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8 Fixing broken seals 10 Kaimania! 21 Drink your fruit 22 ATL serves Leftover 30 Where to Valentine 35 Tunneling with Barry


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table of 5 Mailbox 6 Poem To Capture the Fleeting

8 News Struggling to Save Seals

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover By the Breach

18 Home & Garden Service Directory

21 The Drunken Botanist Unusual and Amazing Fruit

22 The Hum pioneers

24 Music & More! 26 In Review a book

26 McKinleyville Art Night friday, feb. 15, 6-8 p.m.

27 Calendar 30 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

31 Filmland Soderbergh Scores

32 Workshops 35 Field Notes The Loleta Tunnel

36 Sudoku 36 Crossword 38 Marketplace 42 Body, Mind & Spirit 43 Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013

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4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


Money Makes Music Editor: There’s no coincidence Humboldt’s luthiers are thriving (“Making Wood Sing,” Feb. 7). Music for generations has been indelibly integrated in Arcata School District’s curriculum. Thanks to Arcata’s voters and the passage of the District’s revenue measures, music and art programs are here to stay and getting stronger. Without a child’s appreciation and understanding of music and art, there would be no stories about luthiers in Humboldt County — what an un-wonderful world that would be. Because voters cared, our schools will be able to add teachers and aides to ensure that our class sizes stay small and get smaller. Our schools are able to keep at full strength their music, art and dance programs. Arcata School District fosters the appreciation of music with its award-winning music programs. We’ll be able to upgrade our classrooms including the completion of our Sunny Brae Middle School science and library complex, which will be available for our music and art programs. We’re even starting a fully accredited top-notch preschool this fall at our el-

ementary school campus that will provide children a seamless integration into kindergarten. Preschoolers will get an even earlier appreciation of music and art. For parents looking for schools for their kindergarteners, check us out. Our schools have always been the premier schools in Humboldt County. Thanks to Arcata voters, we expect to excel even further with smaller classrooms, more aides and lots of music and art. A well-run and well-funded public school is one that provides an equal opportunity to every child regardless of economic, social or cultural background. A good community is one that supports the enrichment of their public schools. Feel proud, Arcata. Keep the luthiers coming. Jeffrey Schwartz, Arcata

Sorry, old man Editor: Thanks to Bob Doran for his feature article on Humboldt County’s luthiers. I’ve been proud of these guys for years. They are well-known internationally, and it’s good to see them get some recognition on their home turf. As the owner of a Eureka music store from 1976-1999, I’ve known Mark Platin, Steve Helgeson, Phil Crump and Ken Lawrence for a long time and have followed their careers closely. I’ve relied on their expertise over the years for difficult repairs

on fine instruments and referred many customers to them as well. Unfortunately for us but not for them, as their skills progressed and their reputations grew, they became more reluctant to repair other people’s instruments, preferring instead to build their own. It reminds me of the following story: Some years ago, Hartley Peavey of Peavey Electronics was in secret negotiations to buy the Gibson Guitar Company, but he broke it off and committed himself to building his own brand, saying, “It’s a lot more fun to make a new baby than to resuscitate an old man.” Rus Krause, Arcata

Picking on pickers Editor: With yet another cartoon picking on trash pickers who frequent the alleys of Eureka, I can’t help but wonder if Mr. Mielke has a bit of an obsession about his trash (“Recycling Eureka Style,” Feb. 7).

Cartoon by joel mielke

His premise: Eureka residents put out trash which is then picked by those who take “things of value” from the bins, followed by the Recology pick, resulting in a bill for services. It is positively Karl Rovian continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013

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in its perverse presentation of information. As depicted, the sequence sways the viewer into thinking hapless pickers are absconding with trash of “value” while residents are stuck with a bill. A few points of clarification: Recology bills for trash services regardless of picked or non-picked bin status. Recology increases fees if a resident’s trash exceeds a limit; that means pickers are actually diminishing a resident’s volume and perhaps saving money for the bill payer. Trash is trash. If you put it in the bin, it does not have any value to you. If it has value to you, it isn’t trash. Monitoring your trash or believing it has value commences a downward spiral — can you say “hoarder”? Does the fact that folks must resort to trash picking make you wonder about the state of our safety net and the growing inequality in America? Rather than focus on who is touching “his” trash, perhaps Mr. Mielke could take aim at those who created the tough times and conditions touching those who resort to picking through garbage. Sheila Evans, Eureka

A model inn

FALL 2013 MAndAtory KindergArten PArent inForMAtion Meeting

continued from previous page

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Editor: I moved to Caspar in 1985. My house was across the street from the Caspar (“R.I.P. Caspar Inn,” Feb. 7). When the wind was right, I could hear the music rockin’ out across the night. I could walk to the Caspar, the neon shimmering through the fog as my beacon — and I must admit, more than a few times, I crawled back home. Peter Lit owned the Caspar Inn then. He brought in some of the best in blues and rock. Ten years later, I bought the Riverwood Inn. The Caspar and the Riverwood could be roadhouse sisters. Caspar’s rooms are upstairs, the Riverwood’s are downstairs. No TV or phones in the rooms. Our web page warns that the rooms are noisy till closing time and on a band night, forget it. No sleep till the fat lady quits singing. When I bought the Riverwood Inn, the Caspar was my model to follow. Music, booze, rooms, food. Ah, but the front porch of the Caspar was a fragrant place. The Riverwood has a

front porch, too. I’m sorry to see the Caspar Inn close, and I hope it’s not forever. It has closed and opened before. So has the Riverwood. Keeping an old building up and running is a lot of work. The sound of a hammer has never stopped since I bought it. It’s a lot of work to keep a music venue up and running, too. Good bands aren’t cheap. It’s important to keep good live music venues going or the music will stop. Lots of bands will miss the Caspar. So, if you get nostalgic and want a place that can remind you, just a little, of the Caspar Inn, come on down to my place. We have Maker’s Mark, too. Loreen Eliason, Phillipsville

To Capture the Fleeting If you were a bird, you would be a pileated woodpecker: sharp and striking, red feathers glowing, poking in the rotten wood for bugs. If you were a snake, you would be a rubber boa: beautiful and harmless, docile in my hands.   If you were mine, I would love you more than dragonflies love summer.   But it is not so. You are a distant mountain, shrouded in mist. You are a wild ocean, never crossed. You are another galaxy, worlds away from mine.   You will never be tamed. — Amy Fontaine

www.northcoastjournal.com


Feb. 14, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 7

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Photo by Ken Bechtol.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013

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Fill Your Home

C omfort with

Mork, an abandoned northern fur seal pup, was rescued from a beach near Crescent City in December. PHOTO BY Deidre Pike

Struggling to Save Seals

Despite losing out on big grant, the Northcoast Marine Mammal Center helps needy pinnipeds By Deidre Pike

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8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

M

ork slides out of the pool, barks sharply and sails across his pen on all four flippers. The feisty northern fur seal pup bares sharp teeth and hisses at a camera — and the humans standing outside his pen. “He’s got a tremendous amount of attitude,” says Dennis Wood, founder of the Northcoast Marine Mammal Center in Crescent City. Attitude is a good thing. Seals like Mork are susceptible to building relationships with humans. That’s not a handy trait when the rehabilitated seals are released back into the wild. Northern fur seals are a protected species, hunted to the brink of extinction about a century ago. Mork was picked up Dec. 18 at a beach north of Crescent City. He had a sticky, tarry substance on his fur, which might have caused his mother to abandon him. He needed a bath and, weighing only 16 pounds, he needed some calories, says Wood, a local veterinarian. Wood and the center’s all-volunteer staff

cared for and fed Mork. Within six weeks, the pup’s weight doubled. Now he’s ready to be released at the beach where he was rescued, a short swim from Castle Rock National Wildlife Refuge. In late January, before his release, Mork is the lone patient in the center’s nine pens. The center’s gift shop is closed. The whole place is quiet and dark as Wood enters and disables an alarm. A broken X-ray machine — too old to be repaired — is pushed against a wall in the examination room. A room with a wall of cages for baby seals is empty for now. In the coming months, the cages will be filled with rescued seal pups — whether or not the center can afford to care for the animals. Last year, the Northcoast Marine Mammal Center didn’t receive federal funds to cover operating expenses and the salary of its sole paid employee, executive director Robyn Walker, who moved from Canada in March 2012 to take the job. Each year, the center applies for up to $100,000 in federal funding through the John


H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program. The grant is a competitive one, available to rescue organizations and research projects. The center received funds two years ago to upgrade its facility, raising walls between pens to deter cross-contamination and to increase the visual security of the animals. With no funds awarded last year, the center could no longer pay Walker. She worked through December and is now volunteering, intermittently, while looking for work. Walker has a master’s degree in coastal environmental management from Duke University. In her short time at the center, she gained hands-on experience with a variety of animals and was part of the team, with Wood, that disentangled a California grey whale in Humboldt Bay in May. She says she doesn’t regret moving here for the job. “It was a great experience,” she said. “I wouldn’t trade it.” Operating on a shoestring budget is nothing new, Wood says. The seal saviors of Humboldt and Del Norte counties have been helping marine animals since 1984, when folks reported stranded seals and sea lions to Ocean World Aquarium. As the aquarium’s vet, Wood assisted with rescues, stabilizing animals to be transported seven or eight hours to the closest marine mammal center in Marin County. In 1989, oil spill mitigation funds made possible the construction of the Northcoast Marine Mammal Center, with a medical treatment room, a harbor seal pup room, kitchen for food preparation and outdoor pens. Wood still donates his time and veterinarian skills. Volunteers from as far south as Garberville and north to the Oregon border investigate reports of stranded animals on beaches. Volunteers put up signs on beaches, monitor animals and help tote hefty marine mammals up steep paths out of, say, College Cove in Trinidad. Volunteers feed seal pups, scrub pens and work in the gift shop. Stranding coordinator Lynda Stockton, also a volunteer, answers the area’s marine mammal hotline 24-7.  “We put in our own time and sweat and sometimes our own money,” Stockton says. Rescues can be expensive. Feeding a baby seal for a couple of months can add up to hundreds of dollars. Harbor seal pupping season runs from mid-February through June. During this time, female harbor seals give birth to 10- to 15-pound pups, soft and round, with spotted fur. While mom goes out to fish, the babies are left alone on the beach. “They’re adorable,” Stockton says. “People want to pick them up, and that’s the last thing you should do.” If people think an animal’s in danger, they

shouldn’t try to intervene, she says. Instead, call the marine mammal stranding hotline, (707) 951-4722. Stay at least 100 yards away — that’s the law — and keep your pets on leashes. “Everybody wants to go right up and look at the seals,” Wood says. “They look like stuffed animals. They even make cute noises.” Wood is a veterinarian at All Creatures Animal Hospital in Crescent City. When he’s not caring for household pets — or the occasional injured wild creature dropped off in a bucket or garbage can — he’s examining seals, patching up wounds and planning rehab regimens. He’s also an authorized whale disentanglement specialist, and points out trophies — bits of ropes and buoys removed from the grey whale incident in May — that now adorn the center’s hallway. In an office, framed photos depict “graduating classes” of rescued marine mammals. During pupping season, the center will rescue, rehabilitate and release up to 30 harbor seal pups. That number should be four or five per year, Wood says. The villains? Dogs and human intervention. Dogs can quickly and easily injure seal pups. Even a peaceful dog-seal encounter might result in a seal pup being abandoned by a self-preserving mother. Also, humans might intervene — with the best of intentions — when they decide a baby seal needs help. Some people pick the seals up. Some try to transport the seals to the center. Not a good idea, Wood says, because they might hurt themselves, hurt the pup or separate it from its mother. “Would I ever presume to pick up an animal when I know nothing about it?” Wood asks. “No. But people do.” The result? A seal pup facing weeks or months of expensive feeding and rehab. Seal pups are fed wildlife milk formula supplemented with salmon oil. As soon as they are big enough, they’re fed high-calorie herring. The idea is to get some weight on them as quickly as possible. The work keeps the all-volunteer team busy through July. The food’s not cheap. As director, Walker promoted an Adopt-a-Seal program that asked donors to give $10 to feed a seal for one day. She also recruited volunteers. An online application is available at the center’s website, www.northcoastmmc. org. New volunteers can help out in any location — doing pretty much anything, she says. Training’s provided. Center volunteers say that limited funds won’t keep them from their mission. Stranded marine mammals in Humboldt and Del Norte will continue to be rescued. “Without the grant, it’s really tight,” Stockton says. “We’re not sure how we’re going to cover this season. But we will. We really care about the animals.” l

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Blog Jammin’

KAI AND KIMMEL, ON THE ROAD

BY ANDREW GOFF / FEB. 8, 3:04 P.M.

The Homefree Hitchhiker

Community Safety Watch

Dirty dryer vents are a leading cause of household fires Call now to have yours cleaned

Let’s assume you are familiar with the overnight hatchet-wielding memesation known as Kai the Homefree Hitchhiker, who earlier this week smash, smash, suhmashed his way into America’s idol-craving hearts. But why does this matter to you, Humboldtian? Well, as the Lost Coast Outpost noted earlier today, Kai’s personal Facebook page lists “Eureka, Calif.” as the place Kai “lives in.” So feel free to claim him as your hometown hero. His Facebook page even has a picure of him on the Arcata Plaza. Seeing Kai on the Plaza triggered something in my brain: I’ve totally run into this guy before. So I went back through my photos and, sure enough, found our hero in a series of shots I’d taken for the Journal’s “End of the World” Issue back in December. Kai kept quiet on his thoughts on Armageddon that day. Perhaps he knew better. Congrats on the fame, Kai. And if you do end up, as rumored, on Jimmy Kimmel Live in the near future, remind him that he owes us a visit. Update: Kai takes a ride with Jimmy Kimmel, and Kimmel lets Kai philosophize. Watch clips on the Journal blog. ● EUREKA, MONEY / BY BOB DORAN / FEB. 8, 1:14 P.M.

Eureka Wages To Rise?

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10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

The “Fair Wage Folks,” a local committee working to raise the minimum wage in Eureka to $12 an hour submitted petitions yesterday with signatures of about 2,700 voters. If enough pass muster, the Eureka Fair Wage Act could be on the ballot in June. “We look forward to about 1,400 of Eureka’s workers getting a raise,” said James Decker, one of the Fair Wage Folks, citing wage statistics from the latest census. “If

we make the spring ballot, that will happen in July 2013.” City Clerk Pam Powell will check the validity of the signatures. The minimum for consideration is 1,370, 10 percent of those who voted in the 2011 election; 15 percent speeds up the process. If the petitions meet either threshold, the clerk will present the ordinance to the city council. The council could pass it as written or opt to put it to a vote for the electorate. “We think it will go to a vote of the people, but anything is possible,” said Decker, noting that, in July 2012, the minimum wage increase was submitted to the city council and they voted against implementation. He sees a reversal as unlikely. If 2,055 signatures are valid, the matter must be put to a vote within 103 days, in the June election. If between 1,370 and 2,055 signatures are valid, the ordinance will be on the November 2014 ballot. The Eureka Fair Wage Act is modeled on a similar ordinance passed by voters in San Jose last November. San Jose’s Measure D raised the minimum wage to $10 an hour within the city. California’s minimum wage is $8 an hour; the federal minimum is $7.25. While San Jose’s ordinance is across the board — for all employers — the Eureka version would exempt businesses with fewer than 25 employees — “the mom and pops in Old Town” for example, said Decker. ● EDUCATION, INDIAN COUNTRY, YUROK / BY HEIDI WALTERS / FEB. 7, NOON

Speaking Yurok in LAT The Los Angeles Times writes about a new Yurok language program at Eureka High School, launched last fall, making Eureka High “the fifth and largest school in Northern California to launch a Yuroklanguage program” and “marking the latest victory in a Native American language revitalization program widely lauded as


DANCE / BY STEPHANIE SILVIA / FEB. 7, 11:27 A.M.

