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32 The Hum Take a Card

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover

34 Music & More! 36 Calendar 39 Seven-o-Heaven

25 Art Beat

40 Filmland

26 Arts! Arcata

41 Workshops 44 Field Notes

Summoned

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Humboldt Folklife Festival

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28 Stage Matters Show and Tell

29 Home & Garden Service Directory

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3

July 12, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 28

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Zach St. George zach@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases  newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor  letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e  calendar@northcoastjournal.com music  thehum@northcoastjournal.com production  ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales  ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops  classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

“He Jumped.” Photo by Hannah Larkin.

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Gasoline Gouge Editor: In his study of local gasoline prices (“Gasoline Kings,” July 5), Ryan Burns skipped lightly over the main answer to his lead question, “Why the heck are Humboldt County’s fuel prices so high?” That answer is that Chevron has a near monopoly on the fuel supply to Humboldt County, and consequently it can charge anything it wants. And boy, does it ever charge!! So, why doesn’t another major refiner come into the local market to give Chevron some competition? There’s not enough volume of fuel sold here to make the investment profitable. That’s it. Period. Corporate competition for Chevron would cause local prices to drop dramatically, but don’t hold your breath. The big refiners rub elbows with each other, you know. Now, consider that there are three ways fuel is shipped: cheapest is by pipeline, next is by barge (all Chevron fuel arrives here by barge, never by tanker), and most expensive is tanker trucks. OK, now you do the math: Our gas is barged in from Richmond. Chevron (and many other) stations in Redding get their fuel by tanker truck from Richmond. Same source, and our fuel comes to us cheaper. So, why are Redding prices generally $.20-.30 below ours? Because we are being gouged by Chevron. Heck, it’s a free market, and Chevron is charging us all the traffic will bear. David R. Young, McKinleyville  

 Editor:

Thank you for taking a swipe at big oil in Humboldt. We know of their larcenous ways and general disregard for customers, but in terms of how they outdo themselves in our otherwise fair land, this discussion has been long overdue. I thought the most interesting news presented by Ryan was that most of our local stations are siphoning their gas from the same bucket. Not only do we have to put up with price gouging but it appears that any dignity formerly accrued to personal product selection has gone up in smoke. The article laid out a number of important, educational facts. Unfortunately, the story has left us with a gaping hole in terms of local government involvement and potential solutions to this stick-up in broad daylight.

I read nothing about what our mayor and council have tried to do about this situation. Certainly oil companies cannot just set up business without a local relationship and contract. I would like to hear our representatives answer to the impropriety of local collusion but more importantly what they can do to put pressure on the “extra” profit margin that big oil is tacking on to wholesale prices. Is it not possible to fire an oil company?  Inviting one company to hit the road would send a message. Some will argue that this type of action would reduce competition. Really? How’s that competition thing working out now? What can you do about it, mayor? I would guess that the residents of Humboldt County live here in part because we do not appreciate toeing the corporate line, living with monopolies, or being forced to pay usurious prices for things. Every day we glower at the ubiquitous signage displaying those atrocious prices and remind ourselves of the nameless, shameless, faceless thugs of big oil. Jon Exley, Eureka Editor: “Why the heck are Humboldt County’s fuel prices so high?” A better question is, “Why are U.S. fuel prices so low?” The answer is that we have oil reserves and government subsidies and we’re spoiled rotten. The price of a gallon of unleaded is about $4.80 in Bangladesh, where one tank would consume about 6 percent of the average citizen’s annual income. It’s $5.40 in Tanzania, $6.80 in New Zealand, $7.70 in Israel, $8.40 in Hong Kong, and $9.30 in Norway. There are few countries (mostly OPEC members) with gas cheaper than ours, and even in some of those the price relative to income is higher. A trip almost anywhere outside this country gives one a very different perspective on our hypochondriac “pain at the pump.” The real cost of our gas is much higher than what we pay. Add the hidden costs of environmental destruction, pollution, social injustice, global warming, political instability, and military action to control access to foreign oil to the “up-front” costs of exploration, extraction, transport, and refining and the cost is more like $15 per gallon. If the retail price were more realistic we’d have fuel-efficient vehicles, decent public transit, better health and sensible community design. Instead, whenever our gas prices start to edge closer to the rest of the world’s and to

what they really should be, we start blaming the president and calling for reform. We should be calling for reform of a very different sort. We are so insular in this country that we lose sight of how privileged we really are. It drives me crazy when people here complain about gas prices. Please … Stop whining or move to Saudi Arabia, where gas is 70 cents per gallon. Just think how much you’ll save — especially if you’re a woman, since you won’t be allowed to drive anyway. Ken Burton, Eureka

Devious Birds Editor: Thank you very much for the article (“Bright Birds,” June 28) by Heidi Walters in the North Coast Journal. I found it informative and inspiring. I want to disagree however with one of the article’s minor conclusions, that Steller’s jays only “stumble upon” bird eggs. I feel certain

Cartoon by joel mielke

that they do stumble on some. But they also conduct synchronized searches for them. Many times over many years I have seen a small flock of them going after nests. Characteristically, a couple will distract the nesting victims with calls and proximity while another one or two or three will silently search through the canopy for the nest. I have also seen both single Steller’s jays and scrub jays directly

follow spotted towhees into places where the towhee may be nesting. They also watch the activities of juncos, apparently with an eye to discerning the nest location. I think not all Steller’s forage by the same techniques, and perhaps this fact has misled you. For example, wasps have nested for many years under my eaves. But in the last two springs, one Steller’s Jay has gone around under my eaves and attacked every nest, apparently eating the

grubs. This is new behavior involving only one bird each year. It has been shown that songbirds have relatively large brains for their body size. I think this must increase the probabilistic aspect of their behavior. Consider for example the blue tits of England in 1920, and their learned behavior of stealing cream. Robert Sutherland, Ettersburg continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

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continued from previous page

Rail Fumbles

these

you’re FURNITURE gonna

need

press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com

Editor: A pox on both your houses!  Let’s be honest, Ms. Hodgson (“We Have a Plan,” June 28), you don’t really pretend that, when gasoline goes up to $10 a gallon (as it inevitably will), that all of you pro-trail/anti-rail voices will sit quietly by and watch your newly won trainless trail be taken away by a reincarnation of the railroad because it will be (as it is now), the most fuel efficient, energy friendly form of transporting people and freight? Come now, I can see the crossed fingers behind your backs. Surely we all know that once the tracks are “rail-banked” it will be for all time. Any move to make a withdrawal from that bank will be met by howls of indignation from those same people who are now promising to respect the need for any future reactivation of the rails. “Just give us what we want now and we’ll respect you in a future morning.” I think we’ve all heard that one before. And as for you, North Coast Rail Authority, did I and others not stand before you years ago and make the point that your collapsing infrastructure along Humboldt County’s busiest highway would, inevitably, lead to a major political push to take it away from you? Did I not tell you that you faced a use-it-or-lose it proposition? That unless you got something running in those tracks this day would come to pass? Now, NCRA, due to your years of leaderless bumbling you face a determined opposition that will in all likelihood confiscate your railroad. You Humboldt County NCRA representatives chose to listen to those on the southern end of the railroad who made all sorts of sweet, vague promises. Now they have freight and, soon commuter trains, and what does Humboldt County have?  I’m waiting for your answer. John Webb, Trinidad

PLAZA

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Editor: I want to respond to the publisher’s column, which mentioned railbanking as an option for the use of the Northwest Pacific Railroad right-of-way between Arcata and Eureka. This is supposed to preserve it for use if rail service is reestablished. This sounds good, but experience has shown that once a trail system is constructed, rail service is never restored. This is because of politics and expense. The Timber Heritage Association has been working very hard to create a railroad museum and establish an historic tourist train around the bay. It has been agreed upon for a rail and trail system from Samoa to Arcata. If the two groups can agree on sharing the right-of-way from Samoa to Arcata, why not all the way to Eureka? The historic tourist train would not only generate revenue for THA and Arcata, but for businesses in Old Town Eureka as well. The column stated that if rail service was re-established, the trail could be relocated alongside the tracks. Why can’t the trail be located there in the first place, so both systems could be utilized? I believe the trail advocates want the rails pulled, knowing that they will never be re-installed. If you support an historic tourist train around Humboldt Bay, I hope you were able to attend the meeting on July 11 when the trail advocates were to present their trail plan to the North Coast Railroad Authority. Scott R. Baker, McKinleyville Editor: NCJ’s Ryan Burns (“Choo-Choo Fantasies,” May 24) professionally researched the East/West railroad idea, and showed even a “feasibility study” is a waste of time and money; it would spend $250,000 in taxpayer money studying the wrong things. Supervisor Mark Lovelace’s request for solid research on market need has gone unanswered. And many other

www.northcoastjou

No one has imagined Hands holding hands holding hands across the Bowery, Connecticut, the Lower East Side, Vermont in autumn, the cornfields and Buffalo plains, the Canyon, Oakland, Humboldt County, the Oregon border, Mt. Rainier We want to live like trees taking and giving and taking and giving and taking and giving and taking and giving and taking and giving — dappled with scars only seen in the moonlight when I lift my shirt and lift my arms out of their armholes and say, “Look, look, I am older now” but it is still me. I am still becoming whole. It is not over yet still exuberantly budding ideas and lovesongs dreams of the endless handholding and thank you prayers and notes of appreciation. Leaves opening green and ready for the circling of boughs and streamers of the maypole, the whole Earth’s maypole. The politicians forget their wallets and we have health care and gardens full of plums and corn. — Stephanie Silvia (With lines from Adrienne Rich, 21 Love Songs)

Write a letter!

urnal.com

Humboldt County residents supporting economic development want facts, not faith, justifying a public project. Some proponents claim questioners oppose “all’ economic development. I want economic development and jobs for Humboldt County, but oppose wasting scarce tax dollars on grandiose dreams. The jobless and “working poor” desperately need achievable, “right now” ideas, and this railroad isn’t one of them. Railroad supporters seem to believe this hundreds of millions of dollars scheme will come from “someone else’s” tax dollars, but there are no “someone else’s” tax dollars — we’re all in this economy together! There are dozens of good ideas for small existing and new business economic development. Let’s pursue those ideas, and not get distracted with unreachable dreams from an era that has passed. Jeff Knapp, Arcata

 

Correction

Last week’s cover article “Gasoline Kings,” relying in part on an incomplete state list of station ownership, misidentified the ownership of several branded gas stations. The Shell and Chevron stations in Arcata, Dave’s 76 in Fortuna and Earp’s 76 in Garberville are independently owned. The Journal regrets the error. ●

Please try to make it no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

7

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Summoned

Many are called — and called — to serve on Humboldt juries By Zach St. George

zachstgeorge@northcoastjournal.com

W

hen Jim Scott saw a red, white and blue slip in his mailbox, summoning him to jury duty, he felt sick.  “I just got a sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach,” he said. “I thought, ‘Oh God, here we go again.’” He’d been expecting the summons. It had been exactly 90 days since the mailman left the last one — right on schedule. Scott gets summoned regularly, at least once a year, usually more. During two separate years, Scott was summoned four times. Since moving to Humboldt County from Ohio 23 years ago, Scott said he’s been summoned close to 40 times. While he’s probably unluckier than most, public records suggest that he’s hardly alone. Anyone with a driver’s license or an ID card from the Department of Motor Vehicles, or anyone registered to vote can be selected for jury duty. At the beginning of each year, the county merges the DMV and the voter registration lists to form its jury pool. At the beginning of the 2010-11 fiscal year, Humboldt County’s jury pool contained roughly 105,700 names.  During that year, the court issued 93,000 summonses. So odds are, most people in the pool will get called. Most weeks, the Humboldt County

Superior Court sends out 2,000 jury summonses — 425 every Monday through Thursday, and 200 on Fridays. The court sends so many summons out, said Courtroom Services manager Sara Biasca, because more than three-quarters of those summoned either aren’t eligible, are excused or don’t respond. Humboldt’s summons response rate is slightly less than the statewide average of 30 to 40 percent, said Kristin Greenaway, senior court systems analyst for the California Superior Court system. That could be one reason why some people here feel as though they get summoned frequently. It’s not just a problem for people in small counties like Humboldt, however, Greenaway said. Frequent picks like Scott could just be unlucky, she said — it’s all up to the computer that chooses the names. Kate Lehre also wonders whether that computer is biased. She’s lived in Humboldt for 30 years, and every year she and her husband both receive jury summons. One friend, meanwhile, hasn’t been called for jury duty in eight or nine years of living in Humboldt. Her friend doesn’t vote, but has a driver’s license. The computer is great at randomness, but it can’t tell when two names belong to the same person, which probably means that a lot of summonses go to

Stay up to date all summer long with activities for kids in our May 17th, 2012 edition, or online at www.northcoastjournal.com

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

people who are supposed to get a break. “If it’s Jane E. Doe on your voter registration and Jane Elizabeth Doe on your driver’s license, the computer thinks those are two different people,” Biasca said. That means that if someone has two names in the pool, they could receive up to four summonses a year. Frustrated by his frequent summons, Scott called the court in the early 2000s. A court worker told him that he had two names in the pool, and that it would be corrected. Now, he said, the names on the summonses are the same, but they come just as frequently. Biasca said nobody should be summoned more than twice a year, but unless mismatched names are corrected at the DMV and with voter registration, the problem will recur each year, when those agencies send the court their new lists. People who think they’re being erroneously over-selected should call the courthouse, she said. In order to be eligible in the first place, potential jurors must be 18 years or older. They must be county residents. They must speak English, and must not be a convicted felon. Active-duty police officers are temporarily excused, as are members of the county Grand Jury. And those people who are summoned and just blow it off? The court sends them a failure-to-appear letter, which warns them that they could be found in contempt of court. Typically, many of the no-shows are people who had moved and didn’t receive the summons in time. Those people are given a new court date. People who ignored the summons and are found in contempt of court can be fined, jailed, or both. Court executive officer Kerri Keenan said, however, that in her 4½ years on the job, she’s never seen anyone penalized for

failing to appear. “We want people to participate in the democratic process,” Keenan said. “We don’t want to hit them with a hammer when they don’t show up.” The names in the jury pool are always changing. When people call in to check if they need to appear for jury duty, their names are withdrawn from the pool for six months. If they are required to appear at the courthouse, then their names are withdrawn from the pool for one year. If they are selected as a member of a jury, then their names are withdrawn for two years. Because jury summonses are sent out each week, names are withdrawn and re-added to the pool constantly. Scott lived outside of Humboldt for more than 50 years and was never summoned once, he said. Less than a year after moving to Eureka, the summonses started. Two decades and dozens of summons later, he’s feeling like moving away. There are other factors, he said, but the jury summons is the biggest. Only around 750 people served on 63 jury trials in 2011 — less than 1 percent of those summoned. That’s little consolation for Scott. “Oddly enough, I have yet to sit on a jury,” he said. He feels that his frequent selection is indicative of a broader problem with the court’s selection methods. “Jury service is touted as one of the proud responsibilities of citizens in this country,” he wrote in a letter to the county Grand Jury. “Sadly, the jury selection process in Humboldt County has turned a jury summons into an onerous duty and frequent harassment that is endured at best and is to be avoided if at all possible.” The Grand Jury replied that it had no jurisdiction over the jury selection process, and returned his letter. l

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

9

Blog Jammin’ ENERGY INDUSTRY / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / JULY 10, 3:23 P.M.

Shell Out Well, looks like that pretty ridge view is safe from those nasty turbines now. This from Shell: Shell exits Bear River Ridge Wind Project We would like to inform you that Shell WindEnergy Inc. has decided to exit the Bear River Wind Project due to unfavorable market conditions and issues pertaining to the transportation logistics. ● ACTIVISM, COURTS / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / JULY 10, 12:35 P.M.

Jury Ponders … And Ponders A jury is taking plenty of time thinking about a new law — specifically about whether it should convict three people accused of defying county limits on courthouse protests. Jurors went home at midday Tuesday with no verdict, and now have deliberated for longer than it took to try the three, who stood with lighted candles outside the courthouse after 9:30 p.m. “I can’t believe they’re still deliberating. … The jury is working very hard,” said Deputy Public Defender Casey Russo. “It’s hard to tell what it means. They’re asking a lot of questions,” said Deputy District Attorney Jackie Pizzo. The case is the first criminal trial stemming from Humboldt County’s attempt to limit protests outside the courthouse in Eureka. (That law is also being challenged in a civil suit, and critics have contended that it is so broad it violates the Constitution.) The three people being tried, Peter Camacho, Kimberly Starr (aka Verbena) and Amanda Tierney, are accused of violating a provision that prevents most people from being on the courthouse grounds after 9:30 p.m. ● ENVIRONMENT, TRANSPORTATION / BY RYAN BURNS / JULY 9, 3:42 P.M.

Judge backs Caltrans on Richardson Grove A Humboldt County Superior Court judge today ruled that Caltrans’ Environmental Impact Report for the Richardson Grove Improvement Project does not violate the California Environmental Quality Act.

The ruling (follow a link on our blog to read it in full) reads as a systematic repudiation of the major claims from the petitioners, including a trio of nonprofit environmental groups: the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC), the Center for Biological Diversity and Californians for Alternatives to Toxics. In a nod to the high level of public interest in the case, Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Dale Reinholtsen begins with a rather unorthodox message to the general public, warning against the kind of hyperbole that has surrounded the project thus far: Caltrans is not going to cut down or otherwise remove any old-growth redwoods from Richardson Grove State Park. There is absolutely no basis is reality for believing that Caltrans “wants” to “destroy” old-growth redwoods. … The evidence is quite obviously and overwhelmingly to the contrary. There is also no evidence that the project was undertaken to satisfy the needs of “big-box” retailers or “corporate giants.” [Emphasis included in original.] Meanwhile, a similar battle in federal court remains on hold pending mapping revisions. In his ruling, Reinholtsen starts off diplomatically enough, saying both sides presented “thoughtful, well-researched arguments meriting serious consideration.” But the even-handed compliments end there. From that point the decision goes into exasperated smack-down mode: The judge calls petitioners “less than forthcoming.” He describes one argument as a red herring and lambasts another as “nothing more than an exercise in wordplay.” Point by point, he dismantles their case. For example, the judge dismisses the notion that Caltrans had a “secret agenda” to widen the roadway for STAA truck access by pointing out that Caltrans’ made this justification clear from the jump, even going so far as to include EPIC on its mailing list. As for the old growth redwoods in question, Reinholtsen says their value stems mostly from their visibility and symbolic meaning, rather than any ecological importance. Statistically, he says, they’re an insignificant portion of the state’s remaining old growth stands (decimated though they are). He concludes that the project won’t ruin the “profound aesthetic experience” provided by these trees. The judge even goes so far as to suggest that some of the petitioners’

allegations may be disingenuous. The petitioners suggest that Caltrans essentially admitted some degree of guilt simply by preparing an Environmental Impact Report, which by definition addresses significant environmental impacts. On page 16 of the 30-page decision, Reinholtsen dismisses this canard with the tone of a disapproving schoolmarm: “That is simply untrue, as Petitioners must know.” The level of detail that the petitioners would like to see in the environmental documents is “uncalled for in CEQA [the California Environmental Quality Act], and indeed possibly unlawful,” Reinholtsen concludes. As if scolding naughty children, the judge then launches this rebuke: We are simply not talking about effects that ‘when taken in isolation, appear insignificant, but when viewed together, appear startling.’ … We are instead talking about effects that when taken in isolation, appear absolutely trivial (or even non-existent), and when viewed together appear a little less trivial. The only potential impact of the suit on Caltrans is a requirement to adopt “a reporting or monitoring program … designed to ensure compliance [with CEQA] during project implementation.” The judge ordered the parties to meet up and work out an agreement on the particulars to ensure this happens. Caltrans heralded the ruling in a press release, writing: Today’s ruling brings the challenges to the project a major step closer to resolution. Route 101 at Richardson Grove has been under study for more than ten years and Richardson Grove Improvement Project has been actively in development since 2006. Minor changes to the existing alignment will be made without removal of any old growth redwood trees in order to allow industry-standard sized truck access along this portion of Route 101. As the court emphasized in its decision, the project was planned and designed to avoid removing any old-growth trees. Natalynne DeLapp, development director for the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC), said in a phone interview that the petitioners are disappointed in this ruling, though she stressed that the case is not over, partly because of the reporting and monitoring

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

required. More significantly, DeLapp said, the project remains on hold pending the remapping that was ordered by a federal judge last year. “For us, I take solace and comfort in the fact that the grove is still protected because of the federal injunction,” DeLapp said. ●

CRIME, CURIOSITIES / BY RYAN BURNS / JULY 3, 1:25 P.M.

