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thursday march 22, 2012 vol XXIII issue 12 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

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'f;t;{;\:;':.';':v.?'. (·'-.:.':.~' ,':,' :"~: :"':' 8 We’re thinkin’ maybe American Airlines 20 Jazz Fest: You will dance 22 The Playhouse’s BIG Week 28 Jah Sun Rises 35 You don’t know prostates I

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table of 5 6 8

Mailbox Poem

26 Calendar 30 Filmland

News

31 Workshops 32 Seven-o-Heaven

Birthday Again catching a flight

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover School Lunch 2.0

18 Home & Garden Service Directory

18 In Review

a book and a cd

20 Gotta Dance!

Dancing Up a Storm

27

The Hum

Playhouse Bound

Stinking Badges

cartoon by andrew goff

35 Field Notes

A Urethra Runs Through It

37 37 38 41 43

Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

24 Music & More!

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012

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4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, march 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


Plaza Aftermath Editor: On the afternoon of March 1 the Big Daddy of the Arcata Economic Development Corp., Ross Welch (“Default Lines,” March 15), entered Plaza Design in Arcata, placed his hand with authoritative display upon the counter near the manager (my wife) Tracy and announced in a reportedly loud, aggressive tone in the middle of a busy Thursday something like:  “I am Ross, from the AEDC. We are here to shut this business down. If you work here, you no longer have a job. This stock is ours. It is our collateral.” Ross had brought Tony, the AEDC’s collections agent, and a locksmith described as being of thuggish temperament. My first instinct was to demand a public apology for Mr. Welch’s hostile attitude during the close down event — and to ask who was responsible for payment of held paychecks. I called Ross at the AEDC to see what was up with the pay for my wife and others. I was under the wrong impression that AEDC had seized accounts!? He said that the AEDC hadn’t seized accounts and that it couldn’t. He explained

the legal logic of this and was notably gentlemanly to me. As of March 17, the held paychecks were finally received from the proprietors with a kind letter. But I still think a public apology is due from Mr. Welch to my wife and her co-workers. I also assign Mr. Welch an exonerate tractate on: An analysis of what ontogenic level(s) money exists on: What is money? And, what are the ethiCartoon by joel mielke cal rules guiding practices of stewarding these increments     of human value? (Hints: You can reference the sciences, mathematics, general system’s theory, cybernetics, human neurology, Editor: history of philosophy, and/or Buddhist As your thorough overview of the ontology. And all systems align along upcoming congressional election pointed the temporal axis.) out (“Congress: The Dating Game,” March Big question issues. Heavy karmic 15), this is a race for two spots on the Noweight. vember ticket. As the title you assigned Assignment due by April 15.  to Jared Huffman, “The Anointed One,”  Matt Yadley, Eureka suggests (and polling has confirmed), he

Anoint Adams

will win one of those two spots. So the race is really about who will be the second candidate in the runoff. My choice to support Susan Adams was made easy by her personal story, her political experience and her close ties to the North Coast. Susan is the fourth generation of a Mendocino ranching family, and her second home is here in Carlotta continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, march 22, 2012

5


Birthday Again

continued from previous page

CONSTITUTION UNDER ATTACK! • USA Patriot Act • NDAA • HR 347 • Bradley Manning • Humboldt County Board of Supervisors’ proposed ordinance to restrict demonstrations

Free Speech Forum

March 24 • 1- 4 p.m. at the WOMEN’S CLUB, 1531 J Street, Eureka Moderator: Dan Faulk, Humboldt State University Panelists: Jeffrey Schwartz, Attorney • James Decker, Occupy Eureka John Hackett, CLMP • Verbena Lee, Redwood Curtain Cop Watch Tracy Rain, Attorney & Homeless Advocate • Marcy Burstiner, Humboldt State University

— unlike Stacy Lawson, who has only lived in the district for two years and whose financial ties with some rather questionable gurus make her much less appealing. While no one questions Norman Solomon’s progressive credentials, those very qualities mean that he would have no chance of defeating Huffman in a general election runoff with Democrats, Independents and Republican voters. If we are to consider the skills you suggest we look for in a congressional representative, Susan Adams is the one candidate both qualified for the job and capable of winning in a general election. While she has broad support from liberals for her progressive positions — on single payer health care, stopping the wars, reforming Wall Street, ending marijuana prohibition and protecting the environment — she also has the political experience of successfully bringing differing factions together to find workable solutions to difficult problems. She is not burdened with corporate or special interest donors and, most impressively, she is already receiving support from what would otherwise be considered more conservative members of the community. This demonstrates her ability to build the diverse coalition needed to work through the gridlock in Washington D.C. At the last Arts Alive there was a photo taken of Susan Adams with two of her supporters, Mark Lovelace and Virginia Bass.  If she can get these two to agree on her, I think that makes the case that she is a consensus builder who can bring people together.  Richard Salzman, Arcata

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  Rain’s back, redwood stumps sliding further into duff. Always this flow of getting older, shirt clinging to skin, skin clinging as much to the surface of wet air as chilled muscle. All morning the rain vacillates between downpour and a slow tapping. Afternoon arrives, and the sun is a bright bruising in the swell of clouds. At dusk, limbs on a slope: bare alders, bald cascaras, my arms pulling in blueness, some starshine. Outside, fallen water cutting ruts awash in darkness. — Kimberley Pittman-Schulz

Corrections In last week’s cover story (“Congress, The Dating Game”), 4th District Humboldt County Supervisor Virginia Bass was misidentified by her previous title of Eureka’s mayor. Last week’s article on the Navy’s Northwest Training Range Complex (“Navy Bounces Sonar off Public,” March 15) misstated the complex’s size. The complex covers 122,400 square nautical miles, equivalent to almost 162,000 square statute — or land-based — miles. Thus, it covers an area slightly larger than Montana, but not quite as big as California.  ●


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flash fiction contest!

March 22, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 12

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

This is The End. But first you must write the beginning and middle. Yep, it’s the return of the North Coast Journal’s Flash Fiction Contest! You tell us a story in 99 words or less. Something sock-stealing, heart-stopping, tearjerking, smile-cracking, brain-whipping. Or maybe a sleepy entrancement. Then slap a title on it – no more than seven words. We will feature the best entries in an issue of the Journal. E-mail your entry to the North Coast Journal Flash Fiction Contest, fiction@northcoastjournal. com. Or, if you must, send it by paper mail to: North Coast Journal Fiction Contest 310 F Street, Eureka, CA 95501

Deadline: April 10, 2012

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Zach St. George zach@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production interns Kimberly Hodges, Jonathan Webster sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Photo by Jada Calypso Brotman.

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Vintage advertising art for American Airlines at the Silver Lining Restaurant. Photo by Bob Doran

Catching a Flight County government hustles to attract American Airlines with $1 million guarantee By Ryan Burns

ryanburns@northcoastjournal.com

T

he Humboldt County government is rushing to catch a plane. Or a jet, actually — an Embraer 140 regional jet equipped with a pair of Rolls-Royce turbofan engines so powerful they can propel up to 44 passengers (in leather seats) from the Arcata-Eureka Airport to LAX in just 90 minutes. American Eagle, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Airlines, would like to provide this service to and from Los Angeles twice a day, starting as early as June, as long as the county can do two things: put up at least $1 million to guarantee the airline’s revenues for the first two years, and do it fast. What’s the rush? Brett Hooyerink, a market development manager for American Airlines, explained that after some schedule shuffling in Los Angeles, one of American’s five hubs nationwide, the company has a jet available. Executives want that jet plugged into the airline’s summer schedule, and to accomplish that they need to select a route by this week. This has placed county officials in the difficult position of needing to move both cautiously and quickly. On the one hand, the region is in desperate need of

expanded airline service. Delta Air Lines, which provided flights to and from Salt Lake City, Utah, for less than two years, abandoned the region in 2010 after collecting $500,000 in prepaid tickets, another $500,000 in revenue guarantees and $62,000 in deferred landing fees. Last April, Horizon Airlines discontinued its service to and from L.A., leaving Humboldt County with a single commercial airline, United. Adding to the urgency: A major construction project will close one of San Francisco International Airport’s two main runways from June of this year until 2015, promising countless flight delays and cancellations. But on the other hand, county officials don’t want to get burned again, like they did with Delta. Over the last two weeks, county staff and the Board of Supervisors have been working furiously, negotiating with airline representatives and meeting with local agencies to see if the deal can come together. Last week, the board of directors for the Headwaters Fund, the county’s unique pot of economic development money, agreed to finance a loan for the $1 million


revenue guarantee. That’s down from the airline’s original request for a $2 million guarantee. The contract that’s currently on the table includes a monthly revenue target for American Eagle’s service to and from L.A. If the airline fails to hit that target — which so far is publicly undisclosed — during any given month, it will make up the difference by withdrawing money from the $1 million in revenue guarantees. At last week’s Board of Supervisors meeting, 3rd District Supervisor Mark Lovelace asked if the county would get to share in the profits if the airline ever exceeds its target revenue. The answer was no. Furthermore, American Eagle wouldn’t have to pay landing fees, terminal rental fees or a variety of other standard expenses thanks to a fee waiver program that the county offers to attract new airline service. Hooyerink, the American Airlines rep, told the Journal that such guarantees and fee waivers are industry standard. “It’s a way for us to ensure we don’t sustain the heavy losses that are typical in the first two years or so of getting a new service up and running,” he said. From the county’s perspective, these concessions may be a risk worth taking (again) given the potential economic benefits of the new service. Many local business owners say their economic growth depends on reliable transportation in and out of the area. “Look, we just need it,” said Briar Bush, general manager of Lost Coast Brewery. Humboldt County Film Commissioner Cassandra Hesseltine said the county pulled in $1 million last fiscal year from TV commercial productions, print ad shoots and independent movie projects. She predicted that direct flights to L.A. would vastly expand those revenues. HSU President Rollin Richmond said airline service is very important to the nearly 90 percent of Humboldt State University students who come here from outside the area. There are a number of reasons to believe things will work out better this time around. Gregg Foster has worked as hard as anyone to attract another airline to the region. Chair of the county’s airport advisory committee and former executive director of the Redwood Region Economic Development Commission,

Foster pointed out that Delta’s service started amid record high fuel prices and just months before the worst recession in more than 60 years. Plus, Delta arrived as the third airline at Arcata-Eureka Airport, while American would be effectively replacing Horizon Airline’s L.A. flights. Horizon was trying to fill 148 seats per day while American would only need to fill 88. “We have data we can rely on from 2005 that shows that if [American Eagle] can just capture what was the existing traffic, they will fill their two planes per day.” Last week, the Board of Supervisors unanimously directed staff to develop a funding package to finance the $1 million revenue guarantee with the following stipulations: It can’t obligate any money from the county’s strapped general fund, and it can’t violate Federal Aviation Administration restrictions on how airport division funds are spent. Public Works Director Tom Mattson said that in order to do that, the funding package will have to be handled through a separate agency. On Monday Mattson and other county officials met with the executive committee of the Redwood Region Economic Development Commission, the agency that handled Delta’s revenue guarantee, and the committee expressed preliminary support. (The decision is ultimately up to the commission’s board of directors.) Complicated, right? While county government and local economic development agencies have all expressed enthusiasm for the American Airlines deal, the big questions remained unanswered as the Journal went to press Tuesday afternoon. Foremost among these is: Who will ultimately pay for the $1 million revenue guarantee? “That is up to negotiation,” Mattson said earlier in the day. It could wind up being county funds (though not from the aviation division), or it could come through a grant, or the private sector might be able to pony up much of the money, he said. “That all has to be negotiated still.” The county has been working since Delta left to increase regional airline service. Sounding beleaguered but optimistic, Mattson said one thing’s certain: “This is the closest we’ve been in a long time.” l

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9


Blog Jammin’ CRIME / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / MARCH 19, 4:29 P.M.

Swift Shooting Probe One Fortuna police officer involved in a deadly shooting is already back on the job after three days of paid leave, and a second officer could return to active duty within a week or so, Fortuna Police Chief Bill Dobberstein said today. “We’re hoping to have everything wrapped up by the end of BIKE PARTS DISAPPEAR. PHOTO BY KENTON ARMSTRONG this week,” the chief said, in the investigation of Fortuna’s first officer-involved shooting in at least 18 wheels followed. years. Fortuna is taking a co-lead in that For me, these photos represent the soinvestigation, along with the Humboldt cial, political and financial rust of AmerCounty District Attorney’s Office. ica in 2012. The victim, Jacob Robert Newmaker, Lean back, rub your chin in a thought26, of Fortuna, was pronounced dead ful manner and tell us what you see. Friday morning at Redwood Memorial Hospital. Police say Newmaker showed AGRICULTURE, COMMERCE, YUROK / BY up in a stranger’s yard around 6 a.m. Friday HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 15, 10:35 A.M. screaming incoherently, then took off on his bicycle. When police caught up with Cannery Dreams in Weitchpec him soon after, they tangled. Dobberstein A Yurok family plans to build a cannery said the man was tasered, first mildly then in Weitchpec, near the confluence of the more severely, but continued to struggle Klamath and Trinity rivers, and has been and yanked away an officer’s baton. One accepting pledges at Kickstarter to get of the two officers on the scene shot the venture going. Newmaker after he raised the baton and Tom and Morneen Willson, who own appeared ready to strike the other officer, Spey-gee Point Resort and Guide Services, Dobberstein said. co-founded The Source Food Company late last year with Billee Willson, who ARTS, GOVERNMENT/ BY RYAN BURNS works in human services for Sacramento / MARCH 16, 11:45 A.M. County. Their intent, according to their Is Bike Crime or Art? Kickstarter page, is to try to restore their community — stuck in a depression of This year, it seems, the tableau outside high unemployment — to a semblence of the Humboldt County Courthouse has the bountiful days their great grandparserved as a Rorschach test for local ents enjoyed, when Weitchpec was “the residents. Some look at the huddled center of commerce … rich in resources Occupy protesters and see a righteous both in the river and on the mountains.” social movement — stalwart defenders of justice. Others look at the same scene and “Food was so plentiful that our people see wastrels. Social rot. had time to create objects of beauty and Some look at hand-drawn signs tied utility. The Yurok women are known for to the chain-link fence and see the First their fine basketry; a craft developed in Amendment in action; others see vandalism. this rich land and made entirely of the Then there’s the courthouse building resources available here.” itself: Is it the ugliest government building The Willsons will build the cannery and in Humboldt County, or is it the ugliest in let community members process their the state? own harvests there — salmon and berries Today the Journal received via email and possibly more. The Willsons hope to two photos from courthouse employee/ create a gourmet market for their own bicycle commuter Rodney Brunlinger, hand-crafted salmon goodies — canned, along with the following message: smoked, jerked. NCJ, “We recognize our food supply is My friend, photographer Kenton Davis becoming fragile and living in such a Armstrong, took these photos this mornremote location, the cost is high and ing next to the Courthouse on I Street. This bike has been locked up for READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT more than one month. Last week, the seat disappeared. Last night, the

the supply could be cut off easily. While this cannery will be individually owned, the cannery becomes the first step in helping the community meet their nutritional needs locally and creating additional income through surplus sales. “The cannery is only one aspect of the food security vision for this community. Our vision is to see our friends and family take initiative to build herds and flocks, to garden and grow crops, to fish and to gather.” They’re working on FDA approval now, and are asking for donations to help them pay regulatory fees, buy equipment including freezers and flash-freezers and smoke house, set up the cannery and conduct food safety training. They hope to open the operation this summer. BY RYAN BURNS / MARCH 15, 9:50 A.M.

CR President Named College of the Redwoods’ Board of Trustees has made its selection from the three finalists named last month: Kathryn G. Lehner, who has been serving as the president/superintendent of Mendocino College since 2005. The press release, which is on our website, says in part: The Trustees are working on a transition timeline for when Ms. Lehner would assume the role of CR president. Until she begins her appointment, CR Interim President Utpal Goswami will continue in his position. Goswami has been the interim president since March 2011. He served as the vice president of instruction from July 2010 until he was appointed the interim president. … Ms. Lehner came to Mendocino College in 2003 and served as its vice president of academic affairs for two years. She has been the president/superintendent of the college since 2005. For nine years she has been involved with the North State Rural Community College Association, of which CR is also a member. As the longest-sitting president of this northern California group, Ms. Lehner is currently serving as its chair. She also represents the northern colleges on the statewide Chief Executive Officers of California Community Colleges, the group representing all

California community college presidents and chancellors. ACTIVISM, PARKS, RECREATION / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 14, 5:06 P.M.

Sharpen Your eTrek Sticks The Guv has proposed closing 70 state parks to ease the budget burden a bit, and several are in our area — including Fort Humboldt and Grizzly Creek Redwoods State Park, through which the Van Duzen River flows. Some of these parks have been saved from closure by private and government entities; most have not. A week from now, Wednesday, March 21, State Sen. Noreen Evans hosts an eTown Hall Meeting, from 6 to 7 p.m. This is your time to webchat about the proposed closures and submit your brilliant ideas on how to avert them. And to jab those pointy walking sticks at your computer screen. For more information call 916 651-4002 or click the link on our website. KINETICS, MEDIA / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 14, 3:05 P.M.

Magazine Gets Kinetic Popular Mechanics, the magazine for wrench-wielding nerds, features a story this week on our very own megaexaltation of artsy mechanical nerdity: the Kinetic sculpture race (in case you needed telling). And, somewhat self-consciously and perhaps in need of explaining his attention to this costumed, joyous absurdity, author James Vlahos asks: “Why would people spend hundreds of hours to create all-terrain racing sculptures?” Then he answers with PM gusto: “The obvious answer is because kinetic racing is fun, but the rationale goes deeper than that. Events like the Kinetic Grand Championship attract both studio artists and grease-stained engineers with the same intoxicating lure: an oddball challenge whose arbitrary constraints inspire wonderfully unconventional solutions. The mandate that all entries be human-powered makes the race more accessible to students and hobbyists. And the no-engines rule gives the race a third component besides artistic design and mechanical engineering — human sweat.” To read Vlahos’ story, “Burning Man Meets Daytona: California’s Crazy Gonzo Race,” yourself, follow the link on our website. ●

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


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11


School Lunch 2.0 LEFT A TORTILLA TOPS THE LUNCH TRAY AT JACOBY CREEK SCHOOL.

Menus are changing, even before new federal rules kick in Story and photos by Jada Calypso Brotman

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t Jacoby Creek School in Arcata, billows of steam cloud the plastic food guards that protect the tables of hot food, duplicating the winter fog that mists the cafeteria windows. The smells of ketchup, vegetable soup and yesterday’s lasagna mingle with the odors of rubber balls and kid sweat from the game of kickball that finished a scant 10 minutes ago. The giggles and hoots of children echo off the high ceilings, dimming momentarily when the authoritative, deep voices of lunch aides and teachers suggest line-forming and lunch-appropriate behavior. It’s time for lunch. School cafeteria lunch. For anyone who went to school decades ago, the experience has changed remarkably little in some ways. Despite a world that has endured budget cuts, cell phone apps, and No Child Left Behind, school lunch looks, sounds and smells a lot like it did in 1985. Or even 1965. As adult visitors we may be taller and bigger, but we still have to wait in line and not push. There are fewer New Kids on the Block lunchboxes, but the sound of Humboldt

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

rain drumming on a gym-turned-cafeteria roof is eternal. And yet, something is different. The lunch ladies are far less frightening than they seemed when we were younger; maybe they have gotten nicer. The sheet cake with loads of artificial vanilla frosting, so fondly remembered from fifth grade, is not on the menu any more. In fact, a lot of the items served even 10 years ago have vanished or been altered. No bright orange nachos, no chocolate chip cookies, no fried corn chips, no mysterious sugary orange drink. Desserts are rare and wholesome (think watermelon). Breakfast is expanded now, and all the schools we visited recently serve it. Far from generic Pop Tarts, breakfast includes fresh baked breads, five-grain cereals and fruit. Cooking methods have been changed; bye-bye, deep fry! Even the corn dogs are baked. It’s hard not to breathe a tiny (although culinarily appalled) sigh of nostalgia at the fading of so much childhood sugar, grease and empty calories. But today’s kids don’t wonder where the pudding went; they were never offered it in the first place.