Hubbard Street Dance The members of Hubbard Street Dance Chicago inhabited choreographer Ohad Naharin’s emotive landscape earnestly and cleanly in their performance Feb. 5 at HSU’s Van Duzer Theater. Naharin, artistic director of Israel’s lush Batsheva Dance Company, reworked sections from earlier works, Three and Max, into the intricate piece Three to Max for Hubbard Street. Brilliantly accumulating movements ... the dancers captivated. As stunning as they were, the performance left an ache to know how Naharin’s own Batsheba Dance Company would perform his work. Sharon Eyal, choreographer for the second act of Tuesday’s program, is a former Batsheba company member who danced under Naharin for years. Some of the older master’s imprint is seen in how she scatters groups about the stage and sets quirky solos against a living backdrop. Eyal has stretched Naharin’s contrast of the classical against the pedestrian by adding rock, bluesy and house-party music. Eyal’s corp in Too Beaucoup was like a chorus line on acid, with women in platinum wigs, Dutch-girl style, men in spiky cuts, and all in nude unitards. The dancers were intensely focused, the choreography relentlessly attentive to the beat. Yet where Naharin kept me enthralled, Eyal lost me at times with too much repetition. ● AGRICULTURE, ENVIRONMENT, FISHERIES / BY RYAN BURNS / FEB. 6, 5:02 P.M.

“Tear Down The Dams” On Monday, the Associated Press published a story outlining the results of a U.S. Geological Survey study, which examined the likely effects of removing four

● ARTS / BY ANDREW GOFF / FEB. 5, 11:52 A.M.

Van Gogh Stolen

READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

dams on the Klamath River. The upshot? It’s a good idea. As AP reporter Jeff Barnard explains, federal scientists believe the $1 billion dam-removal project would restore the ecosystem, improve commercial fishing harvests and boost regional farm revenues: “Overall, the benefits far outweigh the costs, by as much as 47.6 to one, the report found.” Today, the San Francisco Chronicle’s editorial board called out an “Amen!,” encouraging Congress to “heed science over politics” and tear those suckers down. Oregon and California support dam removal, as does PacifiCorp, the company that owns the dams, along with a broad coalition of enviros, tribal leaders, fishermen and ranchers. A deal authorizing removal of the dams got hung up last year in the foul, fetid waters of Congress. “There are no other sensible options,” the Chron editorial states.

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

the most successful in the state.” The story notes there are about 300 basic Yurok speakers now, 17 of whom are fluent. Eureka High’s plan, it says, goes beyond mere language learning: “… the teacher and tribe have some longer-term goals: boosting Native American high school graduation rates and college admissions numbers; deepening the Yurok youths’ bonds to their culture; and ensuring that their language will regain prominence after half a century of virtual silence.”

Vincent van Gone! OK, it wasn’t by Vincent van Gogh, it was of van Gogh. But lame either way. Press release from the Eureka Police Department: On 2/5/13 EPD took a report of a stolen 2’ x 2’ oil painting on panel of Vincent van Gogh. It was painted in his impressionistic style by local artist Rachel Schlueter. It was stolen on February 5, 2013 between 9:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. from the C Street Studios (Second and C Streets) from the wall of the upstairs gallery area. If you know anything about this, call Suzie Owsley at the EPD: 441-4325 ext. 2#.

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013

11


By the Breach Creatures thrive in the shifting world of Stone Lagoon By Heidi Walters

E

ven from the car, skimming fast south on Highway 101 in late December as the dusk sky streaked orange, you could tell something was different about Stone Lagoon, shimmering there behind a flickering screen of trees. It was breached! The smooth, silvery oval surface had grown a narrow, turbulent funnel that cut through the sand spit. The lagoon rivered through; the ocean pushed in. This was exciting. Stone Lagoon doesn’t breach every year. Unlike Big Lagoon, the larger body to the south which might breach as much as seven times in a year, Stone might open one year then go several more without breaching. On New Year’s day, a small group of breach seekers walked roughly four miles from Dry Lagoon north to Stone Lagoon. They followed the pretty sandspit between marshy Dry and the steep-beached ocean, then ascended into the hilly peninsula between the two once-joined lagoons. The trail, muddy and grassy in turns, passed through shady spruce stands, white-green corridors of huge, lichened alder, cedars, redwoods, salal, salmon berry, thimbleberry. Ferns everywhere. Rashes of mushrooms clustered on mossy tree roots. Scaffoldings of thick

fungus plates rising up trunks. A pileated woodpecker knocked scarlet head into gray snag, chunking out square holes. In late summer and fall, the place would be thick with berries and bears. The group traversed down the slippery north side and emerged onto a slaty dark shore. It widened, changing to coarse pebbles and quartz chunks that grew finergrained as they walked westward. Marshy grass and dune mat spread south toward the peninsula. Recently exposed beach expanded to the new waterline, plastered occasionally by small white bivalve shells. Finally, the breach. They stood on a sturdy shelf of sand far back from the rupture. Below, smooth sand, crowded with gulls, fanned to the channel where the ocean pushed in. What was coming in with it? What was going out? What happened as the lagoon level dropped? And when it closed back up, what then? Also (just asking), could you grab a shovel or apply a heavy boot and, you know, dig the thing open if you felt so inclined — and should you? The answer to those last questions, to be agate-eyed clear, is yes you could (and people have) and no, you definitely shouldn’t — for many reasons, including that you could be sucked in and spit out into the tumbling cold ocean. Coastal lagoons are common (in the United States, there are far more on the Atlantic coast than the Pacific). But the four in Humboldt Lagoons State Park —

ON THE BREACHED SANDSPIT AT STONE LAGOON, NEW YEAR’S DAY 2013. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

ON THE COVER A WHITEHALL-STYLE ROWBOAT BUILT BY KEN BECHTOL, WHO OFTEN FINDS HIMSELF PEACEFULLY ALONE ON STONE LAGOON. PHOTO BY KEN BECHTOL

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Freshwater, Stone, Dry and Big — are unique in how they formed. And two of them, Big and Stone, might be the last naturally breaching lagoons in the state, said Michelle Gilroy, a biologist with AS THE LEVEL IN STONE LAGOON DROPS AFTER IT HAS BREACHED, the state Fish and A SHELL-PLASTERED SHORELINE EMERGES. PHOTO BY KEN MALCOMSON Wildlife department. They are unaltered by human-made structures. (Freshwater tonic plates that continues to this day. is bounded permanently by Highway 101. They are drowned river valleys created Dry, which state park ranger Greg Hall by low-angle, northwest-trending foldsaid has been filling up more lately, was and-thrust faults in the North American drained by early settlers to create land plate, said Humboldt State geology for crops and livestock.) professor Mark Hemphill-Haley, whose Stone Lagoon is the most enigmatic of work focuses on current earth movethe four. Freshwater is an easy adventure ments, such as earthquakes. These faults just off the highway. Big is enormous and occur as the Gorda plate shoves under much visited. Dry is a marsh — a nice rethe North American plate, at what’s called doubt for elk and bird watchers. Stone is the Cascadia subduction zone, causing it an astonishingly productive environment, to buckle. Anticlines (hills) and synclines better than the others, supporting more (valleys) form along these faults. than a dozen fish species — freshwater, A belt of these fold-and-thrust faults, saltwater and anadromous (which can live stretching from the Eel River Basin to a in both). It also has far more waterfowl little north of Freshwater Lagoon, crethan the other lagoons. And yet Stone’s ated such features as Humboldt Hill (an popularity, like its breaching regime, is anticline), Humboldt Bay (a syncline), and intermittent. Flurries of interest gapped the Humboldt lagoons, which formed in by long, quiet spells. the bottom of synclines where rivers run down to the ocean. “If you’re looking northwest towards formed in a mashup between several tecthe ocean over Big Lagoon, the fault as-

Humboldt’s lagoons


sociated with it would be along the northeast margin of the lagoon, and trends northwest,” Hemphill-Haley said. Same thing at Stone Lagoon. This particular fold-and-thrust belt is a unique structure. “We’re probably one of the only places where this fold-and-thrust belt is on land,” he said. “Usually it’s off shore.” What’s happening is the Pacific plate, south of us, is shoving northwestward against the North American plate (at the San Andreas Fault), pushing the southern end of the Cascadia subduction zone landward. It comes closest to shore near Humboldt. The spits closing off the lagoons are formed by ocean-borne sediments. As Humboldt State Professor Jeff Borgeld, a marine geologist who studies near-shore sediments, explains it, sediments flow out of the rivers and creeks, get transported by longshore currents and deposited by waves in a zig-zag fashion up and down the coast. The Eel River, Borgeld said, supplies 90 percent of the sediment shoring up the beaches and spits between False Cape and Moonstone Beach, with some more added by the Mad River. The Klamath River and Redwood Creek supply most of the sediment building the beaches and lagoon spits north of Big Lagoon.

Most of the time,

the lagoon is quiet. Wild quiet, that is. Sure, there’s Highway 101 over there, on the east shore. A small visitor’s center nearby (closed now), a boat launch and a cabin where a state park ranger sometimes lives. There’s also the little boat-in campground on the west shore, six spots nestled in a leafy bower of alder, willows and spruce. It, too, is closed these days — the state’s broke. But when it was open, you could row over with a batch of friends and, as the sun sank and the mist took over, it felt like you’d been flung into a remote past. The difficult access filtered out the bozos who’d bring stereos. And though you could still hear trucks on the highway, a mile away, their moaning on the down-

grades just sounded like ghostly harbingers of a distant future. There’ll be no other boats on the water, usually. At least, not when Ken Bechtol comes out here. Even on a weekend. Bechtol’s been coming to Stone Lagoon, on average, once a week for the past 10 years — twice a week most months, less often in the winter. He’ll bring a sailboat, sometimes, but more often one of the rowboats he built. Maybe the little white dory skiff, or perhaps one of the Whitehalls — elegant, 12- to 14-foot numbers patterned after the livery boats that used to ply back and forth between ships, delivering people and goods, in the 19th century’s New York Harbor. Usually he’ll row from the launch to the south end of the mile-and-a-half long spit. If it has breached, he’ll swing far to the side before landing. Then he’ll walk over and watch the lagoon communicating with the ocean. Then maybe he’ll row to the middle of the lagoon and stop. He doesn’t fish. Just watches. Listens. There will be muddles of bobbing black coots. Sleek, curved cormorants. Kingfishers, treelimb-perched then suddenly diving. Ospreys scooping up fish — each orienting the catch lengthwise in clutches so that bird and fish, aligned, cut neatly through the air. The fog might roll in low, opaque. But the lagoon is narrow, cozy within steep forested hills, and Bechtol is never lost. In the winter, the whole hillside to the east will bristle gray where thickets of deciduous trees stand leafless. In the spring it’ll turn brilliant green and stay green all summer. The otters show up for a couple of months, some years. There are two families; one, a family of four, hangs around a little rock on the west shore, near the campground. They’re elusive; one might poke a sleek head out of the water to eye you from 50 yards away, then slither back under water. Sometimes harbor seals swim in, when continued on next page

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continued from previous page the spit is breached. Bears often come down to the water, crossing the highway or descending from the hilly woods of the peninsula between Dry and Stone lagoons. There will be elk, when they’re not lounging on the grass by the Little Red School House nearby. Occasionally, Bechtol is popped from his reverie by gunshots: The duck hunters have arrived, in their boats (they can’t hunt on shore because it’s state park land. The waters of the lagoon, however, fall under state Fish and Wildlife jurisdiction). He might see park ranger Hall paddleboard over to check on someone’s hunting license. And once, for about 18 months, Bechtol’s solitude was frequently interupted by the exploits of a Coast Guard member, temporarily stationed at Humboldt Bay, who came to the lagoon with his performance kayak and whirred speedy laps around the bay. There will be moonlight paddlers. And regular bouts of swimmers in the summer. Every year, one particular group of swimmers — a competitive lot — will arrive, fill the parking lot with their fancy Humvees and such, and for two days challenge each other, swimming rapidly across the lagoon. Last July, Bechtol saw the Yurok jump dancers, something he’d never seen before. Nobody had, here on the lagoon anyway, in perhaps 135 years. There were at least six dugout redwood canoes. In several of them, men stood three abreast. They wore long dentalium shell necklaces and flared headresses whose broad, scarlet bands of pileated woodpecker feathers flashed against the misty gray-green landscape. The women, several sitting in one boat and one sitting

in the front of another, wore traditional ceremonial dresses. One of the men showed Bechtol, the curious boatmaker, the parts of a canoe, each representing a part of the human body. Heart. Kidneys. Lungs. Nose.

It was Christmas Eve,

1985. Dan Doble and a friend were flyfishing in the south end of Stone Lagoon, and they hadn’t had any strikes in a long while. They had just cast their lines out once more and, trolling along, were talking about heading to another part of the lagoon. Then Doble had a strike. “I thought I had hooked a steelhead,” he said by phone from his home in Eureka recently. He hauled it in. It was speckled like a steelhead. But it had two bright orange stripes under its jaw. “And when we saw the stripes, both of us were aghast. Neither one of us had ever seen a cutthroat that big.” It was 21 inches long. On their way home, they weighed the fish on a grocery scale at the market in Trinidad: seven pounds. After the holiday, Doble brought his catch to the state Fish and Game (now “Wildlife”) office. It had shrunk a bit by then and weighed in officially at five pounds, 10 ounces. It was still a new state record for coastal cutthroat trout, Doble said. “The fisheries biologist, Ron Warner, he examined it and he was very excited,” Doble recalled. “He made me a deal: He’d make me a fish print in exchange for letting him keep it for research.” Doble said if he caught such a big cut-

IN 1985, RON WARNER, A STATE FISHERIES BIOLOGIST, MADE THIS FISH PRINT OF A COASTAL CUTTHROAT TROUT CAUGHT BY DAN DOBLE. AT 21 INCHES AND FIVE POUNDS, THE FISH SET A NEW STATE RECORD AT THE TIME. PHOTO BY TERRAN WINSTON-DOBLE

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Stone Lagoon Watershed Aquatic Species List is not all inclusive. FISH

Federal ESA listed – Threatened: Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss

Redtail surf perch Amphistichus rhodoterus Saddleback gunnel Pholis ornata Staghorn sculpin Leptocottus armatus Starry flounder Platichthys stellatus Shiner surfperch Cymatogaster aggregata Threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus Topsmelt Atherinops affinis

Federal ESA and State CESA listed as Threatened: Coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

Fish species CDFW would like to determine if present — at times — in Stone Lagoon: Longfin smelt Spirinchus thaleichthys

California Fish Species of Special Concern: Coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki clarki Green sturgeon Acipenser medirostris

AMPHIBIANS

Other fish species noted as present: Jacksmelt Atherinopsis californiensis Northern anchovy Engraulis mordax Pacific herring Clupea pallasii Prickly sculpin Cottus asper

California Species of Special Concern: Coastal tailed frog Ascaphus truei Foothill yellow-legged frog Rana boylii Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora

Federal ESA listed – Endangered and California Fish Species of Special Concern: Tidewater goby Eucyclogobius newberryi

throat today, he’d kiss the fish on the nose and turn it loose. But it was a different time. Back then, you could use bait and barbs in the lagoon, kill and keep your catch. And the lagoon was stuffed with fish. (Today, while you can fish year-round on Stone Lagoon, you can only take two coastal cutthroat trout, no smaller than 14 inches, per day, and only with barbless hooks and artificial lures. You can’t keep any other salmonids — steelhead, Chinook, coho.) Brackish lagoons are naturally highly productive. But Stone Lagoon seems an

Coastal giant salamander Dicamptodon tenebrosus

SOURCE: CDFW EUREKA

especially good place for fish, and fish food. Fish and Game biologist Mike Berry wrote in a 1997 management plan that the roughly 500-acre Stone Lagoon (its size depends on whether it’s breached or not) supports 17 fish species, 16 of which are California natives. Many of these creatures are euryhaline, meaning they can exist over a wide range of salinity. Stone Lagoon ranges from 1 part per thousand salinity (when it hasn’t breached in awhile) to 33 parts per thousand (the ocean is 35), according to a 1996 report by Robert Markle, who was a Humboldt State graduate student at the time. Stone Lagoon also rarely goes anoxic — devoid of dissolved oxygen — Markle found. That happens when the denser salt water sinks to the bottom, along with organic matter, and a layer of fresh stays on top. As the organic matter decays it uses up the oxygen. This happens sometimes in Stone, but because it is fairly


concentrations of algae, invertebrates — including masses of polychete worms — zooplankton and little bait fish that the bigger fish gobble up. And, even when Stone Lagoon becomes almost entirely fresh water, it tends to lose its salinity so slowly that saltwater fish trapped in there have time to acclimate. “There’s an incredible list of fish that have been found there,” Taylor said. The first year Taylor sampled the lagoon, its spit had been closed for three years. It had almost no salt in it. He found brackish and saltwater fish species living just fine alongside freshwater species: sculpins (freshwater), anchovies, starry flounder, MAP OF THE LAGOONS IN HUMBOLDT LAGOONS STATE PARK. THE English sole, four DASHED LINES SHOW, ROUGHLY, THE LOCATIONS OF FOLD-ANDspecies of surf THRUST FAULTS THAT CREATED THE BASINS WHERE THE LAGOONS HAVE perch, surf smelt, FORMED. SOURCES: MARK HEMPHILL-HALEY, GOOGLE MAPS, CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS night smelt, green sturgeon, Pacific shallow (around 20 feet deep), the layers herring, American shad, tidewater and usually get mixed by wind in short time. In all four native Pacific salmon species — deeper Big Lagoon, the stratification tends coastal cutthroat trout, steelhead, coho to last longer. and Chinook. Ross Taylor, a fisheries biologist who “It was even documented that herconducted fish studies in Stone Lagoon’s ring were successfully spawning in Stone watershed in the early 1990s when he was Lagoon in nearly freshwater, at that time, at Humboldt State, said Stone has high which is almost unheard of,” Taylor said. LEFT A COASTAL CUTTHROAT TROUT SMOLT FROM THE TROUTBREEDING AND PLANTING DAYS AT MCDONALD CREEK AND STONE LAGOON IN THE EARLY 1990S. FAR LEFT ONE OF THE MANY STONE LAGOON STEELHEAD TROUT CAUGHT AT TRAP SITES ON MCDONALD CREEK IN 1992-93. PHOTOS BY ROSS TAYLOR.

In 1985, when Doble caught his big fish, the lagoon was especially stuffed. Fish and Game had been stocking it with hundreds of thousands of hatchery fish since at least 1940 — mostly rainbow trout and steelhead (ocean-going, or anadromous, rainbows), Chinook salmon, coastal cutthroat trout and coho salmon. The fish came from hatcheries all over Northern California. Fisherman came from all over, too. There were fishing derbies. It was a different time. But attitudes were changing. And trouble — brewing for a long time in the lagoon’s humanimpacted watershed — couldn’t be masked much longer by indiscriminate fish stocking.

Humans have been

living at Stone Lagoon for thousands of years. Yurok people called the lagoon Cha-pekw ‘O Ket’oh and lived there yearround. The Europeans arrived, cleared land, built homes, diverted McDonald Creek into a channel, and drained the already marsh-tending Dry Lagoon to raise crops and graze livestock. They even dug for gold in the lagoon’s beach sands. And they renamed it, after a farmer from Massachusetts, William Stone. There were still lots of fish. From 1903 to 1904, Eleanor Ethel Tracy, a 23-year-old from Eureka, taught at the Stone Lagoon School. Her letters home were compiled in a book called Schoolma’am. On Nov. 19, 1903, she wrote that it had rained nearly two weeks straight after a long dry summer, and the salmon were running up the overflowing creeks. Her boy students fished on their breaks. “The fish don’t bite very well,” she wrote, “but today they had pitchforks, and so managed to land four fine, large ones.” After World War II, things got worse, as large-scale logging of old growth redwood commenced, said Don Allen, who’s director of the Redwood Community Action Agency’s natural resources division. He was just a field specialist back in 1983 when RCAA began the first major restoration projects on McDonald Creek. “The whole watershed was tractor logged in the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s,” Allen said. “The disturbance was pretty intense. Old aerial photos show that there were skid tractor trails everywhere — straight up the creek channels, straight up the slopes.” The already unstable land — uplifted ancient marine terraces, including the infamous Franciscan Complex “blue goo” — got that much more slip-slidey. Massive volumes of sediment — especially after continued on next page

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big storms blew out badly constructed roads and creek crossings — washed downstream, messing up creek spawning beds and filling in part of the lagoon. Other private landowners logged, built ponds, planted nonnative fish and grazed cattle along McDonald Creek and its north fork. There was even a private quarry, with a poorly built road, that supplied Caltrans with shale, Allen said. In the 1980s and ’90s, suddenly everybody was flocking to Stone Lagoon to try to fix it: California State Parks, which had been slowly buying up lagoon lands since 1931, state Fish and Game, landowners, RCAA, fishermen, university professors and their students, and more. RCAA planted trees along the cow-denuded lower creek lands and built fences to keep the cattle away. The Stone Lagoon Action Committee formed. Its members fixed bad creek crossings, recreated spawning habitat, and got non-native fish out of manmade ponds. They studied fish habits, lagoon salinity and other phenomena. And they tried to boost the population of coastal cutthroat. The species had declined in some areas of its range (which is from the Eel River in Humboldt County to the southern coast of Alaska). Before the stocking, it had probably dominated Stone Lagoon, said Terry Roelofs, a retired Humboldt State fisheries professor who, with graduate students, conducted studies there. Maybe the species could make a comeback there. That turned out to be tricky, even after Fish and Game stopped stocking non-local fish. It turned out that cutthroat were breeding with steelhead and producing hybrids. That rendered the first breeding attempts — in hatchboxes using eggs from fish in McDonald Creek — untrustworthy. The second attempt — hatchery raising pure-strain, wild cutthroat using eggs collected in uncompromised nearby watersheds — yielded mixed results.

The tens of thousands of introduced cutthroat thrived in the food-rich lagoon. “It was great fishing,” said Taylor, who was one of Roelof’s graduate students. “You could catch and release 30-50 fish a day. It was phenomenal.” But they still bred with steelhead in the creek; chances of a wild, self-sustaining cutthroat population, without hatchery help, seemed slim. Taylor thought the problem might be solved by removing some barriers in smaller tributaries in the upper watershed, where cutthroat could get away by themselves. Then, around 1994, everything stopped. A landowner balked at the finger-pointing at his troubled land and booted the restorationists off. And the tidewater goby, a tiny anadromous fish, had been listed federally as endangered. The feds worried that the introduced cutthroat might gobble the goby up. Since then, not a lot has happened fishwise at Stone Lagoon. Gilroy, the state Fish and Wildlife biologist, said limited salmonid restoration funds have been diverted largely to the state-listed endangered coho salmon in other watersheds.


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once stood, not far from where Stone Lagoon usually breaches. Women dancers sat in their canoes. Men dancers stood, three to a canoe, clasping hands with straight arms, raising them at times and then lowering them. And they boat danced across the water. On the other side, they left the canoes and walked across the highway, with state and national park personnel, highway patrollers and several hundred other people looking on, including descendants of people who used to live in the villages at Stone Lagoon. They danced in the field on the other side of the road. Then they climbed the ridge on counterclockwise from top left A dory skiff built by Ken Bechtol, ready for a spin around rebuilt ancient trails. Stone Lagoon. An old barn overtaken by On top, overlooking nature across the highway from Stone Stone Lagoon, they Lagoon. Even trees grow massive at Stone danced. Then, followLagoon, some seeming to try to octopus ing modern horse trails their way into the water. Photos by Ken Bechtol On some of the way, they the trail from Dry Lagoon to Stone Lagoon climbed another ridge, on a sunny winter’s day. Photo by Ken Malcomson and there danced. Hundreds of tribe members joined them at times, even But, she said, her agency wants to begin an elder in her mid-90s who walked the monitoring the lagoon again, in hopes of steep ridges with her family. They walked learning more about its fish — especially down to Redwood Creek, then up to Gans the longfin smelt, an anadromous fish the Prairie. Danced. And then the ceremony, state listed as threatened in 2009. She which began July 20 with the new moon said she hopes anglers will start filling out and ended July 29 close to the full moon, those fish surveys placed in boxes at the was done. lagoon. As well, the agency is keeping an This was just last year — the first time eye on the New Zealand mudsnail, which since the late 1800s that the people had recently invaded (see “Invasion of Big had their jump dance at Stone Lagoon. Lagoon,” June 2, 2011). The tribe hopes to revive a jump dance State parks, meanwhile, has focused on at Big Lagoon, next, said Chris Peters, a invasive plants, and has nearly erased them spiritual leader who is Yurok and Karuk. from the spit, said environmental scientist Traditionally, dancers from Big Lagoon and Michelle Forys. She and her crew are now Stone Lagoon would begin their ceremotackling invasives elsewhere around the lanies on the same day, cross their respecgoon. They also monitor the snowy plover, tive lagoons, and converge upon the first a federally listed threatened species, which ridge. Villages all along the coast would sometimes nests on the spit. take part in jump dances, which origiThat’s nated on the coast at either Stone or Big the way one of the spirit people, the Lagoon, said Peters. creators, had instructed long ago that The Jump Dance is an earth-healing woo-neek-we-ley-goo (now called the dance, “a prayer for the continuance of Jump Dance) should always start. human kind,” he said. Then the people — the Ner-er ner Peters has worked with elders and oth(coastal Yurok) — left the place where ers since the 1970s to restore traditional one of their ancestors’ villages, Cha-pekw, continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013

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continued from previous page

cultural practices. In 1984, they restored the Jump Dance at Pek-won, along the Klamath River. In 2000, they brought the White Deerskin Dance, also a 10-day ceremony, back at Weitchpec, where the Trinity River flows into the Klamath. It is a world-renewal dance. Both it and the Jump Dance, Peters said, are connected, and used to take place every two years. They are called high dance ceremonies. “Not many other tribal nations in the world has that healing and renewing the earth as a central, philosophical approach to who they are as people,” Peters said. “We — Yurok and other groups here in Northern California — that’s why we’re put here, to heal and renew the earth. It’s our central purpose in life.”

A guy once told Don Allen

that he used to gather butter clams on a beach at Stone Lagoon. “And when the lagoon got full, he would not be able to get to his butter clams,” Allen said. So the man would take a shovel out to the spit and start the breach. “I know a guy who did that with his boot,” Allen added. Terry Roelofs said he, too, saw a guy taking a boot to Stone Lagoon’s spit. He figured the man would have been swept away if he’d succeeded. “I’ve threatened lawsuits against one of my best friends for breaching out Big Lagoon,” Roelofs said. “I was so pissed. It messed up a field trip up there at the lagoon. And he was so thrilled, so excited just to see it go! My concern was for wa-

View from the highway in late December of Stone Lagoon and its recently breached spit. The lagoon has breached five times since February 2003, according to California State Park records. Photo by Ken Malcomson

terfowl nests in that marsh out there. And when that thing is drained for the summer, it significantly reduces the surface area of the lagoon.” Someone breached the lagoon in the summer of 1993, just after hatchery bred young cutthroat trout had been planted in the lagoon. The next winter, Roelofs said, fish traps in the creek yielded just seven cutthroat — there’d been more than 2,200 in there before the breach. The theory was that most of the planted cutthroats had gone through the breach (some were later seen in Redwood Creek). It closed, and they couldn’t get back in. Stone Lagoon won’t breach naturally in late spring or summer. The water is too

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low. Both Big and Stone lagoons need the winter rains to raise their levels above the ocean. Then, lagoon water seeps through the sand, and washes over it, nibbling away. Once open, over a couple of days the lagoon level drops to sea level. Big Lagoon breaches frequently because it has two big creeks flowing into it, filling it more often. Stone Lagoon just has McDonald Creek and its small north fork. Stone’s watershed needs at least 60 inches of total rainfall in a season for the lagoon to breach, according to a breach study published in 2006 by Humboldt State student Jill Beckmann. This happens, she found, on average about two out of three years.