Female Cage Fighter Tackles Eureka Transient The Journal moved its offices to Old Town Eureka two years ago to be in the middle of the action, but this morning’s events weren’t exactly what we had in mind. I’d just stepped outside our door to make a phone call when a group of young people sprinted past, hung a left at the corner and disappeared. Okay, whatever. It’s Old Town. Then they reemerged, carrying a guy. Now I was interested. Turns out Nikki Owen had just gotten her ring resized at the goldsmith’s shop across the street from us. When she walked out the door onto F Street she saw a man having something of a temper tantrum. He kicked the sandwich-board sign outside the Old Town Market and ran away, Owen said. The proprietor of the store, Jay Joh, emerged and yelled something to the effect of, “Stop him!” And here’s the thing about Nikki Owen: Not only does she value properly fitting bling; she happens to be a cage fighter from Hoopa. Owen took off after him. Some friends joined in. “I had to citi-

zen’s arrest this guy,” she bragged to one of them later. “I chased him down and slammed him.” The friends carried the suspect back to the store and stood watch until the cops arrived. Store owners Jay and Sung Joh gave this account of the events: The man had tried to purchase a bag of tobacco, some rolling papers and a sports drink with a debit card, and when the card was twice declined he became angry and refused to relinquish the merchandise he’d gathered. He finally did hand it back, Jay Joh said, but then in a fit of pique started kicking stuff. When Eureka police arrived, Officer Justin Winkle explained to the Johs that the man was a known transient who “tends to be a problem once in a while.” Their options were to a) press charges or b) let the officers give him a warning for trespassing. They chose Option A. Before hauling the supsect to jail, the officers took Owen’s number and thanked her for her service. Owen and friends piled back into their van and took off. And Old Town Eureka returned to abnormal. ● ANIMALS, ENVIRONMENT, LAW / BY HEIDI WALTERS / JULY 3, 4:13 P.M.

Bite You in the Face That’s what the Humboldt marten does to the porcupine, supposedly. And it’s what the Center for Biological Diversity does, too, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fails to do what the center wants — in this case, protect the minksy little triangle-eared critter, of which there are apparently only 20 left in California and 100 total in existence anywhere. In a news release sent out today, the center announced it was suing the service for failing to act on a 2010 petition to protect the Humboldt marten under the Endangered Species Act. This January, the service said that Martes americana humboldtensis’ need for protection may be warranted. But then it failed to make a final decision by an April deadline. The center announced it would sue, and now it has. The center claims that the service’s failure to make a final ruling could legally lead to a default, in which some protections “immediately go into effect for the marten.” With a little helpful nip on the nose, perhaps. ●

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

11

: 7 07 A Moment in Humboldt

Photographs by Journal Readers

HONORABLE MENTION “McKinleyville Morning, Coffee and an Ocean View.” By Bryan Wilson.

Morning

J

ust a few steps, and the views are endless. Past the guy probing the edge of the parking lot with a metal detector. Past the two forms huddled green and blue in sleeping bags, deep in a dune swale. Past the sand flecked with charcoal and old fireworks. They were 6:45 a.m. This is 7:07. The sky crumples in a dozen shades of fog:

“The Prince” (Agaricus augustus) with banana slug near Prairie Creek in Orick. By Gary Lester.

pewter, pearl, alabaster, bronze. The closest waves splash and trickle, tenor to the bass that pounds beyond them. In less than 20 minutes, a short walk from a parking lot toward the wandering mouth of the Mad River, and there is no one in sight, no one to be heard, nothing but the sweep of shore and sea and sky. Solitude. It’s part of what pulls so many of us to Humboldt or keeps us here. A land as lush and empty as we need it to be, whenever we crave it. The tide is going out, and the beach is wide here. Green lines of old waves wriggle across the sand. Damp underfoot, and then damper, the sand turns half-liquid beneath the toes. A thin sheen of water spills over crab shells, broken sand dollars, coin-shaped stones. To the north, ocean and hills disappear in a white mist. To the south, waves repeat and repeat until there’s nothing but a gray shimmer. Away from the waves, back where the sand turns powdery, a breeze lifts a wisp of dried seaweed. Tiny insects, dappled brown and tan, go invisible between each move. A raven caws. Walk further, where the surf sound fades, and songbirds are raucous in grasses. Beyond, in every direction, are all of Humboldt’s solitary retreats: redwoods, meadows, rivers, mountaintops. Where was your 7:07? — Carrie Peyton Dahlberg

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

“Pewetole Island,” with Trinidad Head in the background and enveloped by the fog. By Simona Carini. “This is part of the poetry of living in this beautiful place: Every day, it’s different; every day, it’s a surprise.”

“Boat Moored in Trinidad Harbor” taken from the new pier. By Chelsea Sandige.

The Contenders

We received 145 entries (wow!) and we couldn’t cram them all into these pages. See more of our favorites online at www. northcoastjournal.com. The three prize winners will receive their photo printed, matted and framed by Humboldt County’s own Swanlund’s Camera. North Coast Journal staff, writers and their families couldn’t resist contributing, but were not eligible for awards. Some photos were cropped for our print edition.

Banana slug breakfasting on honeysuckle near Van Duzen River, Carlotta. By Anthony Westkamper.

“Redwood, Sorrel and Ferns.” By Gene Genoar.

Stacks of lumber air-drying at California Redwood Company in Korbel. By Edward Olson.

“Woodmill in Samoa.” By Jimmy Callian.

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

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continued from previous page

WINNER “He Jumped.” By Hannah Larkin. “I really have the most wonderful boyfriend. As I’m trying to think of things to take pictures of for this contest, he jumped into the water at exactly 7:07 just so I could snap the most amazing photo. It was a perfect moment.”

HONORABLE MENTION “Hammocks on a Hot Evening” near Dinsmore. By Dottie Simmons.

“Ramshackle House.” By Adrienne Phillips. “Along LK Wood Boulevard sits this shack, a drab antique of Humboldt.”

“Petrolia Road.” By Anthony Westkamper “When I left home to photograph one of the beautiful vistas on the Petrolia Road it was sunny. By 7 p.m. I could barely see the grasses on the side of the road. So I rode back to this point, set up my camera, and took pictures. After which I went straight to Starbucks for something warm.”

“Summer Project.” By Tracy Jordan French

14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

“Old Town Window.” By Kimberly Hendrickson. “A quiet moment in a reflective window at Arts Alive in Old Town.”

HONORABLE MENTION “Glancing Back – Moving Forward” either way is pleasant in Humboldt. Miller Lane, Arcata Bottoms. By Sheryl Sandige.

“Ferndale.” By Jessica Felse. “Shot looking out from the top of Ferndale Cemetery, 7:07p.m. and 51 degrees. Brrrrr.”

“Robert H. Madsen Bridge.” By Mary Bullwinkel. “The Robert H. Madsen Bridge over Jordan Creek in Humboldt Redwoods State Park is located south of Scotia, just off the Avenue of the Giants. The old Highway 101 bridge was built in 1938.” continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

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“Cone Truck.” By Angie Valetutto. A man laying out cones to block off the street for farmer’s market.

“Garden Candy.” By Holly Harvey. “Grass Snack for the Flock.” By Elizabeth Who.

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“In the Green House.” By Grant Thomson.

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

“Homegrown Broccoli” on an organic balcony garden. By Maria Mueller.

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“Ready for the Market.” By Bob Doran. Eric “E.J.” Justesen of Blue Jay Nursery in Carlotta and his son William set up their booth early at the Arcata Farmers’ Market to avoid the last-minute chaos. They are about to head for The Big Blue Café for breakfast.

Fieldbrook Winery

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Fortuna Rodeo • July 16-22

Don’t wait in line, Go online!

continued from previous page

Go to www.FortunaRodeo. com to buy tickets for any rodeo event, including the Barbecue, Cowboy Mixer and admission to all three days of rodeo events. Register for ATV events online, even buy Fortuna Rodeo hats and posters! Available until 5 p.m. Thursday July 12th.

“Self Portrait,” playing with leftover sparklers in the northern Humboldt redwoods. By Natalie Arroyo.

www.fortunarodeo.com

“Early Morning Double Bald Eagles,” on the Trinity. By Tibora Bea and David Bethuy. “A true Humboldt Moment.”

“Joey and Harry,” taking a quick break from their morning game of fetch to pose for a photo. By Dave Fuller.

“Corn Plants on the Arcata Bottoms,” dog-high by the seventh of July. By Elizabeth Who.

Judy Willis

“Skunk on the Front Porch.” By Rachel Almanas.

18 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

“American Goldfinches.” By Holly Harvey.

HONORABLE MENTION “Humboldt Wine.” By E. Chris Wisner. “The most important part of dinner preparation.”

WINNER “Evelyn” at her parents’ wedding fiesta in Ferndale. By Lynn McCulloch.

“Joe and Tyla Seal the Deal.” By Jeff Schmitt. Joe Miller and Tyla Hafstrom’s wedding at Trinity River Farms in Willow Creek, Calif.

“Katie and Mario Maggio.” By Andrew Goff. Katie and Mario share a 7:07 moment along the shore of the Eel River on their fifth wedding anniversary — they were married on the way more legit 07/07/07.

“Gaby and Jesus” at their wedding fiesta in Ferndale. By Lynn McCulloch.

“Celebrating a 7-7-77 Birthday,” on 7-7-12 at 7:07 p.m. in Rita’s. By Hayley Sirrine.

“The Mundane at KMUD’s 25th.” By Talvi Fried. “These were taken at (what I was told) was 7:07pm. (I work for Sweet Basil, one of the companies vending/catering at KMUD’s 25th event) and well, I only had a minute then BACK TO WORK XD. I missed shots of the adorable Humboldt Fire, costumed promo gals passing out papers and the half naked men of various age groups grooving like only people in Humboldt can groove.” continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

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From

continued from previous page

wedding plans to dinner plans... we guide the way! HONORABLE MENTION “The Dance Scene.” By Zoey Gordon. Dancers Halie Gordon, Sarah Mastroni and Carrie Maschmeier on the vista point at Table Bluff. Carrie Maschmeier notes, “It was very cold and windy on Table Bluff at that time, especially for leotards, so we stayed in my Volkswagen van until 7:02 and then ran over, got in our positions, made some adjustments and snapped the photo. Then we all went back to Arts Alive!”

“Yard Art with Sarah Alexander.” By April Alexander.

ID E IN S ues

Ven lry e Jew ns and s Gow doe Tuxe ers Flow ries e Bak More And

“Alton Chord Gabriel Paredes.” By Debbie Topping. Newborn baby Alton Chord Gabriel Paredes with his parents, Monica Topping and Gabe Paredes at Mad River Birthing Center. (Photo by Alton’s grandmother.)

“Dog Pile,” Karsen (11), Kyler (5), Madisen (9) playing in the back yard. By Kim Coelho.

The Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt. Menu of Menus is available at newsstands throughout Humboldt. And online at

www.northcoastjournal.com or call 442-1400 for more information. “Twins.” By Gail Slaughter. “Siri and Gemma Caruso brush their teeth early in order to watch a video before bed at Grandma’s house.” The girls, their mother and siblings are staying with grandma while their dad installs new flooring at their house in McKinleyville.

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

“Sleep-in Saturday.” By Anna Tempelaere. “A picture of my 5-year-old daughter, Ava, sleeping at 7:07 a.m. on Saturday.”

Hunan, Szechuan, Peking, Cantonese & Asian Cooking Beer & Wine Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week 4th & D Streets • Eureka 269-2618 “Arts Alive Alley.” By Ken Malcomson.

“Seagulls and The Siren.” By Lisken Rossi. The talented Aimee Montague Taylor with Jack Sewell’s sculpture, “Following Current Events,” both wrapped in Humboldt fog.

“Lily.” By Jessica Casandra O. “My daughter Lily begged to be my subject and posed on our front lawn with her favorite umbrella.”

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

“Sculpture at Fire Arts Center.” By Katie Whiteside. “There is a garden down at Fire Arts that many people overlook.” Many treasures can be found there. Patrick Moran tends to the garden and created this statue. The hands hold birdseed.

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET • EUREKA MONDAY-SATURDAY 11:30AM-9:00PM

HONORABLE MENTION

“Graffiti Only Humboldt Can Produce.” By Meghan Quintanilla. “This is a sign at the end of my street in Eureka.” “Arcata Plaza Reflected in Window of Natural Selection.” By Sydney Fisher Larson. continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

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continued from previous page “Actors Warming Up.” By Edward Olson of Designit Digital Multimedia. Ron Halverson, Bonnie Halverson, Nathan Emmons and Nanette Voss-Herlihy warm up onstage at Redwood Curtain Theatre in Old Town Eureka, before the evening’s performance of the play Show People.

“SO GOOD.” North Coast Journal

835 J Street, Arcata • 822-WISH Open For Dinner @ 5:30 pm Tues-Sun

“At KHSU with Your Saving Grace.” By Jesica Bishop. “She was playing all songs involving photography in the lyrics.”

Ch

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Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

HONORABLE MENTION “Reading Rack at the Coffee Shack.” By Russ Cole. International periodicals on display at Café Mokka in Arcata.

“Andy Jones.” By Mike Dronkers.

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

“Float Like a Feather In a Beautiful World.” By Bob Doran. Mustachioed busker Rick Fugate sings “Creep” by Radiohead, accompanying himself on accordion during Arts Alive! in Old Town Eureka. Ciara Weaver stops to drop a tip in his case while her husband Zach waits down the alley. Chuck Johnson of Freak Photo records it all for posterity.

“Mike Dronkers.” By Andy Jones.

Evening

C WINNER “Evening Kickflip in Old Town.” By Rose Lily Levy.

“The Kinetic ‘Velo Crab.’” By Mark A. Larson. “The latest incarnation of Matt Porr's kinetic sculpture team was parked on the Arcata Plaza.” “Empty Lot Full of Future.” By Kathy Srabian. “Empty lot waiting to become a playground at Jefferson School.”

“Good Dog and Wanda at Arts Alive,” featuring the work of John King. By Terri Vroman Little. “We took our daughter to Arts Alive tonight because, for the first time ever, she asked to go and see the art. What can one say when an 8-year old asks for that? We said OK!!”

ats tiptoe along broken sidewalks, two men tinker under the hood of a Chevy pickup, the scent of grease and dishwater mingles with the gray, still air, and on E and F and G streets people walk, in twos and threes and whole families, down to the center. The tsunami zone. Where the black hands on the tall blue street clocks glide. Alone on a corner a block from the F Street Plaza, a girl rolls a slow tune on her green banjo. Another girl stands statue straight in a blue doorway with her ukulele; she sings high, sweet, a little off key. A guy balances a greasy plate of Smug’s pizza on a wood post, dank coolness leaks from the Pearl, and inside the Vance the Fortuna Camera Club is gathering. Old Town is doors-open — music thrums, people wander in and out of galleries sniffing the paint and proclaiming they liked the frame, the scrubbed wood floor, the way the dog jutted paws-andhead from the wall, the leaf shimmer, the misty cliffs, the way those red blotches looked like robots. Or streetlamps. Loud chatter in the square, and cheers. Shrieks. Thin Perico, from Chile, is again atop his high unicycle juggling knives. Soon Candy Pants Broken Glass will be landing with her bare feet — crunch! — onto the pile of jaggy glass bits. The merry clown-haired fellows are still a block away, pedaling a behemoth kinetic sculpture as slow-fastly as they can. The sky hangs, thin and gray. Plump, inked arms extend, pulled by dogs. Kids squeal, splashing in the fountain. Zoltar (“I see you over there!”) accosts another hip couple — him in buff Carhartts and North Face fleece, her in black mini, lace tights, kneehigh boots and a flowery hoodie. Blue cake. Yellow cake. Green cake. Students sell goodies so they can get to Belize. Calvary Chapel will say a prayer for you. Another group offers rainbows. A councilwoman stumps for more time. Anna sells paper roses. A waft of medicine tickles the nose. The black clock hands move … then it’s 7:07 p.m. Marty backs his carriage closer to the crowd, white horse ears-atwitch. Chatter-roarlaugh-shriek-thumpa-dee-thumpety-drumssplash-Whooo! On the boardwalk, where the teenagers have gathered in cliques, a pelican launches from the wood railing and rises up, out, over boats and bay. Tilts to sweep over the town, wings slowly pumping, pulling everything into the vortex: salt air, salmon, towns, redwoods, ocean, rivers, sunny south and sunny east, foggy heart. Minutes have ticked past, but it’s still 707. Forever. — Heidi Walters ●

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

23

Sunny Brae •Glendale Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Prices Effective July 11 through July 24, 2012

Meet our neighbor Tom and Dutchy have known each other since grade school in Hamilton, New Jersey. Dutchy ended up in

Amsterdam for college and Tom, a woodcrafter of custom mats and frames, played soccer on the US national circuit. Each man walked his own path and ended up in a California with the mutual lament of “Why can’t we find any pizza like we used to have when we were kids?” With that in mind, and Dutchy’s experience making pizzas since his early teens, Dutchy and Tom began creating until they had the perfect recipes. Now they are co-owners of Dutchy’s Pizza where they use simple, quality ingredients for that perfect pizza experience. With Murphy’s Westwood Market down the street, they never run out of their favorite organic ingredients!

Newman’s Own Pasta/Spaghetti Sauce

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24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Ryan “Dutch

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1

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northcoastjournal.com

pull-out A RT sect i on

Eclectic Artisans By Jason Marak

L

ove it or loathe it, everyone has to agree that the Arcata Plaza is an eclectic place: from the people to the shops and restaurants, the Plaza runs the gamut. On the Plaza’s west side, there is a shop that embodies the spirit of its location. Arcata Artisans has been displaying and selling the work of a diverse group of local artists and craftspeople for more than nine years. For July, Arcata Artisans features a collection of artists that shows the variety of its membership: printmaker Marsha Mello, jeweler Kris Patzlaff and ceramic artist Michael Pearce. Marsha Mello, a member of Arcata Artisans since it began, has been a printmaker for more than 30 years. Mello employs the age-old intaglio method that involves drawing images on copper plates that are then etched in acid. It’s a medium she finds well suited for capturing the detail in the variety of natural subjects she explores: Birds, marine animals and insects are among her favorites. Mello’s latest exhibition focuses on birds. “I am endlessly intrigued by their grace, elegance and variety, and strive to show their connections to their surroundings and place in the world,” she writes in her artist statement. Those connections are evident: The patterns and movement of the COUNTERCLOCKWISE FROM TOP “TEAPOT,” CERAMICS BY MICHAEL PEARCE; “CURIO,” NECKLACE BY KRIS PATZLAFF; “GREAT BLUE HERON,” ETCHING BY MARSHA MELLO

lines that describe the background in each scene seem connected to the patterns and lines in the birds themselves. The birds are part of their environment and the environment is part of the birds. Mello hopes that her work will inspire people to learn more about that environment and, as a result, help to protect it. Kris Patzlaff, another longtime Artisans member, has been making and exhibiting jewelry for over 35 years. Patzlaff is showing some recent carved acrylic, jet, bone and carved black coral pieces reminiscent of organic shapes like branches and stones combined with formed and fabricated silver components, often covered with intricate patterns and textures. Looking at her work, one gets a strong sense of parts coming together to create an even more interesting, often unexpected, whole. She speaks of her work as a discovery process with pieces evolving as she puts them together. “For me, that keeps it refreshing and fun,” she said. “A lot of jewelers, and I have great respect for them, will design something and then they’ll make it and you can look at their drawing or their design and go, ‘Yup, that’s it!’ None of my jewelry has ever been like that; I’ve always had this element of assemblage,” said Patzlaff. A set of necklaces she titled “Curios” was inspired by the idea of 16th and 17th century cabinets of curiosities. “Early travelers would bring back odd things from their travels and then put them into these cabinets. They were sort of like the first museums before museums existed. My house is similar to that,” Patzlaff said with a laugh. “I have a lot of cabinets with different things in [them], different things I collect.” While making and displaying the jewelry brings its own rewards, Patzlaff sees the end of the process as something a bit more personal. “It’s so important for

me for someone else to own it, enjoy it and wear it. And for the jewelry — when those necklaces are on the body, that’s their home, that’s where they should be.” Ceramic artist Michael Pearce is the newest member of Arcata Artisans and this is his first featured exhibition with the collective. While he is the newcomer to the group, Pearce certainly isn’t a newcomer to his chosen medium. He started working with clay in 1970 with wheel thrown pieces. More recently, he’s been focusing on slab-built forms using highfire techniques with porcelain and stoneware clays including asymmetrical vases and teapots of various sizes. Something about the irregular shapes makes you want to pick them up to feel the edges and curves. Colors range from strong blues to more muted, natural tones. “I like stuff that’s asymmetrical — it kind of gets more of a movement going,” explained Pearce. “I started distorting my thrown forms a little bit, I just liked it better when they weren’t perfectly symmetrical, and then [using slab-built forms] just launched [the work] into a new dimension.” The teapot is one of Pearce’s favorite forms. In addition to providing numerous elements to manipulate (spout, handle, lid, body), the form allows Pearce to highlight another aspect of his work: whimsy. The lids of Pearce’s teapots are home to a variety of figures and scenes, from surfers to dogs and cats. “I love being able to stick a little element of humor in and I can’t really do that [with a standard vase]. They’re very expressive, teapots are, for me — it’s just fun,” Pearce said, “I’m just kind of addicted to it, really.” ● There will be a reception for the artists at Arcata Artisans (883 H Street) on Friday, July 13, from 6-9 in conjunction with Arts! Arcata.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

25

Second Friday Arts! Arcata Friday, July 13, 6-9 p.m.

Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at more than 30 participating locations in Arcata. Visit www.artsarcata.com for even more information about the event or call 822-4500.

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latrattoriaarcata.com • 822-6101

Dinners Thursday-Sunday, 5:30-9:00 p.m. • 30 Sunny Brae Center • Arcata

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

1. Abruzzi 780 Seventh St. Live music; Serving late from 7 to 10 p.m. 2. Arcata Artisans Cooperative 883 H St. Marsha Mello, printmaker; Kris Patzlaff jewelry; Michael Pearce, ceramics; Natalie DiCostanzo, potter; Jim Lowry, photographer; Betsy Roberts, metalwork. 3. Arcata City Hall* 736 F St. Cynthia Julian, mixed media. 4. Arcata Exchange 813 H St. Ron and Donna Queen, Topside Photography; Live music by Jennifer Breeze. 5. Arcata Holistic Health Center 940 Ninth St. Catalina Ruiz, acrylic on canvas; Live music by Candace Wase and James Robinson.

6. Arcata Marsh* 569 South G St. William Wood, bird photography. 7. Bon Boniere 791 Eighth St. Arcata Arts Institute; Arcata Police Department volunteers table. 8. Bubbles 1031 H St. Live music from the bluegrass band, Clean Livin’. 9. Café Brio 791 G St. Faye Honoroff, oil paintings; Live music by Blue Lotus. 10. Fire Arts Center 520 South G St. #A. Locally made textured sculpted ceramics by Kristin Dalziel and Rahi Miraie. 11. The Garden Gate 905 H St. Andrew Daniel, Autumn Reflections; oil on wood; music by Chris Parreira and friends.

northcoastjournal.com

book THE CREW OF THE NEWEST ADDITION TO HUMBOLDT’S MUTANT ART VEHICLE FLEET, THE THUGBOAT, INVITES YOU TO AN ARTS! ARCATA OPEN HOUSE AT MISCHIEF LAB TO SEE THE PROGRESS OF THE FAUX TUGBOAT. THE MOBILE ART PIECE BUILT OVER AN ISUZU TRUCK FRAME BOASTING FIRE POOFERS, WATER CANNONS, FLOODLIGHTS AND A BASS HEAVY SOUND SYSTEM IS A COLLABORATIVE PROJECT LINKING MISCHIEF LAB WITH ONE WAY FIRE, WOODLAB DESIGNS AND BLUE LAKE IRON WORKS. THE THUGBOAT CREW IS PREPARING TO SET SAIL ON THE SEAS OF BLACK ROCK DESERT OVER LABOR DAY WEEKEND.

12. Hensel’s Ace Hardware Kitchen Store 884 Ninth St. Willie McCarthy, oil paintings; Beth Gin, watercolors. 13. Humboldt Hardware 791 Eighth St. Nature Joe and Turtle Mountain Designs, reclaimed ecofriendly woodworking; Learn about Nature Joe’s animal education programs. 14. Humboldt Outfitters 860 G St. SunnyBrae Middle School Artwork, mixed media; Live Music by The Speakeasy Saints. 15. Humbrews 856 10th St. Brian Woida, records, textiles, prints and skateboards. 17. Ironside Gallery 900 Ninth St. Member Artists and Humboldt Arts Project. 18. Jambalaya 915 H St. Sierra Martin, mixed media. 19. Libation 761 Eighth St. Sandy LeBlanc, Libation in View, photographs; Live music by guitarist Duncan Burgess. 20. Mazzotti’s 773 Eighth St. Jen Mackey, mixed media.

UMPQUA BANKS’ UPSTAIRS GALLERY FEATURES PAINTINGS OF CLASSIC MILITARY AIRCRAFT BY TEXAS-BORN ARTIST HOWARD RUTHERFORD WHO SERVED IN THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. MEET THE ARTIST AT AN ARTS! ARCATA RECEPTION FRIDAY FROM 6-9 P.M. 21. Natural Selection 708 Ninth St. Shayne Holler, driftwood wall art; Annie Howell, driftwood dancers; Michael Guerriero, serigraphs; Marg Miguel, watercolors. 22. North Soles Footwear 853 H St. Maureen Fitzgerald, photos, Women of the World. 23. Om Shala Yoga 858 10th St. Jessie Albee, Mystic Truths Art. 24. Plaza 808 G St. Lisa Landis, pastels; Kellie-Jo Brown, photography. 25. Redwood Curtain Brewing Company 550 S G St. #6. Gabriel Watson, photography. 26. Robert Goodman Winery 937 10th St. Susanna Snodgrass Gallisdorfer, acrylic paintings.

27. The Kushite African Art and Herbs Store 1062 G St., Suite A. Music by Abba Rootz Sound System; Special guest appearance by renowned poet Amde of the Watts Prophets. 28. The Rocking Horse 791 Eighth St. Children’s art. 29. Soul to Soul Spa and Footbar 854 10th St. Sue O’Kieffe, digital art. 30. Stair Gallery 839 Ninth St. Stefan Elliott, oil paintings. 31. Upstairs Art Gallery 1063 G St. Howard Rutherford, Flight, oil paintings. *These venues are open only during regular hours ●

Skios By Michael Frayn Metropolitan Books

  On the stage, farce is about running in and out of  doors, concealment and revelation, expectation and  illusion, pretence and persuasion, need and want.  Michael Frayn, who wrote what many regard as the  best stage farce of the age (Noises Off), wondered if  he could write farce as a novel, and this book is the  convincing — and consequently very funny — result. How could a younger, handsomer and utterly  feckless guy successfully impersonate a staid expert  guest speaker at the annual gala of an international  foundation dedicated to preserving Western Civilization, held on the private Greek island of Skios? A lot  of coincidence helps, but much aid comes from very  contemporary examples of human nature. Rich, powerful and educated, the gulled audience nevertheless  is a willing accomplice. When the imposter suggests  he could easily be someone else, they happily agree.  “We’re all such fools!” There are some slamming doors and bedroom  misadventures as well as star-crossed suitcases and  taxi rides, though the mechanics of this farce also  involve cell phones as the modern gateways to  confusion. The ambitions, emotions and pretensions of a number of other characters are exposed  and involved, including the real guest speaker — an  expert in the “scientific management of science”  whose convictions as well as disposition make him  peculiarly vulnerable to chaos. Another contemporary mechanism of farce working here is the  space-erasing jet engine, which makes the difference  between places (Skios or skiing in Switzerland) way  too easy to miss. What the novel adds to stage farce is getting  inside the characters’ heads to learn the precise  nature of their delusions, and the yearnings and  weaknesses that feed them. How they — and we  — tend to interpret the world from a few tellingly  misunderstood clues is deliciously described. This  novel extends not only from Frayn’s plays, previous  novels and journalism but from his philosophical  work (The Human Touch) with its insight that: “The  world plainly exists independently of us — and yet it  equally plainly exists only through our consciousness  of it.” When the two factors collide you may have  drama and tragedy, or comedy and farce. Even with satirical touches, Frayn creates a  convincing world so endearingly vulnerable to this  kind of mayhem that farce seems inevitable, yet you  wind up rooting for the irredeemably irresponsible  protagonist to get away with it. There are sweet  reminders of Kosinski’s Being There (as well as Ferris Bueller’s Day Off) in this fragile oasis of uncertain civility where bored but lionized experts speak to rich,  dutiful but bored audiences. Not everything at the  foundation is what it seems either, as the routines  of greed undermine the frightened maintenance of  civilization, in a fiendishly funny finish.  — William Kowinski

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

27

BONNIE AND RON HALVERSON PLAY MARNIE AND JERRY IN SHOW PEOPLE. COURTESY OF REDWOOD CURTAIN

Show and Tell Game-playing comedy at Redwood Curtain By William S. Kowinski williamkowinski@northcoastjournal.com

I

n Show People, the contemporary comedy now on stage at Redwood Curtain in Eureka, the middle-aged acting couple of Marnie and Jerry (played by Bonnie Halverson and Ron Halverson) begin their latest performance. But it’s not on stage, where they haven’t worked in a decade: it’s at a posh vacation home with an ocean view. All they know about Tom, their employer (Nathan Emmons), is that he’s a software entrepreneur currently negotiating a huge buyout by Microsoft. They’re supposed to play his parents, for the benefit of his soon-to-be fiancé, Natalie (Nanette Voss-Herlihy). Any ethical questions are bypassed for the work of improvising convincing characters, as well as to the sorely needed payday. From here the plot moves quickly but in directions that it would be unfair

to divulge, in deference to potential audiences. A first act revelation only complicates the possibilities, leading to a buzz of intermission wonderment. Though the second act wanders a bit, it does resolve neatly. Apart from clever plot twists and turns, the thinness of the play is counteracted by the characterizations and performances, with room to grow. Bonnie and Ron Halverson play the realities rather than the stereotypes of professional actors. Nanette Voss-Herlihy plays Natalie’s earnestness and vulnerability. But none of it would work without yet another superior performance by Nathan Emmons, who again proves he can be subtle as well as powerful. In the course of the play, we learn of Jerry and Marnie’s dappled careers

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

as a Broadway couple who never quite achieved stardom, including an opening night Jerry believes could have taken them to the next level, but it was ruined by a backstage mishap. That night will return to haunt him one more time. We learn of the strong crosscurrents of their marriage, as well as Natalie’s youthful ambitions and doubts, and as the play strays into Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? territory, shards of Tom’s family background are sent flying. But the play pulls back from any real engagement, leaving us to ponder the subtext of powerful yearnings for the conventionally perfect family and perfect life. Though not at the level of the theatrical in-jokes of Shakespeare in Love (for instance), there is some sardonic commentary on theatrical history and contemporary practice. There is also a version of a famous Hamlet soliloquy that is a slightly exaggerated version of an all too familiar approach. The credibility of the plot depends on the seductive mystique of the garageto-riches techie billionaires and their potential position as the wealthy eccentrics of the age, especially as combined with the quiet desperation of financially as well as emotionally vulnerable actors dependent on capricious outside forces for their sustenance and their opportunities to perform. The result is a mostly clever though convention-riddled diversion, conveniently packaged in a nice two hours. It would be nothing more than this except for the humanity that these actors bring to roles that reviews suggest have been interpreted much differently elsewhere. Playwright Paul Weitz first attracted attention as a screenwriter and director, beginning with American Pie in 1999. He followed up his successful romantic comedy film In Good Company (2004) with three stage plays, including this one in 2006. He continues to work in film, directing Little Fockers in 2010. Show People is very capably directed

by Clint Rebik, with an attractive and functional set by Liz Uhazy, lighting by Greta Stockwell, sound by Jon Turney and costumes by Sarah McKinney. It continues at Redwood Curtain Thursdays-Saturdays at 8 p.m. through July 28, with a 2 p.m. Sunday matinee on July 22.

Coming Up:

Parents who enjoy an outdoor show with the family at the Mad River Festival, but had doubts about explaining Mary Jane: The Musical to their children, can confidently bring the kids to Dell Arte’s The Fish in My Head this coming weekend, July 12-14, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday July 15 at 4 p.m. in the amphitheatre out back. It’s a self-created, circus-style fantasy about “the untold stories that swim around in our dreams,” complete with music, acrobatics, physical comedy, masks and stilt-walking. There are special familyfriendly admission prices, too. The Berserker Residents, an ensemble from Philadelphia, will perform their “burlesque cabaret meets three-ring circus” production of The Jersey Devil at the Arcata Playhouse on Friday and Saturday, July 13 and 14, at 8 p.m. There’s an opening act at 7:30 p.m., too: San Francisco clown Summer Shapiro. Speaking of cabaret, Ferndale Repertory Theatre opens the famed musical Cabaret on Friday, July 13, at 8 p.m. Though this show set in 1930s Berlin has been revived and revised several times since its 1966 Broadway debut, many probably still know it from the 1972 film version with Liza Minnelli and Joel Grey. However, the stage play is different from the film to an even greater degree than usual. On Saturday, July 14, North Coast Repertory Theatre holds a fundraiser at the Wharfinger Building in Eureka. It’s the 2012 Pirate Ball, with music by The Delta Nationals and performance by the Ya Habibi Dance Company, among other swashbuckling features. Doors open at 7 p.m. ●

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The drunken botanist

Stop the Madness! By Amy Stewart

amystewart@northcoastjournal.com

the “Enough Already” PHoto by AMy Stewart

L

et us review the brief and troubled history of the Modern Cocktail. It began in the early ‘90s, when youngsters realized that a Martini was a nice thing to order in a bar. A few variations on the Martini followed, most notably the godawful “dirty Martini” made with excessive amounts of olive brine, and the vodka-based Cosmopolitan, which featured prominently in HBO’s Sex and the City. That gets us to about 1999. A few years later, somebody in Brooklyn decided it might be refreshing to order a drink with some whiskey in it, and pretty soon we all remembered about the Manhattan and the Old-Fashioned. (See AMC’s Mad Men, 2007.) Around that time, a few bartenders grew out their sideburns, put on vests and started mixing Prohibition-era cocktails with obscure and interesting ingredients that had to be smuggled in from London because liquor distributors had not yet caught on to what was happening. The smuggling was part of the fun, actually: These bartenders preferred to mix their strange and wonderful drinks in tiny unmarked basement rooms that they

called “speakeasies,” thus allowing us all to pretend we were doing something illegal or at least illicit when at best what we were doing could be called “exclusive,” which is to say that we were simply paying very high prices for very nice drinks in locations that were (for a short time) not well known to tourists. Meanwhile, on the West Coast, bartenders realized that as long as chefs were working with fresh, seasonal, locallysourced ingredients, they might as well get in on the action and infuse some cucumbers in vodka or throw some basil under the muddler. Which was a fine idea. That brings us to about a year and a half ago, when it all went to hell. Here’s what happened, as near as I can figure: The fancy cocktail movement went on a date with the slow food movement, and they had a few too many drinks, then they went back to the fancy cocktail movement’s apartment, and things got a little out of hand, and together they spawned the Modern Cocktail. The Modern Cocktail might have a dozen or more handcrafted, artisanal, obscure ingredients. It might call for such

things as freshly-pressed heirloom tomato water, rhubarb-vanilla-ginger simple syrup, a rinse of absinthe or vermouth, a mist of rose water, a few drops of housemade cigar and allspice bitters, and the frothy whites of a freshly-laid egg from a young Ameraucana hen who has been named after a member of the Algonquin Round Table. You may have to special-order an aromatized wine whose name you cannot pronounce. Essential oils may be involved. There could be vinegar or pickling liquid. The glass may be placed atop a board of smoldering hickory to coat its interior in smoke. Spice-impregnated sugar may grace the rim of the glass. A garnish of snap peas, sun-dried beet chips, or imported Italian marasca cherries soaked in Kentucky bourbon may confront the (by now quite thirsty) drinker trying to get at the beverage. The Modern Cocktail is, in short, a mess. This was illustrated most recently by the short-lived fame of the Bone Luge, in which alcohol is chugged through a splitapart animal bone so that some of the marrow mixes with the booze as it goes down the hatch. Awful, right? Makes you long for the days when a good-looking man or woman dressed mostly in black would just stand behind the bar and shake a few ingredients over ice and pour it in a glass and wish you a good evening. Here’s the thing: Making really good liquor is complicated enough. Whiskey goes through a very careful fermentation and distillation process in wonderfully crafted copper stills, then it gets aged in a precisely charred oak barrel that may — believe it or not — be made only from one particular part of the oak tree because the distiller believes that branches make for better booze than trunks do, or the other way around. Gin might have a dozen or more botanical ingredients, with each flavor extracted or infused or distilled in a different manner. Vermouth has a few dozen ingredients, and those crazy old European herbal liqueurs like

Chartreuse claim over a hundred. A good classic cocktail — a Martini or a Manhattan or a Vieux Carré — might already contain 70 or 80 distinct botanical ingredients, and that’s before you add the olive or the cherry or the lemon peel. Does a bartender really need to contribute a few dozen more? Lately I’ve heard of gin infused with cattails, Campari infused with cardamom and bourbon soaked in barbecued short ribs. No good can come of this. So here’s my advice to you, the recreational drinker, the amateur bartender, the gardener: Grow a little mint in your garden for mojitos and mint juleps. If you’ve got raspberries or any other kind of summer fruit you don’t know what to do with, wash it well, pack it into a Mason jar, and fill it up with decent vodka. In a few days it’ll be ready to filter and drink. If you’re lucky enough to have a citrus tree, by all means make some homemade limoncello. But beyond that? Don’t go too crazy. Even a simple drink is already extraordinarily, wonderfully complex. Here’s what I’ve been drinking this summer. I don’t know if this drink has a name; it’s just something I mixed up one night when I wanted something a bit drier than Lillet but not quite as strong as a Martini. It contains several dozen herbs, spices and fruits, all blended together in complicated infusions and extractions on strange equipment in a foreign land — but all you have to do is buy two bottles and mix them together. The Lillet will keep about a month in the fridge after you open it, and if you can’t get G’vine (a lovely French gin made from a grape spirit similar to that found in Lillet) use Tanqueray instead. Here, I’ll make up a name for it: Enough Already 3 oz Lillet blanc 1 oz G’vine Floraison gin Lemon peel for garnish Shake and pour into a short rocks glass with ice. Add more gin if you feel like it. Drop in a lemon peel. Drink. l

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No

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northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Deadline: Noon Thursday the week before publication

The 51 Cards photo by Bob Doran

Take a Card

The 51 Cards, plus garage girls, Potluck, Avalon Allstars and jazz by Jill By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

T

he sound of a young saxophonist struggling through “American Patrol,” wafts from a practice room at Mantova’s Two Street Music while a rock trio called The 51 Cards sets up on a stage in the main back room, preparing for a rehearsal. Guitarist JR Perez kicks off an upbeat tune, “Undertow,” and drummer Adam Summers and bassist Rich Macey join in. “Nothing’s exactly what you would expect it to be. Take it from me,” sings Perez as he rolls out quarter note triplets. The Cards’ sound is bright and positive, with a youthful exuberance that comes from the fact that the members are all teenagers. “I don’t try to emulate other bands, but at the time we started developing our sound I was listening to The Strokes and Vampire Weekend a lot,” said Perez, when the band took a break to talk. “And I used to be a huge Led Zeppelin fan. We’re going for a really big sound, trying to fill as much space as possible.” The group began with Perez helping a friend, Christian Legaspi, flesh out a solo project called Chasing Royals. While at Mantova’s in McKinleyville they came across Summers,

