm

$508.15

GreenBooks

$18,849.07

GRAND TOTAL:

$431,621.07

6th St. & K St. | 707-633-6124 theotherplacearcata.com

887 H Street | 707-826-0415 lukesjointarcata.com

Wednesday thru Sunday:

Monday thru Sunday:

5 p.m. - 10 p.m.

9 a.m. - 8 p.m.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JULY 19, 2012

23


Folk in the Cyber Age Caitlin Jemma, plus Folklife Free Fest, The Tribal Stomp, Mask-R-Aid and The Intelligence By Bob Doran

Caitlin Jemma

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

I

’ve never met Caitlin Jemma, never heard her play her music live, but I feel like I know her, like we’re somehow connected. Of course this connection is just a digital illusion — she is a young folksinger living and sharing her music in the cyber landscape. I discovered Caitlin, who lives in Arcata and apparently is going to HSU, through her ReverbNation page. We’ve since become “friends” on Facebook; I watched and listened to her heartfelt pitch on Kickstarter asking for $1,000 to finish up an album she was working on. “Some of the songs on the album are about being homesick, others are about being lovesick; some are about traveling and nature, others are about dreams, gardens, cowgirls, berries and romance,” she wrote. “All document my journey into womanhood and as a new musician ready to share my art with you and the rest of the world.” By the time I saw her vid, she’d already raised the money she needed and a little more. At this point you can buy her record Home Means The Hills via Bandcamp, yet another digital platform — “name your price,” or you can just listen to it, which is what I’m doing right now. Her songs are good; she has a way with words, telling tales of magical forests and the like. Her voice is clear as a mountain stream with a bit of backwoods twang hinting at roots in the Appalachians, but as she explains, she actually “grew up in the tiny historic mining town of Virginia City, Nevada.” She draws inspiration from “old country songs,” something you hear in the sweet harmonies that recur on her record. She strums a guitar on some songs, a mandolin on others; I particularly like the banjo tunes. She was looking to borrow one for her album release party Tuesday at Robert Goodman Wines, “just in case Joe WhiskeyWhiskers Deschaine makes a request.” Blue Oaks, Lyndsey Battle and Chris Parreira are among those who will join her that night.

24

Caitlin is not part of the lineup for the big Humboldt Folklife All Day Free Festival Saturday at Dell’Arte, but a bunch of her friends are, including Battle, who plays at 2 p.m., and Parreira, who is in The Trouble, the band closing the show. I imagine I might meet even meet her there; pretty much every folky in NoHum will be there. There are dozens of acts and workshops, too many to mention them all. Some I’m looking forward to: The Dead Strings, who were busking at last year’s fest (11 a.m.), Mo and Morgan, a folky match made in heaven (12:30 p.m.), guitar picker extraordinaire Todd Krider (1:15 p.m.), all on the street stage. On the Rooney Amphitheater stage: Swami Love Child, which is a variation on The Bayou Swamis with a horn section replacing fiddler/ accordionist Randle Lundgren, who is out with a broken arm (1 p.m.); the gospel of Mo’ Betta, with Swami Jeff Landen on guitar and soulful vocals by James Harris, Jeff Thomas and Andy Hannon plus bassist Gary Davidson and Tim Gray on drums (2 p.m.); Colin Vance and Cory Goldman‘s old time tunes (3 p.m.); Baykeepers’ swingin’ house band Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (4 p.m.); the sweet Mendo import The Blushin’ Roulettes (5 p.m.); the Gram Parsons-esque Bakersfield country of Cadillac Ranch (6 p.m.) and of course the above-mentioned closer, The Trouble, who have new songs every time I hear them. In the middle of all that (at 3 p.m.), I’ll head upstairs for another über-cool Beatles sing-a-long led by Joel Sonenshein. Big fun in Blue Lake! You’ll find Caitlin’s friend Joe Deschaine from Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy Troupe at the Jambalaya Friday night, serving as emcee for The Second Annual Mask-R-Aid, a costume party put on by Don Husman II of In Human Creation. The parade of performers includes Madame Delicious, ZZ LaRouge, Hoop Dreamer and Lex (think burlesque), The Janky Mallets drummers, rock by Petromart and dubstep EDM by Cyber Shaman. Proceeds

North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

benefit Odds & Ends, a local creative reuse art project soon to become Scrap Humboldt. Costume contest right before midnight. Friday at Humboldt Brews catch Fox Street All Stars, a bluesy jamband from Colorado whose singer, Jonathan “Skippy” Huvard, sounds like he’s spent some time smoking cigarettes and drinking whiskey back in the hills. Saturday, HumBrews has a twang-jamband fan’s dream double-bill with The David Nelson Band and the semi-related Moonalice. The two bands are on their way to Junction City where they are part of Sunday’s Trinity Tribal Stomp lineup along with Latin rockers LoCura, folksinger Diane Patterson and a few others. Saturday’s Stomp includes Humboldt’s own Absynth Quintet (who are playing tons of festivals this summer), The Victor Wooten Band, Poor Man’s Whiskey, Peter Rowan’s Big Twang Theory, the loveable Shook Twins and Clan Dyken. The Stomp is also the start of Clan Dyken’s Emerald Triangle Bike Music Tour, with the eco-groovy rockers cycling more than 300 miles in two weeks on the way to The Gaia Festival, stopping along the way to play on the Arcata Plaza and at the Blue Lake Music Festival in Perigot Park on July 28. BTW, you are invited to join them: “We’ll be riding with bike music pioneers The Ginger Ninjas and bringing the music all along the way. Let’s just say this is guaranteed to be a blast. Riders of all ability and skill are welcome — you can do this!” Ryan Bisio, born and raised in Arcata, is now a singer/songwriter living in Copenhagen, Denmark. He’s back in town briefly for a Thursday show at the Jambalaya, a CD release party for a new collection of pop/folk tunes he calls Harbor Longing. Indie-folk road warriors Gwyneth and Monko open. Coming to the Shanty Saturday night: The Intelligence, a cool lo-fi combo from L.A. that includes Lars Finberg from Thee Oh Sees, touring behind a new album, Everybody’s Got

it Easy But Me. I particularly like the song “Reading And Writing About Partying.” (I guess I can relate.) Shanty bartender Jon Fisher tells me The Intel has a strong local following and that they’re playing with Technicolor Hearts from Austin, “an art project for lovers, a discourse between friends, an interactive expression of memories, feelings, sadness, happiness and a celebration of life,” according to the band’s Facebook page. Jon also notes, “Radios in Caves is the local opener — Eureka punk/psych or whatever — I’m in that band so I can’t really say anything about it without sounding like a self-promoting creep.” Let’s just say it’s a classic Shanty-style band — and that’s a good thing.    Do tattoos and vinyl go together? They do on Saturday (4-8 p.m.) when Old Growth Tattoo in Eureka offers ink specials while Subatomic Hi-fi DJs Gabe Pressure and Billy Goat spin hip hop, punk, reggae and soul rebel music (just in case you want to tat it up before you go to the Shanty). Tuesday at the Riverwood, catch Igor and The Red Elvises, a band from SoCal led by Russian émigré Igor Yuzov mixing surf music, rockabilly and reggae with trad Russian sounds. Sounds weird but kinda cool. In the mood for something even further out? An incredibly eclectic collection of alt. this and that bands take turns on the stage in the back of the Works on Wednesday, July 25: There’s “femme schizo synth” by Blood Gnome, organic post-EDM by Medicine Baul, crustiness by Wretched Animals and the new “Arcata muscle beach party,” Shores Galore. This “apocalyptic clash of musical genres” comes with a couple of warnings from Blood Gnome, including that it’s “probably” the band’s last show before a temporary hiatus, so, “Get it while you can.” Gnome Natalie Arroyo also notes, “This is an all-ages show, but you should know that every single one of our songs is about sex.” Um, isn’t everything? l

 


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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

25


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

see Hum pg. 24

Visit our NEW Arcata Store

at 10th & H Streets

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 9th St. ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

thur 7/19

fri 7/20

sat 7/21

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

A.M. Beers (punk) Coon Doggin’ Outlaws (punkabilly) 11pm $5

Sci Fi Night ft. Babes, Beaches & Monsters 6pm-10pm All ages Free

Raising Arizona (1987) 8:30pm $5 Rated PG-13

Immediately like us on Facebook. Now.

ARCATA VETERANS HALL BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com

Celebration Sale both locations Buy 2 Hoodies Save $10 Buy 2 shirts Save $5 Buy 2 hats/beanies Save $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Folklife Barn Dance 7:30pm Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

www.barflypub.com

Find us on Facebook

The Roadmasters (country) no cover 9pm

NightHawk (dance/rock) no cover 9pm

Tom Drinnon & Deuces Wild (country) no cover 9pm

The Hot Rods (‘50s rock ‘n’ roll) no cover 9pm

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke 8pm-1am

Bon Swing (Gypsy jazz) 8pm

CAFE MOKKA Arcata 822-2228 C ST. PLAZA Old Town, Eureka

Cheating Daylight (pop) 6-8pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville DELL’ARTE Blue Lake

BossLevelz w/Masta Shredda & Itchie Fingaz no cover 9pm

HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Dr. Squid (dance rock) no cover 9pm

Dr. Squid (dance rock) no cover 9pm

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm Folklife Festival Bluegrass Night 7:30pm

Folklife All Day Free Festival 10am Blues Jam 9 pm

EUREKA INN 497-6093 FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521 HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

montage (rock) 9 pm

The Spindrifters 7pm Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close!

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger Fox Street Allstars (funk rock) 9:30pm $10

Happy Hour All Day! David Nelson Band, Moonalice (jammage) 8pm $25/$20

Ryan Bisio (singer/songwriter) 9pm

In Human Prod.: Mask-R-Raid 9pm $8

Ponche (salsa) 9pm

Summer Hours: until 9pm Monday Thursday, 10pm Friday & Saturday

Brian Post (jazz keyboards) 7-10pm, no cover

SquarPeg with Jill Petricca & Gregg Moore 7-10pm, no cover

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Rob Larkin and Joseph Eid (Americana folk) 6pm

Don’t think of it as work, think of it as fun! Orjazzmic Sextet (funk/jazz) 6pm

The Rezonators (rock and roll) 6pm

Bill and Dave @ Henderson Center Chris Parriera @ McKinleyville

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

The Roadmasters 9am-2pm on the Arcata Plaza

Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

www.humboldtbrews.com

INK ANNEX 47B West 3rd St Eureka JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake NOCTURNUM Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

We got beer.

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600

Located in beautiful Old Town Eureka DJ music (dance music) 10pm

PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy 9pm

DJ MuziqLement (dance music) 10pm

Larry Fries, Tony Nester and Randy Rulin (folk) 7pm

Yolanda Nickell (jazz sax) 7pm

Pizza Night!

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

Check Facebook for updates about live music and other special events

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Get your Growlers filled

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

West African Drum and Dance 5:30-7pm

Congolese Dace with Makaya 5:30-7pm

Learn more at www.redwoodraks.com

Happy hour M-F 4-6pm Jim Lahman Band (blues) 9:30pm-midnight

Kindred Spirits (folk bluegrass) 7-10pm

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Rittz, Never Die, (hip hop) 9pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com Join us in celebrating Fortuna Rodeo Week

The Intelligence, Technicolor Hearts

THE SHANTY Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

Join us in celebrating Fortuna Rodeo Week

Karaoke 7-10pm MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Rude Lion 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Arcata Afro Funk 9pm

Ukesperience (uke-led rock) 9pm

The Grass Band (funk/rock) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

SugaFoot (blues duo) 7:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 9pm

Boss Levelz 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza THE WORKS Eureka

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


WINE SHOP WINE BY THE GLASS ALWAYS AVAILABLE.

LIBATION

BRIAN POST, Keyboards Jazz Fri., July 20, 7-10pm • no cover

SQUARPEG WITH JILL PETRICCA

Get smart and see The Intelligence at The Shanty on Saturday

Sat., July 21, 7-10 pm • no cover

sun 7/22

mon 7/23

tues 7/24

wed 7/25

DJ Anya 11pm $3

Your friend on the Arcata Plaza.

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Princess Bride (1987) 5:30pm $5 Rated PG

Find our website at www.arcatatheatre.com

Check our website for upcoming events!

UPCOMING: Next Sci Fi Night is Wed, August 1! 6pm-10pm All ages Free

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

www.barflypub.com

Free pool in back room.

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm Quiz Night 7pm

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

A Chance to win $1,000,000

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

Wild Wing Wednesday w/ 25¢ wings

A Chance to win $1,000,000 Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

www.bluelakecasino.com

HAPPY HOUR! 6-8PM, MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY Wine Bar & Store: Open Monday through Saturday 8th Street on the Arcata Plaza • 825-7596

Fresh Good Food Dine-In or Take-Out

Open Daily 11 am - 4 pm

On Arts Alive! Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Ba-Dum Chh Comedy 8pm

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long!