Probably for the best (sigh of longing for whipped topping). … As adults, many of us have discovered that less-processed foods, grown closer to our kitchens, taste better than all those garbage calories. And with childhood obesity rampant, far from worrying about our kids getting enough calories, we’re concerned with them getting healthy and nutritious meals. In Humboldt, the County Office of Education recently scored a grant from the St. Joseph Health System Foundation to host a series of healthier cooking classes for local cafeteria staff. Nationally, Michelle Obama, highest-profile proponent of changing the way kids are fed in public schools, has made healthy eating her cause celebre. From growing vegetables in the White House garden to championing 2010’s Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act (which mandated updated nutrition legislation), she has reason to celebrate in 2012; this year saw the USDA release its final version of the new healthier standards, after two years of national feedback. No longer does ketchup count as a vegetable! There are other, more substantial dif-


FRUIT IS OFFERED, LEFT, AT ALICE BIRNEY ELEMENTARY, AND HOPE REINMAN DISHES UP LUNCH AT TRINIDAD ELEMENTARY.

ferences that affect the almost 32 million students who eat hot lunches. The new rules, which are to be phased in over the next three years, include offering eight to 10 ounces of whole grains per week, more beans and twice as many fruits and vegetables. The rules limit salt and ban trans-fat (goodbye, deep-fried potatoes!) but they allow tofu. And they abolish “Nutrient Based Menu Planning,” which allowed nutrition requirements to be filled via, for instance, the iron-fortified white flour in animal crackers. These rules apply to all school lunches, not just subsidized students. The federal government, as usual, is big on demands and short on dollars. The feds give schools just 26 to 34 cents per meal — plus about 22 cents worth of free food — to supplement the prices children pay, according to the USDA. It will be challenging to contain costs and meet the guidelines. Autumn Coffman, kitchen manager at the central kitchen for Eureka City Schools, says that although the kitchen has long been serving at least 50 percent whole grains, the switch in the last month to 100 percent whole grains has been expensive. “Whole grains cost more. We’re in a situation where we’re facing overspending,” she said. “The government tells us what we have to serve, and the state won’t pay for it.” Still, the change puts Eureka ahead of the curve; nationally, schools have that three-year grace period to get up to 100 percent whole grains. Here behind the Redwood Curtain, school districts are faced with particularly high food costs, high fuel costs and an ever-shrinking state budget. This makes for a Catch 22 in school kitchens — they

need to cut costs while simultaneously attracting more paying lunch eaters, even the picky eaters. (Down in L.A., schools faced a serious backlash in the fall of 2011, when some more adventurous dishes, like chicken jambalaya and tamales, ended up in the trash can.) Somehow, with all the constraints imposed by parents, staff, funding and nutrition requirements, food that kids will eat still has to get on the table, five days a week, all school year long. We visited five different school lunchrooms in Humboldt in late February, from Fortuna to Trinidad, so see how they are coping with the fiscal pressures and impending federal rules. From the admirably organic chard at Trinidad (cue Alice Waters cooing) to the individually-wrapped pre-made pizzas (so much shameful plastic!) at Ferndale, lunch seemed be going down without complaint. The kids reported, with adorably gaptoothed smiles, that school lunch is about as popular as it’s ever been; they like the pizza and the chocolate milk, not so much the tuna noodle. One thing hasn’t changed; hot lunch kids still look with envy at the heavily advertised “snacks” brown-baggers bring. But in this tough economic time, hot lunch is the biggest meal some children will get in a day, and the schools are well aware of that responsibility. At the schools we sampled, full-price lunches cost from $2.50 to $3.50 and reduced price lunches cost 40 to 60 cents. In some places, up to 90 percent of children qualified to get lunch for free. Schools fund those “free” lunches by applying for reimbursement from the state and the feds. Right now, the feds pay the schools $2.77 to $2.94 per continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012

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meal and the state adds another 22 cents. If lunches cost more than that to produce, the schools have to make up the difference out of their own budgets. The cost for food alone — the raw material of lunch, without any labor thrown in — can vary. At Trinidad Elementary, which grows much of its own produce, food costs around $1 per meal. The central kitchen for Eureka City Schools spends more: $1.28. And schools also have to pay the workers who prepare and serve that food, the folks who clean up, and all the other expenses, like replacing worn pots and pans and heating up the stoves. This explains the lack of local and/ or organic produce in public schools.  Financially, it’s a challenge to keep everyone fed and healthy. At Trinidad Elementary, Hope Reinman and her staff serve up a truly impressive hot lunch tray. The school boasts its own garden, complete with greenhouses so the bounty can be spread throughout the colder parts of the school year. Rows of chard, spinach, peas and broccoli are a few hundred feet away from the kitchen where the staff cooks up fresh meals like chicken curry over rice, minestrone soup, vegetable frittata and whole wheat pasta with meat or veggie marinara. On the last Wednesday in February, bagels with fresh grated carrots, olives, cream cheese and “slug slime” were on the menu, along with egg salad, mixed organic greens with chickpeas, black bean soup, organic apple slices and milk. The kids can choose chocolate nonfat or plain 1 percent. Alyssa Morehead, a third grader, munched a bagel and cream cheese and apple slices with gusto. “We garden ourselves, mostly in the spring time,” she said. “I like carrots and the spinach. Bagels are my favorite.”

above Organization! Lists abound at Eureka City Schools’ central kitchen. right Arlene Lazio runs the big central kitchen that prepares food for 1,900 Eureka schoolchildren on several campuses.

The table agrees en masse. Dislikes include the tomato soup — today’s black bean is acceptable — and the pizza, oddly enough, is the least favorite. The pizza sounds fantastic to this grownup — there’s not only cheese and pepperoni, but white bean, kale and rosemary, on homemade 50-percent-whole-grain crust.  No home delivery, though. “We have a mostly traditional menu,” says Reinman, “except we use all organic fruits and vegetables.” Isn’t that costprohibitive? “We run a tight ship,” she says with a grin. Trinidad charges only $2.50 a meal, the lowest priced lunch out of the schools sampled, and thanks to its garden, it keeps food costs down. “We really try to eliminate waste,” Reinman says. This

explains why the students at Trinidad are serve d single apple slices and small portions unless they specifically request more. Reinman says the school has used at least 50 percent whole grains in its wheat products for several years, so the regulation change doesn’t bother her. The traditional lunch faves are in evidence on Trinidad’s monthly menu — tacos, tuna melts — but there are some modern, grown-up style additions. The Thai style vegan coconut-based corn chowder and homemade breads are adult and kid favorites both. The greenhouse, started two years ago with a lot of impetus from parents, affords a lot of organic produce. Other food comes from nearby sources: Arrington’s Apples, as well as Clendenen’s

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left and above Food is prepared and sealed for transport, so it can be taken from the central kitchen to school cafeterias around Eureka.

and Fieldbrook Valley Apple Farm, supply the apples. Along with the Eureka and Mckinleyville schools, the staff at Trinidad is talking with the Farm to Cafeteria Program to try to expand farmer-to-school direct supply; there’s no date set for that, though, because of cost restrictions and distribution challenges, The farmers need to get fairly compensated, and the state’s idea of  “fair compensation” is anybody’s guess. Right now, Trinidad Elementary gets a heck of a lot from its gardens. Eureka City schools all get their food from one giant gleaming central kitchen off Broadway, which boasts huge walk-in ovens that have a “steam” function. They look like a Burning Man installation. “I’d love to have a signature bread,” says Arlene Lazio, the kitchen’s director. Lazio is an affable woman with warm dark eyes, graying hair, a competent, no-nonsense attitude and plenty of enthusiasm. She started working at the Eureka central kitchen in 2006. Her 18-person staff is responsible for feeding close to 1,900 students a day. They get their apples locally, and have been including whole grains, legumes and healthier meals since long before the new requirements were announced. Lazio says she has been in contact with the Farm to

Cafeteria project (Fortuna, Mckinleyville and Trinidad schools say the same), and hopefully someday more local produce will consistently be on the menu; funding, as ever, is the primary challenge. The staff creates its menus via Nutrikids, a software program that lets the administrator plug in ingredients to design balanced meals. Walking through the enormous kitchen is like walking through the dream of a busy kitchen goddess. Towering machines gleam, ovens roar and a giant dishwasher pummels huge cookware. The cooks are all female, and they work at stations responsible for salads, breads, entrees and packaging. Kristin Lenderman makes the entrees. At her station, a cauldron of Beefy Mac bubbles away, next to a vat of simmering pork roast that is destined for a bath in teriyaki sauce. Lenderman, swathed in hairnets, is a cheerful, light-eyed woman who takes pride in her work. She’s just made a test batch of blueberry bagels, in the endless quest for “signature bread.” It’s all very clean and industrious. The menu looks appealing and kid-friendly; Pizza Burger, BBQ Pork Sliders, Roasted Herb Chicken. The sides are simple; seasonal fruit like apples, pears and kiwi, celery or continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012

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carrot sticks, graham crackers, and always salad. Kids get desserts very rarely. Fries are out — it’s baked wedges. Alice Birney Elementary in Eureka gets its lunches from the Eureka central kitchen, and on a busy Wednesday in February, the lunch was tasty. The kids loved the sliced apples from Clendenen’s, and the salad bar was good enough to eat, with fresh-tasting greens, tomatoes, carrots, orange slices and ranch or Italian dressing. The entree was a beefy chili with corn chips and shredded cheddar. Third-grader Stephanie Montezuma says she loves the salad bar and the whole wheat PB&J, “and especially watermelon,” which the school has in season. Her classmate Neveah West loves the jicama. Jicama, in school lunches! In an effort to reduce waste, the school lets kids choose what they want, buffet style. Everything is a healthy selection, so no matter if they just pick vegetables and orange wedges, like some kids, or corn chips, salsa, raisins, carrots and milk, they can’t load up on anything terribly unhealthy. The kids at Alice Birney, not sur-

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prisingly, all say pizza is their favorite lunch, but the pizza they have today is made with whole wheat crust and vegetable toppings. No more greasy bright red pepperoni on limp white bread — remember that? Both disgusting and delicious? Overall, from an adult perspective, lunch was fine — the chili was good, the chips weren’t stale, the apples weren’t brown and the salad was crisp. Unadventurous, nourishing food, with healthier ingredients and more fruit than the author recalls from her school days. Allowing the kids to pick only what they wanted appeared to cut down on waste; the trashcans weren’t overflowing with uneaten food. Although one might think kids would sidestep the veggies given their druthers, the salad bar was popular. At Jacoby Creek, the offerings were a little less appealing on a Tuesday that same week  — the tortilla was cold, which gives it that raw dough consistency, kind of like chewing wood paste. The oranges were served whole, which looked like a challenge to the delicate digits of the under-7 set.  That being said, the school’s

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menu (out of the given the ludicrousNorthern Humboldt ly small budget the Union High School government sees fit District kitchens) to give our schools, looked par for the they’re amazing. The course; Whole smell of the black grains? Check. bean soup at TriniSalad bar? Crispy dad triggered a deand well-stocked. sire for the recipe, As in all the other and the hot fresh lunchroom except whole grain breads Trinidad, kids’ favorwere as good as any ites included the bakery. There’s none homemade macaof the (tasty) junk roni and cheese, and garden at Trinidad elementary food there was 20 pizza — both with years ago, and the whole grain flour! Kids palates are better fruits and vegetables are fresher and more adjusted these days to whole wheat, it applentiful. Given that the local produce is pears. At Jacoby Creek, there are no steam a bit pricey for school budgets, why does tables to keep the food hot as the kids only Trinidad grow so much of its own go through the line, so trays are made up food? The answer is parental involvement in advance. The portions are small so that and donations. So, people, go ahead, start not too much is wasted, but more food a kale patch! Donate materials for a greenended up in the trash than with self-serve. house! And write your local representative Overall, school lunches are much imasking for increased school funding. After proved from an adult point of view. Frankly all, children have to eat. l

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The novel arose with the literate middle class that it was designed to please and ultimately to reflect. From its beginnings in the 17th and 18th century it was the most egalitarian of literary forms, mashing up everything from the high art of epic poetry and the high aspirations of religious texts to the common trade of letters, journals, folk tales, political pamphlets and popular accounts of exploration and adventure. Through the years it became the most elastic and universal form, linking the world in story. One way to tell the novel’s history could be through the lives of novelists. British professor, columnist and critic on radio and TV John Sutherland writes two to four breezy pages about 294 of his favorites. Historically they range from John Bunyan and Samuel Richardson in the 1800s to Paul Auster in 2008. As for accuracy and judgment, I can only spotcheck by what I already knew. Jacqueline Susann’s novels were indeed assembled by hired pens (I met one), but I’m not sure I would call Kurt Vonnegut’s architect father “successful,” and even a brief bio of John Barth seems incomplete without mentioning the novel that made him famous, Giles Goat-Boy. The life I know the most about — H.G. Wells — suffers seriously from this summary. But these are personal essays, not Wikipedia refereed entries. Astringent, ironic, breezy, cynical and lyrical in turns, individually they are not boring or unbiased Collectively, the question is do they tell the story of the novel? The early entries are promising, as the novel form is unintentionally assembled from individual obsessions and reactions to them, often expressed in parody. The 19th century was the novel’s high point as popular entertainment as well as literature, and here Sutherland especially hits his stride in combining individual biography, its echoes in the writer’s work, and the social and cultural context. His Dickens entry is excellent. When he gets to the 20th century however, the portraits seem more sensational and less literary. Gossip can be made into literature, but gossip is not literature, nor much of a key on how literature is made. Sutherland restricts himself to English language writers and so huge influences like Kafka and Marquez are absent, as well as English-writing innovators like Sinclair Lewis, Thomas Pynchon and Doris Lessing. Still, the inclusion of writers unknown today (many of whom were popular in their time, especially women) and genre novelists (westerns, crime, romance, science fiction) add crucially to the historical narrative. They help demonstrate the vitality of the novel form in all its wildness as well as its polish. That wildness not only reflects life but also helps the novel (the word simply means “new”) continue to surprise. — William Kowinski

cd Every Child A Daughter, Every Moon A Sun By The Wooden Sky - Black Box Recordings Shouldn’t our North American neighbors in Canada have an equal right to lay claim to what is loosely termed “Americana” music? Three principal ’60s Canadian artists — Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell and Neil Young — contributed immensely in changing the landscape of contemporary folk and rock. In the current wave of “alt.” folk-country, there are a slew of Canadian-based bands, Elliot Brood, Cuff the Duke and The Barr Brothers among them. With this third, strong release, Every Child A Daughter, Every Moon A Sun, The Wooden Sky throw a dirt-laden hat into the corral. Shaking the dust from the alt. country genre once led by an Uncle Tupelo/Wilco/Son Volt/Jayhawks axis, The Wooden Sky instills a healthy dose of the granddaddy of “alt. country,” namely its Ontario brethren, Neil Young. Strummed acoustic guitars, distorted electric guitars, elegant piano, ethereal keyboards and a thumping rhythm section dominate Every Child‘s sound. Lead vocalist and songwriter Gavin Gardiner executes a weary, relaxed vocal style with just-enough drawl that rides closer to contemporaries such as Phosphorescent’s Matthew Houck, Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy and Calexico’s Joey Burns. With the dense “It Gets Old to Be Alone,” the band manages to combine Young’s rough-edged electric guitars with the pop sensibilities and sonic density of Neko Case’s work with Calexico (in particular, Case’s 2002 release, Blacklisted). While the most hook-filled song, “City of Light,” tips its brim prominently towards Young’s “Heart of Gold,” it does so without making the gesture too pronounced. “Take Me Out” is reminiscent of a ’50s Ricky Nelson style of country-pop/rock and roll/swing (presently employed by elder songwriting masters including Nick Lowe and John Hiatt). Gardiner’s influences also seep into the L.A.-styled country-rock/pop range of Dwight Yoakum to Tom Petty. With songs such as “Malibu Rum,” he borrows from ’60s L.A. songwriters Jimmy Webb and Lee Hazelwood, who employed a smooth combination of Tex-Mex, TV “Western” soundtracks and L.A. pop. And though Gardiner’s woefulness and “oh-solonely” lyrics occasionally teeter into self-pity and excess, The Wooden Sky’s Every Child A Daughter, Every Moon A Sun is filled with inspired instrumentation and a sincere, convincing voice. Arcade Fire producer Howard Beliman, who also worked on the band’s 2009 effort, If I Don’t Come Home You’ll Know I’m Gone, again adds subtle contemporary adornments and orchestral touches to the core sound, as glowingly exhibited in the elegant “Your Fight Will Not Be Long.” Every Child may not offer anything entirely new, but its tight sound, confident execution, well-built songs and infectious hooks keep you coming back — like good, aged whiskey. — Mark Shikuma


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Debbie Weist and Matt Lee.

Photo by Bob Doran

Dancing Up a Storm … at the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

D

on’t be surprised if you see an uptick in bowler hats, vests, fringed dresses and Mardi Gras beads around Eureka this weekend. It’s jazz time once again as Redwood Coast Music Festivals presents the 22nd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival starting Thursday, March 22, and running through Sunday. By the numbers, the RCJ Festival features 11 touring bands playing everything from traditional Dixieland jazz to swing to Cajun music, plus five student bands and two local bands (jazz fest stalwarts Hall Street Honkers and UKEsperience). That’s 80 plus sets on five stages over the course of four days. The festival began as a fundraiser for senior programs, and you’ll see a fair share of silver-haired jazz fans, more at some venues than others. But the focus has always been on music for dancing. The

various venues all include some sort of dance floor where you’ll find baby boomers, 20-somethings, teens and seniors swinging their partners and showing off their moves. Saturday the Eureka Municipal Auditorium becomes dance central, with dance contests in the afternoon and the Redwood Coast Dance Show in the evening. Between sets by appropriately swinging bands, couples and teams will strut their stuff in dance demonstrations. Among the swingers will be Debbie Weist, her dance partner Matt Lee and a small troupe from her dance classes. Last year her dance team did a West Coast swing number and a cha cha in the demonstration portions of the Saturday dance contest. She has even bigger plans this time out. Weist teaches social dancing Tuesday evenings and Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon at the North Coast Dance Annex in

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Old Town. Last weekend she put her group through its moves at a rehearsal with North Coast Dance’s Danny Furlong watching so he could offer some choreographic advice. She and Lee ended with an elaborate dance montage to the Gloria Gaynor disco hit “I Will Survive,” as performed by several bands in different styles, including an Andrews Sisters-style swing version by The Puppini Sisters. Weist lumps the various forms she teaches together as “ballroom dancing.” “Ballroom dance is any sort of dance you might do if you went to a formal dance,” she explained after catching her breath following the rehearsal. “That covers almost all of the social dances. They could play a foxtrot or West Coast swing. They could play a tango or a polka, maybe a waltz. They’ll probably play something Latin: a cha cha, a rhumba or a bolero, maybe even salsa. The nightclub two-step has become more and more popular, particularly at weddings, because it was designed for pop-rock and country love songs. It’s an easy dance to learn and very romantic.” She points out that the local jazz fest lineup includes much more than Dixieland and swing bands. Cajun outfits such as Gator Beat and fiddler Tom Rigney’s band, Flambeau, mix many styles. “You can dance to their Latin stuff and they’ll often play a waltz,” she says, suggesting that dancers be ready for anything. “It can become very boring if you only know one style and you use up all your steps. If you know a few styles you can liven it up.” Another local dance teacher, Jesseca Waggoner, is skipping the contest this year. She’s too busy organizing something called the Emerald Coast Lindy Exchange, a group effort to welcome swing dancers from out of the area by providing housing and other hospitality. They’re expecting around 100 dedicated dancers will visit from up and down the West Coast, coming here just to dance at the Jazz Fest. Waggoner teaches a class Monday nights at Redwood Raks with open dancing following. She also serves on the board for the chapter of USA Dance, a national organization dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing via monthly dances at places like the local Moose Lodge, Grange halls and other venues. “A lot of people are under the misconception that our area doesn’t have a thriving dance population. We do,” says Waggoner. “We have tango nights, we have salsa nights — obviously we have swing nights. USA Dance is helping keep that alive.” She emphasizes the wide age range in those wanting to improve their dance skills. “We have dancers at my Monday night class anywhere from 12 to 80. It’s all over the board — not a young person thing or an old person thing.” Like Weist, she advises learning many styles. “I think the biggest change in the last few years is that dancers don’t just do one type of dance anymore. Of course anything you learn in one dance

style can be used in other styles.” In addition to arranging crash pads for folks like the Hollywood Hotshots, a swing dance troupe from Los Angeles, she’s organizing Emerald Exchange Last Nights, a pair of events for tireless dancers planned for Friday and Saturday at the Eureka Theater, after the rest of the fest is over. Friday, Glen and the Syncopators play two sets; Saturday it’s DJ Augie, up from L.A. to play Lindy Hop dance music until 2 a.m. Admission is $10 on Friday and $8 on Saturday, free for those registered with the Exchange. Ready? Dig out those dancing shoes and get set to swing. l

The Line-Up Thursday’s Redwood Coast Jazz Festival Kick-Off Dance runs from 7-10 p.m. at the Adorni Center. Admission is $8 with a festival pass or Taste of Main Street coupon; $10 without. “Dressy attire or period costumes suggested.” The free RCJ Fest Opening Ceremony takes place Friday, March 23, at 12:30 p.m. at the Arkley Center for the Performing Arts with music by Blue Street Jazz Band and Stompy Jones. There’s another free jazz concert Friday at the Arkley Center at 7:30 p.m. featuring The Redwood Coast All Star Jazz Band with members from various festival bands (sponsored by YP.com). The Redwood Coast Jazz Festival Dance Contest runs noon-4 p.m. Saturday at the Eureka Municipal Auditorium with music by Stompy Jones, Glenn Crytzer and The Syncopators and Blue Street Jazz Band; admission $5. The Redwood Coast Dance Party at the Muni runs from 5:30-10:30 p.m. Saturday night with The Carl Sonny Leyland Trio, The Syncopators and Stompy Jones plus special guest clarinetist Bob Draga. (A $25 Saturday Prime Time ticket gets you into any venue from 5 p.m. to closing.) Other festival headliners include Tom Rigney and Flambeau, Gator Beat, The Midiri Brothers, Bob Schultz Frisco Jazz, Sister Swing and The Young Bucs. Blue Street plays a free Sunday hymnal show at the Adorni Center with doors at 8:30 a.m. music from 9-10:15. Eureka First Methodist Church (520 Del Norte) hosts free hymnals featuring The Midiri Brothers and Bob Draga starting at 8:45 a.m. Three-day, all-event tickets for the entire festival are $80 if you buy them before the end of Thursday, March 22. Then they go up to $85. For additional ticket options and information about the rest of the fest go to www.redwoodjazz.org or call (707) 445-3378.    