The irregular regime — the timing — at Stone Lagoon seems to work well for the creatures living in it. When it’s closed, the fish and other animals grow and proliferate. When it opens, small creatures might get washed out, it’s true. But big ocean fish ready to spawn can come in. It stays open until the longshore currents and waves rebuild the spit again. On Jan. 10, Ken Bechtol, the rowboater, wrote to a friend saying the breach at Stone Lagoon had closed. He was keeping an eye on it. “At a 3.5 foot tide, wave wash just carried over to the lagoon side at 5 to 10 minute intervals,” he wrote. “Water is just above previous breach level … .” l


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The drunken botanist

Rhubarb and Rye

RHUBARB AND RYE COCKTAIL PHOTO BY AMY STEWART

Unusual and Amazing Fruit By Amy Stewart

amystewart@northcoastjournal.com

I

f your idea of mixing drinking and gardening goes beyond dropping a homegrown cherry in your Manhattan, this is the list for you. They might be a little harder to track down, but there’s still time to get them in the ground. Don’t expect much the first year: These are long-term investments. Black Currant. We Americans don’t drink much cassis, and that’s a shame. This thick, rich, French liqueur, made from the fruit of the black currant bush, turns an ordinary glass of dry white wine, sparkling wine or hard cider into something wonderful. I’ve even heard tell of it being mixed with red wine, or with beer. A little dollop of it in sparkling water is not such a bad thing either. (The fine people at Clear Creek Distillery make an excellent American version of cassis if you don’t want to bother growing your own.) So why don’t we Americans grow black currants? The plant was banned in the 1920s for its role in spreading white pine blister rust. By 1966, the USDA realized that the ban was unnecessary and lifted

it. Spores of the disease can only travel a thousand feet from black currant bush to pine tree, so keeping them out of pine forests is really pretty easy. Besides, many new varieties are disease-resistant. However, the ban remains in place in 10 states on the East Coast. Agricultural scientists are working with those states to educate them about black currant and persuade them to lift the ban. So you can certainly grow them. Ask at your local garden center; if you can’t find them locally, Raintree Nursery in Oregon will ship them to you. The authentic French variety is “Noir de Bourgogne,” but it doesn’t turn up in garden centers much. “Minaj Smyriou” is self-fertile and resists blister rust. “Ben Sarek” was bred by Scottish researchers to resist frost and do well in backyards, where it reaches only 3 feet. “Hilltop Baldwin” is a popular English variety. They aren’t all self-fertile, so get at least two to ensure good pollination. To make your own cassis, take a pound of black currants, wash well, and seal in a jar with one 750 ml bottle of grappa,

grape eau-de-vie, marc or good vodka. (I’d choose Ciroc, a vodka distilled from grapes.) Mash the fruit to release the juice, and let it sit for a month, shaking or stirring the jar once a week. Then strain into a new container and add simple syrup to taste — one to two cups simple syrup should do it. (Simple syrup is equal parts sugar and water, heated and allowed to cool.) Give it a couple more months, and your cassis should be ready to drink. Sloe: Also known as the blackthorn bush or by its Latin name, Prunus spinosa, this large European hedgerow plant produces the small, tart fruit used to make sloe gin. It’s hard to find in these parts, but try ForestFarm, a nursery in Oregon or Lincoln Oakes Nursery in North Dakota. Sloes can take a little light shade, but they can grow to over 12 feet tall, so give them plenty of room. And don’t expect fruit for a few years — sloes are, well, slow. The instructions for making sloe gin are pretty similar to those of cassis, except you’ll use gin. Or you can just go buy a bottle of sloe gin. Plymouth is distributing it again in the United States, and it’s a fine thing. To make a fizz, shake two ounces of sloe gin, a hearty squeeze of lemon juice, a dollop of simple syrup, and the white of one recently-laid egg in a shaker with no ice. Shake for 30 seconds, then add ice and keep shaking. Pour into a glass over ice and top with club soda. (If drinking raw eggs freaks you out, don’t do it.) Rhubarb. There is no special trick to planting rhubarb. Just give it some sunlight and plenty of compost. Choose a permanent spot, because rhubarb doesn’t like to get moved around. Space the crowns about 3 feet apart and bury them just deep enough to cover the top of the crown with a couple inches of soil. Pile a little more aged manure around the plants every spring, give it regular water, and that’s all the care it needs. Go easy the first year or two, harvesting only a few stalks. By the third year you’ll get a better harvest, but don’t ever pick more than half the stalks from a single plant. Rather than cutting the stalks, grip them firmly near the base and give them a little twist and pull. They should come out fairly easily. The tenderest stalks grow in spring and early summer; by July they can get a little tough. Remove flowering stalks to force the plant to put its energy into growing more foliage rather than setting seed. Remember that the leaves are toxic; you only want to eat the stalks. Here’s an idea of what you can do with rhubarb, and if you can’t be bothered to grow your own, try a delightful liqueur called Rhubarb Tea from Art in the Age.

A delightful twist on the classic Manhattan from Adam Chumas at Tilth in Seattle.

Ingredients and Method:

1.5 oz. rye whiskey .5 oz. rhubarb-lemon verbena simple syrup .5 oz. fresh lemon juice .5 oz. sweet (red) vermouth Shake all ingredients over ice and serve in a cocktail glass.

Rhubarb simple syrup

1 loosely-packed cup chopped rhubarb stalks 1 cup sugar 1 cup water Other fruits or herbs to taste (strawberries, lemon verbena, scented geranium, for instance) Combine all ingredients and simmer gently for 15 to 20 minutes. Once the stalks are soft, press them with a muddler or wooden spoon to release the juice. Allow to cool, then strain and bottle. Keep tightly sealed in the refrigerator. Adding an ounce of vodka as a preservative will help extend the life of the simple syrup.

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013

21


Leftover Salmon

Pioneers

Leftover Salmon, V-Day suggestions, Ott, Winterfest and the MUD Fling By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

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22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

oes the electric banjo held by Leftover Salmon’s Andy Thorn look familiar? It was made here in Humboldt by Ian Davidson from Absynth Quintet, a “gypsy jamgrass” group inspired by Leftover’s groundbreaking “poly-ethnic Cajun slamgrass.” Salmon guitarist and founder Vince Herman laughed at the suggestion that his band pioneered a new sound. He pointed to Nitty Gritty Dirt Band as an earlier example of “the continuity of loud things to do with folk music.” Herman and mandolin picker Drew Emmitt have been playing amped-up string music together since 1989. Thorn came in a few years ago to replace the late, great Mark Vann. While Colorado neighbors Yonder Mountain String Band and String Cheese Incident achieved greater market penetration, Salmon pretty much invented Boulder’s jamgrass scene. “We never had a plan,” said Herman. “We were never strategically marketed, never really invested properly in the project. We never hired the right light show or the right bands to open for us. We’re just a bunch of bozos doing our thing. And luckily, after all these years, we’re still allowed to keep doing it. We’re pretty psyched about it.” The key, says Herman, is making music that makes people want to get together. “You know, I’ll volunteer to be the loud guy if it helps everybody ride the same wave,” he said. “Creating the group mind

is really cool. We humans just want to do things together; we want to join. We’re here to provide a train to ride, for everybody to jump on. And to do that, you have to make it a time that will not be recreated. Something out of the ordinary.” One way to do that is through improvisation. Some object to the term, but Herman doesn’t mind if you call Leftover Salmon a jamband. “That’s because I know what ‘jamband’ means,” he says. What does it mean? “It means that people with hair will be there,” he concludes with a laugh. Got hair? Leftover Salmon and Absynth Quintet are playing at Arcata Theatre Lounge Sunday night. Get on board. So, Thursday is Valentine’s Day and you’re wondering where to go on a date. You have options. Just figure out what kind of music your Valentine likes. Let’s say your loved one is into string band music and/or newgrass. Well, The Bee Eaters are at the Arcata Playhouse VDay for night-one of a two-night run. The band’s roots are in the new acoustic “newgrass” of formerly local fiddlers Tashina and Tristan Clarridge (with Tristan switching to cello) — but what makes it unusual is Simon Chrisman’s hammered dulcimer laying down flurries of notes. Elements of bluegrass, jazz and Celtic weave into Texas fiddle tunes (the Clarridges are certified champions), creating a unique, organic whole. “We grew up listening to the sounds of nature, rather than the sounds


of cities,” says Tristan, and perhaps that explains it. San Francisco-based rockers The Stone Foxes are at the Jambalaya for V-Day. The four-piece plays music you might call a post-classic rock — mostly original tunes but based on the rootsy-bluesy sound of the Stones, Zep, Credence, etc. The Foxes just released its third album, Small Fires; pick up at a copy at the merch table. They share the bill with The Trouble, who somehow sound better and better every time I hear them. Great songs, great players, a truly fine band.   The Lorenza Simmons Trio plays jazzy love songs at Robert Goodman Wines with Lorenza on vocals backed by the versatile Tim Randles on keys and Bobby Amirkhan on bass. Is your date into EDM (as in electronic dance music)? “I Hate Valentines Day!” at the Red Fox Tavern has GRAssHOppA, OnHell and DJ Trey playing dance music heavy on the bass end. “Another Awkward Valentine’s” at the Arcata Theatre Lounge is Ba-Dum-CHH Comedy‘s take on VD with William Head up from S.F. to join the B-D-C crew: Joe Deschaine, Kimberly Hodges, Ratty Maty, John McClurg, Tony Persico, Ivy Vasquez and your hostess with the mostess Sherae O’Shaughnessy. Special guests Kyle and The MacLachlans provide some sort of musical interlude. The troupe invites you to “share your VD with us,” which sounds kinda dangerous. Pressure/Anya spins vinyl for an ’80s Valentine’s Day Dance Party in the Eureka Inn’s Palm Lounge with the Humboldt Pinups calendar girls signing autographs. (As usual Pressure Anya is rocking multiple parties this week: Saturday at the Pearl, the duo spins “world wide beats” with guest belly dancers; Taco Tuesday at the Jambalaya is equally worldly; then Anya goes solo for Whomp Whomp Wednesday at Nocturnum, opening for a female electro-duo from S.F. with Lotus Drops and Skulltrane, aka SkullDrops.) The day after VD, Friday, In Human Creation presents My Bloodiest Valentine, “a satirical look at a classic holiday,” at The Jambalaya with music by Tellum, Twist of the Python and Fuck You (Sex Ghost), dancing by Megz, Lex and friends plus thematic games and prizes. It comes with a warning: “This show will contain images of a bloody nature. Viewer discretion is advised.” The British electronic artist known as Ott grew up listening to dub by Scientist and King Tubby alongside proto-electro bands like Neu! and Kraftwerk. The inspiration led to work as an engineer in London helping craft soundscapes by The Orb and On-U-Sound bands like African Head

Charge, and working with masters such as Brian Eno. Ott ultimately created his own psychedelic dub style, first collaborating with Simon Posford of Shpongle and Hallucinogen, then, starting 10 years ago, releasing his own solo records. His latest tour as Ott and The All Seeing I finds him backed by guitar (Naked Nick), bass (Chris Barker) and drums (Matt White). He says shifting to playing with a band was an obvious choice. “People like going out to see bands. It’s a way to amplify the fun. It’s fun on your own but much more fun with a gang of your mates.” How much fun? See for yourself when Ott and company play at the Arcata Theatre Lounge Saturday night. Philly-based producer KiloWatts opens. Jamaican reggae/dancehall singer Gyptian is among the few who have managed to cross over to the American hip hop/ urban market. The key was his song “Hold Yuh,” which was remixed with added vocals by hot rapper (and American Idol host) Nicki Minaj. Gyptian hits the Arcata Theatre Lounge Friday with a full band (sorry, no Nicki). Second Nature Sound and Rude Lion provide local support. More reggae? The One-Love Jam Saturday at the Angelina Inn has Stevie Culture headlining with C-Baker, Judrum, Aminata, Mykal Somers, Marcio, Professor Funk and Madi Simmons. It’s cold out, which makes it time for another Winterfest, Humboldt’s only wintertime beer-tasting festival, once again held at the Arcata Community Center, Saturday evening. As usual they’ll be pouring a whole bunch of different microbrews. Music comes from Chris Parreira, Speakeasy Saints and, breaking a long all-local Winterfest tradition, an import: a neo-psychedelic rock band from Santa Cruz, Grandpa’s Chili. The afterparty at Humboldt Brews has electro-funk by a reunited Moo-Got-2; free admission with a Winterfest wristband. KMUD/KMUE Community Radio has a pair of benefits at Portuguese Hall in Arcata Saturday. First, it’s an afternoon wine tasting party (3-6 p.m.) with samples from our fine local vintners, an auction, and music by the Meadowood String Quartet. After sundown it’s time for the MUD Fling with an eclectic collection of local bands: the funky River Valley Mud, Kenny Ray and The Mighty Rovers playing country swing (Kenny is a KMUD deejay), bluegrass-ish tunes by The No Good Redwood Ramblers, jammy rock by Liquid Kactus and Brazilian-style rhythms and dancing by SambAmore. Proceeds from both parties go to help pay for a signal upgrade for KMUD’s NoHum branch, KMUE. Good cause. Good music. Good times. ●

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

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Looking for a romantic getaway? The Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt & online at northcoastjournal.com

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013

23


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue

thur 2/14

fri 2/15

sat 2/16

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Rooster McClintock (honky tonk) Crosby Tyler (country-blues) 11pm $5

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575

The Bee Eaters (chambergrass) 8pm

The Bee Eaters (chambergrass) 8pm

Steven Carne: Laptop Dancer 8pm

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

BA-DUM-CHH: Another Awkward Valentine’s with William Head 8pm $6

Gyption, Rude Lion Sound, Second Nature Sound (reggae) 10pm $30

World Famous presnts: Ott. and The All-Seeing I w/ KiloWatts 9:30pm

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Sour Cream (rock) 9pm The Uptown Kings (blues) no cover 9pm

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints Jimi Jeff and the Gypsy Band (rock/funk) no cover 9pm

Decades (rock) 9pm

Bailazo De Los Enamorados 8pm Decades (rock) 9pm (Wave)

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Phil Berkowitz & The Dirty Cats (Bay Area blues) 9pm

Phil Berkowitz & The Dirty Cats (Bay Area blues) 9pm

Pressure Anya (DJ duo) 9pm Humboldt Pin-ups calendar signing

Blues Jam 9pm

David and Jenni Sweet Soul Band 9pm

Reservations absolutely required for Valentine’s Day.

Hours Tuesday through Sunday 5pm until 10pm

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Silver Hammer, Peace of Mind Orch: Coastal Grove Benefit 9pm $5-$10 Lawrence Ferrera (guitar) 8pm My Bloodiest Valentine 9pm

DGS: Sundaze Vinyl Night 9pm

Brian Post (jazz keys) 7-10pm

Jim Silva (soul-o guitar) 7-10pm

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

Bump Foundation (funk) 7pm

Logger Bar house band: Jeff DeMark and the LaPatinas 7pm

La Barca Taqueria 5pm

Le Cassis black currant lambic on draft

THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731 ARCATA COMMUNITY CENTER

BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Winterfest 6pm $25/$20

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

A Farewell Device 8pm

Twango Boys 8pm

CECIL’S 773 Redwood Dr. Garberville CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 8:30pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093

One Billion Rising 7pm $5

EUREKA WOMEN’S CLUB 1531 J St. FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852 HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739 HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY JAMBALAYA 915 H St, Arcata

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩ G E NTLEMEN ’ S C L U B

Nightly 6pm-3am

The Stone Foxes, The Trouble 10pm $8

LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596 LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St Eureka 444-1344

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THE LOCAL 517 F St. Eureka 497-6320 LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000

CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

V-Day: Aphrodisiac cocktails, oysters, steamy music! Love the one you’re with! The Cherry Pickers (bluegrass/newgrass) 6pm

MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd Arcata

Errol Previde (guitar) 7-9pm Va Va Vrooom Stoplight Party 10pm

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

Locally Blown Glass

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EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

WINE

HAVE YOU BEEN TO THE DOWNTOWN ARCATA LOCATION?

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts



HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

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Moo-Got-2 Winterfest After Party 10pm

LIGHTHOUSE GRILL Trinidad 677-0077

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Live music on the weekends

Stevie Culture (reggae)

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com DJ Lost (dance music) 10pm

Experience: Fresh roasted coffee & espresso DJ Jsun (dance music) 10pm

Mud Fling 5:30pm $18/$15

PORTUGUESE HALL 1185 11th St. Arcata Jon Demello (jazz guitar) 6-8:30pm

RAMONE’S 2297 Harrison Ave. Eureka RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

GRAssHOppA, OnHell, Trey 9pm $10

Nueva Illusion (Latin) 10pm

Wandering Weenie Wagon is here!

Have you tried RCB Black Forest Imperial Stout yet?

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Zumba Toning (Bella) 5:30pm Blues Night w/Brian & Kimberli 8pm Lorenza Simmons Trio (love songs) 9pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am Jazz Funk Hip Hop 5:30pm www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Open from noon to 9pm Birthday Party Rentals all day Book yours! La Musique Diabolique (gypsy jazz) 8pm

SquarePeg (chamber) 7pm $7

SEWELL GALLERY 423 F St., Eureka SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Free wireless Internet Computer rentals Pressure Anya (world wide beats) 10pm

The Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 7:30-9:30pm

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Come in for a great dinner!