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two

Call In Your Order: 822-8433

Not your average “pub grub”

UPCOMING: Soul Night July 28

Cribbage Tournament 6:30pm Terrorist, Replica, etc. (punk) 6pm $7

nights open until 9pm

~Mediterranean & Creole Specialities~ ~Local Wine & Beer~ ~Offering dining choices for ALL appetites~

On E St. between 2nd and 3rd Eureka • 443-4663

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza

Happy Hour 6-8pm Monday - Thursday, $1 off wine by the glass

www.libation.com

Come for the drinks, stay for the clowns!

Book your band 444-1344

Repeat: We got beer.

Hefeweizen on tap

$3 off growler refills

Clay Clinton (Americana from Austin) 6pm

Big Nick Digger (hip hop) 9pm All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Online at humfarm.org

We are a certified wine shipper myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Compost Mtn Boys (bluegrass) 6pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday 9pm

Dale Winget @ Old Town Eureka M.C. Bruce @ Wildberries

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

AA CA$H AA CHECK

www.humboldtbrews.com

4Payday Loans n 4ATM n Open Mon.-Fri. 9-6 • Sat. 10-6

1102 5th St. • 445-9022 (Corner of 5th & L)

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

Sit and sip.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

www.persimmons.net or find us on Facebook

Open 2-10pm Wed-Fri

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Live music 7-10pm

Find us on Facebook.

Happy Hour? Happy Day!

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Jam Session 9pm Tasting Room open Mon-Wed 4-11pm Thu-Fri 4-12, Sat. 12-12, Sun 2-10 Breakdance w/ Rex 5pm

Swing Dance Night! 7:30pm Class, 8:30pm Party, $5 Igor & Red Elvises (rock) 9pm

West African Drum and Dance 5:30-7pm

Congolese Dace with Makaya 5:30-7pm

Michael David (acoustic) 7-10pm

Spoken Word Night 8pm

Caitlin Jemma CD release party w/ Blue Oaks, L. Battle, C. Parreira 7pm

Salsa Night 7pm

End the weekend right Dine early

Check out our Sports Bar

Make Early Reservations for the weekend 407-3550

Full cocktail bar

Blue Lotus Jazz noon-3pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Dogbone (feral jazz) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Secret Password Hint: South of St. Charles Avenue

SugaFoot (trumpet/guitar duo) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

Blood Gnome, Medicine Baul 9pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012

27


HUMBOLDT FOLKLIFE SOCIETY’S FREE FESTIVAL RUNS MORNING UNTIL EVENING IN AND AROUND DELL’ARTE IN BLUE LAKE ON SATURDAY, WITH WORKSHOPS AND MUSIC BY CADILLAC RANCH (SHOWN HERE), THE TROUBLE, THE BLUSHIN’ ROULETTES, KENNY RAY AND THE MIGHTY ROVERS, LYNDSEY BATTLE AND MANY, MANY MORE. FULL SCHEDULE IN LAST WEEK’S JOURNAL OR ONLINE AT WWW.HUMBOLDTFOLKLIFE.ORG. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

19 thursday

FERNDALE REPERTORY THEATRE PRESENTS WOODY GUTHRIE’S AMERICAN SONG, WITH SEVEN SINGERS BACKED BY A LIVE BAND PERFORMING THE WORK OF ONE OF AMERICA’S GREATEST SONGWRITERS, WOODROW WILSON GUTHRIE, BORN JULY 14, 1912. THE SHOW RUNS THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENING AND SUNDAY AFTERNOON, THEN ALTERNATES WEEKENDS WITH FERNDALE REP’S PRODUCTION OF CABARET, CONCLUDING AUG. 19.

MEGHAN FRANK AND PRATIK MOTWANI STAR AS PARK RANGER PATRICIA PINKY AND FIRST-TIME CAMPER CHIPOTLE IN THE RANGEELAY THEATRE ENSEMBLE’S IN’ TENTS: A CONSERVATION COMEDY IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS, PLAYING THURSDAY NIGHT AT THE ELK PRAIRIE CAMPGROUND IN PRAIRIE CREEK REDWOODS STATE PARK.

EVENTS

Fortuna Rodeo Week. 6 p.m. Fortuna Rodeo Grounds, Main Street. Events include Junior Rodeo, Fireman’s Games and a carnival. fortunarodeo.com. 725-3959. Humboldt Plan It Green: Creating a Resilient Future. 7-8:30 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Theme: “Adaptation: Creating a Resilient Future” features leading national and regional experts discussing and developing action plans to address climate change and other issues. Opening day symposium features Plan It Green’s Steve Salzman, special videos and a networking mixer. Tickets online at AdaptationConference.org. 444-2670.

THEATER

Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain, 220 First St., Eureka. Married Broadway actors Jerry and Marnie haven’t worked in years and are desperate to take any acting job that comes their way. Written by Paul Weitz. $10 on Thursdays. redwoodcurtain. com. 443-7688. IN’ Tents: A Conservation Comedy in the Great Outdoors. 8:30 p.m. Elk Prairie Campground, Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway. The Rangeelay Theatre Ensemble with Dell’Artisans Pratik Motwani, Meghan Frank and Janessa Johnsrude present a family-friendly Chaplin-esque educational comedy about the misadventures of a first time camper schooled by a park ranger on how to camp without messing up natural spaces. Also runs July 20 at Jedediah Smith Campground. intents.snappages.com.

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Festival Bluegrass and Beyond Night. 7:30 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Featuring local groups Absynth Quintet, Clean Livin’, No Good Redwood Ramblers and Compost Mountain Boys. $10. 822-5394.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

FOOD

Free Produce Market. Noon-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Income eligible folks are invited to pick out fresh fruits and vegetables, sample recipes using available produce. Sponsored by Food for People. www.foodforpeople. org. 445-3166.

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Bill and Dave. humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farm-fresh produce, music by Chris Parreira. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

MEETINGS

Redwood Region Audubon Society. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Discuss local and bigger-picture conservation issues. 442-9353.

FOR KIDS

Cinderella Story Time. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Free evening program features songs from Humboldt Light Opera Company’s upcoming August production, plus a fractured fairy tale reading. hloc.org. 445-4310.

20 friday EVENTS

Humboldt Plan It Green. 8:30 a.m. HSU. Full day of events including breakout workshops and presentations, speakers Bill McKibben and Richard Heinberg. Tickets online at AdaptationConference.org. 444-2670. McKinleyville Arts Night. 6-8 p.m. Various locations throughout McKinleyville. Celebration of local artists and their works.

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

834-6460. Fortuna Rodeo. 6 p.m. Fortuna Rodeo Grounds and Rohner Park. Junior Rodeo, Jackpot Roping, Kidnapped Tourists, carnival and Motorsports Night at 6 p.m. featuring Quadiators. fortunarodeo.com. 725-3959. Mustache Party. 7 p.m. The Wine Spot, Eureka. Wear your best mustache and join Advocates for Choice for wine, music and good company. Contest for best mustache. Proceeds benefit Six Rivers Planned Parenthood. srpp.org. 442-2961.

THEATER

Woody Guthrie’s American Song. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St., Ferndale. Seven singers backed by a live band in a celebration of America telling the life of the rambling folksinger through his words and music as he travels from the Dust Bowl to California to the New York island. $18, $16 seniors, students and military. 800-838-3006. Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See July 19 listing.

DANCE

Humboldt Folklife Festival Barn Dance. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J St. Music by Striped Pig Stringband with caller Gabe Strand. 822-5394. World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Albans Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Join the Humboldt Folk Dancers for a dance lesson and request dancing. All levels of dance experience welcome. $3. humboldtfolkdancers.org. 822-8045

MUSIC

Lisa Baney Trio. 7 p.m. Sewell Gallery of Fine Art, 423 F. Street, Eureka. Jazz trio performs with special guests Stephen Smith

and Geoff Daugherty. $8. 269-0617. Third Friday Jazz. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Featuring music by tenor sax master Francis Vanek with pianist Darius Brotman. $10. 677-9493. Mask-R-Aid. 9:30 p.m. Jambalaya, 915 H St., Arcata. Costumed benefit show for local artists featuring burlesque performances, music by The Janky Mallets and hosted by Joe Deschaine. Prizes for best costumes. $8/$5 in costume. 822-4766. Late Night Dancehall Dome. 10 p.m. Cooks Valley Campground, Piercy. Just down the road from Reggae on the River. Music by Lutan Fyah, Cocoa Tea, Norris Man, Lion Camp and others. $50. www.awakenation.com. 616-4123.

FOOD

Garberville Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Town Square, Locust and Church streets. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

MOVIES

Raising Arizona. 8:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A comedy beyond belief. $5. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

SPORTS

Humboldt Crabs vs. Walnut Creek Crawdads. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Take yourself out to the ballgame, HumCo! $8/$6 students and seniors/$4 kids 12 and under. humboldtcrabs.com. 826-2333.

LECTURE

Celebrating Life in Humboldt: Eureka. 7 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Local author/historian Jerry Rohde continues his series of regional history talks. This week: Eureka. 441-2700.


Garberville’s Organic Café Where Locals Eat

OPEN DAILY

Mon-Fri 8-2 • Sat-Sun 8-1

Outdoor Patio • Easy Parking

The last Reggae on the River at Benbow

911 Redwood Dr., Garberville

923-3191

TOOTS HIBBERT AT REGGAE ON THE RIVER 2005 PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

Another year, another Reggae on the River: Saturday and Sunday at Benbow Lake State Recreation Area south of Garberville the Mateel Community Center will host its 28th annual reggae and world music festival. This one’s another step in what the Mateel folks are calling “the continuing evolution of MCC’s grassroots reclamation of the great Reggae On The River tradition,” biding farewell to Benbow “as the event gears up for a big return home to its original French’s Camp venue in 2013.” Explaining how this year fits into the twists and turns in the history and future of Reggae on the River is, as they say on Facebook, “complicated.” Going home to French’s will be complicated, too. We’ll get to that in a minute. First let’s take a quick look at the music lineup for this weekend. Headliner Frederick “Toots“ Hibbert and The Maytals closes Saturday night’s show with a set starting at 8:30 p.m. on the Main Stage. The soulful Toots, who has a music career stretching back 50 years, is arguably the man who gave reggae its name with his song “Do the Reggay.” Added bonus, his son, Junior Toots, plays earlier that day (4:25 p.m.) on the River Stage. Closing Sunday’s show is Midnite, led by the Benjamin brothers, Vaughn and Ron, the top band in the St. Croix/Virgin Island reggae movement. Other islanders at the fest include St. Croix songstress Lady Passion (4:50 Sunday) and Bambú Station with Reemah playing Saturday (6:55). While Midnite is on the Main Stage Sunday, Jamaican dancehall queen Lady Saw closes out the River Stage. Known as a female pioneer in slackness, she has apparently left her nasty ways behind for conscious music. What would RotR be without a Marley? Young Daniel Bambaata Marley, son of Ziggy, grandson of Bob, plays Sunday (7:05 p.m.). Other progeny: Nkulee Dube, daughter of the late great South African reggae icon Lucky Dube, plays Saturday (3:55). Speaking of Bob and The Wailers, a band of Jamaican all-stars led by bassist Fully Fullwood offers a tribute, Tosh Meets Marley, Saturday (2:35) with Tony Chin and Vince Black on guitars. Taking things international: the awesome Zimbabwean guitarist Oliver “Tuku” Mtukudzi and Black Spirits Sunday (3:30); five-time Calypso Queen from Tobago Calypso Rose backed by Yellow Wall Dub Squad Sunday (1:50); Argentinean reggae/dancehall/hip-hop star Alika Saturday (1:30); and Londonborn reggae/ska vet Pato Banton (who now lives in Cali) Sunday (5:10). Representing Humboldt reggae, two bands open the show (at 11 a.m.) on the River Stage: Saturday it’s Synrgy (who left us for Ashland); Sunday, JUCE, who add touches of hip hop and dub to the mix. And that’s just a few of the 30-plus acts playing. You may notice that the closers start fairly early — there’s a 10 p.m. curfew at the park. Those who want to party into the wee hours have Awake Nation’s Cooks Valley Late Night Dancehall Dome down the road. This separate party at Keith Bowman’s Cooks Valley Campground (with separate admission) starts Friday at noon and promises music all night ranging from harder dancehall to