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1 0 41 H ST. , A R CATA • 8 2 5 - 93 0 0 northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012

21


Playhouse Bound

Frank Fairfield, plus “March Madness,” funk, Yellow Ostrich and Branford By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

Frank Fairfield Photo by Bob Doran

W

ith his dress shirt buttoned to the top and a ‘20s-era haircut, 20-something old timer Frank Fairfield looks like he could have stepped out of a time machine. He’ll often play selections he calls “unheard ofs and forgotten abouts” from his carefully curated collection of vintage 78-rpm records before he sits down with a guitar, a fiddle and a banjo to play and sing tunes that sound, quite authentically, like music from another decade. NPR hit the nail on the head referring to him as a “one-man folk revival.” He’s unequivocally the real deal. I was duly impressed when I caught his act at a local nightclub. He was in the pocket, and he’d drawn a sizeable crowd of local hipsters. Some settled in to listen with rapt attention, but too many were there because, well, it seemed like the place to be. Before long folks were chatting about who knows what, and the general hubbub made it nearly impossible to hear Fairfield’s playing. When he took a break, I introduced myself and apologized for the rudeness of the crowd. He seemed unperturbed; I imagine that’s his nature. I told him he’d be better off playing at the Arcata Playhouse, a venue where folks tend to listen more closely. Then, even though I’d enjoyed what I could hear of the first set, I left early. This coming Monday Frank Fairfield finally plays at the Playhouse (Colin Vance from Striped Pig and Water Tower Bucket Boy Cory Goldman open). The show comes in the midst of something A.P. proprietors David and Jackie are calling “March Madness” (no sports involved) with the venue marking its fifth anniversary by hosting shows night after

night. I have to say, the Playhouse has become my favorite place to listen to music. Don’t get me wrong, for some bands nightclubs are preferable, but when you really want to listen (and be able to get a beer or a glass of wine in the lobby), the Playhouse is it. Former local Melody Walker chose the Playhouse for her Gold Rush Goddess CD release party on Friday, her first headlining gig in the venue. Of course she’ll be joined by her musical partner Jacob Groopman. Melody says she’s excited about momentum on the new album, which she’s offering as a “name your price” download on Bandcamp. “Maybe two-thirds get it for free, but that’s OK; it’s getting out to the world,” she said, calling from the East Bay digs she shares with Jacob. “This coming Monday is our radio add date, so we’ve sent 350 CDs to radio stations. I’m hoping they’ll play it so I’ll chart on Americana, maybe AAA, as in ‘adult album alternative,’ whatever that means. It’s what KHUM is, like contemporary folky pop.” (The Lonesome Roses open.) Saturday the Playhouse goes alt. folk/rock with Lost in the Trees, a music collective out of Chapel Hill, N.C., with two discs out on Anti- Records helmed by songwriter Ari Picker, who describes the Lost sound as “orchestral folk music.” Strings and brass combine with accordion, banjo, mandolin and musical saw on elegant tunes. Opening is Seattle band Poor Moon, with Fleet Foxes bassist Christian Wargo moving to lead guitar, joined by F.F. keysman Casey Wescott and brothers Ian and Peter Murray. The first P.M. LP, Illusion, is due soon on Sub Pop. Sunday Humboldt Folklife presents an evening at the Playhouse with New England-based singer-songwriter, raconteur and sit-down comedienne Cheryl Wheeler accompanied by songwriter/guitarist Kenny White (he’ll sing a few of his own). Monday’s show with Frank is followed by Tuesday and Wednesday with soul man Earl

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Thomas joined by Londoner Eddie Angel, a guitarist Earl met on one of his many European tours. “It’s called ‘The Coffeehouse Show,’” said Thomas. “An acoustic guitar and vocal duo with Eddie and I doing this eclectic mix of songs, anything from Tracy Chapman to Bobbie Gentry to Robert Johnson, even some of my stuff in the mix.” Tuesday the ladies from Vidagua open; Wednesday it’s Jason Hodel from UKEsperience with Jo Kuzelka from Wet Fez. It’s a good weekend for funk and soul. Thursday Humboldt Brews has another Missing Link DJ party with Matt n’ Adam and the usual suspects, plus special guest Funky T-Rex aka DJ Tanasa Ras from Akaboom Sound. Friday, it’s “nu-funk” at the Arcata Theatre Lounge with Washington DC’s renegade funk n’ soul label Fort Knox Recordings’ “Rhythm & FX” tour featuring Fort Knox Five, Thunderball and nu-funk pioneers All Good Funk Alliance. All that plus electro artists Smash and Grab, Quade and Little John. Then on Sunday the eight-piece organic funk/soul powerhouse from L.A. Orgone plays Humboldt Brews. This band’s more old school funk than “nu” — really good dance music. More electro Sunday at the ATL: a World Famous thing with dubstep by NiT GRiT from San Jose, hip hop-ish grooves by Two Fresh, and electrojams by Conspirator with Disco Biscuits’ keyboardist and bassist Aron Magner and Marc Brownstein exploring their electronic mad scientist personae joined by New Yorker DJ Omen. Sinners drummer Jason Trevino and Justin Hobart Brown have been hosting a series of jam nights at the Red Fox. Thursday (following Taste of Main Street) they ramp things up with an “All-Star Blues/Jazz Jam” with The Uptown Kings and St. John and The Sinners. Thursday at the Jambalaya, Seattle’s saxophonic punk-jazz iconoclast Skerik introduces his latest project Bandalabra with guitarist Andy Coe, upright bassist Evan Flory Barnes and drummer Dvonne Lewis. Skerik describes the quartet as “conjuring the sounds of Fela Kuti meeting Steve Reich in rock’s backyard.” The three bands playing Friday at HumBrews share the same irrepressible bassist, Drew Mohr. “Psycho-blues power trio” Children of

the Sun rocks. Area Sound explores hip hop grooves. Opening act Smith House has Sky Miller on sax, drummer John Thomas and Mohr on bass, who says, “I’ve been calling our music ‘death jazz.’ It’s pretty hard-hitting and funky; Thelonious Monk tunes never sounded so heavy.” Yellow Ostrich started with Alex Schaaf making lo-fi indie pop in his Wisconsin dorm room on a four-track recorder. After success with a series of EPs and the LP The Mistress, Schaaf enlisted multi-instrumentalist Jon Natchez and drummer Michael Tapper for the anthemic Strange Land. “The Mistress was a guy in a bedroom,” says Schaaf, who now lives in New York. “Strange Land is a band. In a slightly bigger room.” Fresh from SxSW, Yellow Ostrich is working its way up that coast, stopping at HSU Saturday night to play The Depot. Added bonus: “special guest” Strix Vega opens. Bad Kitty brings L.A. punkabilly kings The Rocketz back to the Firewater Lounge Saturday with locals The Smashed Glass. “Consider it a high-energy alternative to the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival,” says Norm. Saturday at the Alibi, Seattle’s Sir Coyler and His Asthmatic Band. “We’re a laid-back, pretty simple lo-fi, ‘60s punk fan boys sorta band,” says Sir Coyler. Eureka’s Bitch Doctor opens. Saturday also sees two big fundraisers: “Unity in the Community” at the Bayside Grange has CADA, Guinea Gbe, Samba Da Alegria, Likwefi and The Mighty Redwood Ambassadors with Madi Simmons all helping out the McCabe family with some medical bills. It starts in the afternoon (3 p.m.) so reggae fans can still catch the Jah Sun party later at the ATL. Also starting early (5 p.m.): the Tempus Fugitives’ Apocalyptic Cockroach End of the World 2012 Kinetic Team Fundraiser at 3rd Eye Sculpture with rock by Silent Giants and The Grass Band, plus Va Va Voom Burlesque and the Que Grande Taco Truck (and beer). Sounds wild. As noted above, it’s also Jazz Fest weekend in Eureka. Coincidentally, Grammy-winning saxophonist Branford Marsalis, of the illustrious New Orleans Marsalis clan, brings his quartet (with pianist Joey Calderazzo) to HSU’s Van Duzer Theatre Sunday night for an evening of stellar neo-classic jazz. Cool. l


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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012

23


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com

thur 3/22 www.myspace.com/ humboldtfreeradiopresents

WINE SHOP

WINEMAKER TASTING WITH ADEA VINEYARDS Thursday, March 22, 5-8pm $10 includes tastes, treats and $5 credit towards purchase

ZUZU'S PETALS JAZZ

Friday, March 23, 6-9 pm • No Cover

JIM SILVA, GUITAR

Saturday, March 24, 6-9 pm • No Cover

Wine Bar & Store: Open Monday through Saturday 8th Street on the Arcata Plaza • 825-7596

3O7FF

%

MSRP

18.99

$

1.75 litre

Fine Wines

Spirits

Beer

Soda

Premium Tobacco

786 9th St., On the Plaza 822-0414 1644 G. St. 16th & G 822-1965 must be 21 & over

Melody Walker CD Release 8pm $10

Lost in the Trees, Poor Moon 8pm

Random Acts Of Comedy Doors at 7:30pm $6 All ages

Fort Knox Five vs. Thunderball Doors at 9pm $15 21+

Jah Sun CD Release Doors at 9:30pm $22/$18 21+

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

The Billies (country rock) no cover 9pm

Open Mic 7pm

Jake Cline (PDXfolk) 6pm

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Full Moon Fever (Petty cover band) no cover 9pm

Unity in the Community 3pm

BAYSIDE GRANGE 2297 Jacoby Creek BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake THE BRIDGE Fernbridge 725-2190

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

707 (funk/rock) no cover 9pm

Good Company (Celtic) 8pm BossLevelz w/Masta Shredda & Itchie Fingaz no cover 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Déjà Vu (classic rock) no cover 9pm

The Rocketz (psychobilly) The Smashed Glass (punk) 9pm

24/7 Jazz trio 9pm-midnight

Barbara Romero & Friends 9pm-12am

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

COUPLE CUPS Arcata EUREKA INN 518 7th St. FIELDBROOK MARKET Fieldbrook HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata

The Billies (country rock) no cover 9pm

Karaoke 8pm

CAFE MOKKA Arcata 822-2228 CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

Orjazzmic Sextet 7pm Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close! Missing Links Records Soul Night 9pm $5

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger Area Sound, Children of the Sun, Smith House 9:30pm $10

Happy Hour All Day! Q-Factor Drag & Talent Contest w/ DJ 360 9pm

Eliot Chang (standup) 8pm (JVD)

Yellow Ostrich (indie) 9pm $5 (Depot)

INK ANNEX Eureka JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER Redway MERRYMAN’S BEACH HOUSE Wsthvn

Skerik’s Bandalabra 9pm $12/$10

Hooves, White Mama 9pm $5

ADEA Winery tasting $10 5-8pm

Zu-Zu’s Petals (jazz) 6-9pm no cover

Jim Silva (acoustic) 6-9pm no cover

We got beer.

Book your band at the Lil’ Red Lion Call 444-1344

Come for the beer, Stay for the clowns!

The Living Rooms (eclectic) 6-9pm

Taqueria La Barca street food 4-7pm

Come out for a pitcher! Seun Kuti & Egypt 80 8pm $30

NOCTURNUM Eureka OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 RAGG’S RACK ROOM 442-2989 615 5th St., Eureka RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com RETRO HUMBOLDT 845-0517 ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Bill & Dave (jazz) 5-8pm DJ Jsun & friends (dance music) 9pm-midnight

Located in beautiful Old Town Eureka MXMSTR KRSHN2N (dance music) 10pm

Jan Bramlett & Friends (folk) 7-9:30pm

Thirsty Thursday

DJ 9:30pm

DJ 9:30pm

Blues Jam 9pm $8

420 Funk Mob (funk) 9pm $25

Bliss n Eso, Big B 9pm $10

New release, Check our FB for details

Tasting Room open Fridays 4-11pm

Tasting Room open Saturdays 12-11pm

West African Drum/Dance 5:30-7pm Conducting From the Grave 6pm $15

ZUMBA five mornings a week Check it out!

Learn more at our website redwoodraks.com

Irish Music Night 7:30-10:30pm

Happy Hour! ~ M-F 4-6pm $1 off glasses, $2 off bottles!

Blake and Rich (old time string duo) 7-10pm

Rude Lion (reggae DJ) 10pm

Rude Lion (reggae DJ) 10pm

Joe Garceau (acoustic) 7pm

Tim Breed (acoustic) 7pm

DJ Itchiefingaz (dance music) 10pm

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES Arcata Plaza SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580 THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 3RD EYE SCULPTURE 326 S. G St. Arc.

Chris Parreira (folk) 9pm

Jim Lahman Band with Ron Perry (blues) 9pm

Undone (blues) 9pm

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

SugaFoot (guitar/trumpet blues duo) 7:30pm

Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (blues) 7:30pm

Boss Levelz 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

www.thealibi.com

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka

*WINE BY THE GLASS ALWAYS AVAILABLE*

LIBATION

sat 3/24 Bitch Doctor, Sir Coyler & his Asthmatic Band (punk) 11pm $5

TGIF Acoustic Open Stage 6-9pm

ALL DOGS BISCUIT BAKERY 2910 E St. ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 9th St. ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

fri 3/23

Tempus Fugitives’ Party 5pm


Yellow Ostrich Saturday at The Depot

sun 3/25

mon 3/26

tues 3/27

wed 3/28

Hella Gay Dance Party w/ DJ Anya 11pm $3

www.thealibi.com

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells Les Craig (folkie) 11:30am

Cheryl Wheeler 8pm $20

Frank Fairfield 8pm $10/$8

Earl Thomas/Eddie Angel + 8pm

Earl Thomas/Eddie Angel + 8pm

NiT GRiT, Conspirator & Two Fresh Doors at 9pm $15 21+

Find our website at www.arcatatheatre.com!

AEDC Spotlight on Success Doors at 5pm. Free

Emancipator, Shigeto & Marley Carroll Doors at 9pm $15 21+ Karaoke 9pm

Sunday Brunch Buffet

One free scratch card every Monday for $25,000 Money Madness

Poker Tournament 6:30pm

Prime Rib Buffet 5pm Wild Wing Wednesday w/ 25¢ wings

Open Mic Night 6pm

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints Open Jam 6pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy 9pm

Quiz Night 7pm Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

www.bluelakecasino.com

Gin & Guitar Stan (country) 5-7pm Organic Open Mic 7pm

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1 Orgone (funk/soul/Afrobeat) 9pm $15

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long!

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two

Open at noon every day Happy Hour 3-6pm

Not your average “pub grub!”

Weensday: all Ween from 4:30-10pm AND 10% off your order! Head for the Hills (acoustic quartet) 9pm $10

northcoastjournal

Branford Marsalis 8pm $45 (JVD) Ratface, Komatose, AM Beers 6pm Deep Groove Society 9pm

Paladino (psych/folk) 9pm

World Class in Your Glass

Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza

We ship wine! Certified!

Dancehall Reggae Night 9pm

The other Red Lion

Little Tybee (rock) 9pm

Repeat: We got beer.

Barretor Coxinator Dopplebock on tap

Purl and Pour come craft 6:30pm

6 packs on sale $6.99

www.libation.com

eat it up

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif 4 For Jazz (jazz) 6pm

@ncj_of_humboldt northcoastjournal.com

Outreach at the Beach open mic 1-7pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday 9pm Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm GLDT/ALLY Open Mic 2:30-4pm

Come sit and sip!

www.oldtowncoffeeeureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

1/2 off pool!

$1 hot dogs

$5 8-ball tourney 8pm

Beer Pong. Blues Jam 9pm

redwoodcurtainbrewing.com Break Dancing with REX 5-10pm $10 Zu-Zu’s Petals (jazz) 6-9pm no cover

Tasting Room open Mon-Thu 4-10pm Swing Dance Night 7:30-10:30pm $5

Happy Day! Happy hour all day!

Get Growlers filled!

West African Drum/Dance 5:30-7pm $10

Hoop Dance w/ Nicole 5:30-7:30pm, two classes

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

The fine taste tasting room

Salsa Night! $5 Lesson 7-8pm, dancing 8-11pm

DJ MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm Karaoke 8pm Blue Lotus Jazz brunch noon-3pm Jimi Jeff Open Jam 8pm

Lunchbox’s Karaoke 8pm w/ sushi specials

Sunny Brae Jazz 8pm w/ fried chicken

Greg Camphis Duo: Unplugged 8pm

Open Sun-Thu 4-11pm Fri-Sat 4pm-2am

Guess the password: HINT: hot and sweet

SugaFoot (trumpet/guitar duo) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012

25


HUMBOLDT FOLKLIFE SOCIETY PRESENTS AN EVENING WITH NEW ENGLAND BASED SINGER-SONGWRITER, RACONTEUR AND SITDOWN COMEDIENNE CHERYL WHEELER ON SUNDAY AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE. NEW YORKER KENNY WHITE SINGS A FEW OF HIS OWN SONGS, THEN ACCOMPANIES WHEELER.

GRAMMY-WINNING SAXOPHONIST BRANFORD MARSALIS, OF THE SUPREMELY JAZZY NEW ORLEANS MARSALIS CLAN, BRINGS HIS BAND TO HSU’S VAN DUZER THEATRE SUNDAY NIGHT FOR AN EVENING OF NEOCLASSIC JAZZ.

22 thursday EVENTS

Redwood Coast Jazz Festival Kick Off Dance. 7 p.m. Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Start of four fun-filled days of traditional Dixieland jazz, swing, zydeco and dancing. www.redwoodjazz. org. 445-3378. A Taste of Main Street. 5-8 p.m. Various locations throughout Old Town, Eureka. Sample food from 24 local participating restaurants and food producers. $25. 442-9054. Economic Fuel: A Night of Inspiration and Innovation. 5-9:15 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Cheer on Humboldt County’s aspiring entrepreneurs! Elevator pitches, finalist presentations, showcase exhibits, keynote speaker EJ Carrion. www.economicfuel.org. 476-2628. HSU Cycling Team Fundraiser. 7-10 p.m. Far North Climbing Gym, 10th and K streets, Arcata. Cycling films, BBQ, beverages, baked goods and extremely limited new HSU Cycling T-Shirts. $10.