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Joey Blaine (folk) 7pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Strix Vega, Drifter Killer 9pm

THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St. Eureka SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Black Hearts Party DJ Itchie Fingaz 9pm

Pressure Anya (dance some more) 9pm

Madrone Brothers (Americana from Cazadero) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8:30 pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed Band (blues) 8pm

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696 TRINIDAD TOWN HALL WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com Joe Garceau, Tim Breed 7pm


The Bee Eaters Thursday and Friday at Arcata Playhouse photo by Sarah Anderson

sun 2/17

mon 2/18

tues 2/19

wed 2/20

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

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Leftover Salmon, Absynth Quintet (alt. strings) Doors 8pm $25 adv.

Voted Best Music Venue 2011 & 2012 Journal Best Of Humboldt readers’ poll!

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Sci-Fi Pint ‘n’ Pizza Night: The Incredible Hulk (2008) Doors 6pm

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Steven Carne: Laptop Dancer 8pm

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Sunday Brunch 9am

Enter to win a Dodge Dart

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Prime Rib Mondays $14.95 Alice’s Steak & Sushi 5-9pm

Taco Tuesday: Dollar Tacos $5 Blue Margaritas 5-10pm

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings and $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Chubby Checker & The Wildcats coming Saturday, March 23

Cocktail lounge in the historic Eureka Inn

Martini Mondays $5 house Martini Mason Matteoli (piano) 6-8pm

Top Shelf Tuesday Mason Matteoli (piano) 6-8pm

Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 5-7pm Mason Matteoli (piano) 6-8pm

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Closed Mondays.

Open Tuesday-Sunday 5pm Food served until 10pm

Family friendly dining.

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Steve Watts & The Humboldt Allstars

Taco Tuesday w/Pressure Anya 9pm

Enter to win a Dodge Dart

Quiz Night 7pm

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

from sushi to sandwiches, we’ve got you covered.

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights Stephen Hough (piano) 8pm Madi Simmons and The Kelptonics 9p

All Renewals Starting At

Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

$ 85

Tim Breed (songs) 5-7pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

We also have liquor.

Repeat: We got beer.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm

Sunday night potluck dinner 6pm

9-ball Tournament Signup 6:30pm Play 7pm

Ping Pong Night

Mad River Czech Pilsner on draft

Purl and Pour Come craft 6:30pm

The Lonesome Roses (Americana) 6pm

Wednesday Open Mic 8pm Pints For Nonprofits: Mad River Alliance w/4 For Jazz

Open Mic 7-10pm WWW: Skulldrops, DJ Anya 9pm Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Happy Growler Day! Fill your growler for less $$$

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is back!

Pints for Nonprofits for the Raven Project!

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northcoastjournal.com

book

MOSAIC BY KAYLA TEMPLETON AT MCKINLEYVILLE HIGH

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26

“Surely mankind’s greatest invention is the sentence,” asserts Irish writer John Banville, and he’ll get no argument from me. For writers trying to orchestrate the elements of a novel, story, screenplay, report, memoir or other form, it’s good advice as well as good practice to remember the prime importance of the first construction: the sentence. In this best-selling, self-proclaimed “how to,” Stanley Fish repeats the question that every would-be writer must answer affirmatively: Do you like sentences? Fish claims that he loves sentences, and offers some of his favorites. And that’s when my smile starts to turn upside down. His examples of great sentences are largely mediocre (one of the authors is Justice A. Scalia) and his own sentences are often awkward. (He could also use a little help with his paragraphs.) But Scalia is a clue. Fish (the back cover bio says) is a professor of law, as well as an author and columnist. Like a lawyer he begins by making an adversarial case, going after his most famous competitor, Strunk and White’s classic The Elements of Style. They take for granted their readers know how to write sentences, he asserts, so they don’t deal with how to write a good one. While it’s true that Strunk emphasizes paragraph construction, he (and especially White) actually do say a great deal about the elements of good sentences — and they say it more clearly and succinctly than Fish does. Their “rules” are still valid, and still needed. Fish claims to go “deeper” into sentence structure, and while some of his observations are valid and cogent, most seem abstruse and unhelpful. I’m not sure why anyone would want to write many kinds of sentences he so painfully deconstructs, especially those that seem to be little more than delivery systems for rhetoric. They might be helpful for decorating a legal opinion, or a final argument in a trial. This is very academic and theoretical for a “how to” book, and yet it is also enigmatic in content and presentation. Fish emphasizes structure but undervalues the importance of the right words, their spontaneous play and music. Read the first few pages of a novel by Jim Harrison, Richard Powers, our own Jim Dodge (for example), for strong sentences that sing and still do good work. Good sentences are elegant ecosystems, but they don’t live in isolation — they are part of larger ecosystems, of paragraphs and beyond. Part of their work is to urge the reader on, to explore further, to take the next step, into the next sentence. While almost any book on writing can be of value to somebody, I would advise caution with this one, even if it is a best-seller. —William Kowinski

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

MckinleyvilL MckinleyvilLee aRts Night

Third Friday McKinleyville Arts Night Feb. 15, 6-8 p.m. A community celebration of art, music, food and fun on the third Friday of each month. For more information, contact coordinator Taffy Stockton at (707) 834-6460 or www.mckinleyvilleartsnight.com. 1. ARCATA-EUREKA AIRPORT 3561 Boeing Ave. Long term exhibit sponsored by the Headwaters Fund currently features work by eight female Humboldt County artists: Regina Case, Natalie Craig, Joan Gold, Linda Mitchell, Kathy O’Leary, Linda Parkinson, Lien Truong and Roberta Welty. 2. SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., No. D (at the Arcata-Eureka Airport) Hand-printed textiles by Beth Kabat of Thimbleberry Threads. Acoustic folk music by Joey Blaine. 3. MCKINLEYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL MULTIPURPOSE ROOM 1300 Murray Road. Family art night in the ceramics lab hosted by Jim Hannon, with materials provided; mosaics and stained glass by Kayla Templeton; pencil drawings by Lindsey Templeton. 4. MCKINLEYVILLE FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER 1450 Hiller Road. Family night with art and special activities for children of all ages. 5. BLAKE’S BOOKS 2005 Cenral Ave. Original botanical watercolors by Dorothy Klein plus her posters, Flowers of the Redwood Forest and Flowers of the Sierras. 6. CHURCH OF THE JOYFUL HEALER 1944 Central Ave. Stained glass by Paula Herr and Laura Hennings, faux stained glass paper art by kids. Music by singer/ songwriter Joanne Rand, accompanied by Robert Franklin on guitar and Tim Randles on piano.

7. HUMSPA 1660 Central Ave., Suite C. Sound healing and chair massage. 8. KNITTER’S LANE 1225 Central Ave., No. 14. Handmade cards by Janice Diller. Knit Night: knitter’s circle, food, fun and knitting until 10 p.m. ● To

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THE RITZ

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, Feb. 14, 2013

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“ONE MAN. ONE LAPTOP. AND THE WOMEN INSIDE.” BRITISH PERFORMER STEVEN CARNE WILL PROJECT HIS LOVE FOR FEMALE SINGERS INTO THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE FOR TWO PERFORMANCES OF HIS SHOW LAPTOP DANCER. THE FIRST, ON SATURDAY, FEB. 16 WILL BE AN “ADULTS ONLY” AFFAIR WHILE THE PERFORMANCE ON SUNDAY, FEB. 17 WILL BE A FAMILY FRIENDLY FUNDRAISER FOR NORTHCOAST PREPARATORY AND PERFORMING ARTS ACADEMY.

thursday EVENTS

PFLAG Rally. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Rally in support of marriage equality. 768-3287.

THEATER

The Vagina Monologues. 8 p.m. Eureka Veterans Memorial Building, 10th and H sts. V-Day Humboldt benefit production of Eve Ensler’s award-winning play. Proceeds benefit Six River’s Planned Parenthood and Women’s Crisis Shelter in Southern Humboldt. $12. vdayhumboldt.org. 499-1458. 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. 7:15 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium, 1915 J St. EHS Players comedy centers on a fictional spelling bee set in a geographically ambiguous Putnam Valley Middle School. $8. E-mail emmonsn@ eurekacityschools.org. 206-276-5744. The Pitmen Painters. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. Based on the triumphant true story of a group of British miners who discover a new way to express themselves and unexpectedly become art-world sensations. $10. redwoodcurtain.com. 443-7688. Contents Under Pressure. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Created and performed the second year students of the Dell’Arte International M.F.A. program as part of their Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

822-2227

Adaptations Projects, wherein they translate the written word into a world of poetic imagery, music and storytelling. Pay what you can.

MUSIC

The Bee Eaters. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Grand National fiddle champions Tristan and Tashina Clarridge bring their innovative string sound back to their Humboldt home. Featuring hammered dulcimer wizard Simon Chrisman and mandolin virtuoso Dominick Leslie. $20/$17 adv. BeeEaters. com. 822-1575.

DANCE

Dance Me to the Moon. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Feet First Dancers performance features jazz, modern, swing, ragtime and aerial work. Special appearance by Bada Bing! Burlesque. $20/$10 balcony. mateel. org. 923-3368.

ART

Collaborate, Create, Communicate. 4 p.m. Reese Bullen Gallery, HSU, Arcata. Features collaborative artworks by members of the HSU community created around the thematic elements of acceptance, diversity, tolerance and inclusion. Through March 14. E-mail RBG@humboldt.edu. 826-5814.

GEEZ, WHAT MUST THE FINGERS OF A MACARTHUR “GENIUS” FELLOWSHIP-WORTHY PIANIST LOOK LIKE? FIND OUT, UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL LIKE, WHEN BRITISH PIANIST AND FREQUENT LONDON GUARDIAN AND LONDON TIMES WRITER STEPHEN HOUGH MASSAGES SOME IVORIES IN HSU’S FULKERSON RECITAL HALL ON WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20.

REMEMBER HOW SHOCKED YOU WERE LAST MONTH WHEN GEORGE W. BUSH’S LEAKED PAINTINGS WEREN’T HORRIBLE? NOW WITNESS THE TALE OF A GROUP OF BRITISH MINERS WHO BECOME ART WORLD SENSATIONS IN THE PITMAN PAINTERS, THE LATEST PRODUCTION OF REDWOOD CURTAIN THEATRE WHICH PREVIEWS FEB. 14 AND 15 BEFORE ITS GALA OPENING ON FEB. 16. DIRECTED BY PEGGY METZGER.

Humboldt Handweavers and Spinners Guild Event. 7 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Program by Pauline Stephensen on the life of her father, weaver Arthur Howatt. 498-2472.

MOVIES

Dirty Dancing. 7:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Nobody puts Baby in a corner! Special Valentine’s Day screening. $10 per couple/$7 single.

COMEDY

Another Awkward Valentine’s. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. BA-DUM-CHH Comedy presents standups William Head and the regular crew. $6. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

EVENTS

V-Day Flash Mob. 2:14 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. One Billion Rising Flash Mob invites one billion women and those who love them to walk out, dance, rise up and demand an end sexual violence. Part of weeklong V-Day Humboldt events. $10. vdayhumboldt.org. Medicare Workshop. 4 p.m. Area 1 Agency on Aging, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. “Supplementing Medicare.” Learn about Medicare supplements, other insurance and how plans, including Medicare Advantage, work with your coverage. 444-3000.

THEATER

ETC.

The Sea Grill

Local crab is here! Seasonal dishes include Whole Crab, Risotto, Cioppino, Fettucini, Crab Cakes, Louie & Sandwiches

Friday, Feb. 15 th 7:00 pm $7 admission

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

15 friday

BACK

EMAND AR D L U P BY PO

One Billion Rising: Dance for Peace and Freedom. 7 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Dance to support the work of Humboldt Domestic Violence Services and the North Coast Rape Crisis Team. Food, drink, a short film, no-host beer and wine and lots of dancing to DJ Goldy Locks. Part of weeklong V-Day Humboldt events. $5. vdayhumboldt.org. 616-6009. Contents Under Pressure. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Created and performed by the second year students of the Dell’Arte International M.F.A. program as part of their

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with Special Guest Rahman Abdur on Tabla

Tina Garsen • Gregg Moore • Jill Petricca

423 F Street, Eureka 95501 • (707) 269-0617 • sewellgallery.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013

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continued from previous page Adaptations Projects, wherein they translate the written word into a dynamic world rich with poetic imagery, music and storytelling. bluecreekahpah.org. Songs For A New World. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. Collection of stories about a defining moment in which each character’s life seems to be going as planned when suddenly everything changes. $18/$16 students and seniors. ferndale-rep.org. 599-7587. 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. 7:15 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium. See Feb. 14 listing. American Buffalo. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. NCRT continues its 29th season with the drama by David Mamet. $15. ncrt.net. 442-6278. The Pitmen Painters. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Feb. 14 listing. Contents Under Pressure. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See Feb. 14 listing.

MUSIC

Gyption. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Cali’s Finest Productions presentsthe Jamaican-born reggae star joined by locals Rude Lion Sound and Second Nature Sound. $30/$25 adv. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. Valentine’s Dance. 8 p.m. Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J St. ArMack jazz band’s annual big band swing dance. $10. E-mail lisabishoprowe@yahoo.com. Classical Guitarist Lawrence Ferrara. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Bay Area guitarist performs. $8/$3 students and seniors. hsumusic.blogspot.com. 826-3928. SquarPeg. 7 p.m. Sewell Gallery of Fine Art, 423 F St., Eureka. Expressive but not overly sentimental chamber music. Special guest Rahman Abdur. $7. E-mail gregg@relevantmusic.org. 445-2613.

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. 839-3665. Third Friday Jazz. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Featuring pianist Darius Brotman and guitar by Duncan Burgess. $5/$10 sliding scale. 677-9493. The Bee Eaters. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See Feb. 14 listing.

upgrade process. $25. kmud.org. 923-2513. Mud Fling. 5:30 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. Redwood Community Radio present a benefit for the KMUE signal upgrade in Northern Humboldt. Features performances by River Valley Mud, Kenny Ray and The Mighty Rovers, The No Good Redwood Ramblers, Liquid Kactus and SambAmore. $18/$15 adv. 923-2513.

Dance Me to the Moon. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center. See Feb. 14 listing.

Laptop Dancer. 8-9:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. UK director/actor Steven Carne presents his one man cabaret show celebrating female singers that live on his laptop. $15. stevencarne.com. 826-5656. 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. 7:15 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium. See Feb. 14 listing. The Vagina Monologues. 2 and 8 p.m. Eureka Veterans Memorial Building. See Feb. 14 listing. American Buffalo. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Feb. 15 listing. The Pitmen Painters Gala Opening. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Feb. 14 listing. Songs For A New World. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre. See Feb. 15 listing. Contents Under Pressure. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See Feb. 14 listing.

DANCE ETC.

Eureka Sequoia Garden Club Meeting. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Monthly meeting features Kenneth Griggs on “Ducks and Geese — Wonderful Waterfowl.” Bring your camera and binoculars. E-mail mgoodwin@northcoast.com. 442-1387. Bridge Club. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. Local trick-takin’ gathering. humsenior. org. 443-9747.