dub and dubstep. Among the performers: Cocoa Tea and Lutan Fyah backed by The Caution Band, Norris Man, Rocker-T and Humboldt’s Lion Camp crew with Jah Sun, Ishi Dube, Stevie Culture, etc. plus DJs galore with Bass Craft providing the bottom-heavy sound system. A shuttle will take you from one show to the other, but the Mateel is not involved. “They’re kind of riding our coattails,” said Doug Green, president of the Mateel board. It’s not clear what role Cooks Valley may play next year when, if all goes according to plan, RotR moves back upriver to French’s Camp near Cooks. Green is working hard on getting the required permits to return to French’s in part because Benbow is less than ideal. He says he doesn’t exactly want to “go back to the good old days,” but there are things people miss. The older model, he says, “is about creating community. … People want to camp together and have that experience — and we’d like to go later than 10 o’clock.” Green also notes there is “insecurity about whether the park will stay open” caused by trouble in the state park system. Green actually put of a couple of rock concerts at French’s in 1980 and ’82 and had started developing the property into a venue before the first Reggae on the River was held as a fundraiser to rebuild the Mateel Hall after a fire. The festival grew and grew over a couple of decades, then blew up a few years ago after expanding across the river to Dimmick Ranch, the property next door to Cooks Valley. What became known as the “Reggae War” followed with a divided SoHum community taking sides and an alternate fest, “Reggae Rising,” rising and falling amid a brutal, expensive legal battle that left Dimmick Ranch owner Tom Dimmick deep in debt. After Dimmick defaulted on a $1 million loan with Redwood Capital Bank, it looked like the ranch would be auctioned off to the highest bidder. Green and Mateel GM Justin Crellin showed up for the auction. “I was interested in who might be interested in buying it,” said Green. But the auction didn’t happen: At the last minute, Dimmick staved off foreclosure by filing for bankruptcy. Working with a new owner on arranging an easement to get into French’s would make it easier to get a crowd into the festival. However, “We have no arrangement and there’s none possible because the property is in foreclosure,” said Green, admitting that he knows little about the legal issues involved. He’s still uncertain how everything will work next year, how attendees will enter the property for example, but he’s feeling positive after meeting with some of the government agencies involved. Another complication comes with the stated desire to return Reggae on the River to the first weekend in August. The Gaia Festival on Black Oak Ranch took over those dates when Reggae Rising fell. Will the two festivals go headto-head? Green said he’s hoping to discuss the timing with Gaia’s organizers, but again, how it will work out remains uncertain. What is certain is that the Mateel folks have a reggae festival to run this weekend, and it should be a good one. — Bob Doran continued on next page

NEW & USED

www.wildwood.ws

SoHum’s One Drop Fest Moves Forward

Folk Instruments Books & Accessories

Friday, July 20 7:00pm

Three

Musicians

One Unforgettable Night of Jazz Lisa

Baney

Geoffrey

Daugherty Stephen

Smith

$8 door

423 F Street, Eureka • 269-0617

s e w e l l g a l l e r y. c om

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012

29


continued from previous page

21 saturday EVENTS

Fortuna Rodeo. 7 a.m. Fortuna Rodeo Grounds, Main Street. Includes pancake breakfast at 7 a.m., carnival and parade at noon, Rodeo at 2 p.m., Cowboy Mixer BBQ and dance featuring Rupert Duncan at night. fortunarodeo.com. 725-3959. Humboldt Plan It Green Trade Show/Expo. 9 a.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. All day event features Wheels of Change Auto Mall and includes exhibitors and vendors with information, goods and services related to the development of a sustainable and resilient future. AdaptationConference.org. 444-2670. North Coast Scottish Society Ceilidh. 1:30 p.m. Sequoia Park, Eureka. Celtic acoustic jam session and potluck picnic. Bring your favorite dish to share, your own table service, utensils, lawn chairs and non-alcoholic drink. 407-5409, willas_hands@ yahoo.com.

THEATER

Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See July 19 listing. Woody Guthrie’s American Song. 8 p.m. Ferndale Rep. See July 20 listing.

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Festival All Day Free Festival. 10 a.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Too much music! Two stages of music, workshops, food and kids events. Music by The Trouble, Cadillac Ranch, Blushin’ Roulettes, Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers, Bret Harte Breakers, Lyndsey Battle and many more. www.humboldtfolklife.org. 822-5394. Reggae on the River 2012. 11 a.m. Benbow Lake SRA, 1600 Hwy 101. Annual two-day reggae festival fundraiser of the Mateel Community Center. Saturday features Toots and the Maytals, Romain Virgo, Duane Stephenson, Nkulee Dube, Tosh Meets Marley, Alika, Synrgy and more. $60/$110 both days. reggaeontheriver.com. 923-3368. Late Night Dancehall Dome. 10 p.m. Cooks Valley Campground. See July 20 listing. Trinity Tribal Stomp. Noon. Junction City Park, Junction City, Hwy. 299. Campout festival with music by Victor Wooten Band, Poor Mans Whiskey. Peter Rowan, Clan Dyken, Absynth

Humboldt Crabs Baseball

2012 Season

WEEKLY SCHEDULE Fri & Sat, July 20 & 21

Walnut Creek Crawdads 7 PM

Sunday, July 22

Walnut Creek Crawdads 12:30 PM

Wednesday, July 25

Redding Colt 45’s Double Header 5:30 PM

ART

PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

Ferndale Arts Night . 6-9 p.m. Main St., Ferndale. Art and music all over town.

OUTDOORS

Sandy Intertidal Exploration. 8-10 a.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Biologist John Demartini leads walk exploring sandy low tide intertidal zone with mole crabs, beach hoppers and bivalves. 444-1397. Liscom Slough Work Day. 8 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Meet where Jackson Ranch Road meets the slough. Call for details. 444-1397. Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at parking lot at end of South I Street. Ralph Bucher leads rain or shine. Bring binoculars for birding. 442-9353. Baykeeper’s Natural History Bay Tour. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Baykeeper, 217 E St., Eureka. Baykeeper volunteers share expertise and enthusiasm for Humboldt Bay in free hour-long tour. www. humboldtbaykeeper.org. 268-8897. Salt Marsh Restoration. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet at first parking lot in from Samoa Boulevard on South I Street. Invasive plant removal. Attendees receive a pair of work gloves, a Together Green tote bag and other swag. Gourmet pizza lunch. 442-5444. Hilfiker Lane Waterfront Enhancement. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Eureka. Meet in new parking lot at end of Hilfiker Lane off 101 in Eureka. Volunteers enhance Eureka waterfront by building a trail and cleaning up the area. Jacob.Salimbene@CCC.CA.GOV. 441-3509. Manila Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive, Arcata. Volunteers needed to help restore coastal dunes. Gloves, tools and cookies provided. Wear closed-toed shoes and bring drinking water. info@friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Open Gardens. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Gardens, College of the Redwoods, Eureka. Roam the 44-acre fully fenced property. $5. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 1-3 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Milt Boyd leads 90-minute marsh ecology walk. 826-2359. King Peak Astronomy Hike. 5 p.m. King Range National Conservation Area, 768 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. Route gains 1,900 feet over 2.6 miles. Part of BLM and Lost Coast Interpretive Assoc. summer hikes series. blm.gov/ca/arcata/kingrange. 986-5415.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by The Roadmasters. humfarm.org. 822-5951.

SPORTS

Humboldt Crabs vs. Walnut Creek Crawdads. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark. See July 20 listing.

BOOKS

Katherine Longshore. 4 p.m. The Booklegger, 402 Second St., Eureka. Humboldt author reads and signs copies of her first young adult novel Gilt, a tale of friendship and betrayal set in the court of Henry VIII. 445-1344.

FOR KIDS

Cinderella’s Slippers. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Materials provided for afternoon of shoe decorating and design. Adorned shoes featured in HLOC production of Cinderella. janine@humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

ETC. www.humboldtcrabs.com

Crabs Ballpark 9th & F Arcata

SOLAR-POWERED VEHICLE AT LAST YEAR'S PLAN IT GREEN CONFERENCE

Quintet, Shook Twins and more. $50 per day, $90 both days. (530) 623-3856, www.trinitytribalstomp.org.

Lost Coast Kennel Club Agility Trial. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Watch dogs climb, jump and weave through obstacles. www.redwoodmatrix. net/lckc/lckc.htm. 672-2995.

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

Greener “Humboldt” and “green” are as synonymous as “Canada” and “white.” Our forests are lush and glorious, we famously elected the first majority Green Party city council (in Arcata) and, uh, there was another stereotype … well, it’ll come to me. Oh, maybe this was it: We dig on our environment! Need tangible, event-form proof? Try the Plan It Green Conference/Expo, back for a sixth year of workshops and presentations on how communities can deal with the spectres of global climate change, diminishing natural resources and economic instability. The theme of this year’s conference, which runs Thursday, July 19, through Saturday, July 21, is “Adaptation: Creating a Resilient Future.” “The new operating word we’re using is resilience,” says event organizer Larry Goldberg. The conference is a networking event as much as it is an information event, Goldberg says. And each year the network of attendees grows, he says, with more than 1,000 showing for last year’s conference. This year, he expects more people from our region, including from Willits, Ukiah and Clear Lake. In addition to learning new stuff, each conferencegoer will receive a snazzy digital community resilience toolkit on a 2GB USB drive (which you can totally later use to store vacation photos! Score!) The greenness kicks off Thursday night at 7 p.m. in HSU’s Kate Buchanan Room with an introduction by Plan It Green’s Steve Salzman. Following that: a presentation, “Resiliency and an Uncertain Future,” by HSU instructor Kathleen Lee, video presentations

22 sunday EVENTS

Fortuna Rodeo. 11 a.m. Fortuna Rodeo Grounds, Main Street. Sunday’s events include Rodeo, motocross performance by Julian Dusseau, carnival and barbecue. $7/$3 kids under 12. fortunarodeo. com. 725-3959.

THEATER

Show People. 2 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See July 19 listing. Woody Guthrie’s American Song. Noon. Ferndale Rep. See July 20 listing.

MUSIC

Reggae on the River 2012. 11 a.m. Benbow Lake SRA, 1600 Hwy 101. Two-day reggae festival fundraiser for Mateel Community Center. Sunday features Midnite, Lady Saw, Fantan Mojah, Juce,

and, finally, a good ol’ drink and snack hobnob session. But don’t get too toasty with the green team Thursday. Friday is jampacked and starts bright and early at 8 a.m. in the KBR with a thanks-for-comin’ from Goldberg and HSU President Rollin Richmond, followed by a totally carbon footprint-reducing webcast with educator and environmentalist Bill McKibben (that’s practicin’ what you preach). Then it’s off to the races with a load of breakout sessions in various HSU locations from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Highlights include presentations on transportation networks, food security, “transition towns” (communities proactively seeking ways to green up), Humboldt Bay studies and how to help greenify local business practices. After the 5 p.m. social hour, keynote speaker, Richard Heinberg, journalist and senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute, takes over. Saturday, proceedings move to the Arcata Community Center for the free, free, free Building Green Communities Tradeshow/Expo, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., in which dozens of businesses and organizations flex their green. Don’t miss the Wheels of Change Vehicle Show featuring groovy alternative-fuel, hybrid and electric vehicles. Oh, there’s a solar pizza oven, too. Blam. So step up, HumCo, and get yer green on. Tickets for Friday’s green scene are available online at adaptationconference.org, at Wildberries and/or at the event (but Larry recommends getting ’em in advance unless you love registration lines). — Andrew Goff

Pato Banton, Winstrong and Yami Bolo. $60/$110 both days. reggaeontheriver.com. 923-3368. Late Night Dancehall Dome. 10 p.m. Cooks Valley Campground. See July 20 listing. Trinity Tribal Stomp. 10 a.m. Junction City Park, Junction City, Hwy. 299. Music by David Nelson Band, LoCura, Moonalice, Diane Patterson and more. (530) 623-3856, www.trinitytribalstomp.org.

ART

Trinidad Artists’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Next to Murphy’s Market, Trinidad. Art and crafts from local artisans, music by JD Jeffries and delicious barbecue. 834-8720. Art Talk Sunday. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Museum tour with trained docents guiding you through the museum’s history, permanent collection, and current exhibitions. $2. humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.


FOOD

Trinidad Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Murphy’s Market, Trinidad. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Willow Creek Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Behind 76 Gas Station. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

MOVIES

The Princess Bride. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Scaling the Cliffs of Insanity, battling Rodents of Unusual Size, facing torture in the Pit of Despair … true love has never been a snap. $5. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

OUTDOORS

Baykeeper’s Natural History Tour. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Baykeeper. See July 21 listing. Madaket Brunch Cruise. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Circumnavigate Indian Island and enjoy a buffet style brunch. RSVP. $32.50/$28.50 students and seniors/$22.50 kids. humboldtbaymaritimemuseum. com. 445-1910.