32 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

who was new in town, practicing on a drum kit. Since Chasing Royals needed a drummer, they recruited him. Not long after, Legaspi decided to move on, but the band did not die. “The 51 Cards name comes from the fact that when the original guy left we were one card short of a full deck — it’s a bad joke,” said Perez, who assumed band leadership. Macey, who had a punk/ska band called The Chocolate Strawberries, would later replace a departing member on bass. “I actually booked their first show,” he explained. “I have this program I started at the Arcata Playhouse, Apprentice Entertainment, a bunch of kids who get together to put on shows. I wanted to book shows for local teenagers. It’s hard for teen bands to book shows because you’re not allowed to play in bars and it’s hard to get festival gigs.” Difficult or not, Macey landed the band gigs at the Humboldt Arts Fest and Humboldt Made Fair; he’s working on the North Country Fair. Monday night The 51 Cards play another Apprentice gig at the Arcata Playhouse, sharing the bill with Tough Stuff, an emo/punk quartet from Orange County. The digitally aware teens invite you to, “find us on Facebook,

ReverbNation, Twitter, Instagram, Soundcloud, even MySpace,” but most of all they want you to hear them play live. Do. I think you’ll like what you hear. Thursday at the Lil’ Red Lion Cocktail Lounge it’s a night of woman-centric rock with girl garage rebels The Lost Luvs, “Theraflufueled synth pop delirium” by Blood Gnome and Deep Time from Austin. Lost Luver Aimee Montague Taylor (see Moment photo page 21) describes Deep Time as “like a bit of Liliput, QuixOtic, Electrelane and Young Marble Giants all mashed up — so many of my favorites!” Incidentally, that’s Natalie from Blood Gnome in the self-portrait on page 18. You may have heard the rumblings in the local rock world about a band taking the monster rhythm section of The Hitch, drummer Steve “Thee Alchemist” Bohner and bassist Roshawn Beere, adding killer guitarist Pablo Midence from Dragged by Horses and a keyboard player, Andy Sorter. Briefly known as Yeti Fight and/or El Yeti, the band is now called Lord Ellis (a much better name). Imagine losing your breaks at the top of a mountain pass and rolling downhill with only the grinding metal of your gears for control — that’s what Lord Ellis feels like. The band has been woodshedding for a long time without many club gigs, but now the heavy hitters are emerging from their practice space to play a Friday the 13th show at the Lil’ Red Lion, sharing the bill with Vastum, a brutal metal band from Oakland. New dad Gabe Pressure (see on photo page 20 — congrats to the whole fam!) is escaping from baby duty for a Friday night post-Arts! Arcata ‘80s dance party at the Jambalaya. He’s joined by DJs Anya, Zephyr and Knutz spinning “all vinyl” dance tunes spanning genes: new wave, dark wave, synth, pop, punk, hip-hop, electro-funk and more. “Eighties attire and rump shaking encouraged.” (DJ Gabe spins again Saturday night at the Shanty.) Nocturnum has been pretty quiet lately aside from Miles PsyFi‘s Whomp Whomp Wednesday dance-a-thons. Friday the Eureka club brings in Arden Park Roots, a reggae/ rock/punk/dub band out of Sacramento for a tribute to Sublime, creators of the reggae/ rock/punk/dub genre. Former L.A. funk rockers Chris Hancock and Chris Brown downshifted to acoustic guitars, practiced some tunes by Hank, Willie and Johnny, hooked up with mandolinist/ vocalist Melissa Bernadt, became Merchants of Moonshine and moved home-base to Nashville. MoM twangs it up at the Wave Friday night. Local hip hop luminaries Potluck have been spreading the Humboldt brand cross-country on the “Underground Rebels Tour” with support from Kungfu Vampire, DGAF and The DRP. Saturday night the crew brings it back

home with a show at the Jambalaya presented by Fatbol with “special guests” including local rapper Hiway. A Humboldt Free Radio show Saturday at The Alibi pairs psychedelic doom band Antikythera from Portland with dark country punk Saint Christopher “from the open road.” Jasmine the all-ages princess alerted us to the fact that Saint Christopher is also playing an all-ages show early (7 p.m.) Sunday night at the Ink Annex with locals Gunsafe and The Bored Again, as well as Derek Dunn from The 357 String Band. “It’s put on by The Placebo, so of course there will be no drinking or smoking at the venue. Should be a killer show.” (Gunsafe also plays the McKinleyville Farmer’s Market Thursday.) Humboldt’s new jam central, Swain’s Flat Outpost, out Highway 36 near Carlotta, hosts a Sunday evening show by The Avalon Allstars, a band that takes its name from San Francisco’s famed Avalon Ballroom. The line-up is indeed all-star with Ray White and Will Bernard on guitars, Bobby Vega on bass, Alan Hertz drums (if you remember KVHW, this is the same band but with Bernard in place of Steve Kimock). Local rockers Knights of Van Duzen open the show. Doors at 4 p.m. Showtime at 5:30. Jill Petricca has been busy lately: She took over from Mike McClimon as director the venerable Scotia Band, playing Sousa marches and the like. She also plays classical music and jazz on her flute and doubles on saxophone. Sunday afternoon she leads a combo for “Jazz at the Graves” with Matt Beck on trumpet, Tim Randles on piano, Michael LaBolle, drums and Shao Way Wu on bass. “The Graves will groove, bop and dance,” she promises, adding, “The monthly concert is always opened up to the community for a lively jam session for the last half of the afternoon. Set the date, don’t be late, and reconnect with this local opportunity to support jazz, community and local art.” The Riverwood Inn doesn’t usually do midweek shows, but Loreen Eliason made an exception for blues guitarist Walter Trout who brings his kick-ass band to the Avenue of the Giants Tuesday, July 17, in part because of a high-powered recommendation: “Tommy Castro told me that if I ever had a chance, to book Walter Trout. I can’t believe our luck that we were able to reel him in,” said Loreen, inserting a bad fishing pun. Same Tuesday at the Lil’ Red, the SoCal band 2HUNDREDWEST stops by on its “Orange in Hindsight” tour. The band, allegedly “known for laid back beach and sun sound,” promises to “bring summer into any room and transform every hot sunny day into a cool chilled out night,” which should not be too hard to do in fogged in Eureka. Is this really summer? l

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33

51 YEARS! of Kickin’ it up in the Redwoods

ORICK RODEO JULY 14th AND 15th

Saturday, July14th 9am Jackpot Roundup 1:30pm Quad Competition 3pm Coronation

Kids’ Games

Sunday, July 15th 11am Listen to “Redwood Ramblers”

entertainment in bold includes paid listings

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clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue

11am Quad Competition 11:30am Deep Pit Beef BBQ

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1pm Kids’ Games

Ticket Drawing

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5pm Jr. Steer Riding

Mutton’ Bustin’

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www.thealibi.com

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Saint Christopher (outlaw country) Antikythera (PDX doom) 11pm $5

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 9th St.

Mutton’ Bustin’ Calf Riding

thur 7/12

2:30pm CCPRA Rodeo

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453

RODEO EVENTS BOTH DAYS

Bull Riding • Bareback Riding • Saddle Bronc • Team Roping Calf Roping • Barrel Racing • Steer Wrestling Breakaway Roping • Sunday Only: Calf Dressing NO DOGS OR ICE CHESTS ALLOWED

BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Sci Fi Night ft. Hercules 6pm-10pm All ages Free

The Jersey Devil 8pm

The Doors (1991) Doors at 8:30pm $5 Rated R

Immediately like us on Facebook. Now.

HFS Barn Dance w/ Sue Moon 7:30pm Free pool in back room Happy Hour 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

www.barflypub.com

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

Don’s Neighbors (classic rock) no cover 9pm

Taxi (classic rock) no cover 9pm

Merchants of Moonshine (country/blugrass) no cover 9pm

Dr. Squid (dance/rock) no cover 9pm

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke 8pm-1am

The Last-Minute Men 8pm

CAFE MOKKA Arcata 822-2228 C ST. PLAZA Old Town, Eureka

The Jersey Devil 8pm

Brad Wilson Band (blues/rock) 6-8pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

BossLevelz w/Masta Shredda & Itchie Fingaz no cover 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Tripwire (classic rock) no cover 9pm

Déjà Vu (classic rock) no cover 9pm

DELL’ARTE Blue Lake Sour Cream (blues/rock) 9pm

EUREKA INN 497-6093

Sponsored by Orick Chamber of Commerce For info Call: 707.488.2885

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521 HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata

Scotch Wiggly (alt. classic rock) 7pm Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close! Freelove Circus Benefit 9pm

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger Fishbone (ska/funk) Pyrx 9:30pm $25/$20

Not your average “pub grub”

The Understudies (hip hop) 9pm

DJs Gabe, Anya, Zephyr, Knutz 9pm

Potluck, DGAF (hip hop) 9pm

French Wine Flights on Fri. and Sat. in honor of Bastille Day Deep Time, Blood Gnome, The Lost Luvs (indie) 9pm

Arts! Arcata: Duncan Burgess (guitar) 7-10pm no cover

Kipp and Lee (jazz) 7-10pm no cover

Lord Ellis, Vastum (heavy rock) 9pm

Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 6pm

Wasteland Hop (indie) 6pm

Don’t think of it as work, think of it as fun! HFS kick-off party: Pilot Rock Ramblers, The Spindrifters 6pm

Sqeeze Bug @ Henderson Center Gunsafe @ McKinleyville

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

UKEsperience 9am-2pm on the Arcata Plaza

Buddy Reed, (gut bucket blues) 7-9pm

Brian Oberland (mandolin) 7-9pm

DJ Jsun & friends (dance music) 9pm-midnight

DJ Jsun (dance music) 10pm

Located in beautiful Old Town DJ Itchie Fingaz (dance music) 10pm

PERIGOT PARK Blue Lake PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

Easton Stuard (jazz piano) 7pm

Steve Smith and Tommy Lockett (jazz fusion) 7pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

Check Facebook for updates about live music and other special events

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Get your Growlers filled

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

West African Dance 7pm

Congolese Dace with Makaya 5:30-7pm Gabriel Lubowe (alt) 7pm

Learn more at www.redwoodraks.com

Irish Music Night 7:30 pm free

Happy hour M-F 4-6pm

Blake and Rich (old time) 7-10pm

Ken Jorgenson Band (country swing) 8-10pm

Dr. Squid (dance rock) 10pm-midnight

Watch the Sunset from our fun bar!

HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata

Happy Hour All Day!

INK ANNEX 47B West 3rd St Eureka JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake NOCTURNUM Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

Visit our NEW Arcata Store

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad

at 10th & H Streets

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩ G E NTLEMEN ’ S C LUB

Celebration Sale both locations

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM

Buy 2 Hoodies Save $10

CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923

Buy 2 shirts Save $5

Nightly 8pm-3am

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

1 8 + O N LY

King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

REDWOOD YOGURT Arcata ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Waiting on Trial (bluegrass) 9pm

DJ Gabe Pressure 10pm

THE SHANTY Eureka SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

Karaoke 7-10pm MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Rude Lion 10pm Dale Winget 6pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Pizza Night!

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Buy 2 hats/beanies Save $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

Arden Park Roots (Sublime) 9:30pm

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

JD Jefferies (folk) 9pm

Strangled Darlings (folk/country/jazz) 9pm

Undone (blues) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

SugaFoot (blues duo) 7:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 9pm

Boss Levelz 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

SWAIN’S FLAT OUTPOST Carlotta TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza

WINE SHOP

ARTS! ARCATA, DUNCAN BURGESS on Guitar SANDY LE BLANC “Libation in View”

Potluck’s Underground Rebels Tour Saturday at the Jambalaya

sun 7/15

mon 7/16

tues 7/17

wed 7/18

DJ Anya 11pm $3

Your friend on the Arcata Plaza.

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Who Bombed Judi Bari? 7:30pm

The 51 Cards, Tough Stuff 7:30pm $5

The Muppet Movie (1979) 5:30pm $5 Rated G

Who Bombed Judi Bari? / Q & A with Darryl Cherney Doors at 7:30pm

Find our website at www.arcatatheatre.com

UPCOMING: Sci Fi Night is Thurs, July 19! 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages Free

www.barflypub.com

Free pool in back room Happy Hour 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

www.barflypub.com

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Holdem 6:30pm

A Chance to win $1,000,000

A Chance to win $1,000,000

No Limit Texas Holdem 6:30pm Poeina Suddarth (alt. chanteuse) 7pm

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

www.bluelakecasino.com

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

200 West (pop/rock) no cover 9pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool & $3 Wells

Folklife Fest Songwriter Night 7:30pm

Folklife Fest Jazz Night 7:30pm

Folklife Fest Country Night 6pm

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long!

Call In Your Order: 822-8433

UPCOMING: Fox Street Allstars July 20 St. Christopher, Gunsafe 7pm

UPCOMING: David Nelson Band July 21

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two Sola Rosa (hip hop/reggae/jazz) DJ Touch 9:30pm $10

Fri., July 13, 7-10 pm • no cover

KIPP & LEE, Jazz Duo

Sat., July 14, 7-10 pm • no cover

CELEBRATE BASTILLE DAY AT LIBATION WINE BAR! Wine Bar & Store: Open Monday through Saturday 8th Street on the Arcata Plaza • 825-7596

*ENJOY OUR BOTTLED BEERS, TOO!*

LIBATION

www.humboldtbrews.com

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza We got beer.

Happy Hour 6-8pm Monday - Thursday, $1 off wine by the glass JE Double F, Greenlander, MC Homeless 8pm

www.libation.com

We are a certified wine shipper

200 West (pop/rock) 9pm

Repeat: We got beer.

Annie and Mary Day after party w/ Jimminy Picket 5pm

Purl and Pour come craft/knit

Karaj (singer/songwriter) 6pm

4 For Jazz (jazz) 6pm

All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Online at humfarm.org

Boltin Basil @ Old Town Eureka Jeff Kelley @ Wildberries

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

Whomp Whomp Wednesday 9pm

northcoastjournal

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

GLDT and ALLY Open Mic 6pm

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com Annie and Mary Day 11am

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

www.persimmons.net or find us on Facebook

Open 2-10pm Wed-Fri

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Live music 7-10pm

Tasting Room open Mon-Wed 4-11pm Thu-Fri 4-12, Sat. 12-12, Sun 2-10

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Happy Hour? Happy Day!

Tasting Room open Mon-Wed 4-11pm Thu-Fri 4-12, Sat. 12-12, Sun 2-10

Let us host your next event!

Swing Dance Night! 7:30pm Class, 8:30pm Party, $5

Intermediate Tango 7-8pm $10

Intermediate Belly Dance 7:30pm

Alana 6pm

“Like” us on Facebook.

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Swing Dance Night 7pm free

End the weekend right Dine early

Check out our Sports Bar

Wallace and Phines noon-3pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

St. John: Unplugged 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Secret Password Hint: South of St. Charles Avenue

SugaFoot (trumpet/guitar duo) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

@ncj_of_humboldt

Jam Session 9pm

It’s here! Hot off the press!

Walter Trout (blues) 9pm $15 Make Early Reservations for the weekend 407-3550

Full cocktail bar

Open 7 days New Thai

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

The Avalon Allstars 4pm $25/$20 adv.

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

www.northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

35

SEVEN ACTOR/MUSICIAN/ACROBAT MEMBERS FROM DELL’ARTE’S 2013 MFA ENSEMBLE PRESENT THE FISH IN MY HEAD, A FAMILY-FRIENDLY COMEDY ABOUT THE UNTOLD STORIES THAT SWIM AROUND IN OUR DREAMS AND THE IMAGINATIVE REALMS OF TRANSFORMATION. THE SHOW RUNS THURSDAY THROUGH SATURDAY WITH A 4 P.M. SUNDAY MATINEE OUTDOORS IN THE ROONEY AMPHITHEATRE IN BLUE LAKE. PATRONS SHOULD NOTE THE 7:30 P.M. SHOW TIME, EARLIER THAN OTHER FESTIVAL EVENTS, TO ACCOMMODATE THE YOUNG OF AGE AND YOUNG AT HEART.

THE HIT BROADWAY MUSICAL CABARET, DIRECTED BY GINGER GENE, OPENS FRIDAY AT FERNDALE REPERTORY THEATRE WITH KELSEY MACILVAINE AS THE DECADENT EMCEE. THE SHOW RUNS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS WITH SUNDAY MATINEES EVERY OTHER WEEKEND THROUGH AUG. 26, IN ROTATING REPERTORY WITH WOODY GUTHRIE’S AMERICAN SONG.

12 thursday THEATER

The Fish in My Head. 7:30 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. One-of-a-kind theatrical storytelling spectacle celebrating the mysteries of the imagination. Combines mask, circus skills, physical comedy, stilt-walking, music and song. $10/$5 kids 12 and under. dellarte.com. 668-5663. Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain, 220 First St., Eureka. Married Broadway actors Jerry and Marnie haven’t worked in years and are desperate to take any acting job that comes their way. Written by Paul Weitz. $10 on Thursdays. redwoodcurtain.com. 443-7688.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. humfarm.org. Music by Squeeze Bug. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farm-fresh produce every Thursday. Music by Gunsafe. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

ETC.

Humboldt Rose Society. 7 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Monthly meeting. 476-8180.

13 friday EVENTS

Arts! Arcata. 6-9 p.m. Around Arcata. Self-guided, public art phenomenon featuring the work of more than 60 visual artists and live musicians at over 30 participating locations. info@arcatamainstreet.com. 822-4500.

THEATER

The Jersey Devil. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Philadelphia theater ensemble The Berserker Residents perform an original, fast-paced telling of the myth of the New Jersey Devil done in a burlesque cabaret meets Laugh-In format. Pay what you can. arcataplayhouse. org. 822-1575. The Fish in My Head. 7:30 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater. See July 12 listing. Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See July 12 listing. Cabaret. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. FRT performance of the celebrated Broadway musical. $10. ferndale-rep.org. 786-5483.

DANCE

World Dance Party. 7-11 p.m. Redwood Raks, 824 L St.,

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

THE NORTH COAST REPERTORY THEATRE PRESENTS THE 2012 PIRATE BALL SATURDAY AT THE WHARFINGER BUILDING, A COSTUME PARTY FUNDRAISER WITH SINGING PIRATES AND OTHER NAUGHTY NAUTICAL FUN. EXPECT BELLYDANCING BY THE YA HABIBI DANCE COMPANY AND DANCING TO MUSIC BY THE DELTA NATIONALS. EYE PATCHES, PIRATE SWORDS, FOOD AND DRINK WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE.

Arcata. Begins with lessons, then moves to dancing to music by Chubritza and The Club Band. $5. www. humboldtfolkdancers.org. 822-8045. Humboldt Folklife Festival Kickoff Barn Dance. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J St. Featuring bands Wild Rumpus and Blake and Sam with callers Sue Moon, Mike Mulderrig and Matthew Marshall. www. humboldtfolklife.org. 822-5394. Jammin’ Fridays. 8-11 p.m. Humboldt Capoeira Academy, 865 Eighth St., Arcata. Swing dancing. Lindy hop lesson with Phillip and Aleisha. $5. loverlipe@hotmail. com. 616-8484.

ART

Westhaven Showcase For the Arts. 6 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Musicians play, community members listen. $5/$10 sliding scale.

MOVIES

Who Bombed Judi Bari? 7:30 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Documentary about Earth First! organizer and car-bomb victim Judi Bari produced by her eco-cohort Darryl Cherney. whobombedjudibari. com. 923-3368. The Doors. 8:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The ultimate story of sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll. $5.

arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

ETC.

Catalog Release Party. 4 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Catalog documents the Pi’êep Káru Payêem: Long Ago and Today exhibit, focused on the continuity of Karuk culture and art from time immemorial. Creator Julian Lang signs copies and answers questions. clarkemuseum.org.