16 saturday EVENTS

Winterfest. 6 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fourth annual wintertime beer festival features a Mardi Gras theme and music from Grampa’s Chili, Speakeasy Saints and Chris Parreira. Proceeds benefit local charities. KMUD/KMUE Wine Tasting. 3-6 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. Sway to the sounds of Meadowood String Quartet, bid on collectible silver and fine art and enjoy libations from local wineries. Proceeds benefit KMUD’s signal

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

THEATER

MUSIC

Ott. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. World Famous Productions presents an evening with UK dubstep producer. All-Seeing I and KiloWatts open. $20/$15 adv. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220. Daniela Mineva. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Chamber Music Concert Series presents pianist and Humboldt State University music professor. E-mail sasha@humboldtarts.org. 442-0278. John and Samrat. 7 p.m. Oshun Yoga, 343 Main St., Trinidad. Evening of bansuri flute and tabla. $15/$12 adv. Joe Garceau. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501

S. Westhaven Drive. Local singer/songwriter performs. Songwriter Tim Breed opens. $10/$5 members. 677-9493.

DANCE

Valentine Tango Dance. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Studio of Dance Arts, 7 Fifth St., Eureka. Free milonga lesson from 7:30-8 p.m. Live music, milonga and tango dancing 8-10:30 p.m. Bring finger foods and beverages. $10/$5 students. E-mail phyllis@humboldt.edu. 822-6170. Dance Me to the Moon. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center. See Feb. 14 listing.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Pat Bitton. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Trail Stewards Work Day. 9-11 a.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help maintain the trails and grounds around the nature center. Wear closedtoed shoes and bring drinking water. friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397. Walk with a Doc. 11 a.m. Eureka Boardwalk. Features a health talk from a local physician, followed by a three mile walk in a friendly, walk-and-talk style. walkwithadoc.org. 619-933-5402. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Alex Stillman for a 90-minute walk focusing on the history and ecology of the marsh. 826-2359.

ETC.

Breakfast and Flea Market. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Meet, eat and browse. E-mail dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100. Free E-Waste Recycling Day. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Get rid of televisions, printers, wires,


cameras and more. Sponsored by Fortuna High Creeks Project and NeuWaste. 499-2975. Community Media Center Orientation. 10 a.m.-noon. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School, Eureka. Learn about resources available at Access Humboldt, including recording studio, field equipment and editing station. accesshumboldt.net. 476-1798.

Wrapping V-Week

Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Meditation. 11 a.m. Arcata Holistic Health Center, 940 Ninth St. Lama Ani Kunzang Drolma leads meditation sessions. E-mail structuralthomas@ gmail.com. 825-1088. Holistic Healthcare Open House. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 822 G St., Arcata. Meet the practitioners, sessions, refreshments. 496-8218.

17 sunday EVENTS

In contrast to Valentine’s Day, a great day for greeting cards manufacturers and chocolate makers for sure, we have V-Day. Started in 1998 by a group of women including The Vagina Monologues playwright Eve Ensler, the now worldwide organization/movement looks to raise awareness and ultimately end sexualized violence against women and girls. Locally for the last several years the movement has been stewarded by VDay Humboldt. But more than a day, we are smack dab in the middle of V-Week, manifested with multiple countywide events. We’ll try to catch you up on what’s left: The Vagina Monologues: Since its debut in 1994, Eve Ensler’s play — based on her interviews with hundreds of women — has allowed thousands of women a unique venue to celebrate their sexuality and strength. This year there will be three local performances at the Eureka Veteran’s Memorial Hall. The first takes place on the traditional Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, at 8 p.m. Then, on Saturday, Feb. 16, there will be a pair of performances, one at 2 p.m. and another at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12. One Billion Rising: On Friday, Feb. 15, starting at 7 p.m., V-Day Humboldt hosts a benefit dance for Humboldt Domestic Violence Services and the North Coast Rape Crisis Team at the Eureka Women’s Club. The night features food and drink, plus short film screenings, but mostly dancing with sounds provided by DJ Goldy Locks. Tickets are $5. V-Day Flash Mob: Mobs rule. On Thursday, Feb. 14, a crowd will gather on the Arcata Plaza at 2:14 p.m. — and at sites around the world — to show solidarity with the V-Day message and the effort to end violence against women. For more info on V-Day Humboldt, check out vdayhumboldt.org. — Andrew Goff

Annual “All You Can Eat” Crab Feed. 3-7 p.m. Samoa Cookhouse, Samoa Road, Arcata. Humboldt Bay Maritime Museum’s annual event includes all you can eat fresh locally caught Dungeness crab donated by local fishermen. $28/$15 kids under 12. humboldtbaymaritimemuseum.com. 445-1910.

THEATER

Laptop Dancer Benefit. 3-4:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. See Feb. 16 listing. Family friendly fundraiser for NPA. $15. stevencarne.com. 822-1575. American Buffalo Matinee. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Feb. 15 listing. Songs For A New World Matinee. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre. See Feb. 15 listing. Contents Under Pressure. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See Feb. 14 listing.

MUSIC

Leftover Salmon. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Polyethnic cajun slamgrass group returns after an eight year hiatus. Joined by locals Absynth Quintet. $25. arcatatheater. com. 822-1575.

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013

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continued from previous page

Get Some Well, HumCo., the bad news is that the calendar gods have screwed you over again: Valentine’s Day is one of a string of recent holidays that refuses to conveniently fall on a weekend. The good news is there is still plenty of out-and-about foreforeplay to be had. Make a reservation if necessary and get your love on. Here are some tips: Take in some art: Show your valentine how cultured you are by taking her to HSU’s Reese Bullen Gallery for its Collaborate, Create, Communicate exhibit featuring photography, sculpture and paintings based on the holiday appropriate themes of acceptance, diversity and tolerance. An opening reception takes place from 4-6 p.m. Take in some cinema: A dose of Swayze is a good aphrodisiac for every couple, right? Luckily for your night, the Eureka Theatre is graciously hosting a screening of the — are we calling this thing a classic at this point, or what? — film Dirty Dancing starting at 7:30 p.m. ($10 couple/$7 single.) Take in some theater: Redwood Curtain Theatre will tug at your heartstrings with its first preview performance of its latest production The Pitman Painters at 8 p.m. The show tells the story of a group of British miners who learn to express themselves with canvas and paintbrush. Totally romantic! ($10.) Take in some dance: SoHum’s Feet First Dancers and Bada Bling! Burlesque will attempt to transport you and your lover into the outer cosmos of love during their V-Day performance, Dance Me to The Moon. The show at the Mateel Community Center features the local feetsmiths’ takes on jazz, modern, swing, ragtime and even some aerial feats. Starts at 8 p.m. ($20/$10 balcony.) Take in some sound: If mood music to you means listening to Grand National Fiddle Champions, look no further than the Arcata Playhouse, which is hosting The Bee Eaters featuring Trinity County-raised sibling fiddlers Tristan and Tashina Clarridge. The musical lovemaking starts at 8 p.m. ($20/$17 adv.) Take in some offense: Or, finally, maybe you got set up on a date with someone you’d rather not take out again. If they’re that lame, surely you can offend them away at Ba-Dum-CHH Comedy’s Arcata Theatre Lounge V-Day shindig Another Awkward Valentine’s, starting at 8 p.m. The night will be classed up by out-of-towner and headliner William Head. ($6.) Get some, HumCo. — Andrew Goff

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Open Jazz Jam. 2-4:30 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Tenor saxophonist Francis Vanek performs followed by an open jam. 442-0278.

DANCE

Dance Me to the Moon. 2 p.m. Mateel Community Center. See Feb. 14 listing.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society SoHum Field Trip. 9 a.m. Southern Humboldt Community Park, 934 Sprowl Creek Road, Garberville. Meet in the parking lot just off Kimtu Road. John Gaffin and/ or Jay Sooter lead a monthly two- to three-hour bird walk. 986-1112. Audubon Society Eureka Marsh Field Trip. 9 a.m. Meet at parking lot at foot of West Del Norte Street, Eureka. Spend one to two hours on a flat loop through a variety of habitats, from bay and mudflat to riparian and marshland. Led by Ralph Bucher. 839-4365.

FOOD

Dow’s Prairie Monthly Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. All proceeds fund grange projects. $5. E-mail dowsgrange@ gmail.com. 840-0100.

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Animism International Meeting. 4 p.m. Community room of the Northcoast Co-op, 25 Fourth St., Eureka. Discuss the ongoing merger of science and spirituality and the use of entheogens and psychedelics in spiritual practice. 382-7566.

18 monday DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing with live music from the 1930s-’50s. $4. 725-5323.

19 tuesday ART

Redwood Art Association Class. 3 p.m. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 527 Fourth St., Eureka. Learn tips for how to hang an art show. Donation. 445-2276.

ETC.

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161.

20 wednesday MUSIC

Stephen Hough. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship award winning pianist performs. $45/$22 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. West Coast Throwdown. 6:30 p.m. Ink Annex, 47B West Third St., Eureka. Placebo event featuring bands Allura, Laid In Stone, Enceledus and It Was A Massacre. $5.

ETC.

Monthly Grange Meeting. 6 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Get your community involvement on. E-mail dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100.

WELLNESS

Our Pathways to Health. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Church on the

Rock, 1650 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Free chronic disease self-management workshop providing health education and peer support for people living with long-term health conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis, COPD, depression or chronic pain. E-mail michelle@aligningforceshumboldt.org. 445-2806. . Our Pathways to Health. 1-3:30 p.m. Royal Crest Mobile Estates, Fortuna. See above listing.

21 thursday EVENTS

MARZ Project Benefit Show. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Featuring performances The LA|Dodger, Body Academics, Rave-On Beautiful, Maniac and White Boy Blues. $8/$5 students. arcataplayhouse.org.

THEATER

The Pitmen Painters. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre. See Feb. 14 listing.

ART

Collaborate, Create, Communicate. 4 p.m. Reese Bullen Gallery. See Feb. 14 listing.

LECTURE

California’s Sustainable Resources Future. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, BSS Room 166, Arcata. HSU’s Sustainable Futures Speaker Series presents John Laird, California Secretary of Natural Resources. www.schatzlab.org/about/ publications/speaker_series.html. 826-4345.

MEETINGS

Audubon Society Monthly Meeting. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Come discuss local and bigger-picture conservation topics with others interested in environmental issues. 442-9353.

ETC.

Boujie Baking Co. Launch Party. 6-9 p.m. Redwood Curtain Brewing Company, 550 South G St, Arcata. Local bakery specializing in handcrafted sweet treats made with craft beer launches with a beer-kissed caramel sauce tasting bar. www.facebook.com/boujiebakingco. 840-4748.

Heads Up… Write. Poets & Writers, College of the Redwoods’ literary magazine, is currently accepting submissions of original poetry and fiction through March 27. To submit entries or for more info email david-holper@redwoods.edu or call 476-4370. Sing. McKinleyville Community Choir is recruiting new members for the spring/summer 2013 season. Interested singers are encouraged to check out a choir rehearsal on Tuesday evenings at the Grace Good Shepherd Church at 1450 Hiller Road in McKinleyville, Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. There are no auditions to join; however, there is a small tuition. Call Jean at 839-2276 or email naofau@yahoo.com for more info. Peace. Veterans For Peace is seeking submissions for its fourth annual Redwood Coast Peace Poetry Contest from all high school students of Humboldt County. Entries must be received no later than 5 p.m., Monday, March 4, 2013. For more info go to vfp56.org or contact Jon Reisdorf 822-4595. Put A Bird On It! Friends of the Arcata Marsh and Redwood Region Audubon Society are co-sponsoring a Student Bird Art Contest in conjunction with Godwit Days. Complete rules and a list of suggested birds are posted at rras.org/education.html Entries must be received by Friday, March 22. Questions should be emailed to sueleskiw@ suddenlink.net. ●


Rooney Mara executes a textbook Depressive Couch Slouch in Side Effects.

Soderbergh Scores

At the end of his career, the versatile director delivers a bravura thriller By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

SIDE EFFECTS. Steven Soderbergh seems intent on retirement. He has said this will be his penultimate movie (there’s Behind the Candelabra, a Liberace biopic, in the works for HBO). Pity; lately he’s been traversing eccentricity and accessibility with aplomb, producing some of the best work of his almost inestimable career. For some reason his last three films (some of my favorites) have been released among the dross and chaff of late winter. The enormous success of the Ocean‘s trilogy bought him time and distance to indulge his penchant for oddball projects, but apparently not the large-scale marketing said oddballs deserve. Magic Mike was easily one of last year’s best, at once a cutting commentary on contemporary economics and a sort of underdog sports/ performance drama. Haywire played immensely entertaining games with the “spy come in from the cold” genre of the 1960s. Both came and went with distressingly little fanfare. Now Soderbergh has made a compact, tricky noir thriller that also hap-

pens to snarkily take on big pharma. Side Effects engrosses from the outset, and blossoms as it progresses with Hitchcockian scope and convolution. Saying much about the plot could easily spoil it. This can safely be said: Martin Taylor (Channing Tatum) is released from prison after serving four years on an insider trading conviction. His wife Emily (Rooney Mara), though glad to have him back, wallows in depression and laments the loss of their formerly luxurious lifestyle. A self-destructive incident lands her in the care of a Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law), a Manhattan headshrinker with a decidedly upscale clientele and attendant monthly nut. He prescribes her a variety of anti-depressants to little effect. After a drug company taps him to participate in the development phase of a new drug, he signs Emily up as a case study. Shortly after she starts taking the medicine, the lives of everyone involved are permanently, tragically altered. And that’s just the first half. In the early going, it’s easy to peg Side Effects as a socio-political screed, an agenda movie

about emotional isolation and a culture’s over-reliance on prescription drugs. But after the turning point I’ve alluded to, it becomes clear that Soderbergh and writer Scott Z. Burns (they formerly collaborated on Contagion in 2011 and The Informant! in 2009) have other ideas. The good Dr. Banks’ delicate ivory tower starts swaying, due in no small part to the influence of his colleague Dr. Victoria Siebert (Catherine Zeta-Jones), and some troubling information from his past. Things that once seemed honest and clear are quickly obfuscated, and we find ourselves in the thick of a classic whodunit. As in most of his late-period movies, Soderbergh’s visual style here is distinctive, but unobtrusive. His cinematography varies attractively from chilly, wet New York exteriors to the warm-honey ambience of tony apartments. He moves the camera and frames compositions in clever, original ways but knows when to hold a medium shot or a close-up and let his actors do their work with the script. And they do universally smart, compelling things with it. Mara’s performance in particular takes challenging, unexpected turns, and she makes the most of every one. She is utterly believable — vulnerable one moment, terrible the next. Law does laudable work here as well, giving plausible, nuanced life to Banks’ gradual transition from cocksure to broken and obsessed. The technical prowess of Soderbergh and his crew make this a rather deceptive enterprise. The plot is so twisty, the performances and artistic execution so unified, that it becomes all too easy to watch Side Effects as a fun, idle entertainment. But it is much more than that: It is the work of a popular artist who has truly hit his stride, who can produce art movies that feel like potboilers, think-pieces that play like blockbusters. I can’t get enough, and I’m gonna miss him when he’s done. R. 106m. IDENTITY THIEF. Absent Melissa McCarthy (Bridesmaids) and Jason Bateman, there wouldn’t be much reason to even bring this up. But because she has perfect comic timing, and he’s a straight man for the ages, it kind of works. Bateman plays a buttoned-down family man and mid-level functionary at a giant financial company. He’s cash-strapped and underappreciated. When some coworkers offer him a new lease on his professional life, he seizes the opportunity. McCarthy’s loathsome grifter throws a wrench in the works when she steals his identity and casts doubt on the content of his character. Some implausible police work leads him to track her down and attempt to bring her to justice. A bounty hunter and some criminal henchpeople get involved, too. This basically serves to set in motion a run-of-the-mill road comedy that,

sadly, yields very little local color or other original touches. The two leads share a few funny scenes, and Eric Stonestreet (Modern Family), John Cho (Harold of Harold and Kumar) and rapper T.I. sneak in entertaining cameos. Despite its shortcomings, I liked Identity Thief for a couple of reasons: First, mainstream comedies with any real humor are too rare these days and this one delivers some real laughs; second, it continues the directing career of Seth Gordon, whose 2007 documentary The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters used humor and heart to make the nerdiest of subjects (arcade gamers) accessible and entertaining. So far, his narrative features haven’t produced an equal to that great effort. But at least he’s getting a shot at it. R. 111m. —John Bennett

Previews

A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD. Not sure why the latest installment of Bruce Willis’ Die Hard franchise is considered a date movie, but the release is timed for Valentine’s Day. Ex-cop/bad guy-nemesis John McClane (Willis) travels to Russia to help his estranged assassin son, Jack (Jai Courtney). Gunfights, chase scenes, big explosions and father/son bonding ensue. Rated R. 98 m. BEAUTIFUL CREATURES. The latest teen romance/fantasy trying to capture the lucrative Twilight market stars Alden Ehrenreich as Ethan Wate, a bored teen in a southern town who falls for Lena (Alice Englert), the new girl in town, niece of the mysterious Macon Ravenwood (Jeremy Irons). She just happens to be a witch. Will she turn to the dark side? Or can Ethan’s love make her see the light? Rated PG-13. 123 m.  SAFE HAVEN. The sappy romance novel by Nicholas Sparks (The Notebook, Dear John) becomes a movie directed by Lasse Hallström (My Life as a Dog, Salmon Fishing on the Yemen). Julianne Hough (from Dancing With the Stars) stars as Katie, a troubled woman who shows up in a continued on next page

Feb. 14-23 Thurs Feb 14 - BA-DUM-CHH’s Awkward Valentine’s w/ William Head, Doors at 8 p.m., $6, 18+ Wed Feb 20 - Sci Fi Night ft.