FOOD

Peaceable Kingdom: The Journey Home. 1 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. Humboldt Vegetarian Society vegan potluck and film screening. Bring one or two dishes to share. humboldtVeg.blogspot.com. 633-6340.

once a week to network. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Senior Get Together. 1-3 p.m. Ramone’s Old Town, 209 E St., Eureka. Single seniors meet for coffee, pastries and good conversation. 442-2990. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Non-denominational prayer group. dlbitte@hotmail.com. 834-5800.

25 wednesday SPORTS

SPORTS

Humboldt Crabs vs. Redding Colt .45s. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Doubleheader! Take yourself out to the ballgame, HumCo! $8/$6 students and seniors/$4 kids 12 and under. humboldtcrabs.com. 826-2333.

ETC.

Cinderella Story Time. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, Eureka. See July 19 listing.

Humboldt Crabs vs. Walnut Creek Crawdads. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ballpark. See July 20 listing.

FOR KIDS

Lost Coast Kennel Club Agility Trials. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds. See July 21 listing. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242.

ETC.

23 monday

Eureka Mindfulness Group. 7:15 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Led by Cindee Grace. Topic: “Befriending The Body, Even If…” Fragrance free, please. $3/$6 free will donation. 269-7044.

26 thursday

DANCE

THEATER

ETC.

ART

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing with live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323. Swing Dance Night. 7:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Swing what your mama gave you! $5. 616-6876.

The Red Velvet Cake War, 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. NCRT continues its 28th season with the comedy by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and Jamie Wooten. Opening night gala. $15. ncrt.net. 442-6278. Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See July 19 listing.

Lost Coast Kennel Club Agility Trial. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds. See July 21 listing.

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See July 19 listing.

24 tuesday MOVIES

Based on the Book Film Series: The Seven Year Itch. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Screening of 1955 Billy Wilder-directed film starring Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell. Hosted by Bob Doran. humlib.org. 269-1962.

FOOD

Wildberries Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Fresh fruit, vegetables and plants from local growers. Music by M.C. Bruce. 441-9999. Old Town Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, F Street between First and Third streets. Fresh farm-grown produce. Music by Dale Winget. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371. Miranda Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. In front of the Avenue Café. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. In front of Mario’s Marina. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 5th St, Eureka. Group of local business people who get together

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Music by The Soulful Sidekicks. See July 19 listing. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. Music by Tofu. See July 19 listing.

Heads Up…

Do You Have Courage? Auditions are being held for the annual Medieval Festival of Courage for the roles of Joan of Arc, St. Gobnait, protector of bees and various fairies and jesters. Bring your monologue to Coastal Grove Charter School on Thursday, July 19, at 7 p.m. or Saturday, July 21, at 4 p.m. For more info, check out medievalfestivalofcourage.org. Web Series Casting Call. A Local independent film team is planning an upcoming web mini-series called Making It and is looking for men and women with improvisation skills between the ages of 20 and 35. The films may contain language or comedic sexual content. For more info, email writerbabie@ gmail.com. Sell it at the Grange! The Humboldt Grange #501 is looking for vendors for their upcoming sales event on Saturday, Aug. 4, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. — specifically, local businesses and entrepreneurs. For more information contact Jill at 442-6437 or look for our grange events on Facebook. ●

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012

31


ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT

Got It Down Cold If you like the Ice Age movies, well here’s another one By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT. You might as well take the kids to see the fourth installment of the Ice Age series because they’re not going to stop making them. And why should they? These folks have the family movie thing down cold. The films look great, they have some heart, they’re witty and they’re fun for both parents and kids. And thankfully they’re not three hours long. Is anybody else secretly glad the Harry Potter movies are over? The herd is assembled again, led by Ray Romano as the put-upon mammoth father, Manny. Romano has turned an extinct hairy elephant into an everyman with whose frustrations parents can

July 19 Aug. 1 Thurs July 19 - Sci Fi Night ft. Babes, Beaches & Monsters 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages Free Fri July 20 - Raising Arizona (1987) Doors at 8:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG-13 Sun July 22 - The Princess Bride (1987) Doors at 5:30 $5 Rated PG Wed Aug 1 - Sci Fi Night ft. Moon Monsters 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages Free

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

32 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

identify. He’s also a member of another rare species: an admirable cartoon dad. As Diego the saber-tooth and Sid the sloth, Dennis Leary and John Leguizamo have a solid odd-couple shtick. (One wonders, though, how Leguizamo can keep his drooly lisp going for a whole film.) At the end of the day, these are all funny people, and they seem to be having a pretty good time inhabiting their cartoon characters. In previous episodes, the herd has been visited by the drama of human hunters, geothermal change, impending extinction, historically out-of-place dinosaurs and new parenthood. Now, Manny and his mate Ellie (Queen Latifah) are beset by the teen drama of their daughter Peaches (Keke Palmer). This on top of the shifting land masses and iceberg pirates. Some of the themes are a bit pat — be yourself; kids have to grow up sometime — but they aren’t pushed too hard. Unfortunately, the teen subplot doesn’t yield much in the way of comedy compared to the slapstick and ribbing in the earlier movies. Mostly the film moves from one action sequence to another, with plenty of the franchise’s signature slides, jumps and falls. Kids will especially enjoy the prehistoric hamsters who have a Braveheart moment. There are a number of new cast members, too. The hilarious Wanda Sykes hollers and gripes along as Sid’s long-lost grandmother. Peter Dinklage, who’s always both funny and intense, has

a ball as Captain Gutt, the primate pirate who snarls, rages and bursts into song. Who knew? Jennifer Lopez, on the other hand, slinks onscreen as more or less herself: a sexy saber-toothed white tiger in fabulous hoop earrings. The rest of the inter-species pirate crew is good for a few laughs, too. At the end of the day, Scrat the squirrel’s single-minded acorn lust is still the highlight. He’s a bug-eyed portrait of compulsion and desire. His schemes and sufferings — the falls! the flattenings! the bends! — are worth the price of admission. PG. 94m. —Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Previews

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES. The most anticipated blockbuster of the summer, this third and reportedly final film in Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy picks up where the last one left off: with Batman (Christian Bale) a fugitive, blamed for the death of Gotham’s beloved district attorney. Now, a terrorist leader named Bane (Tom Hardy) lures the caped crusader from the shadows. Nolan has already raised the bar for superhero movies by painting Batman/Bruce Wayne as a tormented soul, someone motivated as much by anger, guilt and fear as by a quest for justice. And he’s used that character to explore such weighty themes as post-9/11 justice, American corruption and the futility of revenge — with plenty of explosions and chase scenes, of course. And this time, Anne Hathaway as Catwoman! Meow. PG13. 164m. SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED. Three hipster-cynic magazine employees find a classified ad that reads, “Wanted: Someone to go back in time with me. This is not a joke. You get paid after we get back. Must bring your own weapons.” They track down the author, a credulous supermarket clerk who leads them into quirky comedy territory. Starring Aubrey Plaza (Parks and Recreation) and Mark Duplass. R. 86m. The Arcata Theatre Lounge has a grab-bag of cheesiness for this week’s Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night, offering “babes, beaches, monsters and Tommy Kirk.” Thursday night’s camp thrills start at 6 p.m. with It’s Alive (1969), a rubbermonster movie starring Kirk, who as a kid starred in such family fare as Old Yeller and The Hardy Boys. That will be followed by Catalina Caper (1967), a beach party mystery that also stars Kirk and features Little Richard singing “Scuba Party.” Friday night at 9, the ATL will show one of the greatest comedies of all time, the Coen


Movie Times brothers’ 1987 classic Raising Arizona, starring Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter as a pair of loony hillbilly baby-nappers. PG13. 94m. The hilarity continues Sunday at 6 p.m. with another classic from the same year, Rob Reiner’s eminently quotable, tongue-in-cheek fairytale comedy The Princess Bride. PG. 98m.

Continuing

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER. Little-known historical fact: Honest Abe had ninja-like skills with an ax, and he used ‘em to chop down bloodsuckers. And by “fact” we mean “bullshit.” R. 105m. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. It’s only been five years since the last Tobey Maguire/Sam Raimi installment, but director Mark Webb manages to give Spidey new dimension in this satisfying, if extraneous, reboot. PG13. 136m. BRAVE. Pixar’s stunning animation doesn’t disappoint, even if this tale of a precocious Scottish princess lacks the studio’s usual depth. PG. 93m. FOR GREATER GLORY. Andy Garcia stars in this historical chronicle of the Cristeros War (1926-1929), a popular uprising against an anti-Catholic Mexican government. R. 145m. MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED. Top-notch voice talent and clever sight gags distinguish the continuing slapstick adventures of goofy zoo fugitives. PG. 85m. MAGIC MIKE. Channing Tatum stars as a male stripper/aspiring entrepreneur in director Steven Soderbergh’s lively — and surprisingly gritty — drama. R. 110m. MOONRISE KINGDOM. Wes Anderson’s trademarks abound — dollhousestyle set design, slow-mo walking shots, copious homages to the 1960s, etc. — but they never overwhelm the sweetness in this bittersweet chronicle of first love. PG13. 94m. SAVAGES. Oliver Stone brings his ham-fisted self-seriousness to this tale of ambitious weed dealers who get mixed up with a Mexican cartel and John Travolta’s crooked CIA agent. R. 130m. TED. This feature film debut from Family Guy creator Seth McFarlane, about a pothead Bostonian (Mark Wahlberg) and his sentient teddy bear, is crass, uproarious and surprisingly touching. R. 106m. TO ROME WITH LOVE. Woody Allen’s latest is a mess, a hodgepodge of pretty characters in a pretty European city and not much more. R. 112m. —Ryan Burns

* = SAT./SUN. EARLY SHOWS

GLASS FUSING WITH TRACE GALBRAITH. Mon.s & Wed.s, 10:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Class #2 July 16, 18, 23, & 25. Class #3 Aug 13, 15, 20, & 22. Tues. & Thurs., 5-8 p.m. Class # 5, July 17, 19, 24, & 26. Class #6, Aug. 14, 16, 21, & 23. Explore the elements of design and the principles of composition as you create exciting works of art with glass. $120 + materials fee: $60. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, more info at fireartsarcata.com (AC-0719)

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 7/20 - 7/26 unless otherwise noted. THE DARK KNIGHT RISES

12:10, 12:50, 1:40, 3:50, 4:35, 5:20, 7:30, 8:15, 9:00 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3D 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 2D 11:55, 2:25, 5:00, 7:40 FOR GREATER GLORY 2:40, 8:25 SAVAGES 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:25 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D 3:00, 9:20 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2D 11:50, 6:10 TED 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 MAGIC MIKE 1:05, 3:45, 6:30, 9:10 BRAVE 2D 12:05, 2:35, 5:10, 7:50 MADAGASCAR 3 2D 12:15, 5:55 TO ROME WITH LOVE 12:35, 3:10, 5:40, 8:05

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 7/20 - 7/26 unless otherwise noted. 12:35, 1:40, 4:20, 5:20, 8:05, 9:00 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3D 1:00, 6:00 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 2D 3:30, 8:30 SAVAGES 12:15, 3:20, 6:30, 9:30 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D 3:05, 9:15 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2D 12:00, 6:10 TED 1:30, 4:10, 6:45, 9:25 MAGIC MIKE 12:50, 3:40, 6:20, 9:10 BRAVE 2D 12:20, 2;50, 5:40, 8:15 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 7/20 - 7/26 unless otherwise noted.