14 saturday EVENTS

51st Orick Rodeo. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Orick Rodeo Grounds, Hwy. 101. CCPRA Rodeo competition and family fun including deep-pit beef barbecue dinner, traditional kids’ animal chase and auction. Mutton busting starts at 4 p.m. Rodeo starts at 5 p.m.. 488-2885. Friends of the Dunes 30th Birthday Celebration. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. A guided walk, cake, activities for kids, new interpretive displays, Discover our Dune and Bay

MANILA DUNES

Dune-gooders The coastal dunes along Humboldt Bay have lots and lots of friends, enough to put your Facebook count to shame. We’re talking more than 250 different species — species! — of birds; more than 200 kinds of plants; and more than 40 varieties of bees. (Seriously? Wow.) Plus the Wiyot people, who have hunted and gathered there for thousands of years. For eons these friendships were pretty darn stable, even as the dunes themselves drifted hither and yon with the waves and wind. Then came the invasive species, led by a virulent strain of white people. These uninvited pale folk were less than courteous to the Wiyot people (read: massacre) and rather pushy with the dunes, too. Not only did they drain and dike the neighboring marshy areas, they also introduced some aggressive foreigners, including iceplant and European beachgrass. These botanical newcomers loved hanging out with the dunes, which was nice and all except for the fact that, like the bullies who brought ’em here, they tried to gentrify the place. Gripping the dunes with their tenacious roots, these invasive plants threatened to push out friends the dunes had known for ages. Thankfully, some new friends came to the dunes’ rescue — groups such as The Nature Con-

servancy, the Lanphere Christensen Dunes Preserve and, starting in 1982, the Arcata-based nonprofit Friends of the Dunes. These pals set about restoring the coastal ecosystem and educating the surrounding community through guided walks, school programs, naturalist trainings and more. This Saturday, the Friends of the Dunes will host their own birthday party at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center (aka the Stamps House, that adorable Hobbit-dome shelter in Manila). “As part of our 30th birthday celebration, we are inviting the community to come out and see the Nature Center’s new exhibits, hike the self-guided trail to the beach, enjoy music by the Spindrifters and, of course, have some cake,” said Carol Vander Meer, FOD’s executive director. The event kicks off at 1 p.m. with music by the Spindrifters. At 1:30 a short ceremony will honor the Stamps family, who built the dome structure as a retirement home in 1985. At 2, birthday cake will be served and at 3 a trained naturalist will lead a dune wildflower walk. Kids’ activities, including dune bingo and sand art, will be available throughout the afternoon. Show up early and grab a free poster of local artist Gary Bloomfield’s new mural, “Humboldt Bay and Dunes.” The Humboldt Coastal Nature Center is at 220 Stamps Lane in Manila. — Ryan Burns

art show by local students, music by The Spindrifters. friendsofthedunes.org. 2012 Relay for Life. 10 a.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Honor cancer survivors, pay tribute to loved ones lost and raise money to help fight cancer here in your community while taking laps on CR’s track. Opening ceremony at 10 a.m., Colors of Hope Lap at 10:30 a.m., luminaria ceremony at 9:30 p.m. 725-8769. Eighth Annual Barnyard Brew. 5-9 p.m. Garberville Rodeo Grounds, Greycliff Acres, Benbow. Benefit for Heart of the Redwoods Community Hospice with food by Fabulous Flaming Chefs, microbrew tasting from 5-6 p.m., bluegrass music, silent auction, kids’s activities. $30. www. heartoftheredwoodscommunityhospice.org. 923-7276. Pirate Ball Fundraiser. 7 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Ma-

rina Way, Eureka. Dance to music by the Delta Nationals, enjoy belly dancing by Ya Habibi and sing pirate songs. Proceeds benefit North Coast Repertory Theatre. $10. ncrt.net. 442-6278.

THEATER

The Fish in My Head. 7:30 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater. See July 12 listing. The Jersey Devil. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See July 13 listing. Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See July 12 listing. Cabaret. 8 p.m. Ferndale Rep. See July 13 listing.

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

37

continued from previous page

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Festival Kickoff Party. 5-9 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company, Blue Lake. Featuring music by The Pilot Rock Ramblers and The Spindrifters. humboldtfolklife.org. 668-4151.

MOVIES

Flicks-On-The-Farm: Food Matters. 9 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Free showing of Food Matters! a documentary evaluating the impact food choices have on our bodies and the environment. Movie starts at dark, no later than 9 p.m. Bring a blanket or chair to sit on and dress warmly. baysideparkfarm@ gmail.com 951-258-4609. Who Bombed Judi Bari?. 7:30 p.m. Mateel Community Center. See July 13 listing.

OUTDOORS

SPORTS

Humboldt Roller Derby. 5 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Roller derby is back! Featuring Humboldt’s Widow Makers facing off against their neighbor league to the south, the Mendo Mayhem Roller Girls followed by a fast-paced battle between Humboldt’s Redwood Rollers and San Diego Starlettes. Advance tickets recommended. $12/$10 adv. humboldtrollerderby.com. 441-1993.

FOR KIDS

Marine Science Discovery Day. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. HSU Telonicher Marine Lab, 570 Ewing St., Trinidad. Marine science students lead exploration activities on marine science topics including marine mammals, plankton, ocean acidification, sharks and invasive species. Free. 826-4479.

Baykeeper’s Natural History Bay Tour. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Baykeeper, 217 E St., Eureka. Knowledgeable Baykeeper volunteers share their expertise and enthusiasm for Humboldt Bay in a free hour-long tour. www.humboldtbaykeeper.org. 268-8897. Bridge Brigade. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Baykeeper, 217 E St., Eureka. Keep trash out of Humboldt Bay by cleaning up the Samoa Bridge. Gloves, litter pickers, trash bags and orange safety vests provided. www. humboldtbaykeeper.org. 268-8897. Manila Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Morning of invasive plant removal. Bring water, wear comfortable work clothes. Tools, gloves and cookies provided. 444-1397. Open Gardens. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Gardens, College of the Redwoods, Eureka. Roam the 44acre fully fenced property. $5. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Sierra Club Ma-le’l Dunes Walk. 10 a.m. Meet at Male’l Dunes South parking area. Parent and child walk explores biologically diverse dune community.

ETC.

FOOD

Til Death Do Us Part Murder Mystery. 2-5 p.m. Red Lion Hotel, 1929 Fourth St., Eureka. Murder By Dessert presents a live, interactive murder mystery. Can you follow the clues and figure out who the killer was before the detective does? $45/$80 couple. www.

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by UKEsperience. humfarm. org. 822-5951.

Jefferson School Playground Build. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Jefferson School, 1000 B St., Eureka. Community building project. Help improve Eureka’s west side by erecting a new playground. heidibenzonelli@yahoo.com. 822-3072.

15 sunday EVENTS

Annie and Mary Day. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Perigot Park, Blue Lake. Fiddling, food, car show, parade and pancake breakfast at Mad River Grange. Music by Ukesperience, Clean Livin’, Lonesome Roses, Blake and Rich, Mon Petit Chou and The Academy Fiddlers. humboldtfolklife. org. 668-5450. 51st Orick Rodeo. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Orick Rodeo Grounds, Hwy. 101. Rodeo starts at 2:30 p.m. See July 14 listing.

THEATER

murderbydessert.com. 223-4172. Cabaret. 2 p.m. Ferndale Rep. See July 13 listing. The Fish in My Head. 4 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater. See July 12 listing.

MUSIC

Outreach at the Beach. 1-8 p.m. Merryman’s Beach House, Moonstone Beach, Westhaven. Bring your singer/ songwriting talent to share and enjoy with other performers. Donation. Open Jazz Jam. 2-4:30 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Flutist, saxophonist and director of Subito Music Ensembles Jill Petricca performs followed by an open jam. 442-0278.

FOOD

Breakfast in Bayside. 8 a.m.-noon. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Quarterly tasty gourmet breakfast featuring music by The Redwood Coast Women’s Chorus. $8/$5 kids. 822-9998.

ART

Trinidad Artists’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Next to Murphy’s Market, Trinidad. Featuring works of art and crafts from local artisans, music by Penny Gunn and delicious barbecue. 834-8720.

MOVIES

The Muppet Movie. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. More entertaining than humanly possible. $5. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. Who Bombed Judi Bari?. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See July 13 listing.

OUTDOORS

Baykeeper’s Natural History Bay Tour. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Baykeeper. See July 14 listing.

GARDEN

Composting Workshop. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Learn basic composting, and how to build your own compost tea brewer out of easy to find materials. baysideparkfarm@gmail.com. 951-258-4609. Open Garden. 1-4 p.m. Fickle Hill Old Rose Nursery, 282 Fickle Hill Road, Arcata. Stroll through natural beauty. Last open garden of the year. ficklerose@att.net. 826-0708.

SPOKEN WORD

Women of the Pacific Northwest Stories. 1-4 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Story swap and afternoon snacks with Jackie Dandeneau. Jackie is working on a theatrical production about local women’s history, to open at the Playhouse and for regional tours in October. Particularly seeking stories from the 1940s and before. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242.

16 monday EVENTS

Fortuna Rodeo Chili Cookoff. 5 p.m. Fortuna Main Street. Chili feed sponsored by Fortuna Chamber of Commerce followed by a family outdoor dance at the Strong Creek Shopping Center. 725-3959.

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Festival Afternoon Band Concert. 5:30 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Free concert in the amphitheater with the legendary Scotia Band. 822-5394. Humboldt Folklife Festival Songwriters Night. 7:30 p.m. Carlo Theater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Local songwriters Marc Jeffares, John Ludington, Jaese Lecuyer and Andrew Goff perform in the round. $7. 822-5394. The 51 Cards. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Humboldt County teen and alt. rock heartthrobs perform and make you feel all tingly. OC band Tough Stuff opens. $5. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing with live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323. Swing Dance Night. 7:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World

Got Folk? It’s that time of year again, time to live the folk life with the Humboldt Folklife Society. It may not seem possible, but Folklife’s annual summer music marathon has grown even larger with 10 events spread over nine days. It all starts on that lucky day, Friday the 13th, with the first of two barn dances at the Arcata Veteran’s Hall. This Friday has Sue Moon calling English country-style dances with her band Wild Rumpus playing the music, and callers Mike Mulderrig and Matthew Marshall working with fiddlers Blake Ritter and Sam McNeil. Next Friday, July 20, at the same location, Striped Pig Stringband plays for dancing with Gabe Strand calling the moves. The fun starts at 7:30 p.m. both nights. Saturday, July 14, the action moves to Blue Lake with a festival kick off party at 5 p.m. at the Mad River Brewery Taproom featuring The Pilot Rock Ramblers and The Spindrifters. Sunday, July 15, is Blue Lake’s annual town party, Annie and Mary Day. It starts early with breakfast

at the Mad River Grange followed by a parade at 11 a.m. with samba drummers and dancers, Dell’Arte clowns, giant puppets and the like. The Folklife folks run the music stage at Perigot Park with Sam McNeil’s Academy Fiddlers at noon followed by Mon Petit Chou with Quebecois tunes, Blake and Rich playing old time, The Lonesome Roses with folky songs, bluegrass by Clean Livin’ and UKEsperience’s ukulele grooves. There’s also a classic car show, a baseball game and more of Blue Lake’s take on all-American fun. The Fest contunues Monday, July 16, with a twofer at Dell’Arte: a free early evening show (at 5:30 p.m.) in the Rooney Amphitheater with Jill Pettrica leading The Scotia Band, followed by Songwriter Night at 7:30 p.m. in the Carlo. This year’s all-male line-up incudes Marc Jeffares from The Trouble, John Luddington from Absynth Quintet, Jaese Lecuyer, who used to direct the Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir, and the Journal‘s own Andrew Goff

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

of Seven-O-Heaven fame. Folklife gets jazzy Tuesday, July 17, collaborating with the Redwood Jazz Alliance for a Jazz Night in the Carlo featuring my former neighbor, the cool bassist Shao Way Wu, returning from his new digs in Portland for the occasion. Wu is joined by keyboardist Tim Randles (from the Mary Jane band etc.) and drummer Mike LaBolle, then later plays with The Coconini Trio with Jill Pettrica on woodwinds and drummer Tommy Fitzmaurice. In between it’s the festival’s one ringer: Victor and Penny, a ukulele/ guitar duo from the Midwest singing music they call “antique pop,” including classic jazz numbers and old time arrangements of modern tunes. Country Night, Wednesday, July 18, in the Rooney Amphitheater starts early, at 6 p.m. with SoHum’s top country band Twango Macallan followed by Carlota’s Ken Jorgensen with Fallin’ Rocks, closing with the return of Huckleberry Flint whose stellar set last year was a festival highlight.

Come back to the Rooney Thursday, July 19, for Bluegrass and Beyond with the Bubbles house band Clean Livin’, the rough ‘n’ tumble bluegrassy jugband No Good Redwood Ramblers, straight-ahead bluegrass by The Compost Mountain Boys and a closing set by Absynth Quintet rocketing into someplace in the great beyond. Friday’s above-mentioned Barn Dance should warm you up for what’s invariably referred to as “the grand finale,” the All Day Free Festival, Saturday, July 21, in and around Dell’Arte with 20 acts or so, a bunch of workshops, Joel Sonenshein’s ever popular Beatles’ sing-along and more stuff we’ll tell you about next week. Don’t miss the handy take-it-with-you pullout in the middle of this paper. For any other details or to keep track of Folklife doings in general, check HFS’s new improved website at www.humboldtfolklife.org. — Bob Doran

Rodeo x2 Bulls. Blood. Dust. Mud. Garth was on to something. And because we interpret Mr. Brooks’ words as gospel truth, we predict that the Sunday crowds will be roaring as Humboldt’s more cowboy-ish tendencies are indulged over the next couple weeks. Why? ‘Cuz it’s rodeo season, y’all! This weekend: Orick Rodeo serves up the ropes and the reins Saturday, July 14, and Sunday, July 15. Next week: Fortuna Rodeo Week supplies the joy and the pain starting Monday, July 16, and running through Sunday, July 22. In both cases the actual rodeo is sandwiched between oodles of other family-attracting events straight outta that America we all think we remember — barbecues, kids’ games, foot tappin’ tunes. Yee-freakin’-haw. But if you want to make sure you catch the rodeo rodeo, here’s your cheat sheet: Orick Rodeo Saturday, July 14 at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 15 at 2:30 p.m. Fortuna Rodeo Saturday, July 21 at 2 p.m. Sunday, July 22 at 1:30 p.m. If you’re unsavvy to the rodeo landscape — we’re gonna estimate that’s about, oh, 99.5 percent of Journal readers — let’s try to put in perspective what level of action you have the opportunity to gawk at. Both the Orick and Fortuna rodeos are sanctioned by the California Cowboys Pro Rodeo Association. Think of the CCPRA as the minor leagues of the rodeo universe. From late March through September, hopeful cowboys leave their day jobs behind and drive long hours to compete for modest purses in CCPRA events as far south as Needles, Calif., and as far north as Lakeview, Ore. Over the years, many ambitious cowboys have gotten their start in the CCPRA before movin’ on up to the PRCA big money events — Ferndale small-town-boy-made-good Billy Bugenig, for example. But smaller stakes doesn’t mean smaller bulls, and bones break regardless of how much moolah is on the line. All the ball-bustin’ events you’d need at a rodeo, you’ll get — bronc riding (saddled and sans), bull riding, steer rasslin’, calf roping. You must be entertained. Both the Orick and Fortuna events also supply their own unique bonus flavors. First, at 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 14, the Orick Rodeo Grounds will play host to its annual Mutton Busting competition, which features young, helmeted children released into the arena on the backs of scared sheep. Adorable. The next week, the Fortuna Rodeo will attempt to top that spectacle with the return of Quadiators in the Fortuna Rodeo Grounds starting at 6 p.m. Friday, July 20. The event features quad-riding two-person teams — one driver, one attacker — driving in circles and swinging wiffle ball bats attempting to pop the helmet-affixed balloons of their competitors. Yes. If you’d like more info on the Fortuna Rodeo — and there’s a lot — well, did you notice how your North Coast Journal is extra heavy this week? That’s because we’ve crammed this year’s jam packed Fortuna Rodeo Guide inside. So, give that a looksee. For more on the Orick Rodeo, uh, you’ll just have to become their friend on Facebook. — Andrew Goff

Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Swing what your mama gave you! $5. 616-6876.

MOVIES

Who Bombed Judi Bari? 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge. See July 13 listing.

17 tuesday EVENTS

Fortuna Rodeo Children’s Games. 6 p.m. Redwood Village Shopping Center, Fortuna. Kids games, rock wall, pony rides, kids fireman’s muster, face painting, wax hands, costume contest and tri-trip sandwiches. fortunarodeo.com. 725-3959.

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Festival Jazz Night. 7:30 p.m. Carlo Theater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Featuring local groups Labolle/Randles/Wu Trio, Victor and Penny, and Coconini Trio. $7. 822-5394.

MOVIES

Based on the Book Film Series: Some Like it Hot. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Screening of the 1959 Billy Wilder-directed cross-dresser comedy starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon. Hosted by Jan Ostrom. humlib.org. 269-1962.

FOOD

Old Town Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, F Street between First and Third streets. Fresh farm-grown produce. Music by Boltin Basil. humfarm. org. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371. Wildberries Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Fresh fruit, vegetables and plants from local growers. Music by Jeff Kelley 441-9999.

SPORTS

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Festival Country Night. 7:30 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Featuring talented local bands Huckleberry Flint, Twango Macallan and Fallin’ Rocks. $10. 822-5394.

SPORTS

Humboldt Crabs vs. San Francisco Seals. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Doubleheader! Take yourself out to the ballgame, HumCo! $8/$6 students and seniors/$4 kids 12 and under. humboldtcrabs.com. 826-2333.

ETC.

Meet the Agency Night. 7 p.m. Adoption Horizons. 10 W. Seventh St., Suite F, Eureka. Open to anyone interested in discussing local adoption services and options. 444-9909.

19 thursday EVENTS

Fortuna Rodeo Week. 6 p.m. Fortuna Rodeo Grounds, Rohner Park. Carnival, Junior Rodeo and Fireman’s Games. fortunarodeo.com. 725-3959. Building Green Communities Conference. 7-8:30 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Humboldt Plan It Green and HSU hosted annual event. This year’s theme “Adaptation: Creating a Resilient Future” features leading national and regional experts discussing and developing action plans to address climate change and other issues. $59. www. AdaptationConference.org. 599-6612.

THEATER

Show People. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See July 12 listing.

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Festival Bluegrass and Beyond Night. 7:30 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Featuring local groups Absynth Quintet, Clean Livin’, No Good Redwood Ramblers and Compost Mountain Boys. $10. 822-5394.

Humboldt Crabs vs. San Francisco Seals. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Take yourself out to the ballgame, HumCo! $8/$6 students and seniors/$4 kids 12 and under. humboldtcrabs.com. 826-2333.

FOOD

Senior Get Together. 1-3 p.m. Ramone’s Old Town, 209 E St., Eureka. Single seniors meet for coffee, pastries and good conversation. 442-2990. Free Financial Security Seminar for Women. 6-7 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. Tax dude Marcos Chavira discusses challenges many women face when planning for retirement and how to overcome them. RSVP. 496-2678. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Non-denominational prayer group. dlbitte@hotmail.com. 834-5800.

FOR KIDS

ETC.

18 wednesday

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Music by Bill and Dave. See July 12 listing. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. Music by Chris Parreira. See July 12 listing. Cinderella Preview and Story Time. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. The cast of Humboldt Light Opera Company’s Cinderella presents a show preview with songs from the upcoming production and a fractured fairytale reading. hloc.org 445-4310.

Heads Up…

Web Series Casting Call. A local independent film team is planning an upcoming web mini-series called Making It and is looking for men and women with improvisation skills between the ages of 20 and 35. The films may contain language or comedic sexual content. For more info, email writerbabie@gmail.com. ●

EVENTS

Fortuna Rodeo Week. Noon. Fortuna Rodeo Grounds, Main Street. Carnival, Junior Rodeo at 5 p.m., street games for kids at 6 p.m. and refreshments by Fortuna Volunteer Fire Department. fortunarodeo.com. 725-3959. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

39

Andrew Garfield as The Amazing Spider-Man.