The Incredible Hulk (2008)

Doors at 6 p.m., All ages, Free

Fri Feb 22 - Rampart Indoor Skatepark Movie Night Doors at 8 p.m., $5, All ages Sat Feb 23 - 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005) Doors at 7:30 p.m., $5, Rated R

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013

31


Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 2/14-2/21 unless otherwise noted. *2/14 ONLY

A GOOd dAY tO die HArd 12:35, 3:20, 6:00, 8:45 ideNtitY tHief 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00 SAfe HAveN 12:15, 3:05, 5:50*, 8:40* eSCApe frOm pLANet eArtH 3d 2:55, 3:10*, 7:50, 8:00* eSCApe frOm pLANet eArtH 2d 12:30, 12:45*, 5:25, 5:35* BeAutifuL CreAtureS 12:20, 3:15, 6:10, 9:05 HANSeL ANd GreteL WitCH HuNterS 3d 2:00, 7:00 HANSeL ANd GreteL WitCH HuNterS 2d 4:30, 9:30 WArm BOdieS 1:55, 4:25, 6:55, 9:20 Side effeCtS 1:15, 3:55, 6:40, 9:15 tHe impOSSiBLe 12:05, 3:00, 5:45, 8:35 ZerO dArk tHirtY 12:55*, 1:25, 4:20*, 4:50, 8:00* djANGO uNCHAiNed 1:05*, 4:40*, 8:15 SiLver LiNiNGS pLAYBOOk 12:00, 2:50, 5:40, 8:30 ArGO 11:55, 2:45, 5:35, 8:25

mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 2/14-2/21 unless otherwise noted. *2/14 ONLY **2/15-2/21 ONLY

A GOOd dAY tO die HArd 12:50**, 3:30, 6:10, 8:50 eSCApe frOm pLANet eArtH 3d 3:00**, 8:00** eSCApe frOm pLANet eArtH 2d 12:30**, 5:30** ideNtitY tHief 1:00**, 3:40, 6:25, 9:10 Side effeCtS 12:40**, 3:20, 5:55, 8:30 BeAutifuL CreAtureS 12:15**, 3:10, 6:05, 9:00 WArm BOdieS 2:00**, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20 SAfe HAveN 12:05**, 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 HANSeL ANd GreteL WitCH HuNterS 3d 4:15, 6:45* HANSeL ANd GreteL WitCH HuNterS 2d 4:15*, 9:30 ArGO 1:20, 3:05*, 5:50*, 6:40, 8:40*

minor theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 2/15-2/21 unless otherwise noted. The Minor will be closed Mon., 2/11 and Tue., 2/12.

A GOOd dAY tO die HArd HYde pArk ON HudSON SiLver LiNiNGS pLAYBOOk

1:50, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25 1:00, 3:35, 6:15, 9:00

fortuna theater 707-725-2121

1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 2/15-2/21 unless otherwise noted.

eSCApe frOm pLANet eArtH 3d eSCApe frOm pLANet eArtH A GOOd dAY tO die HArd BeAutifuL CreAtureS SAfe HAveN ideNtitY tHief Side effeCtS

12:15, 4:30, 8:45 2:25, 6:40 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:45 12:50, 3:45, 6:50, 9:35 1:00, 4:10, 7:10, 9:40 1:10, 4:00, 6:40, 9:20 1:30, 4:10, 7:00, 9:30

Garberville theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville LiNCOLN

2/15-2/21: 7:30 (exCept 2/20: 6:30)

continued from previous page

Computers seaside town escaping her past. A kind and handsome widower (Josh Duhamel) offers her safe haven. Rated PG-13. ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH. 3D CGI animated comedy/adventure in space has heroic astronaut Scorch Supernova (voiced by Brendan Fraser) battling evil villain Shanker (William Shatner). When Scorch finds himself in trouble, it’s up to his nerdy brother Gary (Rob Corddry) to save the day. Rated PG. Arcata Theatre Lounge’s Sci-Fi Pint ‘n’ Pizza Night on Wednesday, Feb. 20, has director Louis Leterrier’s 2008 Marvel Comics superhero tale The Incredible Hulk, starring Edward Norton as Dr. Bruce Banner. (Not to be confused with Ang Lee’s 2003 The Hulk with Eric Bana.) Looking for a date movie for Valentine’s Day? The Eureka Theater is screening the ’80s romance Dirty Dancing, Thursday night only, with a young Jennifer Grey learning to dance the mambo from a hunky Patrick Swayze. Sigh. —Bob Doran 

Continuing

ARGO. Ben Affleck helms a thrilling and surprisingly funny account of the 197980 Iran hostage crisis — up for Best Pic Oscar. R. 120m. DJANGO UNCHAINED. Quentin Tarantino’s Blaxploitation western about an avenging slave in the antebellum South is the most audacious and entertaining film of the year. R. 165m. HANSEL AND GRETEL WITCH HUNTERS. An effects-laden action/horror/ comedy about grown-up versions of the Grimm fairy tale characters? In 3D? Why? Rated R. 88 m. HYDE PARK ON HUDSON. It’s a slightly awkward weekend when FDR (Bill Murray) plays host to the King and Queen of England, while carrying on with his mistress (Laura Linney). R. 94m. THE IMPOSSIBLE. A vacationing British family (Naomi Watts, Ewan McGregor, etc.) is torn apart in the devastating Southeast Asian tsunami of 2004. PG. 114m. SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK. Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence deliver Oscar-nominated performances, with a twist of mental instability, in this bipolar dramedy. R. 122m. WARM BODIES. Teen rom-com based on the Bard’s Romeo and Juliet — with zombies. Nicholas Hoult and Teresa Palmer are R and Julie, the star-crossed lovers. PG13. 97m. ZERO DARK THIRTY. Director Kathryn Bigelow crafts a taut thriller that follows a young CIA agent’s (Jessica Chastain) dogged 10-year pursuit of Bin Laden. R. 157m. •

northcoastjournal.com North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, FEB. Feb.14, 14,2013 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 32 NORTH

INTRO TO ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR CS6. Learn the drawing program used to create logos, technical and free-form illustrations, banners, posters, web graphics and more. With Annie Reid. Mon./Wed., Feb. 25-March 11, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (C-0214)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts INTERMEDIATE KNITTING CLASS AT YARN. Sat.s, March 16 & 23, 3-4:30 p.m., $30, plus materials. Go beyond the basics - learn to read patterns, textured stitches & lace. Beginning knitting level required. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-0307) LEARN TO KNIT SOCKS AT YARN. Thurs.s, March 14-April 4, 5:30-7 p.m., $60, plus materials. Hand knit socks are fun to make and a joy to wear. Beginning knitting level required. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-0307) MAKING PHOTOS 1. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, 333 6th St. Wed.s, Feb. 27-April 17, no class 3/13. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $85. Learn more about your digital camera and the techniques that will help your artistic expression. View more at www. redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to reserve your seat. (AC-0214) OPEN CRAFT NIGHT. Every Fri. 6-9 p.m. Free! Come craft with us, get creative and crazy, bring your project and snack. A great way to explore new projects and meet people. 8 seats available, please R.S.V.P. 621 Third St., Eureka. (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0228)

Communication

THE ART OF LISTENING. Discover practical tools for connecting deeply with others at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., Feb. 17, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-0214) COMMUNICATION & CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. Are you having trouble managing conflict in your life? Do you find yourself at a loss when dealing with difficult friends, family or co-workers? Learn how to take charge of difficult situations and turn conflicts into win-win solutions. Sign up for Humboldt Mediation Services’ one day workshop on Communication and Conflict Management Sat., March 9. Advanced registration is required. Call 445-2505 or visit our website at www.humboldtmediationservices.org. (CMM-0221) STORYTELLING SEMINAR. Speaking with Art & Imagination. Learn to deliver the brief effective story to highlight a public speech. With Jesse Austin. Sat., Feb. 23-March 9, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. plus Sat., March 9, 7-9 p.m. $45. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMM-0214)

LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1226) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT-0228) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-0606) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-0228) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-0606) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1226)

Fitness

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session Feb. 1-June 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-0606) NIA-DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6-7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Starting Jan. 14. Wed.s, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. Starting Jan. 9. $5 drop-in, $50/12 classes (707) 441-9102 (F-0328) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1226) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1226)


AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-0328) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0606) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1226)

Home & Garden

KLAMATH KNOT PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE. Earn a Permaculture Design Certificate and learn ecological design, natural building, forest farming, mycotechnology, greywater design, rainwater catchment and more in this extended course. www. Klamath Knot.com, Sandy Bar Ranch, (530) 627-3379 (G-0228)

TINY TUTUS BEGINNING BALLET I. Ballerinas ages 4-7 will learn ballet’s basic steps and beginning dance positions. John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Tues.s, 6-6:45 p.m., beginning 3/5. $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0214) IMPROV IN ACTION. An exciting theater improv workshop taught by HSU’s improv team Unscripted Sutras. Mon.-Fri., Feb. 18-22, 9 a.m-Noon. Ages 9-14, Call Arcata Playhouse at 822-1575. (K-0214) SHADOW PLAY. Create amazing shadow puppets and learn to perform with them! Taught by James Hildebrandt. Mon. - Fri. Feb. 18 -22, 12:30 p.m- 3:30 p.m. Ages 9-14 Call the Arcata Playhouse at 822-1575 to register today! (K-0214) PRESIDENT’S BREAK CAMP. Join us in Blue Lake for our President’s Break Camp for 5-13 year olds. Mon.Fri., Feb. 18-22, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Fullday or half-day option. Roller Skating, Arts & Crafts, Dodge Ball and more! Register today! Download a registration form at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932, for more information. (K-0214) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1226)

Language

EASY CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH. Thurs.s, March 7-28. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $78. College of the Redwoods Downtown Eureka Site @ 333 6th St. This class is for people with little or no prior knowledge of Spanish who want to be able to communicate with Spanish speaking individuals they meet at home or abroad. View more at www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to reserve your seat. (L-0214) SPANISH LESSONS. Learn Spanish with a native speaker. Private lessons or personalized tutoring. Rocio, (787)225-6610, talavera.rocio@gmail.com. (L-0221)

Lectures

Kids & Teens

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS IS EVERYONE’S BUSINESS. Local businesses are relied upon to remain open after a disaster. Create a simple but effective business disaster plan, including making disaster supply kits, strengthening buildings and injury prevention. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. Wed., Feb. 27, 1-4 p.m., Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, Eureka. $50. Pre-registration required: humboldt. edu/rti/business or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at (707) 826-3731.(L-0214)

FIESTA KIDS Latin inspired dance fitness class for kids ages 5-11. Crank up the music, shake, wiggle & have a blast! Mon.s, 4 p.m., starting 3/4 at the Adorni Center. $20/child. Register online at www.eurekarecreation. com or visit The Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. 441-4244. (K-0214)

FOOD SAFETY. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Tues., Feb. 26, 6-8 p.m., Humboldt Area Foundation, Bayside. Preregistration required: humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0214)

HIP HOP DANCE CREW. Have your child learn the art of hip hop dance! Give your child confidence & a creative energy outlet. 4 week class for ages 5-9, Wed.s, 6-6:45 pm starting 3/6, $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or visit The Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. 441-4244 (K-0214)

G.U.L.C.H. TEEN POETRY SLAM. Learn poetry writing & performing techniques, rules & regulations, upcoming slam contests. Enjoy performances by guest poets. 2/28, 4-6 p.m. at Cooper Gulch,1720 10th St. $5 drop-in fee & scholarships available. Call Brian at 441-4240 for more info. (K-0214)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1226)

FINGERPAINTING ON YOUR IPAD. An introduction to iPad painting using the ArtStudio app, with local artist Claire Iris Schencke. Sat., March 2 and 9, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0228) AN INSIDER’S GUIDE, LISTENING TO MODERN JAZZ. With music writer Bob Doran. Wed. night discussions take place Tues., Feb. 20 and April 3, 4-6 p.m. prior to two corresponding Redwood Jazz Alliance concerts. Class participants are invited to attend Matt Wilson’s jazz quartet “Arts and Crafts”, Feb. 22, and jazz quintet “Spirit House” with guitarist Joel Harrison, April 4. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. Tickets not included. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0228) ART OF LIVING. Wed. Brown Bag Lunch Presentations and Discussions. Wed., Noon-2 p.m., ongoing through May 22, at Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center. Topics include Restoration and Renewal in Redwood National/State Parks; Conversations on Creative Aging; Independence for a Lifetime; Creating Community Assets. Presentations are FREE to OLLI at HSU members. To join/reserve your seat, call OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0228) CONTEMPORARY DIPLOMACY, INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION. Join a discussion of different cultures and diplomatic communication with Elena Matusevich. Thurs., March 7-21, 2-4 p.m. $45/ OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0228) FLOODS OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. Examine the history, weather and geology that contributed to extreme rainfall and flood events with historian Jerry Rohde, meteorologist Nancy Dean and geologist Harvey Kelsey. Tues,, March 5-19, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45/ OLLI members, $60/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0228) FUN, FORMS & FUNCTIONS OF FOLKLORE. Look at different forms of folklore, including myths, tales, jokes, food ways, music, games, music, traditions and more. With Renee Ross. Tues., March 5-19, 10 a.m.-Noon. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0228) GENTLE YOGA FOR OLLI. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., March 4-April 8, 1:30-3 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0228) SENIOR ACTION COALITION. Use your knowledge and experience to take action on pressing issues affecting older adults. Seniors, boomers welcome. Grassroots, non-partisan, current focus health care. Meetings held third Wed. of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Jefferson School, 1000 B St. For more information, e-mail psa@a1aa.org or call (707) 442-3763. (O-0214) STEER CLEAR, WHEN IT IS TIME FOR SOMEONE ELSE TO CONTROL THE CRUISING. This course is designed to help start the difficult conversation about driving retirement. See the documentary, “Old People Driving,” and join in a guided discussion with Kip Roberti. Sat., March 2, 10 a.m.-Noon. $10/OLLI members, $35/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0228) 2012 & THE MAYA CALENDAR, CONTEMPORARY APOCALYPTICS. Retrospectively examine the “2012 phenomenon” that involved contemporary expectations of a transformative event on or around Dec. 21, 2012. With Kevin Whitesides. Thurs., Feb. 28-April 25, 6-8 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: continued on next page

T-Ball Signups are happening now!