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES

SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED MOONRISE KINGDOM

*1:30, 5:10, 8:45 2:45, 4:55, 7:10, 9:20 2:00, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00

Fortuna Theater

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! • Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

CERAMIC GLAZE DESIGN & APPLICATION TECHNIQUES. With Otamay Hushing. Tues., 10 a.m.-Noon, July 31-Aug. 14. Explore a variety of decoration and design techniques using the Fire Arts glaze palette. Students will be required to have bisque ware ready for this course including horizontal and vertical surfaces, an incised piece, and shallow bowls. $55. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, more info at fireartsarcata.com (AC-0719) CREATING TUMBLERS & MUGS. Ongoing, weekly the first and third Mon., 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Create whimsical ceramic mugs for our fundraising events. All ages welcome. Attend 3 workshops and receive a final product free. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. 707-826-1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-0621) THE NATURAL FIBER FAIR. Is now accepting applications for Vendors selling fibers, supplies, tools, finished products. Sept. 8-9, Arcata Community Center. (707) 223-1638, http://naturalfiberfair.com. (AC-0726)

Beach Volleyball Tournament

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 7/20 -7/26 unless otherwise noted. THE DARK KNIGHT RISES *12:00, 1:15, 3:45, 5:00, 7:30, 9:00 TED 7:10, 9:35 BRAVE *12:00, 2:20, 4:40 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D 5:15, 8:30 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2D 12:20, 3:30, 6:40, 9:40 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3D *12:40, 3:00 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 2D *12:10, 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER

7/20- 7/26: 7:30 EXCEPT 7/25: 6:30

NEW CERAMIC WORKSHOP WITH BOB RAYMOND. # 2 Drinking vessels. Aug. 3 & Aug. 10, Fri.s, 9:30 am12:30 p.m. Want that lid to fit? Want to pour from a spout without a dribble? Here’s your chance to refine your skills and get it right. Students have studio access one week prior and two weeks after each workshop. $85 each. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, more info at fireartsarcata. com. (AC-0719) SCREEN PRINTING STUDIO WITH MARI. $40, Mon.s, 6-8 p.m. 2/6 persons max. Learn basics of screen printing, or come work on your own projects. Studio will be set up ready to use. Screens and inks available. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0726) HAND DYED SILK SCARVES. With April Sproule, $45. Sat., July 21, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Three hour workshop, learn the basics of fabric dyeing along with some quick and easy techniques for creating beautiful one-ofa-kind silk scarves. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0719)

Communication

I AM… SAFE ZONE LGBT ALLY DEVELOPMENT TRAINING. Aug. 3. 8:30 a.m-4 p.m, Red Lion, Eureka $75 register at www.iamsafezone.com. Want to better serve your LGBT clients and community? Join local resident and nationally recognized trainer, Jessica Pettitt, for this local training to learn about Heterosexual, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender stereotypes, power and privilege dynamics, and how your own life can make you the best ally ever! Reduce stigma, misunderstanding, and isolation and increase collaboration, advocacy, and empowerment. CEUs are available. Sliding scale scholarships available. Got ?’s jess@iamsocialjustice.com or (917) 543-0966. (CMM-0802) continued on next page

Stay up to date, all summer long, with activities for kids with our May 17th, 2012

edition, or online at northcoastjournal.com

Moonstone Beach 3 Courts!

July 21 & 22 Individuals welcome $5 entry fee

Saturday - 9 am Men’s Doubles 2pm Women’s Doubles Sunday - 10 am Co-ed Doubles Contact Zander Kurnizki at (530) 228-0850 For information or to register

Sanctioned by Northcoast Beach Volleyball Association

31

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012 northcoastjournal.com Thursday, JULY North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, July 19, 19, 2012 2012 • • NORTH northcoastjournal.com

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continued from previous page LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. Practical tips and strategies for finding financial freedom. Sun., July 22, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@hotmail.com. (CMM-0719)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

DANCE TANGO! Mid-Summer Milonga July 21, 8-11 p.m., $7, Studio of Dance Arts, Eureka. Humboldtango. org. NO SUMMER CLASSES. (DMT-0719) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Latin Technique, Arm Styling, ‘Bolero & more. Series of 4, Tues. evenings 7-9 p.m., starting July 10, North Coast Dance, Eureka, $18/workshop if you mention this ad. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT-0726) TRILLIUM DANCE STUDIOS SUMMER DANCE CAMP Dance class with Erin Fernandez, Julie Ryman and guest instructors. All levels of Ballet, Modern, Jazz, Latin Dance and more! Ages 4-Adult. July 23-Aug. 4. Trillium Dance Studios, 1925 Alliance & Common Ground Studio, 180 Westwood Center. Email or call for pricing. info@DanceWithErin.com, 822-8408. (DMT-0719) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227) BELLY DANCING WITH SHOSHANNA. Feel fabulous in classes for all levels in Arcata at Redwood Raks. 616-6876 or Shoshannaland.com. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

ZUMBA IN THE PARK. Join Eureka Recreation on Sat., July 21, 12:30-2 p.m. at Carson Park. Kids’ Zumba, 12:3012:50 p.m. All ages Zumba, 1-2 p.m. FREE community event open to all ages. Registration begins at Noon. Call 441-4244. (F-0719) LAU KUNE DO: TEMPLE OF MARTIAL ARTS: 445 I St., Arcata. Head instructor, Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kung Fu: ages 13 & up, Youth Kung Fu: ages 5-12, also offering Tai Chi classes. Students may come free train outside of class during our daily open temple hours. Parents, drop off your child for our monthly, “Kung Fu Movie Night”. Kids uniforms free with membership ! Visit www.arcatakungfu.com for fees, schedule and upcoming workshops in the Chinese martial arts. (707) 496-5510. (F-0913) NEW AT CROSSFIT EUREKA! Offering Core Strength, Kettlebell, FitMom Prenatal Movement, Vinyasa Fow Yoga, Clinics for Endurance Runners, Foundations with Dr. Phil Pritting D.C. www.crossfiteureka.com, crossfiteureka@gmail.com. (F-0719) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Summer Intersession: June 16-July 31. Classes: All Level Adults, Mon.s & Wed.s, 5-7 p.m. Open Gym & Roda (all ages, all levels), Sat.s, Noon-2 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. HSU Students First Class Free. (F-0726)

NIA. Nia has arrived in Humboldt County! Dance fusion fitness program blending healing arts, dance arts, and martial arts. Weds at the Bayside Grange, 6:30-7:30pm., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. Your first class is always FREE! Regular fees $6/$4 Grange Members. Pauline Ivens 707-441-9102, waterpolly@gmail.com (F-0726) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0927) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at the Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (F-0531) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Lau Kune Do Kung Fu, Muay Thai, Stand-up/Kickboxing & MMA. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www. northcoastaikido.org. (F-1227)

Home & Garden

COMMUNITY GARDEN WORKSHOPS. Gain knowledge of organic gardening and learn hands on techniques for insect/pest management on Sat., July 28, 10:30 a.m. Summer workshops are free and sponsored by the City of Arcata Bayside Park Farm and Community Garden, 930 Old Arcata Rd. For more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org. (G-0719)

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

FOUNDATION CLASS. Cannabis Law, Medicinal Uses and Horticulture. $275. Sat.-Sun., Aug. 18-19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Beginning level class. Learn how to grow, harvest, dry/cure and store their own medicine. Medical Applications: cannabinoids and their effects, delivery methods, dosage and contraindications. Law class: history of cannabis in US, existing and evolving California law. Hummingbird Healing Center 1626 Myrtle Ave. Eureka. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com or, (707) 672-9860. (G-0816) HARVEST, DRYING & STORAGE. With Kevin Jodrey, Master Gardener. Fri., Aug. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45. Effective practices for processing and storing medical cannabis to retain the best smell, flavor and cannabinoid potency. Hummingbird Healing Center, 1626 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com or, (707) 672-9860 (G-0816) TROUBLE SHOOTING Q & A. With Kevin Jodrey. Fri., July 20, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45. Have a question that no one else can answer? Ask Kevin, an expert on all aspects of Cannabis cultivation. Hummingbird Healing Center, 1626 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com or, (707) 6729860 (G-0719)

Kids & Teens

CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 5-7. Sat.s, 9:30-11 a.m., Aug. 4-Aug. 25. Children will have a great time creating with clay. They will make one to two pieces per week and each project is designed to bring out their creativity. Clay Artist Ben Freund is their guide to ceramic fun. $60 per class. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, more info at fireartsarcata.com (K-0719) YOUTH FELTING WITH BEQUIN. $85. All Ages. July 30-Aug. 2, 4 days, 9 a.m.-Noon. Explore exciting art of wet and needle felting along with hand sewing embellishments. Several projects each day. Materials included. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (K-0726) YOUTH SKATEBOARD COMPETITION. Join us for afternoon of kicks ‘n tricks at Eureka Skatepark, Sat., July 21, Noon-4 p.m. Prizes awarded to youth ages 5-17. All skill levels welcome. $5 Entrance Fee. Register on-site or in advance at AdorniCenter, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Call 441-4240 for information. (K-0719) 12TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SUMMER SURFCAMP. Have fun while Safely Learning to SURF. Exciting beach and ocean activities/education including Jr. Lifesaving. Licensed & Insured, male/female instructors. Ages 8+. $195/week. Sessions: July 23-27, Aug. 6-10. MoonstoneBeachSurfCamp.com or (707) 822-5099. (K-0719) SUMMER CLIMBING CAMP. Learn climbing techniques, safety and build confidence. Ages: 6-14. When: M-F, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., running through summer. Far North Climbing Gym, 10th and K streets, Arcata. Cost: $135/week. Contact: 826-9558. Website: www. farnorthclimbinggym.com. (K-0726) SUMMER CAMP. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for roller skating, arts and crafts, sports and more at Camp Perigot for Ages 5-13, Mon.-Fri., June 18-Aug. 24, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Perigot Park. Very affordable and every camper receives a free breakfast and lunch! Full-day or half-day options. Extended care hours available. Register today! Find registration materials at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 6685932, for more information. (K-0816)

CAPOEIRA KIDS. Summer Intersession: June 16-July 31. Classes: All Level Kids (Ages 5 & Up), Mon.s and Wed.s, 4-5:30 p.m. Open Gym & Roda (all ages, all levels), Sat.s, Noon-2 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (K-0726) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

Lectures

NEIGHBORHOOD READY! Discover simple strategies to organize your household and neighborhood for surprise hazard events. The people who live around you could be the community you rely on when things get tough. We’ll help you explore the boundaries of your neighborhood, conduct an inventory of resources, and go step-by-step through developing household and neighborhood plans that could not only make a disaster manageable, but actually help you avoid a disaster — and enrich your life. With Judy Sears of HSU Regional Training Institute — Community Disaster Preparedness. Sat.s, Aug. 4 & 11, 9:30 a.m.-Noon, Eureka Public Safety Fire Training Facility (corner of L and Harris streets). $35. For more details and to register: www.humboldt.edu/rti or call HSU Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0726) WEEKEND RETREAT, HISTORY OF CANNABIS IN SPIRITUAL PRACTICE. Fri.-Sun., July 20-22, Booneville, Ca. $250 + $70/meals. With Pagan Minister and Herbalist Wendy Read at her stunning indoor temple and healing center. Trace use of Cannabis as spiritual sacrament through history. Communicate with spirit of plants. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (L-0719)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) RESTORING OLD GROWTH FOREST. Second-Growth Management at Redwood National & State Parks. Join National Park Service forester Jason Teraoka and ranger Jim Wheeler for a presentation and field trip to learn about the parks’ Second-Growth Forest Restoration Program. Thurs., Aug. 2, 1-3 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 4, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0726) SOUL COLLAGE©, THE FRIEND. Make a collage from cut-out images out of magazines and other sources and access the many different parts of yourself in the process. This last workshop in the series “The Fool, the Challenger and the Friend” focuses on the “friend” archetype/sub-personality/significant person. With Janet Patterson. (This course may be taken independently of the series.) Tues., Aug. 7, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0726) TRINIDAD & THE CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH. Learn how the city of Trinidad became a principal supply and communication spot for travelers and miners in the mid-19th century. With Patricia Fleschner, president of the Trinidad Museum Society. Wed., Aug. 8, 10 a.m.-Noon. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0726) THE ARAB SPRING. Discuss the unrest in the Middle East, focusing on Syria, with HSU Professor Emeritus Dr. Tom Gage. Tues., July 10-31, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/ OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0719)


DAY OF YOGA & MINDFULNESS. Join Patricia Starr for a gentle and nurturing day of relaxation, with yoga and walking meditation in the morning, a brown bag lunch and restorative yoga and sitting meditation in the afternoon. Sat., July 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0719)

Sports/Recreation

HUMBOLDT BAY WILDLIFE REFUGE, THEN & NOW. Explore the past and future of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge with Candee Fetsch Kimbrell, Eric Nelson, Gisela Rohde and Denise Seeger. Thurs., July 26, 6-8 p.m. and Sat. (field trip), July 28, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0719)

PICKLEBALL. Combines elements of badminton, tennis and table tennis into a fun new sport for all ages. Drop-in Indoor Pickleball; Thurs.s & Sat.s, 10 a.m.-Noon, AdorniCenter, 1011 Waterfront Dr. $2 Adult, $1.50 Senior. Call 441-4374. (SR-0719)

Pets/Animals

DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSES. Start your puppy off on the right “paw” by providing socialization and behavior modification or reinforce the basics with your dog. Six-week classes are available Wed.s, Aug. 1-Sept. 15, with Puppy Class 6:30-7:30 p.m. and Dog Class 7:30-8:30 p.m. To sign up or for more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org. (P-0719)