Caught in the Web

The Spidey reboot has heart, unlike Oliver Stone or Woody Allen’s latest By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. I think Sam Raimi is a fine director, and I’d rewatch a number of his movies any day of the week. However, I don’t feel any real connection to his Spiderman trilogy. The movies were fun, if unremarkable, entertainment. They were also released

July 12 July 19 Thurs July 12 - Sci Fi Night ft. Hercules 6 p.m. - 10 p.m., All ages, Free Fri July 13 - The Doors (1991) Doors at 8:30 p.m., $5, Rated R Sun July 15 - The Muppet Movie (1979) Doors at 5:30, $5, Rated G Mon July 16 - Who Bombed Judi Bari? Doors at 7:30, by donation, All ages, Q & A with Darryl Cherney Thurs July 19 - Sci Fi Night ft. Babes, Beaches & Monsters, 6-10 p.m., All ages, Free

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

pretty recently, so I was mildly surprised (not to say upset) when talk of the reboot started. As it turns out, this new one is smart and strong enough to just about erase any memory of the previous three. When the first teaser trailers hit theaters, I was pretty skeptical: They looked like videogame footage and seemed to contain all of the movie’s action sequences. But that was a clever marketing gambit: Nearly everything in those trailers comes from the final third of the movie, so we get the pleasant surprise of two acts of solid character development and subtle visual storytelling. By the time the last, action-packed section rolled around, I was totally involved. Director Marc Webb builds the story painstakingly, first introducing Peter Parker as a smart, bullied high-school senior. Webb perfectly evokes the painful, all-encompassing dramas of teenage life, with help from a tremendous performance by Andrew Garfield. He plays Peter as a kid who may be a little lost, but who knows he’s a person of strength and value. His peers don’t recognize it, so he’s trapped in

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

the doldrums of late adolescence, trying to navigate an uncooperative world. When the fateful super-spider bites him and sets him on the path of hero-dom, there’s an exhilarating catharsis. Peter doesn’t have to submit anymore, and he revels in it. As he builds his Spidey skills, his enjoyment of this newfound strength and freedom comes through in the smart-assed, cocksure way Garfield delivers his lines. Overall, The Amazing Spider-Man charms and satisfies thanks to Webb’s light touch. He possesses the rare ability to tell a story visually, with frames full of details, but also hold onto the overarching narrative. He obviously has a way with actors, as well. The supporting cast members all turn in strong, distinctive performances, with the formidable Emma Stone in the lead. Rhys Ifans’ combination of intellectual arrogance and sensitivity make him a compelling villain. PG13. 136m. SAVAGES. With the wreckage of Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps still smoldering, Oliver Stone again attempts to mine his back catalog for inspiration. This time, he lifts the kaleidoscopic aesthetic of U-Turn (1997), the weird sexual politics of Natural Born Killers (1994) and the pointed politicizing of almost every movie he’s made. The mash-up almost works: Savages is watchable, for the most part, unlike the Wall Street sequel. In that case, a permeating over-seriousness and sense of self-importance unmade whatever positive impression the movie might have made. Ironically, Savages ultimately falls apart because Stone treats its subject matter too lightly. Aaron Johnson and Taylor Kitsch give convincing performances as Ben, a business/botany wiz, and Chon, an ex-SEAL. Implausibly, but allowably, the two are best friends and co-owners of a thriving cannabis collective. (They also share a girlfriend, but more on that in a minute.) Ben’s the brains behind the production and distribution of the most potent strain on the planet. Chon’s a one-man army, controlling collections, payoffs, strongarming — those aspects of large-scale dope-peddling that offend Ben’s delicate Buddhist sensibilities. Blake Lively plays the aforementioned shared love interest, a spoiled-rich-girl burnout.  She goes by O, short for Ophelia (guh). Their consensual love triangle and booming enterprise clip right along until one of the Mexican cartels demands a piece of the action. The boys try to outsmart them and fly the coop. O gets kidnapped, and the bullets start flying. Back to the main problem: Ultimately this is a movie about the war going on around our southern border. It even opens with a series of chainsaw beheadings but goes no further in examining the scale and horror of the conflict. The narrative

ignores any cultural implications of this international drug war, electing instead to use it as an excuse for shoot-outs and torture videos. No less damaging is the beyondclumsy voice-over that frames the story. Lively’s performance, and the character she plays, are pretty cold and unlikeable to start with. This makes her an unconvincing narrator, and she certainly isn’t helped by the script’s attempt to play some kind of postmodern game with Sunset Boulevard’s storytelling model. The cinematography emphasizes the bright light and tan skin of southern California and its beautiful people. Taken together, these elements produce a too-simple, too-familiar crime story that’s mostly well-acted, goodlooking and intermittently exciting, but inconsequential. R. 130m. TO ROME WITH LOVE. There are two distinct tiers of Woody Allen movies. At the top we have Annie Hall (1977) and Midnight in Paris (2011), among others. They stand among the finest American comedies ever made and bear the imprint of a singular storyteller. Waaaaay down on the second tier we have stuff like this. While better than some of Allen’s bombs (the almost unwatchable Scoop, for example) Rome is inarguably a minor work. Because he’s Woody Allen, he’ll never have trouble attracting talented casts — or gorgeous starlets, for that matter. And the dialogue will always be distinctive and clever. But this, like a few of his lateperiod movies, seems more like an excuse to take a European vacation with a film crew than a story that needed to be told. It does make me want to go to Rome, though. R. 102m. MOONRISE KINGDOM. As readers of last week’s issue may recall, my initial viewing of Wes Anderson’s latest was hindered by drunken hijinks at the Minor. Visit the Journal online for my belated review. —John J. Bennett

Previews

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT. Yet another installment in the computer-animated adventures of a woolly mammoth (voiced by Ray Romano), a saber-toothed tiger (Denis Leary) and a lisping sloth (John Leguizamo). PG. 94m. FOR GREATER GLORY. Andy Garcia stars in this historical chronicle of the Cristeros War (1926-1929), a popular uprising against an anti-Catholic Mexican government. R. 145m. Toned Italian pecs feature prominently in this week’s Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night, Thursday at the Arcata Theatre Lounge, with a pair of sword-and-sandal epics: Fury of Hercules (1962) followed by Triumph of the Son of Hercules (1962).

6-10 p.m. On lucky Friday the 13th, Oliver Stone’s 1991 biopic The Doors stumbles into the ATL, with Val Kilmer as Jim Morrison, trippin’ balls in tight pants. R. 140m. 9 p.m. Last year’s The Muppets successfully revived the genius and playful spirit of the late Jim Henson. On Sunday you can catch The Muppet Movie (1979), their delightful and star-studded feature film debut. G. 95m. 6 p.m. You have four opportunities over the next week to catch Who Bombed Judi Bari?, the award-winning documentary about the late Earth First! activist who, along with SoHum agitator Darryl Cherney, was blamed by the FBI for the 1990 explosion in their own car. On Friday and Saturday the film will screen at the Mateel Community Center — doors at 7 p.m., show at 7:30 both nights. On Sunday it will show at the Arcata Playhouse (same show times), and Monday it’ll be at the Arcata Theatre Lounge — doors at 7:30 p.m., movie at 8. Cherney will be in attendance at all screenings.

Continuing

BRAVE. Pixar’s stunning animation doesn’t disappoint, even if this tale of a precocious Scottish princess lacks the studio’s usual depth. PG. 93m. KATY PERRY: PART OF ME. But which part? Starting Thursday, this behind-thescenes documentary takes you backstage with the bubbly tween pop idol, who split with British funnyman Russell Brand during production. See the drama and the Sesame Street-scandalizing décolletage in 3D! PG. 95m. MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED. Top-notch voice talent and clever sight gags distinguish the continuing slapstick adventures of goofy zoo fugitives. PG. 85m. MADEA’S WITNESS PROTECTION. Tyler Perry continues to milk his unconvincing drag act as the eponymous materfamilias. PG-13. 114m. MAGIC MIKE. Channing Tatum stars as a male stripper/aspiring entrepreneur in director Steven Soderbergh’s lively — and surprisingly gritty — drama. R. 110m. ROCK OF AGES. Maudlin, humorless hair metal Broadway musical about a rock club sports an all-star cast including Tom Cruise and Alec Baldwin. PG13. 123m. TED. The feature film directorial debut from Family Guy creator Seth McFarlane is a crass and clever comedy about a pothead Bostonian (Mark Wahlberg) and his best buddy, a sentient teddy bear. R. 106m. —Ryan Burns ●

Movie Times

* = SAT./SUN. EARLY SHOWS

SAMBA DANCE WITH MARIA. Learn Samba and other Brazilian dance styles. Choreography for the North Country Fair Samba Parade taught in class. Tues., July 17 - Sept.11, 5:30-7 p.m. Bayside Grange, Arcata. $8 Drop-In. Session & student rates available. (707) 845-3225 (DMT-0712)

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227)

Broadway Cinema 707-443-3456

1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 7/13 - 7/19 unless otherwise noted. ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3D 12:55, 3:25, 6:00, 8:30 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 2D 11:55, 2:25, 5:00, 7:30 FOR GREATER GLORY 2:40, 8:20 SAVAGES 12:20, 3:20, 6:25, 9:25 KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3D 4:30, 7:05, 9:40 KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 2D 1:55 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D 2:15, 5:30, 8:40 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2D 11:50, 3:00, 6:10, 9:20 TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S WITNESS PROTECTION 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30 TED 1:05, 3:40, 6:30, 9:10, 9:45 MAGIC MIKE 12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:00 BRAVE 2D 12:05, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45 MADAGASCAR 3 2D 12:15, 5:55 TO ROME WITH LOVE 12:35, 3:10, 5:40, 8:05 *7/19: THE DARK KNIGHT MARATHON & MIDNIGHT SHOW

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 7/13 - 7/19 unless otherwise noted. ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3D ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 2D SAVAGES THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2D KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3D KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 2D TED MAGIC MIKE BRAVE 2D MADAGASCAR 3 2D

1:00, 6:00 3:30, 8:30 12:15, 3:20, 6:30, 9:30 12:00, 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 2:15, 5:30, 8:40 2:25, 9:40 7:15 1:30, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20 12:50, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 12:20, 2;50, 5:40, 8:10 12:05, 4:50

*7/19: THE DARK KNIGHT MARATHON & MIDNIGHT SHOW

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 7/13 - 7/19 unless otherwise noted.

TED MOONRISE KINGDOM THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN

*2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 *1:50, 4:05, 6:20, 8:40 *2:50, 5:55, 9:00

*7/19: THE DARK KNIGHT RISES MIDNIGHT SHOW

Fortuna Theater 707-725-2121

1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 7/13 -7/19 unless otherwise noted. TED 7:20, 9:50 MAGIC MIKE 7:05, 9:35 BRAVE *12:00, 2:20, 4:40 KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3D 7:15, 9:30 KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 2D *12:30, 2:45, 5:00 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D *1:30, 4:30, 7:30 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2D 12:20, 3:30, 6:40, 9:40 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3D *12:10, 2:30, 4:45 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 2D *12:40, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45 *7/19: THE DARK KNIGHT all you can eat free popcorn marathon

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville ROCK OF AGES

7/13 - 7/19: 7:30 EXCEPT 7/18: 6:30

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! • Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

ONE-ON-ONE INTRO TO LAMPWORKING. Learn basic torching-working. $50 (2 hour workshop) materials included. For more information call Kevin Stockwell at 826-1896. Fire Arts Center 520 South St. Arcata, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com.(AC-0614) THE NATURAL FIBER FAIR. Is now accepting applications for Vendors selling fibers, supplies, tools, finished products. Sept. 8-9, Arcata Community Center. (707) 223-1638, http://naturalfiberfair.com. (AC-0726) HAND DYED SILK SCARVES. With April Sproul, $45. Sat., July 21, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Three hour workshop, learn the basics of fabric dyeing along with some quick and easy techniques for creating beautiful one-ofa-kind silk scarves. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0719)

Communication

I AM… SAFE ZONE LGBT ALLY DEVELOPMENT TRAINING. Aug. 3. 9-4 p.m, Red Lion, Eureka $75 register at www.iamsafezone.com. Want to better serve your LGBT clients and community? Join local resident and nationally recognized trainer, Jessica Pettitt, for this local training to learn about Heterosexual, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender stereotypes, power and privilege dynamics, and how your own life can make you the best ally ever! Reduce stigma, misunderstanding, and isolation and increase collaboration, advocacy, and empowerment. CEUs are available. Sliding scale scholarships available. Got ?’s jess@iamsocialjustice.com or (917) 543-0966. (CMM-0802)

DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Latin Technique, Arm Styling, ‘Bolero & more. Series of 4, Tues. evenings 7-9 p.m., starting July 10, North Coast Dance, Eureka, $18/workshop if you mention this ad. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT-0726) TRILLIUM DANCE STUDIOS SUMMER DANCE CAMP Dance class with Erin Fernandez, Julie Ryman and guest instructors. All levels of Ballet, Modern, Jazz, Latin Dance and more! Ages 4-Adult. July 23-Aug. 4. Trillium Dance Studios, 1925 Alliance & Common Ground Studio, 180 Westwood Center. Email or call for pricing. info@DanceWithErin.com, 822-8408. (DMT-0719) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227) BELLY DANCING WITH SHOSHANNA. Feel fabulous in classes for all levels in Arcata at Redwood Raks. 616-6876 or Shoshannaland.com. (DMT-1227) MOVIE IN THE PARK. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for a movie in Perigot Park under the stars on Fri., July 13 at sundown ! Featured movie is Wizard of Oz. Free to the public. All ages. Family friendly event: no smoking, no alcohol, no dogs. Bring blankets and short chairs for comfort. Concessions will be available for purchase. Come dressed in costume! Information, visit www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932. (DMT-0712)

Fitness

LAU KUNE DO: TEMPLE OF MARTIAL ARTS: 445 I St., Arcata. Head instructor, Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kung Fu: ages 13 & up, Youth Kung Fu: ages 5-12, also offering Tai Chi classes. Students may come free train outside of class during our daily open temple hours. Parents, drop off your child for our monthly, “Kung Fu Movie Night”. Kids uniforms free with membership ! Visit www.arcatakungfu.com for fees, schedule and upcoming workshops in the Chinese martial arts. (707) 496-5510. (F-0913)

LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. How to overcome regrets and make peace with the past explored, Sun., July 15, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@hotmail.com. (CMM-0712)

NEW AT CROSSFIT EUREKA! Offering Core Strength, Kettlebell, FitMom Prenatal Movement, Vinyasa Fow Yoga, Clinics for Endurance Runners, Foundations with Dr. Phil Pritting D.C. www.crossfiteureka.com, crossfiteureka@gmail.com. (F-0719)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Summer Intersession: June 16-July 31. Classes: All Level Adults, Mon.s & Wed.s, 5-7 p.m. Open Gym & Roda (all ages, all levels), Sat.s, Noon-2 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. HSU Students First Class Free. (F-0726)

DANCE TANGO! Mid-Summer Milonga July 21, 8-11 p.m., $7, Studio of Dance Arts, Eureka. Humboldtango. org. NO SUMMER CLASSES. (DMT-0719) BOLOKADA CONDE DJEMBE/DUNDUN. Master drummer from Guinea, West Africa. Beg./Int., Mon., July 16, 7:30 p.m.; Int./Adv., Tue., July 17, 3 p.m. Garden Bliss, 295 E St., Arcata. Drum Rentals Available, Call 601-9493. (DMT-0712) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227)

31

ZUMBA IN THE PARK. Join Eureka Recreation on Sat., July 21, 12:30-2 p.m. at Carson Park. Kids’ Zumba, 12:3012:50 p.m. All ages Zumba, 1-2 p.m. FREE community event open to all ages. Registration begins at Noon. Call 441-4244. (F-0712) continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012 northcoastjournal.com Thursday, JULY North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, July 12, 12, 2012 2012 • • NORTH northcoastjournal.com

41

Ongoing Support Groups

continued from previous page NIA. Nia has arrived in Humboldt County! Dance fusion fitness program blending healing arts, dance arts, and martial arts. Weds at the Bayside Grange, 6:30-7:30pm., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. Your first class is always FREE! Regular fees $6/$4 Grange Members. Pauline Ivens 707-441-9102, waterpolly@gmail.com (F-0726)

Please call the listed phone number for more information. Dates and times are subject to change without notice.

AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206)

THURSDAY Humboldt Domestic Violence Services. 6-7:30 p.m. For women experiencing intimate partner violence. Call for more info. 443-6042.

FRIDAY

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0927)

Bereavement Group. 1-2:30 p.m. Hospice Office, Eureka. 445-8443. Humboldt Domestic Violence Services. 12-1:30 p.m. For women experiencing intimate partner violence. Call for more info. 443-6042.

ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at the Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (F-0531)

MONDAY Lyme Disease Support Group. 5:30-7 p.m. (3rd Mon.) Church of the Joyful Healer, Mckinleyville. 825-7835. Caregiver Support Group. 4-5:30 p.m. (2nd & 4th Mon.) Alzheimer’s Resource Center, 1901 B California St., Eureka 444-8254, x3220. Bereavement Group. 6-7:30 p.m. Jacoby’s Storehouse,

ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227)

4th floor, Arcata. 445-8443. Bereavement Group. 6-7:30 p.m. Sequoia Springs, Fortuna. 445-8443. Nicotine Anonymous. 7-8 p.m. ACS Conference Room, Eureka. 668-4084.

NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Lau Kune Do Kung Fu, Muay Thai, Stand-up/Kickboxing & MMA. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227)

TUESDAY Gynecologic Cancer Support Group. 3-4:30 p.m. (2nd & 4th Tues.) Humboldt Community Breast Health Project Office, Arcata. 825-8345. Caregiver Support Group. 10-11 a.m. (1st Tue.) Mad

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227)

River Community Hospital. 444-8254, x3220. Caregiver Support Group. 12-1 p.m. (1st & 3rd Tue.) Timber Ridge Assissted Living, Eureka. 444-8254, x3220. Caregiver Support Group. 4-5:30 p.m. (2nd Tue.)

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

Sequoia Springs Assisted Living Center, 2401 Redwood Way, Fortuna 444-8254, x3220. Prostate Cancer Support Group. 7-9 p.m. (2nd Tuesday) Eureka. 443-2241.

NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www. northcoastaikido.org. (F-1227)

WEDNESDAY Bereavement Group. 5:30-7 p.m. Hospice Office, Eureka. 445-8443. Bereavement Group. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 1450 Hiller Rd., McKinleyville. 445-8443. Caregiver Support Group. 4-5 p.m. (2nd & 4th Wed.) St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Ferndale 444-8254, x 3220. Caregiver Support Group. 6:30-8 p.m. (1st Wed.) Timber Ridge Assisted Living Center, McKinleyville

Home & Garden

Caregiver Support Group. 1-2 p.m. (4th Wed.) Heart of the Redwoods Community Hospice, Garberville.

444-8254, x 3220.

7/12/12

444-8254, x 3220.