THEATER

Twentieth Century. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. Over-the-top screwball comedy about crazy antics on the Twentieth Century Limited train as it travels from Chicago to NYC. $7. ssandige@aol.com. 839-6400. Little Shop of Horrors. 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. Arcata High production: It’s time to feed Audrey! Watch Seymour struggle with the task! $8/$5 students. The Miser. 8 p.m. Forum Theater, College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Moliere’s classic farce. $10/$5 students and seniors. 476-4558.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

LECTURE WE’RE ALL GOING TO DIE. THE FUNERAL CONSUMERS ALLIANCE OF HUMBOLDT WANTS DEATH TO BE ON OUR OWN TERMS. THE ALLIANCE’S ANNUAL GATHERING SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP IN BAYSIDE INCLUDES A TALK BY JIM LAWER OF HOSPICE OF HUMBOLDT ON HOW YOU CAN FACILITATE A ROSY, PEACEFUL, NATURAL END.

Restoration and Reciprocity. 5:30-7 p.m. Gist Hall Room 218, HSU. Sustainable Futures Speaker Series presents Robin Kimmerer on “Finding Common Ground Between Traditional and Scientific Ecological Knowledge.” humboldt.edu/envcomm/speaker_series. 826-3653. Dr. Orm Anniline. 6 p.m. Professional Building, 507 F St., Eureka. Anniline discusses his work with families and young people, sponsored by NAMI-Humboldt. nami-humboldt.org. 822-4335.

MEETINGS

Senior Action Coalition. 10 a.m.-noon. Alzheimer’s Resource Center, 1910 California St., Building B, Second Floor, Eureka. Take a stand on issues that affect older adults in our community. www.a1aa.org/psa. 441-0449. Redwood Region Audubon Society. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Discuss local and bigger-picture conservation issues. 442-9353. American Rhododendron Society. 7 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Eureka chapter. 443-0604.

23 friday EVENTS

22nd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Noon. Friday highlights:

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

two free events at the Arkley Center: Opening Ceremonies from 1:30 to 4 p.m. with music by Blue Street and The Midiri Brother; evening concert by the Redwood Coast Jazz All Stars from 7:30 to 9 p.m. See March 22 listing. THEATER [title of show]. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. Hit Broadway musical featuring music and lyrics by Jeff Bowen, a love letter to musical theatre that tells the story of two struggling young artists who enter a musical theatre competition. $10. ferndale-rep.org. 800-838-3006. Twentieth Century. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High. See March 22 listing. Little Shop of Horrors. 7 p.m. Arcata High. See March 22 listing. The Miser. 8 p.m. Forum Theater, CR. See March 22 listing.

MUSIC

Brass Concert. 5 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Studio recital for horn and for trumpet. hsumusic.blogspot.com. 826-3928. Melody Walker. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Walker and her musical partner Jacob Groopman perform as an intimate acoustic duo. Hometown duo the Lonesome Roses open. $10. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

COMEDY

Eliot Chang. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Comedy Central comedian brings his “Indecent Behavior” Stand-Up Comedy Tour to Humboldt. Free for HSU students. $5. 826-3928.

LECTURE

Photographer David F. Thomson. 7 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. “Challenges of Photographing Birds at Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge.” Thomson shows his photos and shares tips on how he got them. 733-5406.

ETC.

Roller Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Fire Hall. Every Friday and Saturday. friendlyfortuna.com.

24 saturday EVENTS

22nd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Noon. Saturday highlights: Dance contest at the Muni noon to 4 p.m.; Piano Playground, 5:30-6:45 p.m. at the Arkley Center featuring top pianists. See March 22 listing. American Civil Liberties Free Speech Forum. 1-4 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Features panelists Jeffrey Schwartz, James Decker, Marcy Burstiner, John Hackett, Tracy Rain and Verbena. Moderated by Dan Faulk. End of the World 2012 Kinetic Team Fundraiser. 5 p.m. 3rd Eye Sculpture, 326 S. G St., Arcata. Tempus Fugitives’ Apocalyptic Cockroach party with Va Va Voom Burlesque, Silent Giants, The Grass Band, beer and the Que Grande Taco Truck. $10. Appraisal Faire and Collectors Sale. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Morris Graves Museum, 636 F St., Eureka. Learn more about antiques and collectibles you cherish. Presented by Humboldt Arts Council. $15 per item; $40 for three. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.


THEATER

Twentieth Century. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High. See March 22 listing. Little Shop of Horrors. 7 p.m. Arcata High. See March 22 listing. The Miser. 8 p.m. Forum Theater, CR. See March 22 listing.

MUSIC

Unity in the Community. 3-10 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Benefit for Friends of the McCabe Family featuring CADA, Guinea Gbe, Samba Da Alegria, Likwefi and The Mighty Redwood Ambassadors with Madi Simmons. $10. 845-4998. Jah Sun and The Redemption Band CD Release. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St., Arcata. Local reggae artist performs with special guests Peetah Morgan, Yami Bolo, Woven Roots and DJ Trees. arcatatheater. com. 822-1220. Seun Kuti and Egypt 80. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Fela’s son Seun and a 15-piece band complete with dancers, heavy percussion and an enormous horn section. $27. mateel.org. 923-3368. Lost in the Trees. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Cinematic indie rock band. Opening: Christian Wargo and Casey Wescott of Fleet Foxes with their new band Poor Moon. $12/$10 members. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Yellow Ostrich. 9 p.m. The Depot, HSU. AS Presents Alex Schaaf’s Wisconsin dorm-room-born indie rock project. $5. 826-3928.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at parking lot end of South I Street. Led by Larry Karsteadt rain or shine. Bring binoculars for birding. 442-9353. Introduction to Sailboat Racing. 10 a.m. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. The Sea Scouts, a co-ed water-based adventuring program of Boy Scouts of America, teach youth aged 14 to 20. 267-8272. Open Gardens. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Gardens, College of the Redwoods, Eureka. Roam the 44acre fully fenced property. $5. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Sierra Club Ma-le’l Dunes Walk. 10 a.m. Meet at Male’l Dunes South parking area. Parent and child walk explores the biologically diverse dune community. Friends of the Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Milt Boyd leads a 90-minute walk focusing on marsh ecology. 826-2359.

FOOD

Humboldt Grange #501 Breakfast. 7:30-11 a.m. Humboldt Grange, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Monthly breakfast of eggs, ham or sausage, pancakes or biscuits and gravy. $5/$3 kids. 268-3806.

SPORTS

Humboldt Roller Derby. 5 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. First double-header home bout of the season features The Redwood Rollers and Widow Makers v. Oakland Outlaws and Berkeley Resistance. $15/$12 adv. humboldtrollerderby. com. 441-1993. HSU Team Time Trial and Road Race. 9 a.m. Loleta. HSU’s cycling team hosts teams from other schools for an exciting road race in downtown Loleta.

Humboldt Youth Soccer League Competitive Tryouts. Noon. College of the Redwoods Field House. Boys and Girls U10 age group noon to 2 p.m.; Boys and Girls U12 & U14: 2 to 4 p.m. humboldtyouthsoccer@gmail.com.

offering curriculum inspired by Waldorf education, educating the whole child— head, heart, and hands.

FOR KIDS

Quack and Wabbit Puppet Theatre. 2 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Based on the popular picture book of the same title by British author John Burningham. 269-1910.

ETC.

Funeral Consumers Alliance of Humboldt Annual Meeting. 1-3:30 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Keynote speaker Jim Lawer on “Finding the ‘Oh, Wow’ in Our Death Experience,” insight on how we get our affairs in order, communicate our final wishes to our loved ones and prepare so that we might face death more peacefully. 601-7056. North Coast Young Democrats Chartering Party. 6-9 p.m. Sewell Gallery of Fine Art, 423 F. Street, Eureka. NCYD, founded and chartered in January 2012, celebrate with drinks, food and conversation. $10/$5 sliding scale. northcoastyoungdems@gmail.com. 726-6293.

FALL 2012 MAndAtory PArent InForMAtIon MeetIng & oPen house thurs., April 5 • 5:30pm Childcare Available

25 sunday

special offerings:

Home School Organic Meal Program Spanish • 4-H Animal Program Kindergarten Half Day or Full Day Option

EVENTS

22nd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Sunday highlights: Free Hymnal at the Adorni Center with music by Blue Street and the Humboldt Harmonaires from 9-10:15 a.m. See March 22 listing. Sisters Bingo Night! 5:30-9 p.m. Green and Gold Room, HSU. Eureka Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence host a night of bingo benefitting North Star Quest Camp for girls and the HSU Women’s Resource Center. $15. vdaybingo. eventbrite.com.

THEATER

The Miser. 2 p.m. Forum Theater, CR. See March 22 listing.

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

Branford Marsalis. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Renowned Grammy Award-winning jazz saxophonist, one of the most revered instrumentalists of his time. $45/$22 students and seniors. 826-3928. All Seasons Orchestra Spring Concert. 7-10 p.m. D Street Neighborhood Center, 13th and D streets, Arcata. From waltzing on the Blue Danube to a good old fashioned hoe-down. Cheryl Wheeler. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Humboldt Folklife Society presents the acclaimed singer/songwriter with Kenny White, her longtime accompanist. $20/$18 members. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

ART

Senior Sunday. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Senior event includes docent-led museum tour on Graves’ history, permanent collection and current exhibitions while sipping tea and meeting new friends. 442-0278.

continued on next page

For a brochure and application call

h

t 14

CALLING ALL HUMBOLDT COUNTY ARTISTS UAL

ANN

Don’t miss this opportunity to open your creative space to art lovers!

JUNE 2-3 & JUNE 9-10

DANCE

Swing Dance. 6 p.m. Willow Creek VFW Hall, 20 Kimtu Road. Features College of the Redwoods’ Twenty Musician Jazz Orchestra under the Direction of Bill Allison. Benefits Dream Quest youth programs. $3/$1 kids. 530-629-3564.

1897 "S" Street, Arcata coastalgrove@coastalgrove.org

825-8804 x0

MUSIC

14TH ANNUAL

WakeUp Humboldt. Noon-3 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Intergenerational multimedia workshop inspiring the creation of a just, sustainable world. 310-399-3311. Q-Factor. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Humboldt Pride presents a showcase of the area’s finest drag and talents. Plus, dancing to DJ 360. $7/$5 in drag. humbrews.com. 826-2739.

North Coast Open Studios Participation Includes:

• A full color listing in our annual guidebook and inclusion on our website • Participation in the Preview Art Show & Reception

Applications are available now, the deadline is March 20. • Access to artist marketing workshops Applications are available at the Ink People Center for and personal marketing assistance the Arts or online at www.northcoastopenstudios.com. • And much more for only $95! Questions? Contact Taffy Stockton, NCOS Coordinator at (707) 834-6460 or contact@northcoastopenstudios.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012

27


continued from previous page

FOOD

Vegan Chili Cook-off. 1 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. Prizes awarded to best chili chefs. Potluck: bring vegan dishes to share. 633-6340.

SPORTS

HSU Criterium. 7-10:30 a.m. HSU. Humboldt State University’s cycling team hosts a wicked-fast criterium on campus featuring teams from other schools. Humboldt Youth Soccer League Competitive Tryouts. Noon. See March 24 listing.

ETC.

The Sea Grill Fresh Crab Dishes! Harris Ranch Beef Extensive Salad Bar Famous Seafood Chowder

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Community Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Victims of Church Abuse. 7 p.m. Lifetree Cafe, 76 13th St., Arcata. Nearly four out of 10 Americans state that they’ve decided to quit church because of a negative experience they’ve had. Snacks and beverages available. bobdipert@hotmail.com. 672-2919.

26 monday DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing to live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

MUSIC

Frank Fairfield. 7:30 a.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. California-native brings the old folk sound. Cory Goldmand and Colin Vance open. $10. www.arcataplayhouse. org/upcoming.html. 822-1575.

ETC.

Humboldt Bay Bicycle Commuters Association. 6 p.m. Carmela’s Arcata, 1288 G St. Regular meeting. 445-1097. Harbor Community Forum. 7 p.m. Labor Temple, E and Ninth streets, Eureka. Revitalize Humboldt Bay Harbor Action Team: Prosperity 2012 sponsors a communitywide forum to provide information about the harbor and gather ideas and opinions to help determine a course of action. s.munzell@yahoo.com. 497-6137.

27 tuesday EVENTS

AEDC Spotlight on Success. 5 p.m. Arcata Theater Lounge, 1036 G St., Arcata. Arcata Economic Development Corporation’s annual celebration of small business features food, drink and circus-style entertainment. arcatatheaterlounge.com. 822-1220.

ETC.

May Pearsall Vintage Clothing. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Champagne reception opens exhibit featuring clothing items from the 1910s to 1930s. 443-1947. Healing Rooms of the Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Nondenominational prayer group. healingrooms.com. 834-5800.

Historic Bar

JAH SUN. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

Struggling Man Reggae singer Jah Sun straddles a stool in front of a computer desk in Jah Culture Studio, a cozy converted garage nestled beneath towering redwoods high in the hills above Arcata. His dreadlocked hair is so long it trails on the ground when he sits. One wall sports a large banner for Lion Camp, a Humboldt-based music collective that includes his friends Stevie Culture and Ishi Dube among others. Another wall has a collection of framed CDs and the painting used as cover art for the brand new Jah Sun release, Battle the Dragon. “It’s a double-headed dragon that wears the symbols of some of the world’s negative forces,” he says, holding up a copy of the album. “You see the symbol of the World Trade Organization; you see a bar code; you see the dragon’s tail is a gas pump [nozzle] representing the oil industry. Behind the dragon is a wake of destruction, a city in flames.” The image has Jah Sun standing up to the

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

dragon, singing into a mic. A mother with a drum and other artists with paintbrushes and graffiti spray cans join the battle. “We’re defending the natural world through art,” he says. The title track was inspired by “looking at the state of the world, the riots in London, the protests in Spain, the Occupy Movement, things happening all over the world, seeing how everyone would interpret this dragon — something bigger than us that we all must overcome. For me personally the dragon represents the illusion that we are separate from each other, separate from the Earth. When we realize our power and potential and realize that everything we do affects the world … when we get through that, we’re on our way to shifting the paradigm on the planet.” Changing the way people think seems like a big task for a Humboldt reggae singer, but that’s what he’s trying to do. “I don’t want to sound cheesy, but music really did change my life — it saved my life,” he says, and he wants to pass that along. Specifically, he credits the music of Bob Marley. “He changed the path I was going down,” he says, describing the early years of his family life as truly dysfunctional. Jah Sun was once Jason. Born in Austin and raised around central Texas, he was the son of a teen mother. “We had government cheese and Kool-Aid, food stamps and the free lunch program,” he recalled. He never met his “real” father and was brought up by a succession of stepfathers, some better than others. Things changed a bit with his last stepdad. “I was basically adopted into a beauti-

ful black American family. From that point on I was raised in that culture: gospel music and hip hop, breakdancing and rap. That’s where I really got into music — but with that also came a lot of running around in the streets, acting like a hoodlum, getting into crazy situations.” The “hoodlum” business landed him in juvenile detention centers. Then he discovered Bob Marley and reggae music. A VHS tape made him an instant convert. “I immediately started growing my locks, learning about clean ways of living, ital food, yoga, spirituality.” After shifting into what he calls “conscious music,” he left Texas, spending time in Hawaii, Florida, Seattle and L.A. before relocating to Humboldt eight years ago. He and his partner were raising a family and, he says, “We wanted to find a nice community where people embraced ideals like ours.” Arcata fit the bill. He fell in with the local reggae community and started touring and reaching out internationally. The outreach paid off: Battle the Dragon is on a French label and includes guest spots from the Italian singer Alboroise, Gentleman from Germany, Stevie Culture, Perfect and Peetah Morgan out of Jamaica. ”I wanted to show that reggae is all over the world. It started in Jamaica but it has a universal message. It’s a music that talks about the struggle, fighting oppression. I think everybody in the world can relate to that. Everyone struggles.” The Jah Sun and The Redemption Band CD Release Concert with special guests Peetah Morgan, Yami Bolo, Humboldt reggae band Woven Roots and DJ Trees takes place on Saturday, March 24, at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. Doors open at 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $22, $18 in advance. Check www. jahsunmusic.com for more details and a taste of Battle the Dragon. — Bob Doran


28 wednesday COMEDY

Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy Night. 8:30 p.m. Cher-ae Heights Casino, Trinidad. Local blue comedy troupe makes with the funny. If you get offended easily, don’t go! cheraeheightscasino.com. 800-684-2464.

ETC.

Residential Solar Leasing Program. 6:30 p.m. 1385 Eighth St., Arcata. Zero-Down residential solar leasing program. ScurfieldSolar.com. 825-0759. Eureka Mindfulness Group. 7:15 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Led by Cindee Grace. Topic: “The Sacred Feminine.” Free-will donation. Fragrance free, please. 269-7044.

29 thursday THEATER

Much Ado About Nothing Opening Night Gala. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. NCRT presents Shakespeare’s comedy. Includes a champagne reception after the show. $15. ncrt.net. 442-6278. Little Shop of Horrors. 7 p.m. Arcata High School. See March 22 listing.

MUSIC

Dan Bern and John Ludington. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. CP Presents hosts a night of eclectic singer/ songwriters. $18/$15 adv. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See March 22 listing. ●

Truth to Power the West. The elites have no interest in what the people go through or the harsh life of the people. It is only these rulers who have a voice, who CNN put on TV, who BBC will talk to daily and who spread their own propaganda to the world. Nobody comes to Africa to listen to the common man’s voice. So it is up to artists who can escape this trap and have a voice on international radio and TV to speak the truth about Africa.” Saturday night, March 24, Seun Kuti and Egypt 80 return to SoHum to speak truth to power at the Mateel Community Center in Redway. The local drum and dance troupe SambAmore opens the show with its Afro-Brazilian rhythms. Bay Area/Humboldt amalgam AfroMassive plays a set of Fela-inspired Cali-Afrofunk. DJ BadaBoon fills in the gaps. Show admission is $30, $27 in advance, discount for Mateel members. Doors open at 7 p.m. with an African dinner. Go to www.mateel.org or call 923-3368 for further details. — Bob Doran

PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

SEUN KUTI AND EGYPT 80

As the sun set on the final day of last summer’s Reggae on the River, Seun Kuti’s band, Egypt 80, filled the stage and eased into a rock-solid Afrofunk groove. Like the bandleader, the gyrating dancers and many of the players were young, but the bass player and guitarist were clearly veterans, guys who’d backed Seun’s illustrious father, Fela Kuti, the godfather of Nigerian Afrobeat in the ’70s version of Egypt 80. When Seun took the stage, everything fell into place. Alternating between his wailing sax, intense vocals and ecstatic dancing, he brought the crowd to a fever pitch with songs like “Don’t Give That Shit To Me,” an update on Fela’s classic protest, “Expensive Shit.” Seun is clearly a man on a mission beyond laying down a groove: He wants to give the people of his homeland a voice. As he explained to a reporter last year, “As an African, you realize that the ordinary people do not have a voice. The ruling elites, which were chosen by Western countries in the 1950s and 1960s, have allowed Africa to develop in terms agreeable to

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012

29


March 22 April 4 Thurs Mar 22 Random Acts Of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m. $6 All ages Sat Mar 31 NCAA Division 1 Semifinals BOTH GAMES Doors at 2:45 p.m. Free All ages Mon April 2 NCAA Division 1 Finals Doors at 5:30 p.m. Free All ages Wed April 4 Sci Fi Pint & Pizza Night ft. Druid Underground Film Festival 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

southeast asian cuisine

Thai • Lao • Vietnamese corner of 4th & L Eureka • 443-2690 ••• OPEN Mon.-Sat Lunch & Dinner • We cater, too! •

Open 7 days New Thai

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

Stinking Badges Harrelson plays a dirty cop while Hill and Tatum police Jump Street By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews RAMPART reunites writer/director Oren Moverman and star Woody Harrelson, who collaborated on 2009’s The Messenger. This time out, Moverman enlisted crime-fiction titan James Ellroy to co-write the screenplay. I’d argue that nobody writing today has a deeper fascination with corruption and the male ego than Ellroy, so he seems like a perfect fit to help the movie’s protagonist, “Date Rape” Dave Brown, live up to the film’s hyperbolic tagline: “THE MOST CORRUPT COP YOU’VE EVER SEEN ON SCREEN.” It’s a fun tag (and classic Ellroy grandstanding), but the character doesn’t quite live up to the hype. Which is not meant to be dismissive: Harrelson’s Brown is undoubtedly corrupt. He’s a thug, a killer, a serial philanderer and a bigot. He considers the LAPD a soldier’s department and imagines himself on the frontlines of a conflict no one else can see. He drinks too many martinis, shakes down pharmacists for uppers, downers and Viagra, and is apparently anorexic. He also cohabitates with his two ex-wives, who happen to be sisters, and their two daughters (one by each sister). It’s a weird living arrangement, especially when compounded by an off-putting casual sex pact. So, yeah, Brown’s pretty dirty, but I’ve seen worse (Bad Lieutenant, for example, or Ellroy’s own L.A. Confidential). Brown is also tremendously intelligent and articulate, often to his own detriment. Despite his failed attempt at becoming an attorney, he values his smarts above anyone else’s. This intellectual arrogance leads him