Spiritual

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

FAMILY KICKBALL TOURNAMENT. Come kick it with your family! Sat., Aug. 18. Minimum 6 players per team, including minimum of 2 youth players, (17 & under), max of 9 players. $25 per team. Call 441-4240 or register at AdorniCenter, 1011 Waterfront Dr (SR-0719)

SUMMER TENNIS LESSONS. Whether you are a beginner or a serious player, come out and play tennis. Arcata Recreation offers three sessions: July 2-12, July 16-26, and July 30-Aug. 9. Two-week sessions, Mon.Thurs., time slots based on age. $5 per class. Drop-ins are welcome. For more nformation call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org. (SR-0719) LEARN TO ROW ! Adult Clinics: Aug. 7-18, Tues.Thurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m, Sat. 8-10 a.m, $175. Ages 18+. Humboldt Bay Rowing Association, No experience required. www.hbra.org or 707-845-4752 for more info. (SR-0802) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Tues./Thurs., 1-3 p.m., Fri./Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parksrec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-0830)

BEACH VOLLEYBALL! 1st sanctioned Northcoast Beach Volleyball Association Tournament at Moonstone Beach. July 21 & 22. 3 Courts! Sat., 9 a.m., Men’s Doubles, 2 p.m. Women’s Doubles, Sun., Co-ed Doubles 10 a.m. Individuals welcome. Contact Zander Kurnizki for information or to register. (530) 228-0850 (SR-0719)

Academy

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

GRIEF SUPPORT SERVICES CREATIVE ARTS GATHERING. Summer of Healing Creative Arts Gatherings: July 28, Aug. 25 & Sept. 22. We will be meeting at the beach, in the forest, and in the marshy wetlands, allowing the natural elements of each place to give voice to our own process of grief and healing. Suggested materials fee: $3-$5. Visit our website for more information at www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or contact Gretchen with questions/registration information at 445-8443. (T-0726)

HERBAL ALLIES WITH WENDY READ. Sat., Sept. 22, 2-4 p.m. $45 + $15 lab fee. Part 3 of making herbal medicine series teaches students how to combine other herbs with your cannabis salves infusions and teas to improve effectiveness. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0920)

Vocational

MAKING MEDICINE, SALVES & TEAS. Part 2, with Wendy Read. Fri., Aug. 3, 6-8 p.m. $45 + $15 lab fee. Use infused oil from part one to make salve, new students make salve from oil provided. Also learn to make medicinal teas. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0802)

Wellness/Bodywork

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0926)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227) NOTARY TRAINING. One-day seminar for new and renewing notaries provides the practical training needed to pass the comprehensive exam required for all California Notaries. Mon., July 30, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $149 plus additional fees for live scan, photo and exam. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended/notary. (V-0719) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. HIGH COUNTRY HERB WEEKEND, July 27-29. Join us on the top of the world at this special botanical preserve. BEGINNING WITH HERBS. Sept. 19 – Nov. 7, eight Wed. evenings plus two herb walks. Learn the basics with many hands-on activities, pre-req to 10 month course. Register online www. dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0726) LEARN AYURVEDA. With Traci Webb. 3-DAY BEGINNING WITH AYURVEDA introductory weekend immersion, July 20-22, Vata, Pitta, Kapha, Elements, Nutrition, Herbs, Aromas, Colors, Yoga, $249. 5 MONTH AYURVEDA FOUNDATIONS PROGRAM-B, 5 weekend immersions, Aug. 24-Dec.19. REGISTER Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0719)

Sports/Recreation

North Coast

Therapy/Support

RESTORATIVE YOGA. W/ Danielle Donaldson, four consecutive Sat’s July 28- Aug. 18, 4 p.m-7 p.m! Call Oshun Yoga in Trinidad for details (707) 232-4505 or email info@oshunyoga.com. (W-0726)

START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Sept. 4, 2012 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

ONLINE

www.northcoastjournal.com

Learn to Row! Adult Sweeps Clinic begins August 7

834-2793 Individual Lessons by appointment

839-9692

Humboldt Bay Rowing Association

www.hbra.org No experience necessary

Trillium Dance Studios

Summer Dance Camp

2012

July 23 - Aug. 4

• Ballet • Jazz • Modern • • Latin Dance • Samba & More!

PERFORMANCE on Aug. 4th

Erin McKeever, Rebecca Rubenstein & Guest Instructors

All levels, ages 4 & up • $8 registration fee plus camp tuition • Drop-ins welcome Studio, 1925 Alliance Rd., Arcata & • Alliance Studio Common Ground Community Ctr, Westwood Shpg Ctr, Alliance Rd., Arcata •

Call 822-8408 or email info@DanceWithErin.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012

35


NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 3/30/2012, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINT YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. TS. NO. 2012F003-KJM NOTICE is hereby given that Professional Trust Deed Services, as trustee, or successor trustee, or substituted trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by James A Parris. Recorded on 10/26/2011 as Instrument No. 2011-22189-2 in Book –, Page  –, of Official records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, California, and pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded 03/30/2012 in Book –, Page –, as Instrument No. 2012-8104-2 of said Official Records, WILL SELL on 08/20/2012 at In the main lobby Ming Tree, Realtors 509 J Street, Suite #1 Eureka, CA 95501 at 10:00 A.M. AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the United States), all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State hereinafter described: THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED CITY OF EUREKA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Lots 24 and 25 in Block 3 of the Second Amendment of Sunnyslope Tract, according to the Amended Map of Sunnyslope, filed in the Office of the Recorder of Humboldt County in Block 7, Page 45 of Maps. APN: 009-214-025-000 The property address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3588 Summer Street Eureka, CA 95503     The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $5,240.75 In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state of federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the

Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. In the event tender other than cash is accepted the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee’s Deed until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed, advances thereunder, with interest as provided therein, and the unpaid principle balance of the Note secured by said Deed with interest thereon as provided in said Note, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. Dated: 07/11/2012 Professional Trust Deed Services, as said Trustee P.O. BOX 115 EUREKA, CA 95502 (707) 268-1205  /s Karen J. Mesa, Agent    

7/19, 7/26, 8/2/2012 (12-206)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code.  The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 7th of August, 2012, at 9:00 A.M., on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at CUTTEN MINI STORAGE, 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt the following: #55        Ernest Foster #258      Ronald Crossland #274      Ronald Crossland Items to be sold include, but are not limited to miscellaneous of the following: household items and furniture, luggage, clothing, kids toys, room partition, appliance, boxes and bags (contents unknown). Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 2341 Fern Street, Eureka CA, prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items sold as is, where is and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Cutten Mini Storage 707-443-2280, Bond # 0336443. Dated this 19th day of July 2012 and 26th day of July 2012. 7/19, 7/26/2012 (12-211)

DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 707-445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: July 5, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicants are: MASAKI GROUP LLC THE The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of

Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 465-475 I ST. ARCATA, CA 95521-6118 Type of License Applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating Place 7/19, 7/26, 8/2/2012 (12-208)

 DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: June 27, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: CHARLES MATTHEW VANERPOOL, SHERRY LYNN VANDERPOOL The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 355 MAIN STREET TRINIDAD, CA 95570 Type of License Applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating Place 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-193)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00373

The following person is doing business as MERLIN MORTGAGE, REALTY SALES AND SERVICES at 1525 McFarlan St., Eureka, CA 95501 Will Dvorak 1525 McFarlan St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Will Dvorak aka Willoughby deQuincy Dvorak. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 19, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/19, 7/26, 8/2, 8/9/2012 (12-207)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00397

The following person is doing business as SIX RIVERS LAWN CARE at 3402 California St., Eureka, CA 95503. Pepper Stockton 3402 California St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Pepper Stockton. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 3, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/19, 7/26, 8/2, 8/9/2012 (12-210)

  FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00409

The following persons are doing business as 5TH SEASON CANNING COMPANY at 220 F St., Arcata, CA 95521.

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Arcata-Mad River Ambulance Services Inc. 220 F St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Doug Boileau, Vice President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 10, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/19, 7/26, 8/2, 8/9/2012 (12-205)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00422

The following person is doing business as ALOHA YARD CARE at 255 H St., Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 5052, Arcata, CA 95518. Robyn Reida 255 H St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Robyn Reida. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 16, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/19, 7/26, 8/2, 8/9/2012 (12-212)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00390

The following person is doing business as TRINIDAD BREWING COMPANY at 101 N. Westhaven Drive, Trinidad, CA 95570. Peter Damian Bauman 101 N. Westhaven Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Peter Damian Bauman. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 26 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/12, 7/19, 7/26, 8/2/2012 (12-199)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00337

The following persons are doing business as WALK- A- BOUT FOODS at 1685 Ocean Drive., McKinleyville, CA 95519 Steven Fredlund 1685 Ocean Drive McKinleyville, CA 95519 Renee Fredlund 1685 Ocean Drive McKinleyville. CA. 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Renee K. Fredlund This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June. 06, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH

Humboldt County Clerk 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/, 7/26/2012 (12-196)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00377

The following person is doing business as PRECISION INTERMEDIA at 1012 Main St., Fortuna, CA 95540 Perter B. Krueger 341 11th St. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Peter B. Krueger This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June. 21, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/, 7/26/2012 (12-194)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00321

The following person is doing business as HUMBOLDT DICHRO at 2219 Spring St., Eureka, CA 95501. Amy Hagan 2219 Spring St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Amy Hagan. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 30, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-192)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00348

The following person is doing business as THAT TREE GUY at 432 West Henderson St., Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 5608, Eureka, CA 95502. Michael E. Flowers 432 W. Henderson Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Michael E. Flowers. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 11, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-188)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00367

The following person is doing business as MARNIE BUGS at 207 G Street, Suite 214, Eureka, CA 95501. Marnie Cooper 2034 Adams Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 6/18/12. /s Marnie Cooper. This statement was filed with the

County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 18, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-187)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00375

The following persons are doing business as CAFÉ NOONER TOO! at 2910 E St., Eureka, CA 95501, 2640 Clay Rd., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Joseph Mark Filgas 2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Lorrena Lucille Filgas 2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Joseph Mark Filgas. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 20, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-189)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00379

The following person is doing business as COFFEE BREAK at 700 Bayside Road, Arcata, CA 95521 Greenway Coffee 700 Bayside Rd. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Michelle Greenway, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June. 22, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-192)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120450 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: TYRELL JAYSSON CHAMBERLAIN TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: TYRELL JAYSSON CHAMBERLAIN has filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name to: TYROL JAYSSON CHAMBERLAIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 29, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: July 12, 2012 Filed: July 12, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 7/19, 7/26, 8/2, 8/9/2012 (12-209)


7/12, 7/19, 7/26/2012 (12-200)

7/12, 7/19, 7/26, 8/2/2012 (12-202)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120386 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

 

7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-197)

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

1. Blouse, e.g. 4. Crazed 9. Bollywood wraps 14. Leave dumbstruck 15. Tums target 16. 2003 NBA Rookie of the Year Stoudemire 17. Because it has key political allies here, you can’t spell this foreign city without spelling 66-Across 19. Boarded 20. Sorority letter 21. Motion approval 23. Because she’s one of its greatest historic figures, you can’t spell this woman’s name without spelling 66-Across

DOWN

1. ____ Mahal 2. Have bills 3. ____ diem 4. One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” 5. From square one 6. Zip 7. Suffix with Brooklyn or Manhattan 8. Spanish road 9. Pomona College athletes 10. It merged with BP in 1998 11. Inform against 12. It may be dramatic 13. Ship 18. Escalates

27. ____ World Tour (sports circuit) 28. Love 29. Points 31. Largest airport in OH 32. Available 36. Because he wrote many of its patriotic songs, you can’t spell this composer’s name without spelling 66-Across 40. Golden, in Guadalajara 41. Where many Apr. checks are sent 42. “Immediately!” in the ER 43. “The Faerie Queene” character 45. A trucker may have one: Abbr. 46. Because it’s a Pulitzer Prize-winner about one of its presidents in the 1960s, you can’t spell this book title

22. Sharpens, as a razor 23. Got off the bottom? 24. ____ wazoo 25. With 56-Down, song from “South Pacific” 26. Legendary soprano ____ Patti 27. Small, medium or large: Abbr. 30. ____-Caps (movie snacks) 31. Musical ensemble 33. Talking-____ (scoldings) 34. “Back in the Saddle Again” autobiographer 35. Jrs. take them 37. Greatest importance 38. OPEC founding member

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

without spelling 66-Across 52. If all goes wrong 53. Switz. neighbor 54. Answer to “Who’s there?” 55. Because it’s one of its most beloved folk tunes, you can’t spell this song title without spelling 66-Across 61. Bowling alley button 62. A stripper takes it off 63. Tibetan milk source 64. Blog piece 65. Like a river bottom 66. This puzzle’s theme