TROUBLE SHOOTING Q & A. With Kevin Jodrey. Fri., July 20, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45. Have a question that no one else can answer? Ask Kevin, an expert on all aspects of Cannabis cultivation. Hummingbird Healing Center, 1626 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com or, (707) 6729860 (G-0719)

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

FOUNDATION CLASS. Cannabis Law, Medicinal Uses and Horticulture. $275. Sat.-Sun., Aug. 18-19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Beginning level class. Learn how to grow, harvest, dry/cure and store their own medicine. Medical Applications: cannabinoids and their effects, delivery methods, dosage and contraindications. Law class: history of cannabis in US, existing and evolving California law. Hummingbird Healing Center 1626 Myrtle Ave. Eureka. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com or, (707) 672-9860. (G-0816) HARVEST, DRYING & STORAGE. With Kevin Jodrey, Master Gardener. Fri., Aug. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45. Effective practices for processing and storing medical cannabis to retain the best smell, flavor and cannabinoid potency. Hummingbird Healing Center, 1626 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com or, (707) 672-9860 (G-0816)

Kids & Teens

12TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP. Have fun while Safely Learning to Surf. Includes Jr. Lifesaving. Licensed & Insured, male/female instructors. Ages 8+. $195/week. Sessions: July 23-27, July 29-Aug. 3. MoonstoneBeachSurfCamp.com or (707) 822-5099. (K-0719) ADVENTURE CAMP. Ages 10-14. Adventure seekers gain skills to apply to lifelong adventures. Camps run 1-5 p.m., July 16-20 (Navigation and Orienteering), Aug. 6-10 (Fire Safety and Cooking) and Aug. 20-24 (Adventure Preparation). $90 per participant/$100 non-resident. Combo with another Arcata Recreation camp for a full day of fun. For more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/ rec. (K-0712) FC SAMOA SOCCER ACADEMY. SUMMER MINIACADEMIES. (continuing). July 31-Aug.14. Various programs M-Fri. See online. Redway, Cutten. Eureka. Arcata/Pacific Union Base Camps: Guaranteed learning “packaged” in fun and age-appropriate games Ages: 8-12yrs. Elite and/or Varsity Prep: age 11-15yrs Intensive week-long program for serious soccer athletes. Base Camps and V-prep $95 for 15 hours 9 a.m.-noon, French Pro $225 (24-30 hours). E-mail for more info. mufc06@yahoo.com,Website: www.fcsamoa.com, Low income (partial)scholarships ALWAYS available upon application. (K-0712) ROPES COURSE FAMILY DAY. Gather family and friends for Arcata Recreation’s popular Redwood Park Family Day Sat., July 14. Expand your limits and have fun with team-building games. Soar to new heights with the Flying Squirrel. 9 a.m.-Noon. Ages 4 and up. Only $10 per participant/ $11 non-resident. For more information call (707) 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/rec. (K-0712) YOUTH SKATEBOARD COMPETITION. Join us for afternoon of kicks ‘n tricks at Eureka Skatepark, July 21, Noon-4 p.m. Prizes awarded to youth ages 5-17. All skill levels welcome. $5 Entrance Fee. Register at Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Call 441-4240 for information. (K-0712) SUMMER CLIMBING CAMP. Learn climbing techniques, safety and build confidence. Ages: 6-14. When: M-F, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., running through summer. Far North Climbing Gym, 10th and K streets, Arcata. Cost: $135/week. Contact: 826-9558. Website: www. farnorthclimbinggym.com. (K-0726) CAPOEIRA KIDS. Summer Intersession: June 16-July 31. Classes: All Level Kids (Ages 5 & Up), Mon.s and Wed.s, 4-5:30 p.m. Open Gym & Roda (all ages, all levels), Sat.s, Noon-2 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (K-0726)

SUMMER CAMP. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for roller skating, arts and crafts, sports and more at Camp Perigot for Ages 5-13, Mon.-Fri., June 18-Aug. 24, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Perigot Park. Very affordable and every camper receives a free breakfast and lunch! Full-day or half-day options. Extended care hours available. Register today! Find registration materials at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 6685932, for more information. (K-0816) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227) STENCILING ON FABRICS. With April Sproule. $40. July 14, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Learn the basics of painting on fabric as you create a fun original t-shirt. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 4976237, www.origindesignlab.com. (K-0712)

Lectures

NEIGHBORHOOD READY! Discover simple strategies to organize your household and neighborhood for surprise hazard events. The people who live around you could be the community you rely on when things get tough. We’ll help you explore the boundaries of your neighborhood, conduct an inventory of resources, and go step-by-step through developing household and neighborhood plans that could not only make a disaster manageable, but actually help you avoid a disaster — and enrich your life. With Judy Sears of HSU Regional Training Institute — Community Disaster Preparedness. Sat.s, Aug. 4 & 11, 9:30 a.m.-Noon, Eureka Public Safety Fire Training Facility (corner of L and Harris streets). $35. For more details and to register: www.humboldt.edu/rti or call HSU Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0726) WEEKEND RETREAT, HISTORY OF CANNABIS IN SPIRITUAL PRACTICE. Fri.-Sun., July 20-22, Booneville, Ca. $250 + $70/meals. With Pagan Minister and Herbalist Wendy Read at her stunning indoor temple and healing center. Trace use of Cannabis as spiritual sacrament through history. Communicate with spirit of plants. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (L-0719)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) RESTORING OLD GROWTH FOREST. Second-Growth Management at Redwood National & State Parks. Join National Park Service forester Jason Teraoka and ranger Jim Wheeler for a presentation and field trip to learn about the parks’ Second-Growth Forest Restoration Program. Thurs., Aug. 2, 1-3 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 4, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0726) THE ARAB SPRING. Discuss the unrest in the Middle East, focusing on Syria, with HSU Professor Emeritus Dr. Tom Gage. Tues., July 10-31, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/ OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0719) TRINIDAD & THE CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH. Learn how the city of Trinidad became a principal supply and communication spot for travelers and miners in the mid-19th century. With Patricia Fleschner, president of the Trinidad Museum Society. Wed., Aug. 8, 10 a.m.-Noon. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0726)

DAY OF YOGA & MINDFULNESS. Join Patricia Starr for a gentle and nurturing day of relaxation, with yoga and walking meditation in the morning, a brown bag lunch and restorative yoga and sitting meditation in the afternoon. Sat., July 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0719) HUMBOLDT BAY WILDLIFE REFUGE, THEN & NOW. Explore the past and future of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge with Candee Fetsch Kimbrell, Eric Nelson, Gisela Rohde and Denise Seeger. Thurs., July 26, 6-8 p.m. and Sat. (field trip), July 28, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0719) SOUL COLLAGE©, THE FRIEND. Make a collage from cut-out images out of magazines and other sources and access the many different parts of yourself in the process. This last workshop in the series “The Fool, the Challenger and the Friend” focuses on the “friend” archetype/sub-personality/significant person. With Janet Patterson. (This course may be taken independently of the series.) Tues., Aug. 7, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0726)

Spiritual

PICKLEBALL. Combines elements of badminton, tennis and table tennis into a fun new sport for all ages. Drop-in Indoor Pickleball; Thurs.s & Sat.s, 10 a.m.-Noon, Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. $2 Adult, $1.50 Senior. Call 441-4374. (SR-0712) SUMMER ULTIMATE FRISBEE LEAGUE. Play the exciting game of Ultimate for the first time or as a way to keep your skills sharp. Players of all abilities, ages 16 and older are welcome. League runs Thurs. evenings, July 12-Aug. 16. $30 per participant/ $40 non-resident. Fee includes uniform shirt. For more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org/rec. (SR-0712) SUMMER BOCCE LEAGUE. Join Arcata Recreation for our Summer Bocce League! Players of all abilities, ages 13 and older are welcome to join this league. League runs for 7 weeks, July 12 – Aug. 23, Thurs’s 5:30 p.m–Dusk at Larson Park Bocce Courts. $40 per participant. For more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org. (SR-0712) LEARN TO ROW ! Adult Clinics: Aug. 7-18, Tues.Thurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m, Sat. 8-10 a.m, $175. Ages 18+. Humboldt Bay Rowing Association, No experience required. www.hbra.org or 707-845-4752 for more info. (SR-0802)

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Tues./Thurs., 1-3 p.m., Fri./Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:309:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-0830)

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Sports/Recreation

NOTARY TRAINING. One-day seminar for new and renewing notaries provides the practical training needed to pass the comprehensive exam required for all California Notaries. Mon., July 30, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $149 plus additional fees for live scan, photo and exam. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended/notary. (V-0719)

FAMILY KICKBALL TOURNAMENT. Come kick it with your family! Sat., Aug. 18. Minimum 6 players per team, including minimum of 2 youth players, (17 & under), max of 9 players. $25 per team. Call 4414240 or register at Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. (SR-0712)

Therapy/Support

Vocational

NEW BUSINESS PROGRAM FOR PLANNING & ENGINEERING SERVICES PROVIDERS. North Coast Small Business Development Center is launching a program aimed at small planning & engineering services consultants looking to improve their business acumen and to increase the success of their enterprises. A rare opportunity for local planners, natural resource planners, engineers, designers, soils scientists, surveyors, GIS mapping specialists, environmental scientists, land management specialists and other similar professionals to participate in a free, intensive, applied business training program. Learn more, plan to attend an informational meeting Mon., July 9, 12:30 p.m. in the large conference room at The Prosperity Center, 520 E St., Eureka. Application deadline is Fri., July 13 at 5 p.m. Program is scheduled to begin in late July and continue until Feb. 2013. For more information visit our website: www.northcoastsbdc.org/planning or contact (707) 445-9612, hartwell@northcoastsbdc. org. (V-0712)

Wellness/Bodywork

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0926) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. HIGH COUNTRY HERB WEEKEND, July 27-29. Join us on the top of the world at this special botanical preserve. BEGINNING WITH HERBS. Sept. 19 – Nov. 7, eight Wed. evenings plus two herb walks. Learn the basics with many hands-on activities, pre-req to 10 month course. Register online www. dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0726) LEARN AYURVEDA. With Traci Webb. 3-DAY BEGINNING WITH AYURVEDA introductory weekend immersion, July 20-22, Vata, Pitta, Kapha, Elements, Nutrition, Herbs, Aromas, Colors, Yoga, $249. 5 MONTH AYURVEDA FOUNDATIONS PROGRAM-B, 5 weekend immersions, Aug. 24-Dec.19. REGISTER Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0719)

HERBAL ALLIES WITH WENDY READ. Sat., Sept. 22, 2-4 p.m. $45 + $15 lab fee. Part 3 of making herbal medicine series teaches students how to combine other herbs with your cannabis salves infusions and teas to improve effectiveness. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0920) MAKING MEDICINE, SALVES & TEAS. Part 2, with Wendy Read. Fri., Aug. 3, 6-8 p.m. $45 + $15 lab fee. Use infused oil from part one to make salve, new students make salve from oil provided. Also learn to make medicinal teas. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0802) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Sept. 4, 2012 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

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northcoastjournal.com

Stay up to date, all summer long, with activities for kids with our May 17th, 2012

edition, or online at northcoastjournal.com

North Coast Academy

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

43

Field notes

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

above White Bird Canyon, site of the first Battle of the nez PerCe War, June 17, 1877. the nez PerCe Were CamPed in the valley to the right of the Photo, While u.s. army trooPs attaCked from the higher ground to the left Before Being routed. Photo By Barry evans left Chief JosePh and his family Photo By f. m. sargent/PuBliC domain

Flight of the Nez Perce By Barry Evans

O

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com n our part, the [Nez Perce] war was in its origin and motive nothing short of a gigantic blunder and a crime. —1877 New York Times editorial

The fighting retreat of Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce in the summer of 1877 through present-day Idaho and Montana is one of the most shameful episodes of the “Indian Wars” that wracked this land for 300 years. On the one hand, about 750 displaced people, mostly women and children, were desperately trying to flee to Canada; on the other, the might of the U.S. Army was employed to prevent their escape. In 1855, the U.S. government “gave” 12,000 square miles of land to the NeeMe-Poo, or Nez Perce (named, incorrectly, by French fur traders — they didn’t practice nose-piercing). The parcel represented about half their traditional homeland in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. The discovery of gold on reservation lands near present-day Pierce, 50 miles east of Lewiston, in October 1860 led to the unchecked invasion of some 5,000 white gold seekers. Three years later, the government pressured a minority of (mostly Christianized) tribal members into accepting the loss of 90 percent of the 1855 reservation land, including the Wallowa Valley hunting grounds. The majority of the tribe viewed this new “treaty” as the betrayal it was. They continued to live and hunt within the 1855 boundaries until 1877, when General Oliver Howard gave them just 30 days to relocate to the new reservation. Instead, they assembled at Chief White Bird’s village, located adjacent to present-day U.S. Highway 95, 60 miles southeast of

Lewiston. There, on the morning of June 17, 1877, a band of about 70 Nez Perce warriors led by Chiefs Joseph, White Bird and Ollocot routed a force of 130 soldiers, militia and Nez Perce scouts, killing 34. No “non-treaty” Nez Perce Indians died. It was a Pyrrhic victory. Coming less than a year after “Custer’s Last Stand” at the Battle of the Little Big Horn in Montana Territory, U.S. Army Commanding General William Tecumseh “war is hell” Sherman believed the government had to capture Chief Joseph and his people to set an example to any other potential “renegade” Indians. However, what should have been a straightforward mopping-up campaign turned into a lengthy and costly pursuit. During the next three months, fewer than 250 Nez Perce warriors engaged some 2,000 U.S Army personnel in 18 battles and skirmishes during a remarkable fighting retreat. The war ended only when fresh troops intercepted and besieged the exhausted Nez Perce, who were resting after their 1,200 mile trek just 40 miles shy of the Canadian border, in the foothills of Bear’s Paw Mountains in Montana. After five days, Chief Joseph surrendered, proclaiming, “I am tired of fighting. Our chiefs are killed. … Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.” He was as honorable and resolute a leader in defeat as he had been in battle. We’ll look at the remaining 27 years of Chief Joseph’s life in a future column. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) pondered the meaning of “humanity” recently as he walked the grassy slopes of White Bird battlefield.

44 North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the County of Humboldt will hold a public meeting conducted by County Economic Development Division staff on July 26, 2012 at 3:30 p.m. at the Prosperity Center Conference Room, 520 E Street, Eureka, CA to the discuss the following State Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) topics: •  Review Annual FY 2011/12 Grantee Performance Reports for open CDBG grants 08-STBG-5282 All-Faith Night Shelter Building Acquisition and Expansion of Beds; Multiple Assistance Center Public Service Delivery Expansion for Children; Aster Place Off-Site Improvements to Support 40 Unit Affordable Housing Project 09-STBG-6416 Mobile Medical Office/Open Door Clinic building Acquisition; Alcohol Drug Care Operating Services; and Senior Resource Center Van Acquisition 10-STBG-6716 Vector/Easter Seals Pool Acquisition & Rehabilitation; All-Faith Night Shelter Van Acquisition 10-EDEF-7265 Microenterprise Program •  Review Final Grantee Performance Report for closed grant 09-EDEF6367 Microenterprise Program •  Review FY 2011/12 Grantee Performance Report for Program Income Accounts: Housing Rehabilitation Revolving Loan Account, Housing First Time Homebuyer Revolving Loan Account, and Business Revolving Loan Account The County is required to submit reports annually to the State of California Housing and Community Development Department (HCD) on their performance under the open Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), final performance on closed grants, and on local program income expended under the CDBG Revolving Loan Accounts.  Staff will have copies of the reports available for review and comment at the meeting.   The purpose of the public hearing/meeting will be to give citizens an opportunity to make their comments known on the activities conducted under the existing grants over the past fiscal year.  If you are unable to attend the public meeting, you may request copies of the reports and direct written comments to Economic Development Coordinator, Housing & Grants, County of Humboldt, 520 E Street, Eureka, CA  95501 or you may telephone (707) 445-7745.    If you plan on attending the public hearing and need a special accommodation because of a chemical sensitivity, sensory or mobility

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00337

impairment/disability, please contact the Economic Development Division Secretary (707) 445-7745 by noon on Monday, July 23, 2012, to arrange for those accommodations.   In addition, a public information file is available for review at the Economic Development Division office, 520 E Street, Eureka, CA between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.   The County of Humboldt promotes fair housing and makes all programs available to low- and moderate-income families and individuals, regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, marital status, political affiliation, sex, age, sexual orientation or other arbitrary factor. This policy does not require the employment of unqualified persons.

The following persons are doing business as WALK-A-BOUT FOODS at 1685 Ocean Drive., McKinleyville, CA 95519 Steven Fredlund 1685 Ocean Drive McKinleyville, CA 95519 Renee Fredlund 1685 Ocean Drive McKinleyville. CA. 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Renee K. Fredlund This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June. 06, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

7/12/2012 (12-201)

7/5, 7/12, 7/19/, 7/26/2012 (12-196)

DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: June 27, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: CHARLES MATTHEW VANERPOOL, SHERRY LYNN VANDERPOOL The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 355 MAIN STREET TRINIDAD, CA 95570 Type of License Applied for: 41-On-Sale Beer and WineEating Place 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-193)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00390

The following person is doing business as TRINIDAD BREWING COMPANY at 101 N. Westhaven Drive, Trinidad, CA 95570. Peter Damian Bauman 101 N. Westhaven Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Peter Damian Bauman. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 26 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/12, 7/19, 7/26, 8/2/2012 (12-199)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00377

The following person is doing business as PRECISION INTERMEDIA at 1012 Main St., Fortuna, CA 95540 Peter B. Krueger 341 11th St. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Peter B. Krueger This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June. 21, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/, 7/26/2012 (12-194)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00321

The following person is doing business as HUMBOLDT DICHRO at 2219 Spring St., Eureka, CA 95501. Amy Hagan 2219 Spring St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Amy Hagan. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 30, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-192)

Curious about legal advertising?

442-1400

USES OF VOTER INFORMATION (ELECTION POLICY) Information on your voter registration application/affidavit will be used by elections officials to send you official information on the voting process and the Vote-by-Mail ballot. Items such as Driver’s license and social security numbers, or your signature as shown on your voter registration application, cannot be released for commercial purposes. If you have any questions about the use of voter information or wish to report suspected misuse of such information, please call UIHS Compliance Officer at 707.825.5000. 7/12/2012 (12-203)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00348

The following person is doing business as THAT TREE GUY at 432 West Henderson St., Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 5608, Eureka, CA 95502. Michael E. Flowers 432 W. Henderson Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Michael E. Flowers. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 11, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-188)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00367

The following person is doing business as MARNIE BUGS at 207 G Street, Suite 214, Eureka, CA 95501. Marnie Cooper 2034 Adams Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 6/18/12. /s Marnie Cooper. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 18, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-187)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00375

The following persons are doing business as CAFÉ NOONER TOO! at 2910 E St., Eureka, CA 95501, 2640 Clay Rd., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Joseph Mark Filgas

2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Lorrena Lucille Filgas 2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Joseph Mark Filgas. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 20, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-189)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00379

The following person is doing business as COFFEE BREAK at 700 Bayside Road, Arcata, CA 95521 Greenway Coffee 700 Bayside Rd. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Michelle Greenway, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June. 22, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-192)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00355

The following person is doing business as GLOBAL HARMONY at 1020 8th St., Arcata, CA 95521, 6630 Bret Harte Ln., Eureka, CA 95503. Mariano Bayless 6630 Bret Harte Ln. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious

business name listed above on n/a. /s Mariano Bayless. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/2012 (12-183)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00361

The following person is doing business as GALA BELEZA EVENTS & WEDDINGS at 2511 Davis Way, Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 194, Arcata, CA 95518. Denise Bauer 2511 Davis Way Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Denise Bauer. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/2012 (12-184)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00362

The following person is doing business as MRM PROPERTY SERVICES at 49 Quail Lane, Fieldbrook, CA 95519. Mark Roger McCullough 49 Quail Lane Fieldbrook, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious

legal NOTICES continued on next page

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE The voter registration period remains open throughout the year except after the voter registration deadline date, which is a closed period of not less than two weeks prior to election day and shall remain closed until election counting day. The deadline date for registration is October 19, 2012. However, please be advised that voters who register after the deadline date will not receive a Vote-by-Mail ballot. The 2012 Election counting day is set for November 14, 2012.

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

1. Hippie’s home 4. “Don’t have ____!” 8. From scratch 14. Man’s name that spells another man’s name backward 15. Dalai ____ 16. Misinforms 17. Prevent (doing) 19. Cozy setting? 20. Moses’ mount 21. What a hoarder might be one day 23. Rock and rap, e.g. 25. Switch sides? 26. Quiet end?

27. Willie ____, the Jackie Robinson of the NHL 28. Fabled loser 31. “____ wise guy, eh?” 32. Magic and Wizards, e.g. 36. Photographer’s order: Abbr. 37. Main Street sights 39. 24-hora period 41. Disparage 42. “Am ____ brother’s keeper?” 43. “Aren’t ____ lucky one?” 44. Its logo has four rings 48. Austin Powers, e.g. 49. Opposite of WSW 51. 1956 perfect game pitcher Don

53. Witches’ pot ingredient in “Macbeth” 57. Suffers from sunburn 58. Lash out at 59. How pendulums swing ... or what to look for in 17-, 21-, 37and 53-Across 61. Vex 62. Handy bag 63. It merged with Continental in 2010: Abbr. 64. Verne of Austin Powers films 65. Neighbor of Kan. 66. Soap ingredient

DOWN

1. Earn $200, in Monopoly 2. More bohemian 3. Singer Warwick 4. 2004 remake starring Jude Law 5. 44-Across, e.g. 6. Melville work before “MobyDick” 7. Banking giant that collapsed in 2008, familiarly 8. Brown who hosts Food Network’s “Good Eats” 9. Feudal lands 10. Caboose

11. Champions, as a cause 12. Used as a platform 13. Soup kitchen offering 18. The “P” in PTA 22. How some meteors fall 24. Be unselfish 29. French for “workshop” 30. Size again 33. Sportscaster Costas 34. ____ 6 35. Oct. 1975 TV debut 37. Accept 38. Got watery, in a way

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

39. Far 40. Unwanted guest, say 45. Good for something 46. ____ Beach, Fla. 47. Shoe part 49. Use TurboTax, say 50. Panther, Jaguar or Lion, briefly 52. Sleep malady 54. Like Cheerios 55. ____ von Bismarck 56. Icky stuff 60. Home of the Braves: Abbr. MEDIUM #4

www.sudoku.com

You will need to re-register to vote when: • You move • You change your name

Solution, tips and computer program at

QUALIFICATIONS TO REGISTER TO VOTE IN UIHS ELECTION You may register to vote if you meet the following criteria: You are an American Indian eligible for services at UIHS and are registered as an Eligible Indian Beneficiary, you are eighteen years of age or older at the time of election, you reside in the voting area from which you will vote and you have completed a Voter Registration Application/Affidavit.