30 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

to believe he can beat the system, whether by nonpayment of income taxes, outlawyering the state in its numerous charges against him or covering up his ongoing criminal enterprises.        This is a complex and demanding role. Harrelson is gaunt and exhausted throughout, and we get glimpses of Brown’s concealed pain as he stomps drunkenly through the L.A. night. Rampart is almost exclusively a character study, a travelogue of one man’s trip to the very bottom, and Harrelson’s performance is nearly flawless, as are those of the supporting cast, particularly Ben Foster, Sigourney Weaver and Ned Beatty. The aesthetic, with its slow-burn close-ups and tracking shots set against the piercing sunlight and neon of L.A., is counterpointed by jittery jump-cuts — an apt visual representation of Brown’s inner turmoil. While the movie is smart and competently assembled, something keeps it from coming together. I’m as big an Ellroy fan as anybody; I’ll line up to read/see whatever he puts his name on. Rampart has his fingerprints all over it, and the Los Angeles depicted here — with its bureaucracy and its undercurrents of race hate and misogyny — is all his. And “Date Rape” Dave is an Ellroy archetype all the way down to the ground, which may be the problem: Despite all the film’s achievements, it plays like an orphaned arc in an Ellroy novel. Ostensibly, the protagonist’s story is an allegory for the LAPD’s 1990s corruption scandal, but we only get hints at that larger conflict. As Brown becomes more and more unhinged, his connection to the larger world, or even to the culture of his troubled department, is never fully explored. As a story about one man’s place in time, Rampart hits most of its marks, but I found myself wishing for something more, some additional facet of the bigger picture to make me care about what happens to “Date Rape” Dave. R. 107m. 21 JUMP STREET is a pretty straightforward ‘80s-style action-comedy, which is a tricky thing to pull off these days. But this one is a success. Star Jonah Hill was reportedly instrumental in shepherding this

project through the development phase (he also co-wrote the story), and I’ve got to give him credit for his fortitude. A reboot of the teen-cop TV action drama seemed an iffy proposition. But the filmmakers have reimagined Jump Street as a hard-R comedy that’s completely self-aware without being annoyingly post-modern. Hill and Channing Tatum (who’s equally funny, surprisingly) lead a cast packed with comic talent. Rob Riggle is a standout, as usual, and Ice Cube really sinks his teeth into the role of easily angered Captain Dickson. Ellie Kemper is hilarious as a teacher with inappropriate feelings for Tatum’s character. There isn’t much point in rehashing the plot, as it’s pretty standard undercover drug squad stuff. But the relationship between the two leads is built in an honest, convincing way. The comedy is consistent throughout, the action scenes are compelling, and the insecurity inherent in the high school experience is surprisingly real. And there’s a fun cameo near the end. This isn’t a game-changer, but it’s wellabove average. Hopefully this heralds a change for the better in mainstream actioncomedy.  R. 109m.

Previews THE HUNGER GAMES. Based on the first book in Suzanne Collins’ mega-selling young-adult trilogy, The Hunger Games stars Jennifer Lawrence (Winter’s Bone) as one of 24 teenagers who, in a dystopian near-future, are forced to compete in a televised death-match. PG13. 144m. WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN. Based on Lionel Shriver’s gut-wrenching novel, this film explores the contentious relationship between an ambivalent mother (the great Tilda Swinton) and her strange son, whose heinous crime leaves a community reeling. With John C. Reilly. R. 112m. The Arcata Theatre Lounge is all about living, breathing humans this week — stand-up comedians, musicians and business leaders. Next week promises a return to the cinema.


Movie Times

* = EARLY SHOWS

CROCHET FLOWER CLASS. Fri.s, Noon-2 p.m. $25, with Kelly Card of KC Made It. Make a variety of flowers to adorn any kind of handwork! Explore several methods of construction, and leave with a bouquet of new skills. Basic crochet skills required. Bring a few hooks and scraps of yarn. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0329)

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema 707-443-3456

1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 3/23-3/29 unless otherwise noted.

Woody harrelsoN as dave BroWN iN RampaRt

Continuing ACT OF VALOR. Active-duty Navy SEALs star as active-duty Navy SEALs in this fictionalized account of Navy SEALs on active duty. Paid for with tax dollars. Shouldn’t we get in free? R. 101m. THE ARTIST. Mostly silent, black-andwhite homage to cinema’s mostly silent, black-and-white early years. Winner of five Academy Awards including Best Picture. PG13. 103m. GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE. Nicolas Cage stars in this moronic, action-packed sequel centered on Johnny Blaze, a motorcycle-driving stuntman who sold his soul to the devil. PG13. 95m. JOHN CARTER. A hunky Civil War vet gets transported to Mars, where, with the help of some four-armed green dudes, he must save a princess. PG13. 132m. JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND 3D. Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson leads a family-friendly adventure to the isle of 3D effects. Jules Verne barfs in his grave. PG. 94m. THE LORAX. The tree-hugging Dr. Seuss character now shills for SUVs and flapjacks. What a sellout! Also, this movie is not good. PG. 86m. PROJECT X. You know the party is off the hook when the angry dwarf gets stuffed in the oven and the drug dealer grabs a flamethrower. Sigh. R. 88m. SILENT HOUSE. A young woman becomes trapped inside her family’s lakeside house, which is, like, totally giving her the silent treatment. Uh, hello? Cerr-reepy! R. 85m. A THOUSAND WORDS. A magical tree keeps Eddie Murphy from speaking, but it doesn’t stop him from making this, perhaps his worst move ever. PG13. 91m. THE VOW. After a car accident, a woman loses all memory of her husband, so he has to woo her anew. PG13. 104m. WANDERLUST. Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston play a Manhattan couple who join a free-love commune in this comedy from director David Wain (Wet Hot American Summer). R. 98m. l

HUNGER GAMES *11:30, *1:40, 2:45, 5:00, 6:00, 8:20, 9:15 JOHN CARTER 3D *12:05, *2:25, 3:10, 6:20, 9:30 JOHN CARTER 2D 11:25, 5:25 THE LORAX 3D *12:50, 3:25, 5:55, 8:25 THE LORAX 2D *12:00, *2:35, 5:10, 7:40 21 JUMP STREET *1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20 ACT OF VALOR *11:35, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35 A THOUSAND WORDS *2:30, 7:20 PROJECT X *12:10, 4:55, 9:40 WANDERLUST *1:45, 6:40 GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE 2D 4:15, 9:05 SILENT HOUSE *12:45, 3:00, 5:45, 8:45 THE VOW 3:55, 9:00 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND 2D 1:25, 6:30

Mill Creek Cinema 707-839-3456

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 3/23-3/29 unless otherwise noted. HUNGER GAMES *11:40, 1:40, 2:50, 5:00, 6:00, 8:20, 9:10 THE LORAX 3D *12:40, 5:45 THE LORAX 2D 3:10, 8:20 21 JUMP STREET *12:30, 3:25, 6:10, 8:55 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND 2D *11:45, *2:10, 4:35, ACT OF VALOR 7:00, 9:30 SILENT HOUSE *11:50, *2:00, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 JOHN CARTER 3D 3:15, 9:20 JOHN CARTER 2D *12:10, 6:20 PROJECT X *12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 3/23 -3/29 unless otherwise noted.

HUNGER GAMES WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN THE ARTIST RAMPART

*1:30, 4:45, 8:00 *1:10, 3:40, 6:15, 8:50 *1:55, 6:50 4:20, 9:15

Fortuna Theater 707-725-2121

1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 3/23 -3/29 unless otherwise noted. JOHN CARTER 3D THE LORAX 3D 21 JUMP STREET THE HUNGER GAMES BIG-D THE HUNGER GAMES

*1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30 *12:05, *2:10, 4:15, 6:15, 8:30 *12:30, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40 *12:00, 3:15, 6:30, 9:45 *12:45, *1:30, 4:00, 4:45, 7:15

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville

JOURNEY 2:THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND 3/23 - 3/29: 7:30 ExCEpT 3/28: 6:30

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! • Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts HAND BUILDING. $180, Weds., March 28-May 30 (10 weeks), 7-9 p.m. Centered around high-fire slab and extruded form construction. Projects include ocarina, jewelry box, vase, platter, and sculpture. Various forming methods introduced, as well as surface decoration techniques and glazing options. (AC-0322) PLAYING WITH CLAY FOR GROWN UPS. $145, Tues., March 27-May 15, (8 weeks) 10 a.m.-Noon. Have fun and get your hands dirty! Covers handbuilding, including slump molding, texturing and slab construction. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0322) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $180, Tues., March 27–May 29 (10 weeks), 7-9 p.m. Learn basics or perfect your wheel-throwing technique. With more than 30 years’ experience, Bob Raymond is an inspiration to students of all levels. Ideal for both new and continuing students. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0322) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $180, Weds., March 28-May 30 (10 weeks). 3 classes offered: 9-11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.1:30 p.m., 2-4 p.m. Join Peggy Loudon for complete introduction to basic wheel-throwing and glazing techniques. For beginning and returning students. Class will put you on the road to developing your own personal style. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0322) WHEEL: UTILITARIAN FORMS & DECORATION. $180, Tues., March 27-May 29, (10 weeks) 1-3 p.m. Master a variety of utilitarian form and cover a variety of decorative techniques used on wet, leather-hard, and bone-dry greenware. Appropriate decorative glazing techniques included. For intermediate-advanced students. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www. fireartsarcata.com (AC-0322) CAN’T BELIEVE I’M CROCHETING WITH KC. Thurs.s, Noon-2 p.m., with Kelly Card of KC Made It. $25. Let me introduce you to the wonderful world of crocheting! Designed for complete beginners. Learn most of the basic stitches: how to chain, single crochet, and double crochet, how to work flat and in the round. We will talk about gauge, what hook goes with what yarn and how to read a pattern. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0329)

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DECONSTRUCTED SILK SCREENING. Sat., March 24,14 p.m. $55, with Cindy Shaw. Using a variety of textures, such as leaves, fabrics, corrugated cardboard, doilies, and stencils (to name a few), I will teach you how to make beautiful designs on fabric and paper using the screen printing process. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0322) FREE EUREKA BUTTON CLUB. 2nd Sun. of the month, 2 p.m. We are mad about buttons old and new. Our meetings are fun and educational. Come and learn more about all of those buttons in your button box. Guests are welcome any time. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0329) INTRO TO WET FELTING. Thurs.s, 6-8 p.m. $35 +$10 material fee. Learn basic wet felting techniques using warm soapy water and wool roving. Create felted balls, felted beads, pin cushions, coasters and flat felt. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0329) LEARN TO KNIT SOCKS AT YARN! Thurs.s, April 5-26, 5:30-7 p.m. Step up your knitting with socks. We’ll learn the short row method of turning the heel. Beg. knitting level required. Call 443-YARN for more info. and to register. (AC-0329) OPEN CRAFT NIGHT. Fri.s, 6-9 p.m. FREE. Come craft with us and get creative and crazy, bring your project and a snack (and your fun hat!). Free to all (adults please) and a great way to explore new projects and get to know your fellow artist. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0329) STENCILING ON FABRICS. With April Sproule. Sat., March 31, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $80. Using April’s collection of original textile stencil designs perfectly suited for a wide variety of fiber art applications such as wearable art, quilting projects, and home decor. Class covers: Basic stenciling technique, Image placement: borders, all over patterns, and central motifs, layering and shading color mixing. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0329) VERY BEGINNING SEWING Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. with Jodi Lee. Learn to use and care for your sewing machine. We will have you sewing a straight line in no time, then on to fancier stiches. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0329) LEARN TO DRAW! Traditional drawing with local artist Susan Fox. Tues., 7-9 p.m. On-going 4 week sessions: $40. Westhaven Center for the Arts. Write/ call, sfox@foxstudio.biz, 496-1246. (AC-0419)

Communication

ADVANCED FACILITATION. Discover a faster, less frustrating and more effective technique to speed up group decision-making and arrive at better solutions. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., April 13, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $100 (includes materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended. (CMM-0405) continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, JaN. 12,• •2012 NORTH northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com North COAST Coast JOURNAL JourNal •• THURSDAY, thursday, MARCH MarCh22, 22,2012 2012

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PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227)

LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. Every day the number of people who have been hurt by a spiritual leader seems to grow. Visit http://lifetreecafe. com and join us at Lifetree Café this week to discuss being hurt by church. Sun., March 25, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@hotmail. com. (CMM-0322)

TRILLIUM DANCE STUDIO PRESENTS: Salsa Lessons with Ozzy Ricardez and Miss Julie. All levels Welcome. Ongoing, drop-in Fri. nights, 7-8:15 p.m. 1925 Alliance Rd., in Arcata (x st. Foster) $7 single $10 couple. (DMT-0531)

WOMEN’S NETWORKING GROUP. Come together to share and grow your Business, Product, or Service. Monthly meetings, $20, includes organic/vegetarian meal. (No membership fee) Contact Joanne (707) 845-6140, or theheartlinknetwork.com. (CMM-0322)

BELLY DANCING WITH SHOSHANNA. Feel fabulous in classes for all levels in Arcata at Redwood Raks. 616-6876 or Shoshannaland.com. (DMT-1227)

UNLAWFUL SEXUAL HARASSMENT TRAINING. Are you and your business in compliance with California law? Participants will learn what is and is not harassment and how to recognize and respond to it effectively. This one-day, two-hour workshop meets the requirements of California State Law AB 1825. CR Eureka Downtown site, Thurs, March 29, 9-11 a.m., $45. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education at 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (CMM-0322)

Computers

INTRO TO ADOBE INDESIGN. Fast-paced, hands-on exploration of Indesign page layout software. Demonstration of tools, menus, palettes, page set-up, master pages, guides and margins, color and more. With Annie Reid. Tues./Thurs., April 10-24, 6:30-9 p.m. $125. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 8263731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended. (C-0329)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

DISCOVER ARGENTINE TANGO! Beginning lessons Sun., 5-5:45 p.m. Practica 6-6:45 p.m., $6 Studio of Dance Arts, Eureka. 445-2655, 822-6170. (DMT-0329) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) BURLESQUE, BALLROOM & BALANCE: Guest instructors Jenica and Eric Zimmer share their unique talents at North Coast Dance. April 13-15. Fri. Ladies only Burlesque, Sat. Ballroom, Sun. A Dancer’s Workout and Arm Styling. Like us on Facebook and search WCS Workshops with Jenica & Eric Zimmer! www. ericzimmer.com, www.jenicazimmer.com. Call (707) 464-3638 to register. Sponsored by dancewithdebbie. biz! (DMT-0405) WEST AFRICAN DANCE WITH ALSENY SOUMAH! All of March, Tues./Thurs., 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-0329) DANCE WITH DEBBIE’S: Ballroom, Latin, Swing, and Yoga group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex, Eureka. Drop in on our Fri. Night Swing 7:30-9:30 p.m. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@ dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-0426) STUDIO OF DANCE ARTS. # 7 5th St., Eureka. (707) 442-1939. Ballet, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Irish Step, Hip Hop, Middle Eastern, Tango, Pre-School Dance, Pilates Mat. All levels & ages welcome. Register this month and perform in our June 19 performance at the Arkley Center For The Performing Arts. (DMT-0419) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

AIKIDO. Aikido is an innovative, dynamic, and noncompetitive self-defense martial art. Six-week class, starting April 3, Tues.s & Thurs.s, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CR main campus on Tompkins Hill Road. $69. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education at 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (F-0322) KUNDALINI YOGA & MEDITATION. Learn the ancient practice that uses posture, mantras, mudras, breathing techniques and relaxation to create a specific physical and mental state. Leave feeling centered and reconnected to the true beauty of your being. With Anne Marie Tse. Mon., April 16-May 21, 7-8:30 p.m. $60. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended. (F-0405) TAI CHI. Designed to stretch, limber, tone and strengthen the body. Boost your immune system, improve focus and coordination, reduce stress and manage pain. Anyone can do Tai Chi! Four-week class starting April 5, Thurs.s, Noon-1:30 p.m. At the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. $52. Ages 15 and up. Information, 441-4244 or register in person at The Adorni Center. (F-0322) ZUMBA FITNESS. Sat.s, 10-11 a.m. Lose weight, get fit, have fun. Sun Yi’s Academy, 1215 Guintoli Ln., Arcata. $5 class. Michele, 445-2355. (F-0517) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session: Feb. 1-June 15. Classes: Beginner Basics, Tues.s & Thurs.s, 6-7:30 p.m. Advanced Adults, Mon.s & Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. All Ages All Levels Community Class, Sat.s, Noon-2 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. HSU Students First Class Free. (F-0329) NIA. Nia has arrived in Humboldt County! Dance fusion fitness program blending healing arts, dance arts, and martial arts. Weds at the Bayside Grange, 6:30-7:30pm., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. Starts Feb. 1. Your first class is always FREE! Regular fees $6/$4 Grange Members. Pauline Ivens 707-441-9102, waterpolly@ gmail.com (F-0412) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-1206)

ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at the Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (F-1227) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Lau Kune Do Kung Fu, Muay Thai, Stand-up/Kickboxing & MMA. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227)

IMPROVE MENTAL AND PHYSICAL AGILITY AT NORTH COAST FENCING! SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www. northcoastaikido.org. (F-1227)

Garden

FOUNDATION CLASS. Fri. & Sat., April 7-8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. each day. $275. Full Weekend beginning level class. Participants will leave understanding: Law: The many faces of Cannabis, from history to the ever changing current law. Health: The many reasons and ways to use medicinal cannabis safely. Horticulture: Effective techniques from soil preparation through to harvest and storage. Key elements of this class focus on knowing how to start, grow, harvest, dry/ cure and store their own medicine. We will address small indoor soil systems but have a focus on outdoor organic practices. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (G-0405)


PURE ANALYTICS WITH SAMANTHA MILLER. FREE, Session 3 of 3 series on medical cannabis. Fri., April 6, 6:30-8 p.m. Introduction to High CBD and THC strain development, medicated edibles and dosage information. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www. cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (G-0401) INFUSIONS FOR CULINARY APPLICATIONS II. Fri., March 23, 6-9 p.m. $70. Infusions for vegetable glycerin, nut milks, and alcohol. Discussion and demonstration class. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (G-0322)

Kids & Teens

BEGINNING CERAMICS. Play with clay! Begins with basic information about clay and commonly used tools. Each week students delve into different construction process such as pinch pots, coils and slabs. Variety of decorative and finishing techniques also explored. Seven-week class starting April 5, Thurs.s, 6-7:30 p.m. At John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St. $40 fee includes materials. Information, 441-4244, or register in person at The Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. (K-0322) CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7-12. $80, (5 weeks) Mon.s., 4-6 p.m., March 26-April 23. Adventures with clay: Learn various hand building and wheel-throwing techniques. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (K-0322) CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 5-7. $60, (4 weeks) Sat.s., 9:30-11 a.m., March 31-April 21. Fun class, which fosters a life-long love of ceramics and art. More info at www.fireartsarcata.com, (707) 826-1445, Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (K-0322) SEQUOIA PARK ZOO’S SCHOOL’S OUT CAMP. For 8-12 year olds. April 10-13. Join us for a wild adventure. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo.net for info. (K-0329) TEEN FILMMAKING. Learn basics of screenwriting and film production by working hands-on with an experienced filmmaker on an original movie. Nineweek class, Tues.s 6-8 p.m., starting April 17. At John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St. $25. 100% fee waiver scholarships available to qualifying participants. Information, 441-4240 or register in person at The Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. (K-0322) DANCE CLASSES AT BLUE LAKE PARK & REC. Dance classes for boys and girls of all ages. Enrich your life with ballet made fun and easy! Beginners, Intermediate, Advanced and Mommy/Daddy & Me classes offered. $5 per class. Begin March 26,. For schedules and descriptions visit www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Amanda Arthington, 668-5932. (K-0322) SPRING BREAK CAMP. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for roller skating, arts and crafts, sports and more at Blue Lake Spring Break Camp for 5-13 year olds. Mon.-Fri., April 9-13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Perigot Park. Full-day or half-day option. Extended care hours available. Register today as space is limited! Register at Blue Lake City Hall, www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932, for more information. (K-0405) MUSEUM ART SCHOOL FOR KIDS. At Morris Graves Museum of Art. Hands-on art instruction based on themes & subject matter reflected in exhibitions on display at MGMA in Eureka. After-school classes for ages 6-12, March 20-April 26. Instructors Arupa Richardson & Karan Collenberg. For fees and more info call 442-0278 ext. 208 or visit www.humboldtarts.org. Registration forms available online. (K-0322)