39. Lunched, say 44. Legally impedes 46. When some TV news comes on 47. Unexpected climax 48. Gardener, at times 49. Intimidate 50. Like attics, often 51. Drunk ____ skunk 52. Suffix for the wealthy 56. See 25-Down 57. Part of RSVP 58. Greenwich Village sch. 59. “If I Ruled the World” rapper 60. Rap sheet initials EASY #13

www.sudoku.com

7/5, 7/12, 7/19, 7/26/2012 (12-198)

PETITION OF: MICHAEL FRAVEL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: MICHAEL FRAVEL for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MICHAEL RAYMOND FRAVEL to Proposed Name MICHAEL RAYMOND SCHREMMER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 17, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: July 5, 2012 Filed: July 5, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ALEXANDRA SINZ A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MARK SINZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MARK SINZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 26, 2012, at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON SB# 30716 MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 JUNE 29, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

PETITION OF: THOR AND CATHERYN BALLEW TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: THOR AND CATHERYN BALLEW for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JACEY CHOIR BALLEW to Proposed Name JACEY SERYN CHOIR BALLEW THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 6, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: June 21, 2012 Filed: June 21, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KATHLEEN K. MURRAY, KATHLEEN MURRAY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SYLVIA A. MERIWEATHER in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SYLVIA A. MERIWEATHER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 26, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: GLORIA SHEETS SB#172371 ATTORNEY AT LAW POST OFFICE BOX 2005 EUREKA, CA 95502 (707) 445-0220 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ALEXANDRA SINZ CASE NO. PR120161

Solution, tips and computer program at

 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KATHLEEN K. MURRAY CASE NO. PR120168

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120428 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

37


Diets for Losers?

the

Employment CITY OF ARCATA DISPATCHER $37,040.64 $45,023.13/yr. SENIOR DISPATCHER $38,937.60 $47,328.90/yr.

By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

I

No image problem 23,000 years ago, wheN the "VeNus of willeNdorf" was made! fouNd iN austria iN 1908, she's four iNches high aNd carVed from oolitic limestoNe. Don HitcHcock, WikimeDia commons

f you’re considering going on a diet to lose weight, you may want to first check the latest evaluations from U.S. News and World Report. every year, experts and readers of USNWR evaluate hundreds of diets, listing what they consider to be the top 25. the results are pretty depressing. according to the most recent ranking (http://health. usnews.com/best-diet), even their no. 1 top-rated “DasH” diet (Dietary approaches to stop Hypertension) only garnered a 30 percent “yes” from readers responding to the question, “Did this diet work for you?” (661 yes, 1511 no). more typical was the south Beach diet, which “worked” for less than 9 percent of the 10,000-plus readers who had tried it. it gets worse: 95 percent of americans who lose weight in the first four to six months after embarking on a diet plan are back at their pre-diet weight by the end of the first year. You don’t even have to look at the data (from the national Weight control Registry, http://www. nwcr.ws/). amazon has over 40,000 books with the word “diet” in the title. ask yourself, if just one of these diets worked reliably, why is there an insatiable market for new ones? For millions of years, before the era of fast — and cheap — food, our innate craving for sugars and fats did more good than harm. the principal risk to survival for our hunting and gathering forebears didn’t come from a saber-toothed tiger, the risk of falling off a cliff, or infection from an untreated cut; it came from starvation. We needed those fats (to maintain body temperature), sugars (to provide energy) and proteins (to build cells). our bodies are super-sensitive to the slightest drop in calorie input and/or weight, because our very survival once depended on it. around 1960, at least in this part of the world, everything changed with the advent of fast food. in the half-century since, obe-

sity, defined as a Body mass index greater than 30, has tripled. (Bmi = 703 x weight-inpounds/height-in-inches squared.) Despite popular opinion, it’s not that we’re bad, weak people who have no will power. it’s that the genes that brought us through all those ancient famines and droughts are the same genes that tell us to eat and eat and eat. there’s nothing magical or complicated about weight gain; it can’t help but happen when the calories in exceed the calories out. Food and drink are the input, of course. the output is the energy it takes to stay alive. Just as your savings will increase if your income exceeds your expenses, your girth will grow if your food calories exceed those you metabolize. it’s that simple. it doesn’t even matter which of the three macronutrient food groups supply those intake calories. From your body’s point of view, a calorie is a calorie is a calorie, whether from fat, protein or carbohydrates. if it’s not used for energy, it’s going to end up somewhere on your body, either as muscle mass or tummy flab. Unfortunately, if you are inclined to the heavy side, nearly 4 billion years of evolution have taught your body to be quite efficient in how it uses the food-fuel you eat. one pound of energy stored in your body translates to 3,500-4,000 calories, while a 150-pound adult burns only about 600 calories a week by exercising moderately for 30 minutes daily. so although daily moderate exercise — brisk walking, for instance — is virtually essential to maintain weight loss, it takes an adjustment on the intake side to lose weight in the first place. Which is where diets come in. But, as the saying goes, you can’t out-train a bad diet. so if you’re serious about weight loss, how do you get into that exclusive 5 percent group of people who lose it and keep it off? check here in a week. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com), BMI 22.6, swears by good Welsh sheepherder genes, no TV,

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JuLY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Filing Date: 4:00 p.m. Friday, July 27, 2012. Required Examination: 9:00 a.m. Thursday, August 9, 2012. Receives and dispatches calls from the public for emergency and nonemergency services; assists with clerical duties within the Police Department and performs other related duties as assigned. Application materials are available at www.cityofarcata.org; Arcata City Hall, City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, or by calling (707) 822-5953. EOE.

Now Hiring:

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Experienced Cook Administrative Assistant ASE Mechanic Medical Biller Log Truck Driver

GRANTS ANd CONTRACTS ANALYST

Dynamic international organization seeks experienced contract manager to provide oversight of federal and private grants for international programs in media development. Seeking to fill full-time, fully-benefitted Grants and Contracts Analyst position to provide administrative, financial, and contractual analysis and grants management for a diverse international portfolio.

Ideal candidate has: • Significant experience with federal contract, grant, and subgrant management • Experience in and aptitude for accounting and financial analysis, including grant budgeting • Experience in proposal, grant, and contract writing and editing • Experience in procurement of goods and services, including development and evaluation of RFPs/RFQs • Experience in USG funder regulations For more details and to apply, visit www.internews.org/about/employment No Calls Please. EOE M/F/d/V

AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214. (E-0719) TUTOR WANTED. Looking for teacher/tutor for 2-D animation on PC: will pay. Using Toon Boom Animate 2. Call Rob, (707) 2233997. (E-0719) DIRECTOR OF PATIENT SERVICES. Plan, coordinate, evaluate medical programs for a nationally recognized reproductive health organization. FT/benefited, salary DOE. Must have RN or BA/BS. 2 years admin/supervisory experience required. Medical office experience preferred. Resume with cover letter to: HR, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Ct., Eureka, CA 95503 by 7/20/12. (E-0719) LIFETOUCH IS LOOKING FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS. No experience needed. Must like working with children. All applicants can come to the hiring event July 24, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at The Job Market, 409 K St., Eureka, Ca. 95501. crea@ lifetouch.com (E-0719) PROGRAM ASSISTANT. For Loleta Boys & Girls Club of the Redwoods. Part-time position. Open until filled. Email resumes to lsmith@bgcredwoods.org. (E-0726)

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Bingo Paymaster Janitorial Security Officer Valet Shuttle Driver Cocktail Waitress TRINIDAD RANCHERIA

Assistant Network Admin 1 - CISCO Staff Accountant SEASCAPE, PART-TIME POSITIONS

Cook Host/Hostess Dish/Bus

Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.


Employment

Rentals BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) $$$ DANCERS WANTED $$$ No experience necessary. Make your own schedule. Opportunity to make cash nightly! Call The Fabulous Tip Top Gentlemen’s Club 443-5696 or 601-7169. 18+ (E-0816) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

General Manager North Coast Co-op is seeking a General Manager. Reporting to the BOD, responsible for the overall operation of these large, full-service, Certified Organic Groceries. Heading up our Management Team, works collaboratively in overall planning and management of the co-op. Interested applicants should demonstrate an understanding and commitment to the cooperative business model and a proven, successful management history. A background in natural foods and experience working in a union environment preferred. Bachelor’s degree preferred plus five years of progressive management experience, or an equivalent combination. North Coast Cooperative offers a competitive wage package dependant upon experience, and an excellent benefits package. Position is open until filled, 1st review of applications is on 9/15/12. For a complete job description and to download an application: http://www.northcoastco-op.com/about. htm#employment. Please submit application, resume, salary requirements and letter of interest to Lisa Landry, HR Director at: hr@northcoastco-op.com

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

Full-Time Positions 1 - MEDICAL BILLER 1 - DESKTOP SUPPORT TECHNICIAN 1 - REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT

To apply visit www.opendoorhealth.com

HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN) (E-0927) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-0920)

Rentals Full-time positions available in Arcata! Dental Assistant III

Must have 6+ mths. current exp. as a CA licensed RDA &/or CDA in addition possesses a CA Dental X-ray and Coronal polish certificate.

Medical Assistant

Must have HS diploma/GED & 6-mths as a MA or be a Certified MA from a certified program.

Staff Accountant II

Offered as a FT/PT position. Must have a BA in accounting & 1 or 2 yrs. exp. &/or training in a health or non-profit setting preferred. In accordance with P.L. 93-638 American Indian Preference will be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/ req’d testing. An Application can be obtained at www.uihs.org or call HR (707) 825-5000. Closes: 7-27-12.

ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Some utilities paid, upstairs, shared yard. $650, (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-0719)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Rentals ARCATA 2 BEDROOM APT. Parking, some utilities paid, onsite laundry $775, (707) 443-4357 www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0719) ARCATA 3 BED 2 BATH HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer hookups, private yard. $1500 (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0719) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Garage, onsite laundry, some utilities paid. $600. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0719) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 309 E St., #5. W/S/G Pd., SEC 8 OK, Cat OK, Rent $530, MtM, Vac 8/2. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM APARTMENT. Onsite laundry, some utilities paid. $725. (707) 4438227, www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-0719) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, yard, washer/dryer hookups, $1225. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0719) EUREKA STUDIO. 320 2nd St., #2G. W/S/G Pd., 2nd Floor, Elevator, Rent $500, MtM, Vac/Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA STUDIO. 212 E St., #309. W/S/G Pd., 2nd Floor, Elevator, Rent $540, MtM, Vac 8/8. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Some utilities paid, Available now, $795. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0719)

Rental Helpers

Offers the largest listing of homes, apartments, condos and rooms for rent in Humboldt County! 4 Seventh Street, Suite A

(707) 443-HELP TheRentalHelpers.com

Humboldt County’s only DRE Licensed Listing Service!

FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, bonus room, laundry hookups, fenced yard, $1495. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0719) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carport, onsite laundry, some utilities. $750. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0719) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard, garage, laundry hookups, pet ok. $1350. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0719) MCKINLEYVILLE 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 2162 Park St. Pets OK, Six Month Lease, Rent $1300, Vac 8/3. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 225 Hillsdale St., #1 & #3. W/S/G Pd, Laundry Hook-ups, Cat OK, Rent $750. Call for Availability. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2275 Summit Ridge Rd. Humboldt Hill, MtM, Pets Considered, Rent $1200, Vac 8/1. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-0719) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/ 1BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Pd., 6 Month Lease, Small Pets, Rent $765, Vac 7/28. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA 2BD/1BA CARRIAGE HOUSE. 1134 A St. W/S Pd., Cat OK, Rent $695, Vac 8/21. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 914 J St. W/S/G Pd., MtM, Rent $895, Vac 7/21. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 2130 Union St. Pets Considered, MtM, Rent $925, Vac 7/20. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) FORTUNA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 513 Summer St. Cute Home, Near Shopping, Schools & Hospital, MtM, Will Consider Pets, Rent $1200, Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719)

Corner 7 th & A of St.