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

United Indian Health Services, Incorporated (UIHS) is registering American Indians to vote, who are eligible for services provided by UIHS.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, July 12, 2012

45

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KATHLEEN K. MURRAY CASE NO. PR120168

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE. business name listed above on 6/15/12. /s Mark R. McCullough. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/2012 (12-185)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120428 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: MICHAEL FRAVEL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: MICHAEL FRAVEL for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MICHAEL RAYMOND FRAVEL to Proposed Name MICHAEL RAYMOND SCHREMMER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 17, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: July 5, 2012 Filed: July 5, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 7/12, 7/19, 7/26, 8/2/2012 (12-202)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120386 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: THOR AND CATHERYN BALLEW TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: THOR AND CATHERYN BALLEW for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JACEY CHOIR BALLEW to Proposed Name JACEY SERYN CHOIR BALLEW

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 6, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: June 21, 2012 Filed: June 21, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 7/5, 7/12, 7/19, 7/26/2012 (12-198)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120378 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: DAVID CRAIG ARIVETT TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: DAVID CRAIG ARIVETT for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DAVID CRAIG ARIVETT to Proposed Name DAVID CRAIG ARIVETTE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: June 14, 2012 Filed: June 14, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/2012 (12-186)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ALEXANDRA SINZ CASE NO. PR120161

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MADELEINE MAY FRENCH CASE NO. PR120146

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KATHLEEN K. MURRAY, KATHLEEN MURRAY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SYLVIA A. MERIWEATHER in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SYLVIA A. MERIWEATHER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 26, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: GLORIA SHEETS SB#172371 ATTORNEY AT LAW POST OFFICE BOX 2005 EUREKA, CA 95502 (707) 445-0220 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ALEXANDRA SINZ A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MARK SINZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MARK SINZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 26, 2012, at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON SB# 30716 MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 JUNE 29, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MADELEINE MAY FRENCH A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LOUISA MAY FRENCH PRICE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LOUISA MAY FRENCH PRICE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 19, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LANT BARNEY, ESQ. SBN #98769 LAW OFFICES OF LANT BARNEY 1155 HIGH STREET AUBURN, CA 95603 (530) 889-5505 Filed June 19, 2012 HUMBOLDT COUNTY SUPERIOR SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

7/12, 7/19, 7/26/2012 (12-200)

7/5, 7/12, 7/19/2012 (12-197)

6/28, 7/5, 7/12/2012 (12-190)

NorthCoast CoastJournal JourNal• Thursday, • thursday, 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com JuLYJuly 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com 46 North

Employment

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Gift Shop Clerk Cage Cashier Bartender (Sunset) Bartender (Lounge) Janitorial Security Officer Shuttle Driver Valet Cocktail Waitress TRINIDAD RANCHERIA

Assistant Network Admin 1 - CISCO Staff Accountant SEASCAPE, PART-TIME POSITIONS

Cook Host/Hostess Dish/Bus

Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

PROGRAM ASSISTANT. For Loleta Boys & Girls Club of the Redwoods. Part-time position. Open until filled. Email resumes to lsmith@ bgcredwoods.org. (E-0726) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214. (E-0712) DIRECTOR OF PATIENT SERVICES. Plan, coordinate, evaluate medical programs for a nationally recognized reproductive health organization. FT/benefited, salary DOE. Must have RN or BA/BS. 2 years admin/supervisory experience required. Medical office experience preferred. Resume with cover letter to: HR, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, 3225 Timber Fall Ct., Eureka, CA 95503 by 7/20/12. (E-0719) HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE TEACHER. Laurel Tree Charter School is looking for a highly qualified, part-time High School Science Teacher for the 2012-13 school year. E-mail cover letter, resume, and references to laureltree_lc@ yahoo.com. (E-0712)

Employment

Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Clinical Staff Specialist

Medical Biller Cook Cashier • Loan Officer Laborer with Transportation

Arcata, FT Position coordinates credentialing & privileging, processing client complaints & assisting the Clinical Services Division Director in administrative functions. Must have four year college or university program degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

In accordance with P.L. 93-638 American Indian Preference will be given. Must have valid driver license and be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace with required testing. Apply at www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closing 7-13-12

SUPERVISING PSYCHIATRIC NURSE County of Humboldt

$5,135 - $6,590 mo.

Plans, organizes and directs day to day nursing and related functions on assigned shift in a psychiatric treatment facility, and performs other work as required. Two years experience in psychiatric nursing with some supervisory or charge experience is desired. CA RN is req. Position is open until filled. Filing deadline: July 20, 2012. For application contact Humboldt County Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, CA, or apply on-line at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST I County of Humboldt

$3,027 -$3,884 monthly, plus excellent benefits, including 2.0 @ 55 PERS retirement. Organize, plan, implement, and evaluate special and continuing public health education and disease prevention programs. Requires knowledge, education and experience related to public health administration, program implementation and teaching. There are currently 3 open assignments for this position. Equivalent to a Master’s degree in health education or a related field is desirable. Filing deadline: July 18, 2012. For application contact Humboldt County Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, CA, or apply on-line at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

Full-Time Positions 1 - MEDICAL BILLER, Arcata 2 - DENTAL RECEPTIONIST, Eureka (Spanish language skills preferred) 1 - RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, Crescent City 1 - REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT, Eureka 1 - MEDICAL ASSISTANT, Crescent City

Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application LEAD MAINTENANCE WORKER. For City of Fort Bragg. Seeking qualified applicants for: Lead Maintenance Worker, SALARY: $3,997-$4,859 with excellent benefits. See City website for details and application: city. fortbragg.com, www.mendocoastrec.org. FILING DEADLINE: July 25. Faxes, postmarks, digital signatures not accepted. Questions? Call 961-2842. EOE/AA/ Drug Free. (E-0712) TECH SUPPORT TECHNICIAN. For City of Fort Bragg. Seeking qualified applicants for: Technology Support Technician, SALARY: $4,333-$5,267 with excellent benefits. See City website for details and application: city.fortbragg. com, www.mendocoastrec.org. FILING DEADLINE: July 25. Faxes, postmarks, digital signatures not accepted. Questions? Call 961-2842. EOE/AA/Drug Free. (E-0712) MILLWRIGHT/MACHINE MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN. Must have minimum of 2 years exp. in hydraulics and air maintenance. Required to repair pumps, cylinders, weld, cut and prefab. Must perform all duties in accordance with safety rules and regulations. Must be 18 years or older. Applications accepted Mon. - Fri., 9 a.m- 4 p.m at Sierra Pacific Industries, 2593 New Navy Base Road, in Arcata. We are a tobacco and drug free work place. A verifiable SS# is required. EOE (E-0712)

OPENING FOR CMT & HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS. In established spa and wellness center. Independent contractor/ rent agreement, 1-3 days a week. Amazing healing space, retail, ocean view. Contact (707) 4980909 or taunusk@earthlink.net (E-0726) SOCIAL WORKER MSW. Full time/benefits avail. Must have exp. working with elderly/disabled. App./job desc. can be picked up at Adult Day Health Care of Mad River. Apps accepted until position filled. (707) 8224866 (E-0726) $$$ DANCERS WANTED $$$ No experience necessary. Make your own schedule. Opportunity to make cash nightly! Call The Fabulous Tip Top Gentlemen’s Club 443-5696 or 601-7169. 18+ (E-0816) R.N PART-TIME. Exp. working w/elderly preferred, excellent assessment skills required. No weekends/holidays. App./job desc. may be picked up at Adult Day Health Care of Mad River Apps. accepted until position filled. (707) 822-4866 (E-)

Employment

Rentals

BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted. com (E-1227) HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. theworkhub.net (E-0927) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-0920) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Rentals EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 225 Hillsdale St., #1 & #3. W/S/G Pd, Laundry Hook-ups, Cat OK, Rent $750. Call for Availability. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2275 Summit Ridge Rd. Humboldt Hill, MtM, Pets Considered, Rent $1200, Vac 8/1. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-0712) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/ 1BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Pd., 6 Month Lease, Small Pets, Rent $765, Vac 7/28. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712)

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1335 6th St., #4. 2nd Fl. Apt., SEC 8 OK, W/S/G Pd. Rent $600, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) EUREKA 2BD/1BA CARRIAGE HOUSE. 1134 A St. W/S Pd., Cat OK, Rent $695, Vac 8/21. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 914 J St. W/S/G Pd., MtM, Rent $895, Vac 7/21. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 2130 Union St. Pets Considered, MtM, Rent $925, Vac 7/20. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Some utilities paid, patio, available now, $795. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R0712) ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Near bus, carport onsite laundry, cat ok. $600, (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-0712) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM APT. Some utilities, onsite laundry, walk to HSU $750, (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0712)

Rental Helpers

Offers the largest listing of homes, apartments, condos and rooms for rent in Humboldt County! 4 Seventh Street, Suite A

(707) 443-HELP TheRentalHelpers.com

Humboldt County’s only DRE Licensed Listing Service!

hiring? place your ad ONLINE @

CONTINUED ON PAGE 48

Corner 7 th & A of St.

PRA02054

CONTINUED ON PAGE 48

the

www.northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JuLY 12, 2012

47

the Rentals ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer hookups, yard. $1300 (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0712) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, some utilities paid. $600. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0712) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM APT. Carport, deck, onsite laundry, some utilities paid. $725. (707) 443-8227 www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R0712) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, yard, washer/dryer hookups, $1300. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0712) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, laundry hookups, fenced yard, $1200. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0712) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carport, patio, onsite laundry, some utilities. $725. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0712) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard, 2 car garage, laundry hookups, pet ok. $1450. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0712) ARCATA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 3385 Buttermilk. Six Month Lease, On Golf Course, Small Pet OK, Rent $1700, Vacant Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) FORTUNA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 513 Summer St. Cute Home, Near Shopping, Schools & Hospital, MtM, Will Consider Pets, Rent $1200, Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) BY THE BAY & OLDTOWN. Eureka 1BD/1BA Apartment. $650/month, $1000/deposit. No Smoking/Pets. W/S/G paid. References required. 445-4679. (R-0712) LOLETA 1BD/1BA DUPLEX. 2721 Eel River Dr., #8. Close to CR, Cat OK, Rent $600, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) ARCATA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSES. 840 D St., Units A & Z. 1 Year Lease, Rent $995, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) ARCATA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2220 Wisteria Way. Close to Schools/ Parks. Rent $1195, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) ARCATA 4BD/1.5BA FARMHOUSE. 1387 Janes Rd.1 mile from HSU, NO PETS, Rent $1995, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712)

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 47

Real Estate EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3113 Ingley St. 2 Units Available. 2nd Floor, SEC 8 OK, W/S/G Pd., Near Shop & Bus Lines, Cat OK, Rent $725,Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) EUREKA 3BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1443 5th St., #1. W/S/G Pd, Cat OK, MtM, Rent $795, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) EUREKA STUDIO. 1140 E St., #32. SEC 8 OK, W/S/G Pd, Cat Ok, Near Bus Lines, MtM, Rent $515, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0712) ARCATA 1BD, 2BD, STUDIOS & BRAND NEW UNITS. Available now. Some or all utilities paid, close to buses. Near HSU! Call for more info! 822-4557 or visit www. strombeckprop.com (R-0726) HUMBOLDT BAY PROPERTIES. Apartments, rooms and houses. 443-5228. (R-0719) ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

Buy/Sell/Trade

USED , NEW & RARE

BOOKS

402 2 Street • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344 nd

SECLUDED SUNNY KNEELAND HOME/FOREST. Private drive, park setting, camp environment with luxuries. Between Eureka and Arcata. 3BD/2BA, large living areas, 1754 sf, 3.8 flat acres of redwoods. Green house, garage, reliable spring. Hardwood floor, skylights, deck, hot tub, patio. $410k Contact is owner-agent: selectivefocus@hotmail.com, (707) 786-5348 (RE-0712) TRINITY VILLAGE 1.3 ACRES WITH CREEK. 3BD/2BA main house. PLUS: Guest House, Art Studio/Workshop, Pool, Sauna, 2 Car Garage, Amenities Galore. $375,000. Call Gail Packard Realty, Owner/Broker, (530) 629-4181. (RE-0726)

Lodging/Travel

Autos 2003 MONTANA 5TH WHEEL. 3 slides. Arctic package. Ready for AZ or AK. 2005 F350 diesel PU. A/C, all power, on board air compressor. Both well maintained. In excellent condition. $52,000. Will sell separately. (707) 443-4445 or (707) 499-2140. (A-0712) 2009 HONDA FIT SPORT MODEL. Warranty, 5-speed Automatic, Great gas mileage. Excellent condition. $14,900 OBO, Call 677-9410. (A-0802) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

616 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com Mon-Fri 10-6 pm Sat 10-5pm

OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Have an extra fixer up cars in the driveway? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

Buy/Sell/Trade

Business Rentals ARCATA 2- 1000 SF WAREHOUSE SPACES AVAILABLE. Call S&W Properties, (707) 443-2246. (BR0719) EUREKA FURNISHED OFFICE SPACE. Close to Courthouse & banks, services included, call S&W (707) 443-2246 (BR-0719) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

Real Estate WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

Pets

home & garden

PLACE YOUR PET AD! service directory

Auto CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0712)

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

home & garden

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE 20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

LIKE NEW HARDWOOD FUTON. 7 ft. $200. Looks good in any room. 444-0408. (BST-0712) SUMMER SIDEWALK SALE. Check out our 50¢ tables full of new arrival summer clothing for Women, Men, Kids & Babies! July 10-14. Dream Quest Thrift Store, Providing Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-0712)

KITS • $7 310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

Need some help home around the house?

&

home & garden

service directory service directory see page 29

service dire

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com garden

service directory LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at wwwhumboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

Pets

Services

Music

Custom Pet Portraits by Sophia Dennler •

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

Sales

For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets

Services

Service

Solutions N

TIO OCA

L NEW

(707)443-1104 1500 4th St Eureka

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

EXPERIENCED BABY/HOUSE/ DOG SITTER. Available for the summer. Good references. Contact (707) 502-6274, m.harris528@ gmail.com. (S-0726) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0726) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded #3860. Spring Cleaning Special! (707) 444-2001. (S-0712) SURFBOARD REPAIR 40+ years experience. George Cicero (707) 616-0738 (S-0823) AMUSING GAMES & AMAZING PERFORMANCES FOR ALL AGES. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227)

Lic. #FD1963

humboldtcremation.com 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-0712) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) HOUSE CLEANING BY JEANNIE. Residence $15/hour, Move-outs $20/hour. Call 921-9424. References Available. (S-0809) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0809) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-0823)

SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) A-1 STEAM CARPET CLEANING. Ask us about our $99.00 2 room special. Also now offering Green Guard 442-3229 ext 13 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) MCKEEVER ENERGY AND ELECTRIC. Residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural. Electrical contracting and design. Renewable energy. Energy efficiency and sustainability. Energy consulting, documentation and field verification. Contact Nate McKeever at 707-822-0100 or info@mckeeverenergyandelectric.com or visit www.mckeeverenergyandelectric. com. Lic. # CA C10 876832 (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson Attorney DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc. FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

Music Too many tubas, overwhelmed with sTuff? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-0809) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi-track recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0823) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

Community LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. How to overcome regrets and make peace with the past explored, Sun., July 15, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@hotmail. com. (C-0712) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-0712) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0726)

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JuLY 12, 2012

49

body, mind

&Spirit

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 49

N. Kristine Chadwick

TIME FOR A MASSAGE?

Award Winning Hollywood Makeup Artist

introduces

Cinema Secrets

professional mineral makeup line.

Therapeutic Massage

Low prices, free makeover demo & $10 gift certificate drawing.

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

AMA approved quality.

Certified Massage Therapist

Call 707-768-3677 for an appointment. #7 Fifth Street, Eureka frommalibutoyou@aol.com

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating. Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH, FROM THE INSIDE OUT. Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist and Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). (707) 845-3749. www.ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB0712) WERE YOU IMPLANTED. WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and Dec. 2010? Have you had this lead replaced, capped or did you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (MB-0712) do TERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719. (MB-0816)

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0926) COLON HYDROTHERAPY WITH MOLLY LEUTHNER. At Jade Dragon Medical Spa. Closed System. Using an F.D.A. approved medical device, warm water is gently inserted into the colon. When the colon contracts, the water is flushed out through the device. Take an internal bath! 822-4300. (MB-1011) CERTIFIED IN MASSAGE THERAPY & FOOT REFLEXOLOGY. Reidun Olsson, (707) 822-7247. (MB-0809) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0726) CRANIAL SACRAL THERAPY. Infused with Shiatsu, Quantum Touch Healing, Energywork. Crescent City, (517) 974-0460. (MB-0726)

Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642

Valerie Schramm

NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 2680929. (MB-1025) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0920) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0920)

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY Weekend Massage Clinic Special ½ hour $30 1 hour $45

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Mon. Club, 610 Main St. Every Tue. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (MB-1227) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 4424240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (MB-1227) BE A LIFE SAVER! Your blood donation is always needed!! Call the Northern California Community Blood Bank. Call for Bloodmobile schedule. 2524 Harrison St., Eureka, 443-8004

www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www.northcoastaikido. org. (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup. org. (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)

It’s here! The 2012 Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt. View it online on our Special Publications page.

Do it Legally

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

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Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 12-6pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI & Veterans New First Tim MMJ Patie e nts S

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Medical Cannabis Consultants

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GOOD HEALTH is a great New Year’s resolution. Your new health practitioner may be listed here. Tell them you saw their notice in the Journal.

INSI DE

Venues Jewelry Gowns and Tuxedoes Flowers Bakeries And More

■ MCKINLEYVILLE

NEW

LISTI

2850 E St., Eureka

NG!

(Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

real estate

this week Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

839-9093

GOOD LOCATION for this older McKinleyville home with new carpet in bedrooms and a good floorplan. Nice big half-acre parcel with a storage shed and greenhouse. Close to elementary school. Needs some TLC. MLS#235831 $178,000

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

this week

Sylvia Garlick

#00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

$315,000

$350,000

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,725 sq ft spacious McKinleyville home on over-sized flat lot, enclosed front porch, covered deck, woodstove, refinished wood floors, fresh interior paint, large master bedroom

4 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,170 sq ft immaculate home close to Henderson Center, 12’ x 16’ bonus room that can be used as workshop or possibly converted into a studio, back deck overlooks greenbelt

real estate

this week

$205,000

Main house & detached Mother-In-Law unit ready to move in, this is a great opportunity to have a second unit subsidize the mortgage or use for extended family, great investment property

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Blue Lake Land/Property

panoramic 160 acres on Snow Camp Road near Snow Camp mountain. Year round creek, developed water system, rolling meadows with scattered second growth and pockets of old growth trees.

$375,000

Swayback Ridge Land/Property

+/-40 acres Jack Rabbit Valley. Sloping property with valley views, 3 cleared flats, year round springs, developed solar water system, meadows and scattered trees.

$ 240,000

Weitchpec Land/ Property

+/-6 acres of wooded property off of HWY 169. this undeveloped property boasts timber, river frontage as well as river views and excellent year round access.

$ 44,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

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North Coast Journal 07-12-12