CAPOEIRA KIDS. Spring Session 2012: Feb. 1-June 15. Classes: Beginner Kids (Age 5-7), Tues.s & Thurs.s, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Beginner kids (Age 8 & up), Tues.s & Thurs.s, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Toddler Tumblers (Ages 3 & 4), Tues.s, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Advanced Kids (Ages 5-7), Mon.s & Wed.s, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Advanced Kids (Ages 8 & up), Mon.s & Wed.s, 4:30-6 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (K-0329) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

Lectures

LIVING ON SHAKY GROUND: How to Survive Earthquakes & Tsunamis in Northern California. A free class. Mon., April 9. Two sessions offered at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., River Lodge, Fortuna. Pre-registration is required: Call (707) 499-0754. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness (www.humboldt.edu/rti). Funding provided by the Calif. Emergency Management Agency Earthquake and Tsunami Program. (L-0329)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) ART FOR THE YOUNG AT HEART. Intro to Watercolor. Mon.s, 5:15-7:15 p.m., April 2-June 11. Instructor Maureen McGarry. $100. Arcata Elementary School, Room 7, 2400 Baldwin. More info, call 826-1738. (O-0329) BEYOND TOURS. Freewheeling, Independent Travel for All Ages. You may remember traveling easily and effortlessly in your youth. Do you think traveling has become more dangerous and difficult in a post 9/11 era? Learn how today’s travel can be freer, lighter and more open than ever with world travelers Louisa Rogers and Barry Evans. Tues., April 17-May 1, 1-3 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0405) COAST GUARD. A Tour of the Past and Present. Visit the Coast Guard facility in Samoa and the Air Station Humboldt Bay in McKinleyville. Meet boat and helicopter crewmembers and learn about their missions. With Maggy Herbelin. Tues., April 17-May 1, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members only. OLLI: 8265880 (O-0405) PORTRAIT DRAWING. Learn the basic fundamentals of portrait drawing with Tim Clewell. Wed., April 18-May 16, 4-6 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0405) SCOTIA AS IT WAS, IS & WILL BE. A comprehensive study of the community of Scotia, originally a Pacific Lumber Company town that is on the edge of great change. With Ray Hillman. Thurs., April 12, 2:30-5:30 p.m. and April 19, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Course includes a field trip. $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0405) SOUL COLLAGE© DISCOVERING YOUR MULTIPLICITY. Make a collage from cut-out images out of magazines and other sources and access the many different parts of yourself in the process. With Janet Patterson. Tues., April 17-May 22, 1-3 p.m. $50/ OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0405)

SPRING WRITING WORKSHOP. Write, reflect, confer, revise, edit and think in this 6-week workshop with Emily Gibson. Join this group if you want to continue a writing project or want to get started on an idea. Wed., April 18-May 23, 10 a.m.-Noon. $70/ OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0405) WRITING ON THE BAY. Learn some of Humboldt Bay’s natural and human history on fieldtrips and then share your investigations through writing short paragraphs and poems. With Jerry Martien. Tues., April 17-May 15, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0405) SENIORS STRETCH CLASS. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Gentle stretch, designed to increase flexibility and strength while improving balance and circulation. Beginning March 26, Mon & Wed. 10-11 a.m. and 2-3 p.m. at Prasch Hall, Blue Lake. Drop-In fee $4. Visit www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Amanda Arthington at 668-5932. (O-0322) THE FOUR STORIES OF EPHESUS: Sources of the Modern World. Discover Ephesus, a city derived from Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Muslim cultures. With Tom Gage. Thurs., April 5-26, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880 (O-0329) INTRO TO MEDITATION: PART 2. A continuation of the Intro to Meditation course, offering more depth and longer meditations. Delve more deeply into Christian, Sufi, Hindu and Buddhist meditative traditions and also learn about the practice of chanting. With Girija Moran. Wed., April 4-25, 6-8 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0322) SHAKESPEARE’S TRAGEDY OF ROMEO & JULIET. Ponder the majesty of Shakepeare’s language and why this drama about young love lives on eternally as an audience favorite. With Tom Gage. Tues., April 3-24, 6-8 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. Extra fee for optional trip to Ashland to see the play. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0322) WINE TASTING 101: An Introduction to Wine Appreciation. Learn more about wine: Wine regions, varietals and styles. Discuss how wine is analyzed, how to understand wine labels and explore food/ wine pairing. With Randy Ward. Tues., April 3-May 1, 6:30-8 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0322)

Spiritual

SACRED RE-PARENTING. At the age of 27-29 we are called to awaken to our Sacred Parents, to begin the process of letting go of the stories of our family of origin and to begin the journey of reparenting ourselves through our understanding, relationship, and experience of the Universal Source of all Things: God/Spirit/Creator. Eight week journey into that liberating and empowering process. Class begins April 3- May 22. Shakati Walsh, M.A. M.S. Visit website: Jupiterslight.com, email shakatiwalsh@yahoo.com or Call 707-826-0734 or 707 616-3163. (S-0329) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-0517)

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North Coast Academy Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com

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continued from previous page THE SLOW DOWN EXPERIENCE. GLOBAL MEDITATION CENTER. Intuitive Qigong, Chanting, Singing for Health & Inner Peace, Drumming, Tibetan Breathplay, Guided Imagery/Visualization & Immersions. 4001 West End Rd., Arcata. (707) 599-0748, shablow@ gmail.com. (S-0322) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./Sat. 6:30-9:30p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Theme Skate: Fri. April 6. Easter theme, Dress in pastel colors and receive $1 discount! Adult Skate Sun., April 8, 6:309:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-0405) ADULT SOFTBALL. Batter up! Gather your friends, family and co-workers and form a team to join our Adult Softball League. 15 game season throughout summer. $600/team, plus $10 non-resident fee. Attend Manager’s Meeting for info and guaranteed spot, Wed., April 11, Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Women’s meeting 6 p.m., Men’s 6:30 p.m. Call Steve, 441-4245 for information. (SR-0322) MEN’S SOFTBALL LEAGUE. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. April 28- June 9. Games on Sat’s, 11:30, 2:30 or 5 p.m. at Perigot Park, Blue Lake. $400/team. Winner receives Championship T-Shirts! Register at Blue Lake City Hall, www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932 for more information. (SR-0419) WOMEN’S SOFTBALL LEAGUE. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. April 9-May 7. Games on Mon.,Tues., and Wed. at 5:30 and 6:45 p.m. $350/team + $5/nonresident. Winner receives Championship T-Shirts! At Perigot Park, Blue Lake. Register at Blue Lake City Hall, call Kara Newman, 668-5932 or visit, www.bluelake. ca.gov , for more information. (SR-0405)

Therapy/Support

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227) JOLENE HAYES. Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist will guide you to uncovering and resolving whatever is blocking you from fulfilling your greatest potential so you can experience a life of creative expression, peace and joy. Call 707-499-9207 or email jolenehayes@sbcglobal.net to make appointment. (T-1227)

Vocational

CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, M.A. Fri., April 13, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., $30 fee includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre-registration is required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (V-0405) PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING. 272 Online Course with classes meeting once a week for 12 weeks. Mobile Lab Services offers intensive courses designed to get you back to work quickly, and well trained. (707) 407-0518 or 511 H St., Eureka. (V-0322)

Wellness/Bodywork

START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Sept. 4, 2012 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Curious about acupuncture? Want to know how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) works and what conditions it might benefit? This 2-hour class will explore basic TCM theory and tools of the medicine, including acupuncture, herbs, dietary therapy and more. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., April 12, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended. (W-0405) BEGIN YOUR LIFETIME COMMITMENT TO LIVING WELL. Qigong Workshop: Sun.s, 9-10:30 a.m., April 22-June 3 (no class 5/13), Arcata. misty-mountain@ hotmail.com, 498-1009. (W-0531) HOLOTROPIC BREATHWORK. Full day workshop in Arcata. May 12. Contact Martin 498-1080. holotropicbreath@yahoo.com (W-0503) SHAMANIC SPIRITUAL SUPPORT. For problem solving, health issues & supporting well-being with Michal Mugrage. Divination, soul-retrieval, energy clearing, heart-centered spirit release, or space clearing. Also offering spiritual mentoring and classes. www.thankful-heart.com, (707) 407-7192. (W-0329) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Three programs: T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis, Traditional Long Form (Wu Style), and The 42 Combined Forms (all 4 major styles). 11-week session starts the week of March 26. Begin as late as the third week. At the martial arts academy in Arcata’s Sunny Brae Shopping Center. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Morning and evening classes. Fees for the 11-week term: $95 for 1 class per week, $150 for 2 or more classes per week. See www.margaretemerson. com or call 822-6508 for schedules. (W-0329) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. EAT LOCAL! WILD FOODS BANQUET, May 5, 2012. Learn to positively identify and prepare many wild delicacies with numerous recipes being shared. PETROLIA SEAWEEDING WEEKEND, with Allison Poklemba. June 23-24, 2012. Learn how to identify, ethically harvest, and prepare local sea vegetables. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0426) NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING/FERTILITY AWARENESS. Safe, effective, fun, women & men, all ages. For class call Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marla_joy@ suddenlink.net (W-0426) DANCING FOR BIRTH: PREGNANCY/ POSPARTUM FITNESS. If you can walk you can dance! Classes are fun and casual, no experience needed. It’s a feel-good workout with world dance movements that will help you have a more satisfying birth experience. Babies are welcome. Two classes available: Sun.s, 2-3:30 p.m. with Sarah Biggs doula and educator, phone, 8404617, pacificbirth.com, and Wed.s, 11-12:30 p.m. with Jyesha Wren, aspiring midwife and dancer, phone: (831) 428-9647, www.jyesha-dfb.com). $10/class & first class free in Arcata at the Humboldt Capoeira Academy. (W-0705) ●

NORTHCoast COASTJourNal JOURNAL• •thursday, THURSDAY,MarCh MARCH22, 22,2012 2012• •northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 34North 34

Is my Fictitious Business Name Statement good forever

?

Y

our fictitious business name statement will expire five years from the date it was last filed with the County Clerk. You have 40 days from the expiration date to renew your FBNS with the County. A new statement does not need to be published unless there has been a change in the information required in the expired statement. If any changes occur then you must file a new FBNS and have published again. Within 30 days from the stamped refiling date, you must begin publishing the statement in the newspaper. If you publish it in the North Coast Journal for the required four weeks, on the last day of publication a “proof of publication” will be sent to the County Clerk to complete the filing process. The cost for running your ficticious business name in the North Coast JourNal is a flat $50 fee.

442-1400

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED JANUARY 27, 2009 UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER

TS. NO. 139713-AH ON APRIL 11, 2012 at 11:00 o’clock A.M. in the lobby of Humboldt Land Title Company, 1034 Sixth St., Eureka, CA County of Humboldt, State of California HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, as Trustee under the Deed of Trust executed by Gerald McGuire, a single man recorded on February 3, 2009 as Instrument No. 2009-2154-5 and Modification and Supplement to Deed of Trust and Partial Reconveyance recorded March 16, 2011 as Instrument No. 2011-5461-6 of Official Records in the office of Recorder of Humboldt County, California by reason of default in the payment or performance of obligations secured thereby including the breach of default, notice of which was recorded November 16, 2011 as Instrument No. 2011-23637-3 of said Official Records, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash in lawful money of the United States, without covenant or warranty, express or implied, as to title, possession, or encumbrances, for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, the interest conveyed to said Trustee by said Deed of Trust in property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California and described as: That portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 3, Township 5 North, Range 1 West, Humboldt Meridian, described as follows: BEGINNING at the point of intersection of the North line of said Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter with the West line of the County Road leading from Samoa to Arcata, as granted by Albert Hart to the County of Humboldt by Deed recorded November 19, 1921 in book 155 of Deeds, Page 471, said point being at right angles North from the South line of said section, 1329 feet; thence West 242.8 feet; thence South 200 feet; thence East 192.8 feet to the said County Road; thence along said County Road, North 14 degrees East 206 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING therefrom Parcel 2 of Parcel Map No. 2122 recorded in Book 18 of Parcel Maps, Page 123. Description pursuant to MODIFICATION AND SUPPLEMENT TO DEED OF TRUST AND PARTIAL RECONVEYANCE, recorded March 16, 2011, as Instrument No. 2011-5461-6, Humboldt County Records.

ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO. 400131-010-000. The unpaid balance and estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of March 12, 2012 is $103,902.12; said amount will increase until date of sale. The street address or other common designation, if any of the real property described herein is purported to be: 1545 Peninsula Dr., Arcata, CA. 95521. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any shown herein. Dated: March 12, 2012; Beneficiary: Steven W. Sellers, Telephone: 707-822-1866, Address: 110 Essex Lane, McKinleyville, CA. 95519. HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a corporation, Trustee. Address: 1034 Sixth Street, Eureka, CA. 95501 Telephone (707) 443-0837 By: /s/ Sue E. Bosch, Pesident 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/2012 (12-86)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED DECEMBER 12, 2008, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER

TS. NO. 139712-AH ON April 11, 2012 at 9:00 o’clock A.M. in the lobby of Humboldt Land Title Company, 1034 Sixth St., Eureka, CA County of Humboldt, State of California HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, as Trustee under the Deed of Trust executed by Gerald McGuire, a single man recorded on recorded December 24, 2008 as Instrument No. 200829779-4 and re-recorded January 30, 2009 as Instrument No. 2009-1852-6 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California by reason of default in the payment or performance of obligations secured thereby including the breach or default, notice of which was recorded November 15, 2011 as Instrument No. 2011-23567-3 of said Official Records, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash in lawful money of the United States, without covenant or warranty, express or implied, as to title, possession, or encumbrances, for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, the interest conveyed to said Trustee by said Deed of Trust in property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California and described as: That portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of section 3, Township 5 North, Range 1


3/22, 3/29, 4/5/2012 (12-87)

 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received by Vector Rehabilitation for furnishing all labor, materials, services, equipment and performing all work necessary for the Vector Therapy Pool Rehabilitation Phase I CDBG Project, 3289 Edgewood Road, Eureka, CA, in the Myrtletown area of Humboldt County. Project plans, special provisions, bid package and sample contract may be obtained from the Project Architect: Philippe Lapotre, 2725 Myrtle Avenue, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 Phone: (707) 442-8867. A Mandatory Site inspection and Pre-Bid meeting is scheduled for Monday March 26, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. at the pool facility. Vector Rehabilitation hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, marital status, political affiliation, sex, age, sexual orientation or other arbitrary factor in consideration of an award. This policy does not require the employment of unqualified persons. The prevailing wage rates, as determined by the Director of Industrial Relations of the State of California, shall apply to this project. In accordance with the provisions of Section 1770 of the Labor Code, the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations of the State of California has determined the general prevailing rates of wages and employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, travel time, and subsistence pay as provided for Section 1773.8 of the California Labor Code, apprenticeship or other training programs authorized by Section 3093 of said code, and similar purposes applicable to the work to be done. Said wages are included in the Bid Request Document

incorporated herein by reference. By submission of a bid, bidder stipulates and agrees to abide by the provisions of the Labor Code related to payment of prevailing wage or will promptly pay a penalty of $50.00 per day per worker paid less than prevailing wage pursuant to the provisions of Labor Code Section 1775. A workday shall not exceed eight hours labor per day or forty hours labor per week. The successful bidder shall keep an accurate record of employees’ hours worked by calendar day and week. This project is also subject to Davis-Bacon wage and labor standards requirements. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and the prevailing wage rates determined by the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations of the State of California for similar classifications of labor, the Contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rate. The work to be performed under this contract is for a project assisted by a program providing direct Federal financial assistance from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Community Development Block Grant Program, and is subject to the requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, as amended, 12 USC 1701u. Section 3 requires that to the greatest extent feasible, opportunities for training and employment be given to low and moderate income persons residing within the project area and that the contracts for work in connection with the project be awarded to eligible business concerns which are located in, or owned in substantial part by persons residing in the area of the project. Regulations for implementing the Section 3 clause are contained in 24 CFR 135, as amended, and as specified in the project specifications. Bids must be filed with Andrew Whitney, 520 E Street, Eureka CA 95501 not later than 2:00 p.m., Friday, April 20, 2012. Shortly thereafter, a representative of Vector Rehabilitation will open said bids and read them publicly. Bids must be submitted in a sealed envelope and have marked on the outside of the envelope “Bid - Vector Therapy Pool Rehabilitation Phase I” together with the name and address of the bidder. Each bid must be accompanied by a cashier’s check, certified check or bidder’s bond in a sum equal to at least five (5%) percent of the total amount bid. Checks or bonds must be made payable to Vector Rehabilitation; such securities shall be a guarantee that the bidder, if his bid is accepted, will enter into a satisfactory contract and furnish a good and sufficient bond for faithful performance thereof and for payment of labor and material costs in accordance with the requirements of the plans and specifications. No contract will be awarded to a Contractor who has not been licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 791, Statutes of 1929, as amended, or whose bid is not on the proposal form included in the contract documents. An appropriate and valid California Contractor’s License is required for the project. All questions regarding interpreta-

tion or clarification of bid specifications shall be directed to Philippe Lapotre (707) 442-8867, plapotre@ plarchitect.com. All interpretations, clarifications or changes will be made via email (and/or U.S. Mail) and provided to all prospective bidders upon request. Vector Rehabilitation will not be responsible for any oral interpretations to bidders. Questions regarding prevailing wages or other contract requirements shall be directed to Andrew Whitney (707)476-4809, awhitney@ co.humboldt.ca.us . Vector Rehabilitation reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in bids received, or to award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder complying with these instructions. Vector Rehabilitation reserves the right to award the contract to other than the lowest bidder if it appears that the best interests of the Vector Rehabilitation will be served thereby. 3/22/2012 (12-95)

 PUBLIC HEARING

The Northern Humboldt Indian Education Program, Title VII, will conduct a public hearing and Parent Committee meeting on Tuesday, March 27, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. in room 604 at McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Rd., McKinleyville, CA. All parents/guardians of American Indian/Alaska Native students enrolled in Trinidad, McKinleyville, Blue Lake, Pacific Union, Arcata, Big Lagoon, Jacoby Creek, Fieldbrook, and Northern Humboldt Union High School Districts and community members are invited to attend. The purpose of the hearing is to receive community input to the 2012-2013 Title VII Formula Grant. For more information contact the Indian Education Office at 839-6469. 3/22/2012 (12-85)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED DECEMBER 9, 2009, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOuld contact a lawyer

TS. NO. 139383-AH ON March 23, 2012 at 10:00 o’clock A.M. in the lobby of Humboldt Land Title Company, 1034 Sixth St., Eureka, CA County of Humboldt, State of California. HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, as Trustee under the Deed of Trust executed by Pacific Sunset Development, LLC, a California Limited Liability Company recorded on January 14, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-886-4 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, by reason of default in the payment or performance of obligations secured thereby including the breach or default, notice of which was recorded

legal NOTICES continued on next page

Field notes

A Urethra Runs Through It

BLADDER

PROSTATE

RECTUM

URETHRA

By Barry Evans

P

wikimedia/north coast Journal

West, Humboldt Meridian, described as follows: Parcel 2 of Parcel Map No. 2122 filed in Book 18 of Parcel Maps, Page 123, Humboldt County Records. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO. 400131-011-000. The unpaid balance and estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of March 12, 2012 is $70,892.36; said amount will increase until date of sale. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described herein is purported to be: 1535 Peninsula Dr., Arcata, Ca. 95521. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Dated: March 12, 2012 Beneficiary: Steven W. Sellers, Telephone: (707) 822-1866, Address: 110 Essex Lane, McKinleyville, CA 95519. HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, Trustee Address: 1034 Sixth Street, Eureka, CA 95501, Telephone (707) 443-0837. By: /s/ Sue E. Bosch, President