PRA02054

BY THE BAY & OLDTOWN. Eureka 1BD/1BA Apartment. $650/month, $1000/deposit. No Smoking/Pets. W/S/G paid. References required. 445-4679. (R-0726) ARCATA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 840 D St., Unit Z. 1 Year Lease, Rent $995, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) ARCATA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2220 Wisteria Way. Close to Schools/ Parks. Rent $1195, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) ARCATA 4BD/1.5BA FARMHOUSE. 1387 Janes Rd.1 mile from HSU, NO PETS, Rent $1995, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3113 Ingley St. 2 Units Available. 2nd Floor, SEC 8 OK, W/S/G Pd., Near Shop & Bus Lines, Cat OK, Rent $725,Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) EUREKA STUDIO. 1140 E St., #32. SEC 8 OK, W/S/G Pd, Cat Ok, Near Bus Lines, MtM, Rent $515, Vac Now www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) LOLETA 1BD/1BA DUPLEX. 2721 Eel River Dr., #8. Close to CR, Cat OK, Rent $600, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0719) ARCATA 1BD, 2BD, STUDIOS & BRAND NEW UNITS. Available now. Some or all utilities paid, close to buses. Near HSU! Call for more info! 822-4557 or visit www. strombeckprop.com (R-0726) HUMBOLDT BAY PROPERTIES. Apartments, rooms and houses. 443-5228. (R-0719) A L L A R E A S - RO OM M AT ES . COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213) your ideal employee may be a Journal reader. 442-1400. VISA/ MC. Place your ad onlinle at www. northcoastjournal.com CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists. For: Ads TV Film Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool. com (E-0719) OPENING FOR CMT & HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS. In established spa and wellness center. Independent contractor/ rent agreement, 1-3 days a week. Amazing healing space, retail, ocean view. Contact (707) 4980909 or taunusk@earthlink.net (E-0726) SOCIAL WORKER MSW. Full time/benefits avail. Must have exp. working with elderly/disabled. App./job desc. can be picked up at Adult Day Health Care of Mad River. Apps accepted until position filled. (707) 8224866 (E-0726)

CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JuLY 19, 2012

39


Business Rentals ARCATA 2- 1000 SF WAREHOUSE SPACES AVAILABLE. Call S&W Properties, (707) 443-2246. (BR0719) EUREKA FURNISHED OFFICE SPACE. Close to Courthouse & banks, services included, call S&W (707) 443-2246 (BR-0719) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

Real Estate

the Autos

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Services

Buy/Sell/Trade

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

      

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

 

15

%

Get

OFF

Arcata LIQUORS OR

HUTCHINs Grocery store Limited one per customer. Not valid with any other offer. Must be 21 to redeem. min. purchase $20

EXPIRES JuLY 31, 2012

Pets

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

home & garden

service directory 616 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017

PANORAMIC MTN VIEWS. Trinity County. 6 acres , power, Well, gravel driveway, cleared homesite .Great location off paved road. Reduced $137,000. (707) 672-6608 (RE-0809) TRINITY VILLAGE 1.3 ACRES WITH CREEK. 3BD/2BA main house. PLUS: Guest House, Art Studio/Workshop, Pool, Sauna, 2 Car Garage, Amenities Galore. $375,000. Call Gail Packard Realty, Owner/Broker, (530) 629-4181. (RE-0726) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

Lucky Gnome!

Buy/Sell/Trade SHOES & SOCKS 1/2 PRICE. Plus Yellow Tagged Clothing 25¢ each! July 17-21. Dream Quest Thrift Store Providing Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-0719) MASSIVE MOVING SALE. Sat., July 21, 8 a.m. 322 Chartin Rd, Blue Lake (across from Perigot Park) Established family leaving the area. 299 east, exit Blue Lake right at the traffic circle. Left on Chartin Rd. (BST-0719) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

Mon-Fri 10-6 pm home & garden Sat 10-5pm

Need some help home around the house?

service directory

& garden

home & garden

service directory service directory see page 18

Auto 2009 HONDA FIT SPORT MODEL. Warranty, 5-speed Automatic, Great gas mileage. Excellent condition. Reduced $14,600 OBO, Call 677-9410. (A-0802) CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0927)

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

Yard Sadirectory le service 996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

on Page 43

LOST GREY TABBY CAT. Male, white chest, no collar-children missing their loved pet. Last seen 7/13 Janes Creek trail neighborhood, Arcata. please call with info. (707) 499-5286 (P-0802) LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at wwwhumboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

EXPERIENCED BABY/HOUSE/ DOG SITTER. Available for the summer. Good references. Contact (707) 502-6274, m.harris528@ gmail.com. (S-0726) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded #3860. Summer Cleaning Special! (707) 444-2001. (S-1011) SURFBOARD REPAIR 40+ years experience. George Cicero (707) 616-0738 (S-0823) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-0809) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) HOUSE CLEANING BY JEANNIE. Residence $15/hour, Move-outs $20/hour. Call 921-9424. References Available. (S-0809) AMUSING GAMES & AMAZING PERFORMANCES FOR ALL AGES. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227)

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Custom Pet Portraits by Sophia Dennler • For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets


N

O ATI

OC WL

NE

(707)443-1104 1500 4th St Eureka

Lic. #FD1963

humboldtcremation.com

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Sabrina Knight MA, MFT Marriage & Family Therapist Individuals & Families

Music PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-0809) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0823)

443-3611  517 3rd Street, Suite 21 Eureka, CA 95501 TOO MANY TUBAS, OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

Community TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0726) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0809) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-0823) SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) A-1 STEAM CARPET CLEANING. Ask us about our $99.00 2 room special. Also now offering Green Guard 442-3229 ext 13 (S-1227)

BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0726)

Award Winning Hollywood Makeup Artist

introduces

Cinema Secrets

professional mineral makeup line. Low prices, free makeover demo & $10 gift certificate drawing. AMA approved quality.

Call 707-768-3677 for an appointment. #7 Fifth Street, Eureka frommalibutoyou@aol.com

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

northcoastjournal. com

Just need someone to talk to? Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW 1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

839-1244

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

Call for free 1/2 hr. consultation

LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. Practical tips and strategies for finding financial freedom. Sun., July 22, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@ hotmail.com. (C-0719) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227)

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems?

LCS # 23232

Spiritual Life Coach/ Gentle Heart Mentor Building bridges between the conscious and unconscious.

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

N. Kristine Chadwick

Brenda R. Bryan

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y at

&Spirit

CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

Music

Services

body, mind

(707)445-1538

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012

41


&Spirit

transformation consciousness expansion to enhance overall well-being ~energy work~

Marny Friedman

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

707-839-5910

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY Weekend Massage Clinic Special ½ hour $30 1 hour $45

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

KICK BUTTS! Become nicotine free with Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist and Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). (707) 845-3749. www. ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-0719) STRAIGHTEN UP! Structural Integration Bodywork Series. Relieves chronic pain, eases movement, frees emotion. Good posture can be natural! 31 years experience, Cecilie Hooper, 6773969. (MB-0823) SUMMER MASSAGE SPECIAL $45. Access your body’s deep wisdom and profound healing capacities with a great massage. Heartwood graduate. 9 years of experience. Office in Arcata. Adam Wolter (707) 362-9006. (MB-0809) CERTIFIED IN MASSAGE THERAPY & FOOT REFLEXOLOGY. Reidun Olsson, (707) 822-7247. (MB-0809)

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0926) COLON HYDROTHERAPY WITH MOLLY LEUTHNER. At Jade Dragon Medical Spa. Closed System. Using an F.D.A. approved medical device, warm water is gently inserted into the colon. When the colon contracts, the water is flushed out through the device. Take an internal bath! 822-4300. (MB-1011) doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719. (MB-0816) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0726)

TIME FOR A MASSAGE? Therapeutic Massage Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

CRANIAL SACRAL THERAPY. Infused with Shiatsu, Quantum Touch Healing, Energywork. Crescent City, (517) 974-0460. (MB-0726) NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 2680929. (MB-1025) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 4424240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (MB-1227) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0920) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0920) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@salinarain.com, www. salinarain.com. (MB-1227) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227)

It’s here! The 2012 Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt. View it online on our Special Publications page.

Certified Massage Therapist

North COAST CoastJOURNAL JourNal• THURSDAY, • thursday, July 2012• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com JULY 19,5,2012 42 NORTH

ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Mon. Club, 610 Main St. Every Tue. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707845-4307. (MB-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www.northcoastaikido.org. (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup.org. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227) GOOD HEALTH is a great New Year’s resolution. Your new health practitioner may be listed here. Tell them you saw their notice in the Journal.

www.northcoastjournal.com

body, mind

real estate

this week NEW

■ MCKINLEYVILLE

LISTI

NG!

MCKINLEYVILLE: Charming home with a south-facing yard! 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths and lots of charm in this 1650 sq ft home built in 1988. The kitchen and dining room have french doors opening on to a deck leading to a lovely landscaped, private backyard. mls#235955 $265,000

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

■ McKINLEYVILLE

NEW

PRICE

OPEN HOU

SUN., JULY SE 22 12PM 1755 CAMEL-3PM LIA DRIVE

IMMACULATE HOME ON 1/4 ACRE. 4Bed/2.5Bath Home, large living room w/ vaulted ceilings, huge master suite with spacious bathroom, oversized soaking tub & walk-in closet. Close to shopping & public transportation. Call Lucky Today! MLS 233056. REDUCED TO $359,900.

Thavisak “Lucky” Syphanthong

Lucky Star Realty 707-954-2070 lucky@luckystarrealty.com www.luckystarrealty.net License #01708681

■ MCKINLEYVILLE

INSI DE

Venues Jewelry Gowns and Tuxedoes Flowers Bakeries And More

OWN AN OCEAN VIEW PARCEL in the Sand Pointe Coastal Community with all utilities to the property. Enjoy all that nature has to offer in this professionally planned upscale community. Access to the nearby Hammond Trail offers miles of hiking, biking, beach combing, and whale watching. $215,000

Jessica Stretch

#01204126 Broker/ Associate 334 Main Street, Ferndale, CA. 95536 707-599-2982


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

$449,900

$489,000

Looking for a prime space in Downtown Eureka? The landmark Gross Building at 5th and F Streets has commercial space and office suites available. This iconic building has been carefully and meticulously restored to its historical splendor. Modern updates include seismic rehabilitation, a sprinkler system and complete handicap access {including restrooms and elevator}. Contact us for a private tour and view the Melvin Schuler Court Gallery in the upstairs outdoor mezzanine.

Gross Building 427 F St. Eureka (707)444-9056

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,436 sq ft private outdoor setting, Trinidad home on almost 4 acres, large wrap around deck, covered porch, vaulted ceilings, woodstove w/slate, wood floors, stunning views

3 bed, 2 bath, 2,650 sq ft luxurious Benbow home, large living room w/spacious fireplace, old growth redwood paneling, balcony, private in ground swimming pool & hot tub, fabulous views

$249,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,324 sq ft immaculate McKinleyville home in cul-de-sac, cathedral ceilings, skylights, open floor plan, breakfast bar, large deck with access from several areas, nice large master bedroom

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Zenia Land/Property

this beautiful, flat 40 acre parcel features 2 unfinished cabins, a yurt, small outbuildings, year round developed creek, phenomenal views and easy access. perfect year round homesteading property or summer retreat. Call today!

$269,000

Willow Creek Land/Property

+/-250 acres near Waterman Ridge, only a half hour from Willow Creek. property boasts Southern exposure, timber, two large year round springs, great access and multiple developed building sites.

$ 450,000

Benbow Land/Property

+/-80 acres Richardson Grove near Benbow. this beautiful Southern Humboldt parcel boasts ample water, old growth redwood trees, abundance of timber and plenty of seclusion.

$470,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 19, 2012

43


Sunny Brae •Glendale Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Prices Effective July 18 through July 24, 2012

Meet our staff

Juliet attended California State University in Bakersfield

while simultaneously working her way through college there. She took a brief hiatus for a trip to Humboldt County with her daughter Lilli. They loved it here and have put down new roots. Forrest, Juliet’s older son and his infant daughter, Prieya, decided to stay down south. One Christmas Juliet gave her daughter a six month old rescued filly whom Lilli aptly named “Miracle.” Lilli cares for the young horse and now that she is older, Miracle is becoming accustomed to saddle and reins. It will be another year before the little filly is ready for Lilli to take her riding. Juliet and Lilli are happy campers and beachcombers when they go out for a fun time together. “The greatest thing,” says Juliet, “about working at Murphy’s is the crew. We are like a family and so are our customers.”

Juliet Fox

Murphy’s Sta

ff, Cutten

USDA Grade A

Chicken Thighs or Drumsticks

99

¢

lb.

Pork Spareribs

Crystal

Organic

4 lb.

56 Oz.

1 lb. Containers

Ice Cream

2 5 $

For

49 lb.

1

49 Ea.

2% Reduced Fat Milk

AA Butter 1 lb.

3

Strawberries

Humboldt Creamery

Western Family

Tender and Meaty Sides

2

C&H Sugar

99

Ea.

Gallon

3

99 Ea.

1

99

Ea.

Garden Fresh

Green Beans

99

¢ lb.


North Coast Journal 07-19-12 Edition