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com rostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, with the National Cancer Institute predicting about 242,000 new cases and 28,000 deaths in 2012. (For comparison, the institute estimates about 227,000 new cases of female breast cancer, with 40,000 deaths.) Until recently, conventional medical wisdom has been to identify prostate cancer early and treat it aggressively with surgery or targeted radiation. That wisdom is increasingly being challenged. For the past 25 years, doctors have urged men over 50 to be screened annually for prostate cancer by checking the concentration of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in their blood. A high reading suggests the presence of prostate cancer, with confirmation normally coming from a subsequent biopsy. As you might guess from the numbers above, this has led to a lot of treatments; worldwide, over 1 million men underwent surgery or radiation for prostate cancer following high PSA readings since the test was introduced in 1985. An article in February’s Scientific American summarizes current thinking, both about the usefulness of the PSA test specifically, and the value of screening for prostate cancer in general. For instance, after following nearly 1,500 men for 20 years (starting age between 50 and 69), a Swedish study published late last year in the British Medical Journal concludes, “the rate of death from prostate cancer did not differ significantly between men in the screening group and those in the [non-screened] control group.” As a result of this and other studies, the U.S. Preventative Task Force recently advised against the PSA test for most men. If the value of screening is questionable, what about treatment? Turns out, it’s both risky and possibly unnecessary. Of those 1 million men who were treated for prostate cancer after initial detection by the PSA test, over 5,000 died soon after treatment, while another 300,000 suffered impotence and/or incontinence. The problem is the prostate itself. Its whole

PENIS TESTICLE

Pity the surgeon whose goal is to remove a cancerous Prostate while not inflicting imPotence or incontinence on the Patient.

purpose for existence is to help reproduction by secreting the alkaline portion of semen in order to neutralize the vagina’s acidity. As such, it sits right behind the penis and under the bladder, with the urethra passing right through the middle of it. This means it’s virtually impossible to surgically remove the walnut-sized gland without risking severed nerves and blood vessels. (Nearly half of patients one year after surgery reported that the side-effects were worse than their expectations.) Radiation is no panacea, either, since the high-energy rays can damage the surrounding area due to “scattering.” Unfortunately, many men have unrealistically high expectations for treatment Immediate treatment has been the standard option when prostate cancer was detected, but today more and more doctors are advising a wait-and-see approach. This is especially true in the case of what’s sometimes referred to as an “indolent tumor” (rather than “slow-growing cancer”). Such a tumor is still cancerous, but is growing so slowly — if at all — that keeping an eye on it with regular PSA testing, and follow-up biopsies if indicated, may be a better option than cutting or nuking. Truth is, most of us guys either have, or will have, prostate cancer — but we won’t die of it. Autopsies consistently show that over half of men in their 50s, and three-quarters of men in their 80s, had prostate cancer, but died of something else. Can anything be done to prevent prostate cancer in the first place? An Australian study from 2003 supported the idea that frequent masturbation — especially for men in their 20s — might be helpful in preventing prostate cancer later in life, presumably by avoiding a build-up of potential carcinogens in the seminal duct: the “prostatic stagnation” hypothesis. The jury’s still out, but as the old lady said who was told that her chicken soup wouldn’t help a friend who had just died, “Won’t do any harm!” l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) is looking forward to a prostate cancerfree old age, based on his habits of 40 years ago.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012

35


continued from previous page. November 21, 2011 as Instrument No. 2011-23926-3 of said Official Records, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash in lawful money of the United States, without covenant or warranty, express or implied, as to title, possession, or encumbrances, for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, the interest conveyed to said Trustee by said Deed of Trust in property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California and described as: That portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 30, Township 7 North, Range 1 East, Humboldt Base and Meridian, described as follows: Lot 12 of Tract No. 612 recorded in Book 24 of Maps, pages 86 and 87, Humboldt County Records. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO. 511-481-032-000 The unpaid balance and estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of February 22, 2012 is $69,984.81; said amount will increase until date of sale. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described herein is purported to be: Lot 12 Sophie Lane, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Directions to the above property may be obtained by requesting same in writing from the beneficiary within 10 days from the first publication of this notice. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Dated: February 22, 2012 Beneficiary: Auric Thoele and Eileen Weppner Telephone: (707) 840-0482 Address: 1820 Heartwood Dr. McKInleyville, CA 95519 HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY a Corporation, Trustee Address: 1034 Sixth Street Eureka, CA 95501 Telephone: (707) 443-0837 By /s/ Sue E. Bosch, President 3/8, 3/15, 3/22/2012 (12-64)

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Mid/Town Storage intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the California Self-Storage Facility Act (Bus.& Prof. Code 21700-21716). Mid/Town Storage will sell property belonging to those listed below to satisfy an Owner’s Lien on stored property at public sale. Property will be auctioned by auctioneer Don Johnson, 707-443-4851, Bond# 9044453, on Saturday April 7th at 9:30 A.M. Sale will take place at 1649 Sutter Road, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Items to be sold but not limited to: Household furniture, misc housewares,

plastic totes & boxes, fish tank, lap top, flat screen TV, misc. electronics, toolbox, weights, toys, ladder, bicycles, camping equipment, musical instruments, speakers, generator, motorcycle helet, wheelchair and much more! Jacqueline Anderson, Unit # 183 Chris Cyphers, Unit # 413 Amy Dees, Unit # 293 Jeff Gier, Unit # 446 Jeff Gier, Unit # 469 Jeff Gier, Unit #424 Jeff Gier, Unit # 547 Travis Hash, Unit # 558 Caleb Johnson, Unit # 578 Sarah Jones, Unit #130 Jennifer Kline, Unit # 179 Eleanora Lanzo, Unit # 225 Peace Light a.k.a. Paul Ingle, Unit # 751 David Love, Unit # 2 Cassie Milligan, Unit # 431 Leanna Morrow, Unit # 285 Devora Norman, Unit # 601 Devora Norman, Unit # 462 Devora Norman, Unit # 426 Lonny Owsley, Unit # 545 Lana Pulver, Unit # 621 Raylynn Robinson, Unit # 618 Christy Sparacio, Unit # 34 Patty Stejskal, Unit #238 Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale and must be paid in CASH ONLY and a deposit is required. Anyone interested in attending must sign in at the office prior to 9:30 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as they are, where they are, and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obliged party. Sale will take place rain or shine. Bring flash light and pad lock or locks… For further information, please call (707) 839-1555 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/2012 (12-93)

SUMMONS

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CHARLES LEE ROSS YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: ALEXANDER J. BERKOWITZ NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/

selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Website (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and cost on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. CASE NUMBER: DR 110847 The name and address of the court is: SUPERIOR COURT OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney is: BRADFORD C. FLOYD (CSB# 136459), LAW OFFICE OF BRADFORD C FLOYD, 819 7TH STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501, (707) 445-9754 DATE: November 07, 2011 NOTICE TO THE PERSONS SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. Filed: February 23, 2012 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 3/1, 3/8, 3/15, 3/22/2012 (12-69)

SUMMONS

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: FRANK A. McKEE WHO IS DECEASED, THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF FRANK McKEE, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER SUCH DECEDENT, AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD ON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, THERETO, and DOES 1-99 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: NANCY SUE WOLF NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Website (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and cost on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. CASE NUMBER: DR 120077 The name and address of the court is: SUPERIOR COURT OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney is: CARLTON D. FLOYD, LAW OFFICE OF BRADFORD C FLOYD, 819 7TH STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501, (707) 445-9754 DATE: February 3, 2012 NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. Filed: February 23, 2012 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 3/1, 3/8, 3/15, 3/22/2012 (12-68)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00138

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00145

The following persons are doing business as WHIPLASH CURVE at 423 First Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Eleanor Mae Mattingly P.O. Box 334, 133 Acacia Dr. Blue Lake, CA 95525 Bonnie Lee Stephens P.O. Box 334, 133 Acacia Dr. Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by State or Local Registered Domestic Partners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/15/12 /s Bonnie Lee Stephens. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 06, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-91 )

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00161

The following person is doing business as REDWOOD ORGANICS/ CELEBRATIONS at 100 Ericson Ct., Unit 130, Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 5108, Arcata, CA 95518. Elizabeth Nester 802 Hiller Rd., Unit A McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Elizabeth Nester. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-94)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00169

The following person is doing business as ROSES AND CREAM STUDIO at 3017 L St., Eureka, CA 95501. Anna Duffy 3017 L St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Anna Duffy. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 02, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing business as MIKKI MOVES REAL ESTATE, INC. at 805 7TH St., Eureka, CA 95501. Mikki Moves Real Estate, Inc 6215 Marge Ct. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/15/2012. /s Michelle Cardoza. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 13, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-90 )

3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-89)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00171

The following person is doing business as MIKKI MOVES REAL ESTATE at 805 7TH St., Eureka, CA 95501. Michelle Cardoza 6215 Marge Ct. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/4/12. /s Michelle Cardoza. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-88 )

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00132

The following person is doing business as NATUWALL at 2351 Scenic Drive, Trinidad, CA 95570. Steven Simoes Regalo 2351 Scenic Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/29/2012. /s Steven Simoes Regalo. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 29, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/15, 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/2012 (12-82)

  FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00140

The following persons are doing business as OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING at 203 F St., Eureka, CA 95501. Kenneth Bruce Norman 3025 Stover Rd. Blue Lake, CA 95525 Sara Debora Norman 3025 Stover Rd. Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Sara D. Norman. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

Did you know?

3/15, 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/2012 (12-80)

that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices”

@ www.northcoastjournal.com


The following person is doing business as ARCATA HOLISTIC HEALTH CENTER at 940 9th St., Arcata, CA 95521. Thomas Kent Edrington 2475 Redwood St., #3 Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Thomas Edrington. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 8, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/15, 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/2012 (12-84 )

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00104

The following person is doing business as tHats FABULOUS at 645 Elizabeth Dr., Arcata, CA 95521. Trillium Smith 645 Elizabeth Dr. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Trillium Smith. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/8, 3/15, 3/22, 3/29/2012 (12-72)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00118

The following person is doing business as LATTE LOVE at 2228 4th St., Eureka, CA 95501, 1240 Mason Way, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Shanell Beyzade 1240 Mason Way McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/22/12. /s Shanell Beyzade. This statement was filed with the

The following person is doing business as DOWN UNDER/ACQUISITIONERS LIMITED at 265 Idlewood Lane, Trinidad, CA 95570, P.O. Box 12, Orick, CA 95555. Ronald Stanley Plotnick 265 Idlewood Lane, #4 Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Ron Plotnick. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 29, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/8, 3/15, 3/22, 3/29/2012 (12-73)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00137

The following persons are doing business as SO MANY DEALZ at 1926 C Ave., Mckinleyville, CA 95519. Hilary Morse 1926 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Cornelius Van 1926 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Hilary Morse. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 2, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/8, 3/15, 3/22, 3/29/2012 (12-77)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00119

The following person is doing business as AFROMASSIVE at 420 California St., #26, Arcata, CA 95521. Chris Noonan 420 California St., #26 Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Chris Noonan. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 22, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

3/8, 3/15, 3/22/2012 (12-75)

3/1, 3/8, 3/15, 3/22/2012 (12-65)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ANITA JO SHERWOOD CASE NO. PR120051

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ANITA JO SHERWOOD. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SHERRI IFVERSEN in the Superior Court of California, County

Curious about legal advertising? 442-1400

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

28. Run smoothly 29. ____-mo 30. Yahoo! rival 31. Make ____ dash for 33. Chemical suffix 35. “The Andy Griffith Show” boy 39. Toys that might answer “Without a doubt” 44. Oscar winner Patricia 45. Lord’s Prayer start 46. Arizona city 47. “The Raven” writer’s monogram 50. Untruth 52. No problem, at NASA

53. Mainstays at country-western bars 59. “For those listening ____ home ...” 60. Smokestack emission 61. PC-to-PC system 62. See 17-Across 68. “Wrong!” 69. Suffix with stink 70. “We, the people of ____” (phrase in Ireland’s constitution) 71. Huffs 72. “The Wanderer” singer 73. Eyeglass frames

DOWN

19. Hercules sailed on it 23. Impact sound 24. Not perfect 25. Persona 26. Rice-a-____ 27. Gooey mass 32. Diego’s day 34. Sense of self 36. Jenna’s role on “The Office” 37. Relating to the intestines 38. Mexico City daily 40. 1960 Lawrence Durrell novel 41. Waisted talent? 42. 13-figure number 43. Nordstrom rival

48. Study of the body: Abbr. 49. Directed a cry of contempt at 51. “Voice of Israel” author 53. Appearances 54. Name in a 2001 accounting scandal 55. “C’mon ... please?” 56. Explosive ‘50s trial 57. Oteri of “Saturday Night Live” 58. Half of “The Odd Couple” 63. Call for help 64. ____ goo gai pan 65. 2006 Nintendo release 66. Hurler’s asset 67. “For sure

1. School year division 5. Part of a window frame 9. Peer 14. “That’s ____ haven’t heard!” 15. Nevada’s ____ 51 16. Grand Canyon transport 17. Author who once summarized the works of 62-Across using the ends of 23-, 39- and 53-Across 20. “____ dreaming?” 21. Wheels 22. Prefix with prompter 23. 1957 Dell-Vikings hit

1. “Mazel ____!” 2. Bigger picture: Abbr. 3. Stephen of “V for Vendetta” 4. King with a golden touch 5. Curtis of cinema 6. NPR’s Shapiro 7. Sarkozy’s thanks 8. One of a bunch 9. Recede 10. Dealer’s offering 11. “Family Matters” nerd 12. “I’m on ____!” 13. Is crazy about 18. Little rascals

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

HARD #10

www.sudoku.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00149

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00131

Solution, tips and computer program at

3/15, 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/2012 (12-81)

3/8, 3/15, 3/22, 3/29/2012 (12-78)

of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SHERRI IFVERSEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on March 29, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES STOKES, ROWE, HAMER & KAUFMAN LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 MARCH 1, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HU™MBOLDT

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

The following persons are doing business as TAMALII COMADRES at 455 Bayside Ct., Apt. B, Arcata, CA 95521. Megan Maire Davis 455 Bayside Ct., Apt. B Arcata, CA 95521 Michael Anthony Horcasitas 455 Bayside Ct., Apt. B Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/5/2012. /s Megan Davis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 5, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 22, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00142

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 22, 2012

37


the

Employment

HOT JOBS!

POLICE CHIEF CIty OF EurEka

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866

annual salary range up to $133,260

eurekaca.expresspros.com

This department head classification oversees, directs and participates in all activities of the Police Department, including short- and long-range planning, development, and administration. This class provides assistance to the City Manager in a variety of administrative, coordinative, analytical and liaison capacities. Successful performance of the work requires knowledge of public policy, municipal functions and activities, including the role of an elected City Council, and the ability to develop, oversee and implement projects and programs in a variety of areas. Responsibilities include coordinating the activities of the department with those of other departments and agencies and managing and overseeing the complex and varied functions of the department. The incumbent is accountable for accomplishing departmental planning and operational goals and objectives and for furthering City goals and objectives within general policy guidelines. Assignments allow for a high degree of administration discretion in their execution. For a complete application packet, please contact the Personnel Department at 531 K Street, Eureka, or call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request that one be mailed to you. A job description is available on line at www. ci.eureka.ca.gov. We will be accepting applications until 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 30, 2012.

COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER CITy Of EUREkA

Laborers with transportation needed! Must be in good physical condition and able to pass a pre-employment drug test.

SUPERVISING MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN County of Humboldt

Player’s Club Supervisor, Hotel Room Inspector, Sushi Roller, Laundry Attendant, Guest Room Attendant and more! To apply, simply visit the Human Resources office at the casino. For directions, current listings and other information visit www.bluelakecasino.com/careers.

$5,135 - $6,590 Monthly Plus Excellent Benefits

Plan, organize, coordinate, supervise and evaluate the activities of assigned mental health program staff; provide clinical supervision; participate in developing and implementing goals, objectives, policies and procedures for assigned area of responsibility. Eligibility list will be used to fill vacant positions for both Youth and Adult assignments. Qualified candidates must possess an appropriate license to practice as an LCSW, MFT or Clinical Psychologist in the State of California and have at least two years of post licensure therapy experience. Must possess a valid California driver’s license. Final filing date: March 30, 2012. Applications available at Humboldt County Personnel, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, CA or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

PSYCHIATRIC MID-LEVEL PRACTITIONER County of Humboldt

$2,963-$3,604/month Excellent benefits

$6,238 - $8,005 Monthly

Would you like the opportunity to make a difference, save lives, and make our community a better place to live? Our dispatchers work in a positive and professional environment that provides opportunities for growth. The City’s modern dispatch center includes 6 dispatch consoles with a userfriendly computerized dispatch system. This is an entrylevel position, no experience is needed, and on-the-job training will be provided. Tasks include taking 911 calls and dispatching police, fire and medical personnel following prescribed procedures, and other related duties. The ability to multi-task and work with others in a fast-paced environment is beneficial.

Assess and evaluate the health care and psychiatric needs of patients in an in-patient psychiatric health facility. Develop, recommend and perform treatment plans. Conduct complete physical and mental assessments. Prescribe medication under protocol. Requires experience and knowledge of principles and practices of psychiatric treatment, extended role nursing, and medical protocols and treatment use. Qualified candidates must possess a valid California license to practice as a Nurse Practitioner and a valid furnishing certificate to issue drugs and devices.

For a complete application packet, please contact the Personnel Department at 531 K Street, Eureka, or call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request that one be mailed to you. A job description is available on line at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. We will be accepting applications until 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 23, 2012.

Looking for fun and friendly people to fill a variety of positions. Current job opportunities:

Plus Excellent Benefits

Applications available at Personnel, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, MARCH 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Area 1 Agency on Aging

CONTRACT MANAGER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Eureka, California

Responsible for grant and contract development and Responsible for overall Agency operations management; developing, evaluating including planning, finance, personnel, clientand services, facility management and compliance for this senior servicenon-profit programs; data analysis and organization. reporting. Help to develop a comprehensive and BA or BS required, Masters preferred, with 3 years responsible administrative or management coordinated system of services for seniors in Del experience. Norte and Humboldt Counties. FT/excellent benefits. Salary range $64,000 to $80,000 DOE.

benefits. Job description andArea 1 For jobCompetitive description/application, contact application at www.a1aa.org. Agency on Aging at 442-3763. To find out more Deadline for submitting applications is March 26. about the organization, visit it online at www.a1aa.org. Application deadline 4:30 p.m., June 6, 2005

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE. Most people listen to radio just about everyday, and a few lucky individuals get to call radio a career. The Bay 95.5 is looking for a sales superstar! Are you ready to step in and move the ball forward? Are you a positive self starter with an eye for detail and a creative edge? Then this job might be the one for you! The Bay 95.5 is actively recruiting for this position. Are you the individual we are looking for? Email your resume in confidence to sales at employment@ kbae955.com, fax to (707) 4429556 or apply in person at The Bay 95.5 studio, 428 C Street, Suite K, in downtown Eureka. (E-0322) AIRLINES ARE HIRING. Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 242-3214 (E-0322)

SEEKING LICENSED ESTHETICIAN. Independent contractor/ space rent. All natural products only. Established clientele & new referrals. Amazing space, retail space, ocean view, Summer tourist season. Contact (707) 498-0909 or taunusk@earthlink.net. (E-0322) PT STAFF HERBALIST. Humboldt Herbals. Ideal candidate is a certified herbalist with a happy, self-motivated disposition who enjoys the fast pace of a retail environment. Excellent customer service skills, retail experience. 3 weekdays and every-other Sat. from 10-6. Mail resume, references, and letter of interest to 300 2nd St., Eureka, CA, 95501. (707) 442-3541. (E-0322) EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool. com. (E-0322)

Hiring? Place your ad online!


CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

Rentals

Employment

HUMAN RESOURCES DATA ADMINISTRATOR Dynamic international organization seeks to fill full-time, fully-benefitted position managing personnel data, performing HR generalist duties and supporting global recruitment Ideal candidate has: • 3+ years administrative support experience, preferably in Human Resources • Strong experience working with relational database programs required, preferably an HRIS • Proven ability to handle confidential information and Strong written communication skills

For more details and to apply, visit www.internews.org/about/employment No Calls Please. EOE M/F/D/V

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care. RN CLINIC COORDINATOR Requires current CA RN license, CPR and 2-4 years of supervisory experience in a medical facility as well as strong computer skills, EMR preferred. MEDICAL ASSISTANT (Experienced), 1 F/T Eureka Must be able to work with a variety of specialty clinics including pediatrics, diabetes, nephrology, psychiatry and gynecology. Strong teamwork and computer skills as well as three years related experience and/or training in a medical setting

Open Door Community Health Centers offers great benefits, competitive compensation and a rewarding work environment. Application may be downloaded from: www.opendoorhealth.com PLEASE submit complete applications (EOE) To: Carolyn Webb, Human Resources Manager Open Door Community Health Centers, 670 Ninth Street, Suite 203, Arcata, CA 95521 (707) 826-8633, ext. 5140, FAX (707) 826-8628 cwebb@opendoorhealth.com

GRANTS ANd CONTRACTS ANALYST

Dynamic international organization seeks experienced contract manager to provide oversight of federal and private grants for international programs in media development. Seeking to fill full-time, fully-benefitted Grants and Contracts Analyst position to provide administrative, financial, and contractual analysis and grants management for a diverse international portfolio.

Ideal candidate has: • Significant experience with federal contract, grant, and subgrant management • Experience in and aptitude for accounting and financial analysis, including grant budgeting • Experience in proposal, grant, and contract writing and editing • Experience in procurement of goods and services, including development and evaluation of RFPs/RFQs • Experience in USG funder regulations For more details and to apply, visit www.internews.org/about/employment No Calls Please. EOE M/F/d/V

THE HSU DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS. Seeks applicants with the qualifications and ability to teach a variety of economic courses, but particularly History of Economic Thought. Applications must be received by April 1, 2012. For more information visit: http://www.humboldt.edu/ aps/employment/pool.html. (E-0329) HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN) (E-0607) FULL TIME HOUSE CLEANING POSITION. Available with Dependable Cleaning. Mon.-Fri. No evenings or weekends. Bilingual a plus.Valid license and reliable vehicle required. Email clean@dependablecleaning.biz and leave name, phone number and best time to call. (E-0322)

www.northcoastjournal.com

FT LEGAL ASSISTANT/LEGAL SECRETARY. For established Eureka Law Office. Prefer family law experience, but will consider other legal experience. Salary commensurate with skills/experience. Benefits available. Must be proficient in all law office procedures, equipment and programs. Must be a team player. Provide resumes to: Davis & Poovey, Inc., 937 Sixth St., Eureka, CA 95501. Email: info@davisandpoovey. com. (E-0322) PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) (E-0607) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-6102. (E-1227)

Rentals

FORTUNA TOWNHOUSE. 2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH, appliances, garbage paid, carport, w/d hook-up, patio. $800 mo., plus sec. deposit. No pets, (707) 725-6293 (R-0412) WILLOW CREEK 2BD/2BA. On riverfront acreage, beautiful quiet setting. $950/month, (360) 790-4428. (R-0322)

BY THE BAY & OLD TOWN. Eureka 1BD/1BA Apartment. $650/month, $1000/deposit. No Smoking/Pets. W/S/G paid. References required. 445-4679. (R-0322) CENTRAL EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. For rent in 55+ family home. $750/month. No smoking, no pets. Call (707) 8456110. (R-0322) EUREKA APARTMENT. 613 Laura Ln., #2. Vacant Now. No Smoking unit. Water/Sewer/Garbage Paid. Super Downtown Location. Fun, funky & cool. Upstairs 1bd/1ba features skylight. Kitchen has range & refrigerator, gas heat. Carpet, linoleum flooring, street parking. No pets. 12 month lease, Rent $600, Deposit $800. Cross street G. Professional Consolidated Property Management, 3109 H St., Eureka. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0322) EUREKA APARTMENT. 2266 Redwood St., #B. Vacant March 21. W/S/G & hotwater Paid. Sunny Cutten, near Sequoia Park & Zoo, shopping, gym and post office. Includes range, refrigerator, dishwasher, disposal, gas heat, coin wash laundry, off street parking. Will consider cat. Six month lease. Rent $750, $770 w/cat, Deposit $1000 or $1200 w/cat. Cross street Redwood. Professional Consolidated Property Management, 3109 H St., Eureka. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0322) EUREKA DUPLEXES. 3108 Glen St., #A & #B. $200 Move in Bonus! Vacant Now. Immaculate, spacious townhouse style duplex near shopping with 2.5 baths, range, refrigerator, dishwasher and microwave. W/D hookups, private fenced ground floor patio, upper deck has view of bay. Garage & off street parking. Six month lease. Rent $1295, Deposit $1700. Non smoking unit. Cross street Harris. Professional Consolidated Property Management, 3109 H St., Eureka. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-0322) EUREKA ROOM FOR RENT. 314 E St. Vacant Now. All utilities included. Super affordable rooms put you in the heart of Old Town! In secure building with shared laundry/kitchen/ baths. On-site manager. No pets. Month to month. #6, #7 Rent $350, Deposit $525, #3 Rent $395, Deposit $525. Professional Consolidated Property Management, 3109 H St., Eureka. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0322)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA STUDIO APARTMENT. 1140 E St., #23. Vacant March 5. Section 8 OK. Water/Sewer/Garbage Paid. Hillsdale Apartments. Cozy upstairs studio apartment will consider cat, has kitchen with range and refrigerator. Carpet and vinyl flooring, locked entry, off street parking. OSRM. Rent $515, Deposit $700, $850 w/ cat. Professional Consolidated Property Management, 3109 H St., Eureka. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-0322) SPACIOUS 2BD DUPLEX. With View. 3 miles south of Eureka. Garage, No Smoking/Pets. Garbage/ Water Paid. Availabe 4/1. $1000, 442-0082. (R-0322) BLUE LAKE SHARE. 1 room, $350per person; $700-deposit per person. Walk to fishing, swimming, hiking. Near Dell’Arte. 668-4041. (R-0322) ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-0531)

Business Rentals ARCATA SPACIOUS HEALING ARTS STUDIO. Quiet and beautiful, for rent part time. Call Alexandra, 822-5395. (BR-0614) MEDICAL/OFFICE BUILDING FOR LEASE. Across from General Hospital. 900 sf. Off street parking. Will remodel to suit. $800/ month. (707) 834-5952, Stodder Properties. (BR-0322) MCKINLEYVILLE DELUXE OFFICES. 1300 Hiller Road. New Building, Upstairs Suites, 700 & 750 sq.ft. Steve, 498-1342. (BR-0322) your ideal employee may be a Journal reader. 442-1400 VISA/ MC. Place your ad onlinle at www. northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, MARCH 22, 2012

39


Rentals

the Lodging/Travel

DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@ hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

on Page 43

Buy/Sell/Trade

Pets

USED , NEW & RARE

BOOKS

402 2nd Street • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

FLASHBACK 443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues.

Real Estate OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS. Come to the quaint town of Rio Rico Arizona to make your dreams come true. This hill top 2.2 acre lot situated in a residential area is a perfect haven to build a small eco-friendly home, grow fruits and vegetables year round and live a sustainable life. Make this the bridge to your future. Offered at $28,000.00. Deborah Van De Putte, Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty, (520) 282-1111 deborah.vandeputte@russlyon. com (RE-0426) MANUFACTURED HOME. 14 wide, 2bd/1ba, in Azalea Park, 2637 Hidden Terrace, McKinleyville. Lot 80x70. $26,000. (707) 838-7653. (RE-0329) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227) TRINITY VILLAGE 1.3 ACRES WITH CREEK. 3BD/2BA main house. PLUS: Guest House, Art Studio/Workshop, Pool, Sauna, 2 Car Garage, Amenities Galore. $385,000. Call Gale Packard Realty, Owner/Broker, (530) 629-4181. (RE-0329)

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Auto

2001 DODGE RAM. Extended cab, short bed, 4x4, excellent condition. $7500 obo, (707) 845-7410. (A-0322) CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0419) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at wwwhumboldtherbals.com (P-0223)

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

50% OFF SALE: SELECT MEN’S JACKETS

Services Weekly specials available on Facebook

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

3954 Jacobs Ave. Eureka 443-7397

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

KITS • $7 310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

Buy/Sell/Trade GLASSWARE & WINTER WEAR 1/2 OFF! At the Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. March 20-24. Helping Provide Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-0322) RUMMAGE SALE. At Coastal Grove Charter School. Fri., March 23, 5:30-8:30 p.m. & Sat., March 24, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Sat. Bag Sale at 2 p.m., Fill a bag for $5. (BST-0322) OLD WEST WOODEN ORE CART. Displayed on two railroad tracks. In very good condition . Very Rare. More Items. (707) 725-3228. (BST-0322)

Services

HOUSEHOLD MOVERS. Local moving company available to move several items, or an entire household to any destination. We have over 30 years experience. Free estimates, local references upon request. Humboldt Moving Company. Contact Sean Denmark, owner at (978) 501-6953, email: northbridgemanagement@yahoo.com. (S-0329) MAKING MEMORIES VIDEO. Personalized Videos, Personal Oral Histories. Pamela Hinrichs, 839-0231. (S-0405) HOUSE CLEANING BY JEANNIE. Residence $15/hour, Move-outs $20/hour. Call 445-2644. References Available. (S-0426) SPECIALIZED HANDYMAN & MAINTENANCE. Anything that needs to be repaired, replaced or maintained around your yard or home. Call Lance, 601-6507. (S-0329)

Pets

616 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com Mon-Fri 10-6 pm Sat 10-5pm

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Custom Pet Portraits by Sophia Dennler •

For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets

DEANNA’S CLEANING SERVICE. $15 hr. Residential, $20 hr. Move-Outs, Rentals & Estates, 2 hr.min. lic #8132, call 445-3610 (S-0517) AMUSING GAMES & AMAZING PERFORMANCES FOR ALL AGES. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) HOUSE CLEANING. Riana Terrill. Experienced, Reliable & Efficient to meet your needs. 668-5205, 499-1536. $15/hour. (S-0426) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0426) CATCH-LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY’S 25th Anniversary sale, 25% off all Weddings, Portraits and Events. (707) 845-4160 www. catch-light.com. (S-0913) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Rentals, Estates, Residential. Gift Certificates Available! Licensed & Bonded #3860. 707-444-2001. (S-0412)


body, mind

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

Sales

Service

Solutions

ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0809) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-0524) SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) A-1 STEAM CARPET CLEANING. Ask us about our $99.00 2 room special. Also now offering Green Guard 442-3229 ext 13 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227)

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

DISORGANIZED? HIRE A PRO! Paper, clutter, kitchens, closets. A.D.D. specialist. Experienced, Affordable, Friendly. Claire Josefine 268-8585. www.clairejosefine. com. (S-1227) MCKEEVER ENERGY AND ELECTRIC. Residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural. Electrical contracting and design. Renewable energy. Energy efficiency and sustainability. Energy consulting, documentation and field verification. Contact Nate McKeever at 707-822-0100 or info@mckeeverenergyandelectric.com or visit www.mckeeverenergyandelectric.com. Lic. # CA C10 876832 (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson Attorney DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc. FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

M-AUDIO PROKEYS 88. Premium stage piano. Custom wood stand. Sony speakers. $700 OBO, 6779410. (M-0329) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-0510) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0524) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

&Spirit

Music

Services

GIT YER VALSSAGE! Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage.

Community LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. Every day the number of people who have been hurt by a spiritual leader seems to grow. Visit http://lifetreecafe. com and join us at Lifetree Café this week to discuss being hurt by church. Sun., March 25, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@hotmail.com. (C-0322) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) TICKETS ON SALE FOR 32ND ANNUAL RIVER NIGHT. If a hillbilly/ charity event tickles your fancy, then River Night is the place for you! Summer LEAP, a program of the Boys and Girls Club, Annual River Night Sat., April 21, 7 p.m- 1 a.m., Portuguese Hall, 1138 11th St. Arcata and will include a benefit drawing, drinks, music and dancing. Beer provided by Mad River Brewery and dancing will be to the musical stylings of the Bret Harte Breakers, Steel Standing, Small Axe Ensemble and DJ Max Michael. Tickets available at Adventure’s Edge and Center Activities, 2 for $10 in advance. At the door, tickets will be $10 per person unless you arrive in your best hillbilly get-up, where tickets will be $8 per person. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-0329) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0726)

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

24-hour online verification

(707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642

www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012

41


body, mind ▼

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

&Spirit

Jolene Hayes

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems?

with Margy Emerson

Just need someone to talk to?

Certified

Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

Clinical Hypnotherapist

Facilitating Self-Empowerment & Healing Sunnybrae Professional Building 801 Crescent Way, Suite #3 Arcata, Ca 95521 (707) 499-9207 jolene-hayes@sbcglobal.net

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna

First Visit Only

Foot Reflexology Body Massage 218 F St, Old Town

268-5588

REBECCA PORTEOUS, LCSW. (LCS #18459) is opening a private therapy and counseling practice at 3135 Boeing Ave., Suite A1, McKinleyville. Experience working with a broad range of issues. Appointments, call 633-6145. (MB-0503) EXPERIENCE YOUR OWN WISDOM. Approach relationships, illnesses, & life challenges from the inside out. Discover the spiritual guidance embedded within your everyday experiences and/or dreams. Dream recall not necessary. With AnaLora Garrard, author of Your Dreams: Spiritual Messages in Pajamas. www. analora.com, 826-2647. (MB-0329) HOLISTIC HOUSECALLS. Acupuncture, Massage and Lifestyle Consultations in your home or office. Specializing in Pain Management, Sports Medicine, Women’s Health and Internal Medicine. Custom Chinese herb prescriptions available. (707) 267-7789, Lauren.L.LAc@gmail.com, www. wayoflifechinesemedicine.com. (MB-0329) FEELING STRESSED? ANXIOUS? DEPRESSED? OR JUST UNSURE? Maybe therapy can help. Let’s talk. I offer sliding scale psychotherapy in a safe, comfortable setting where you can confidentially unpack difficult feelings. 8 years experience, located in Eureka area. Sarah Goldberg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist, Lic #47032 (707) 205-9005, www.mysilverlaketherapy.com (MB-0531) SHAMANIC SPIRITUAL SUPPORT. For problem solving, health issues and supporting well-being with Michal Mugrage. Divination, soul-retrieval, energy clearing, heart-centered spirit release, or space clearing. Also offering spiritual mentoring and classes. www.thankful-heart.com (707) 407-7192. (MB-0426)

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

839-1244

_

do TERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719. (MB-0517) GAIL PASCOE, RN, MFC. CA license MFC 25083 is re-opening her private practice specializing in T.B.I. & other neurological problems, health challenges, anxiety and depression. Call 362-6951. (MB-0503) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0726) CRANIAL SACRAL THERAPY. Infused with Shiatsu, Quantum Touch Healing, Energywork. Crescent City, (517) 974-0460. (MB-0726) NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 268-0929. (MB-0426) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www. tarotofbecoming.com. (MB-0517) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0920) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0920)

Call 441-1484

MOSAIC MASSAGE. Customized pressure and style by Heather, Massage Therapist with 10 years experience. Swedish, Deep Tissue, Prenatal, Reflexology. Located at Om Shala Yoga, Arcata, (707) 362-2821 (MB-1227) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Mon. Club, 610 Main St. Every Tue. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (MB-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www.northcoastaikido. org. (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup. org. (MB-1227)

3 ProgrAMS:

• Tradtitional T’ai Chi

• T’ai Chi for Back Pain

and Arthritis • 42 Combined Forms

-private lessons availableFor Schedule and Fees: www.margaretemerson.com or

822-6508 Visit any class free!

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-1227)

body, mind &Spi r i t

5 OFF

$

LCS # 23232

Kim Moor, MFT #37499

11-Week Session

Starts Week of March 26

www. northcoastjournal.com

GRAND OPENING

CERTIFIED IN MASSAGE THERAPY & FOOT REFLEXOLOGY. Reidun Olsson, (707) 822-7247. (MB-0510) NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING/ FERTILITY AWARENESS CLASS. Safe, effective, fun, women & men, all ages. Call Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marla_joy@suddenlink. net (MB-0426) IF YOU USED YAZ/YASMIN/ OCELLA BIRTH CONTROL PILLS OR A NuvaRING VAGINAL RING CONTRACEPTIVE between 2001 and the present time and suffered a stroke or heart attack or developed blood clots, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800535-5727 (MB-0322) LEARN TO MANAGE YOUR MOOD. And feel good anytime with Neuro-Linguistic Programming. NLP Playshops, 6 p.m., 2nd and 4th Wednesdays. 920 Samoa Blvd., #223, Arcata. $10 drop-in fee. Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist, Life Coach & Master Practitioner of NLP. (707) 845-3749. www. ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-0322) REFLEXOLOGY CLASSES & WORKSHOPS. At the Center for Reflexology and Intuitive Healing Arts. Now accepting students to learn the art and practice of reflexology for personal and professional use. Call Alexandra, certified practitioner and instructor, 822-5395 or visit www.reflexologyinstruction. com. (MB-0614) JUPITERS LIGHT ASTROLOGY READING. The Sacred Geometry of Our Lives. Shakati L. Walsh, MA Spiritual Phychology, MS Educational Counseling. 1-800-ASK-Keen ext: 02466043 First 3 minutes are free (707) 616-3163, shakatiwalsk@yahoo. com

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

Martial Arts Academy Sunny Brae Shopping Ctr., Arcata


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

real estate

this week Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

www.communityrealty.net

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

real estate

this week $365,000

$550,000

■ EUREKA

NEW TILE HEARTH AND LOPI WOODSTOVE IN THIS PRIVATE CUTTEN HOME. Excellent neighborhood for this 3 bd/2 ba home with about 1388 sqft, built in 1960, with a woodsy view. Wrap-around deck. All located on a half-acre parcel. Seller negotiable. mls# 234525 $229,000.

839-9093

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

2 bed, 2.5 bath, 1,868 sq ft wonderful country property in Elk River, 9.26 acres, two wood stoves, lovely knotty pine accents, porch & decking w/views, 1800 sq ft shop, out buildings, & old barn

2 bed, 2 bath, 1,367 sq ft private home on Fickle Hill with 2.5 acres, private lane, lots of redwoods, potential for beautiful views, large sunny deck, hot tub, lots of natural light, upstairs den

$319,000

Great Arcata triplex close to shopping, each unit has its own address, each one as two large bedrooms, hardwood floors, and has a very low vacancy rate, total square footage is 2,160

real estate

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

“WE WORK FOR YOU.”

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Pitt River Single Family Home

Real Estate Loan Rates offered by Northern Redwood FCU

+/-61 acres by the pitt River in Shasta County. newer 2000 square foot 3 bedroom/2 bathroom home, hydro- electric power, year round creek, southern exposure. over 750 thousand board feet of merchantable timber. Gorgeous hideaway location only one hour from Redding.

Funded through C.U. Members Mortgage 15 Year Fixed Rate 30 Year Fixed Rate Rate - 4.125%  APR - 4.316%

Rate - 3.375%  APR - 3.707%

$ 375,000

10 Year Fixed Rate Rate - 3.250%  APR - 3.730%

F.H.A

FHA 30 Year Rate

V.A.

Federal VA 30 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 4.125%  APR - 4.526% *These rates are subject to change daily. Subject to C.U. Members Mortgage Disclaimers. Up to $417,000.00

Rate - 3.875%  APR - 4.838%

1270 GIUNTOLI LANE, ARCATA or 707-822-5902 northernredwoodfcu.org

Weitchpec Land/Property

Eel River Land

$ 250,000

$ 125,000

+/-40 acres near Weitchpec. this amazing parcel boasts two flats, large year round creek, 20x30 ft. cabin, gradual sloping elevation, southwest exposure, great access and amazing views.

neW L

IStInG

!

+/-1.5 acres on the eel River in Redcrest. this beautiful private property has a combination of flat meadows and trees, river frontage, and amazing views.

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, march 22, 2012

43


SPRING HAS SPRUNG! MARCH 20TH - 27TH

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BUY 3 AND GET THE 4TH FOR FREE! Bareroot Trees 25% off

Soy Bean Candles 30% off

Rhododendron 1 gallon 3 for $20 reg. $9.99 ea Over 600 to choose from! Solar Stakes 3 for $20 reg. $9.99 Classic Digging Forks $ 15.99 reg. $29.99 Suet Cakes (11 ¾ oz.)$.99 reg. $1.99

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www.millerfarmsnursery.com  1828 Central Ave.  McKinleyville  839-1571 x5 Mon-Sat 8:30-5:30, Sun 10:00-4:00 (Nursery Only)


North Coast Journal 03-22-12 Edition