Call 441-1030

FRUIT TREE GRAFTING WITH SAM POLLY Learn Fruit Tree Grafting Basics Sat., Feb. 16th 10:30 a.m. Workshop Fee: $20 (Includes Grafted Tree) Call 839-1571x5

for details and to register!

1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville Mon.-Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 • millerfarmsnursery.com

North Coast Academy

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013

33


continued from previous page

EARLY CHRISTIANITIES, THE FIRST 400 YEARS. Explore the various currents, groups and controversies that shaped Christian history, from Pentecost to the Council of Chalcedon in 451. With Laurent Cleenewerck. Thurs., Feb. 28-March 21, 10 a.m.-Noon. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www. humboldt.edu/olli (O-0214) SUPERSTORM SANDY. Discuss the impacts of the second most costly tropical storm in the U.S. with NOAA meteorologist Nancy Dean. Tues., Feb. 26-March 5, 3-5 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0214) THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE, CIVILIZATION & LEGACY. Explore the fascinating history of the Byzantine (Eastern Roman Empire) from Constantine to the tragic fall of Constantinople in 1453. With Laurent Cleenewerck. Tues., Feb. 26-March 19, 10 a.m.-Noon. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0214)

Spiritual

KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direction of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442-7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www. kdkarcatagroup.org (S-0502) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442-4240 www.tarotofbecoming. com (S-0228) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-0606)

Sports/Recreation

SWEETHEARTS PADDLE ON THE EEL RIVER. Bring the one you love out for some adventure in the Redwoods Sat., Feb. 16. Cruise this mellow section of river along the avenue of the giants with expert guides. Boats and gear included in tour price. No experience necessary. $95 pp or $70 with own boat. Call (707) 443-5157 or email info@humboats.com to reserve. (SR-0214) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1226)

Therapy/Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk-in support group for anyone suffering from depression. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m -7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839-5691. (T-1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1226)

TYPE 1 DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP. meeting the 3rd Tues. of each month, 6-7:30 p.m, at the Foundation of Medical Care, 3100 Edgewood Rd. Eureka.Contact 443-0124. (T-0214) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1226)

Vocational

MAKE XTRA INCOME AS A WHOLSALE AUTO DEALER FROM HOME Sun., Feb. 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $105. College of the Redwoods Eureka Downtown Site, 333 6th St. Come learn how to supplement your income buying and selling wholesale cars. View more at www. redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. Call (707) 2694000 to reserve your seat. (V-0214) CAREGIVER TRAINING. Area 1 Agency on Aging offers FREE 42-hour course in Fortuna. Prepare for new career, take better care of loved ones, request employment referrals. Sessions held Tues.s and Thurs.s, 6-9 p.m., Feb. 19-March 19. Homework due at first session. Call Caregiver Services at (707) 4434363 to schedule registration. (V-0214)

yoga, workshops, and other healing modalities. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (W-0214) TUES. & THURS. AFTERNOON MASSAGE WITH DIANE DAVIS. Enhance your Pilates or yoga practice or just unwind and relax with a massage session at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Nationally certified since 1997, Diane is trained in Hawaiian Lomi Lomi, Myofascial Release, Swedish, Craniosacral, Acupressure and Reiki. Questions? Call (707) 268-8926 to schedule an appointment. (W-0214) YOGA FOR ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS. At Om Shala Yoga. With Christine Fiorentino. 6 session series on Tues.s & Thurs.s, Feb. 19-March 7, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Learn in a supportive environment. No experience or flexibility required! $75 cost. Must preregister by Mon., Feb. 18. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (W-0214)

AY U RV E D I C M A SS AG E TRAINING & CLEANSING RETREATS. With Traci Webb and Myrica Morningstar, Training meets five weekends (Fri-Sun). May 17-July 14. Learn over 16 Ayurvedic Massages and Herbal Body Therapies for Career Enhancement and Self-Healing (Deadline: April 17). Group & YOGA FOR Personal Cleansing Retreats: ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS July 17-Aug. 11. Call for deAT OM SHALA YOGA. tails. NCBTMB Approved CE CALL 825-YOGA (9642) Provider. REGISTER: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: CREATING PROFITwww.ayurvedicliving.com, ABILITY. With Strateinfo@ayurvedicliving.com, gic eMarketing founder and owner Emanual Rose. (707) 601-9025. (W-0411) 5 part workshop series starting Feb. 20. Participants will learn how to bundle products and services HOLOTROPIC BREATHWORK. Full day workshop effectively, reward referral services, optimize their in Arcata. March 16. Contact Martin 498-1080. holomedia for the latest search algorithms and embrace tropicbreath@yahoo.com (W-0228) internet marketing. 5:30-8 p.m., Feb. 20, March 20, April 17, May 15, and June 19. $249 includes materials. NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center Prosperity Center Conference Room, 520 E St., Eureka. 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., (707) 506-6138, strategicemarketing.com (V-0214) specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on Wellness/Bodywork that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger CHAKRA BALANCING WORKSHOP FOR RELATIONpoint, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, SHIPS. Feb. 23, 5:30-8 p.m, Healing 4 lovers, Intensive lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilworkshop at Oshun yoga, Trinidad. info@Oshunyoga. ary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we com (W-0214) do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1226) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Intermediate Herbology with Jane Bothwell, April 17- June 12, Wed. eveSTART YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! nings, 7-9 p.m., next to Humboldt Herbals in Eureka. Daytime classes begin June, 2013 at Arcata School of Delve deeper into the healing power of plants. $365. Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certifica(707) 442-8157 www.dandelionherb.com (W-0411) tion will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our compreOM SHALA 40-DAY YOGA JOURNEY! Devote yourhensive program prepares your body, mind and self to 40-days of Mindfulness, meditation & asana. heart to become a caring, confident professional Fri., March 1–Tues. April 9. Free Opening Intention massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or Setting Potluck Sat., Feb. 23, 6 p.m. 40-Day Unlimited visit arcatamassage.com (W-1226) ● Yoga Pass for $175: Includes unlimited yoga classes, sauna & generous discounts on bodywork, private

NORTH Coast COAST Journal JOURNAL •• Thursday, THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013 ••northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 34 34 North

classified@northcoastjournal.com

826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0214)

Legal Notice

City of Arcata Publically Owned Treatment Works (POTW) Pretreatment Program notice of Significant Noncompliance of Industrial Waste Pretreatment Requirements in 2012. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) General Pretreatment Regulations (40 CFR Part 403) requires the City of Arcata to annually publish a list of “Significant Industrial Users” which, during the previous calendar year, significantly violated applicable Pretreatment Standards or other Pretreatment Requirements. For the purpose of this publication, “Pretreatment Standards” are “any regulation containing pollutant discharge limits established by the USEPA, or the City of Arcata which applies to Industrial Users. This term includes prohibitive discharge limits established pursuant to Section 403.5” (Section 403.3(j)). The term “Pretreatment Requirements” means any substantive or procedural requirement related to Pretreatment, other than a National Standard, imposed on an Industrial User (Section 403.3(r)). A Significant Industrial User is in “Significant Noncompliance” if its violation meets one or more of the following criteria: (A) Chronic violations of wastewater Discharge limits, defined here as those in which 66 percent or more of all of the measurements taken for the same pollutant parameter during a 6-month period exceed (by any magnitude) a numeric Pretreatment Standard or Requirement, including instantaneous limits, as defined by 40 CFR 403.3(l); (B) Technical Review Criteria (TRC) violations, defined here as those in which 33 percent or more of all of the measurements taken for the same pollutant parameter during a 6-month period equal or exceed the product of the numeric Pretreatment Standard or Requirement including instantaneous limits, as defined by 40 CFR 403.3(l) multiplied by the applicable TRC (TRC=1.4 for BOD, TSS, fats, oil, and grease, and 1.2 for all other pollutants except pH); (C) Any other violation of a Pretreatment Standard or Requirement as defined by 40 CFR 403.3(l) that the POTW determines has caused, alone or in combination with other Discharges, Interference or Pass Through (including endangering the health of POTW personnel or the general public); (D) Any Discharge of a pollutant that has caused imminent endangerment to human health, welfare or to the environment or has resulted in the POTW’s exercise of its emergency authority under paragraph (f)(1)(iv)(B) of 40 CFR 403 to halt or prevent such discharge; (E) Failure to meet, within 90 days after the scheduled date, a compliance schedule milestone contained in


a local control mechanism or enforcement order for starting construction, completing construction, or attaining final compliance; (F) Failure to provide, within 45 days after the due date, required reports such as baseline monitoring reports, 90-day compliance reports, periodic self-monitoring reports, and reports on compliance with compliance schedules; (G) Failure to accurately report noncompliance; (H) Any other violation or group of violations, which may include a violation of Best Management Practices, which the POTW determines will adversely affect the operation or implementation of the local Pretreatment program. In 2012 the following Industrial Users were in Significant Noncompliance of applicable Pretreatment Standards: Cypress Grove Chevre was in Significant Noncompliance for discharge of Oil and Grease above Technical Review Criteria (TRC) in Quarter 1, Quarter 2, Quarter 3 and Quarter 4 and for Chronic violations of wastewater discharge limits for Oil and Grease in Quarter 1, Quarter 2, Quarter 3 and Quarter 4. Persons wishing to comment may do so, in writing, within 30 days following the publication date of this notice, to the following address: City of Arcata Environmental Services Department 736 F Street Arcata, CA 95521 Published date: 2/14/2013 2/14/2013 (13-48)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00038

The following persons are doing Business as SUNNYNIGHTS PHOTOBOOTH/ CONFIGURATIONS BUILDING COMPAMY at 1834 14TH St. Eureka, CA. 95501. Jason Cseh 1834 14th St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Bethany Cseh 1834 14th St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A /s/ Jason J. Cseh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 17, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 03/07/2013 (13-46)

  FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00057

The following person is doing Business as RIVERBEND PARK at 45630 St Hwy 36., Bridgeville CA. 95526. Brian A. Beltramo 1438 East Ave. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A /s/ Brian A. Beltramo This statement was filed with the

County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 28, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 03/07/2013 (13-44)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00082

The following person is doing Business as FUTURETECH at 940 Broadway, Eureka CA. 95501, PO Box 3011, Eureka, CA 95502. Bobby Doyle Weaver Jr. 2937 I St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 02/05/2013 /s/ Bobby Doyle Weaver Jr. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 06, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 03/07/2013 (13-43)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00083

The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDT PAWN/ HUMBOLDT BAY TRADE & PAWN at 1435 Fifth St. Eureka, CA. 95501. Humboldt Bay Trading Co., Inc. 1435 Fifth St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A /s/ Lester L. Krause III, President/ CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 06, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 03/07/2013 (13-45)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00041

The following persons are doing Business as NAGAN BUILDING at 786 9th St. Arcata, CA. 95521. Jeffrey Nagan 775 Patrick Ct. St. Arcata, CA. 95521 Shelly Ergeson 7061 Enright Dr. Citrus Heights, CA. 95621 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/16/2013 /s/ Jeff Nagan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 17, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 03/07/2013 (13-49)

  FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00072

The following person is doing business as PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTELLA at 1393 Chaparral Drive, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Jamey Estelle Hughes 1393 Chaparral Dr. McKinleyville, CA 95519

The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/31/13. /s Jamey Estelle Hughes. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 31, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

Field notes

2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 3/7/2013 (13-50)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00085

The following person is doing business as FOREVERGREEN LANDSCAPE at 2723 Fairfield St., Eureka, CA 95501. Brian William Kretz 2723 Fairfield St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Brian Kretz. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 3/7/2013 (13-47)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00039

The following person is doing Business as THE QUEENWAH PALACE at 171 Langford Rd., Trinidad, CA 95570, PO Box 723, Trinidad, CA 95570 Katherine Ann Long 171 Langford Rd. Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/17/2013 /s/ Katherine Ann Long This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 17, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28/2013 (13-34)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00078

The following persons are doing business as HORIZON RENTAL SERVICES at 3853 Glenwood St., Eureka, CA 95502, P.O. Box 6533, Eureka, CA 95502. Horizon Realty Services, Inc. 3853 Glenwood St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 12/01/12. /s Sean Crowder, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28/2013 (13-41)

➤ legal NOTICES continued on next page

left: Northeast portal of tuNNel today. above: lookiNg out from the southwest portal. photos by barry evaNs.

The Loleta Tunnel By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

I

’m told that the toughest part of the annual Memorial Day weekend Kinetic Grand Championship is the Eel River Drive hill up from Hookton Road heading toward Loleta. That’s where the route crosses over Table Bluff, a 300-foot high sandstone ridge separating the Eel River valley from Humboldt Bay. If those hardy racers find the hill a challenge, they’ll be in good company, including that of the lumbermen of the 1870s and 1880s who wanted to transport logs and lumber from the Eel to Humboldt Bay’s sawmills and ship landings. Until the summer of 1884, they had two choices: Go around the ridge or over it. Around 1873, local entrepreneur Charles Heney built a five-mile mule-powered, wooden-track railroad around the western end of Table Bluff, from McNulty Slough (which flows into the Eel River estuary) to Heney’s new settlement of Southport Landing, near the present-day Wiyot Reservation. The railroad was short-lived because of a huge storm that permanently wrecked it in the winter of 1878. So much for going around the ridge. But the roads going over were terrible, as illustrated by a report in the Humboldt Times (April 15, 1876): “… surely we never before saw a highway in such deplorable condition. Great ruts and mudholes, into which the horse sank over knee deep and it is a mystery to us how the Rohnerville stages succeed in pulling through them.” A railroad would solve the mud problem, but only if the route could avoid steep grades. What was needed was a route that went through Table Bluff.

The Pacific Lumber Company owned huge tracts of redwood in the Eel valley, and its ambitions for a huge new mill at Scotia (named for the many natives of Nova Scotia who had settled there) resulted in a permanent solution to the Eel-to-Bay transportation problem. After several lumber barons — John Vance, William Carson and Captain Henry Buhne among them — joined forces in 1882 to create the Eel River and Eureka Railroad, work on a tunnel soon followed. Working day and night, crews dug from both ends to complete the one-third-mile-long tunnel by the summer of 1884. For 114 years, the tunnel was a vital conduit for countless trains bringing lumber from the Eel River basin to Fields Landing. In 1907, many local railroads were reorganized and brought under one umbrella company, the Northwestern Pacific Railroad, and today the tunnel is officially designated NWP No. 40. It’s in good shape today — it was renovated in 1960 — with tracks still running through it. If you want to check it out, start in Loleta and walk north-easterly about one mile up the NWP tracks. Boots and flashlights are recommended for the full throughthe-tunnel experience. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) thanks Mike Kellogg and the Timber Heritage Association for help with this column. THA will be running a speeder from Loleta to the tunnel entrance this coming July 14 and Oct. 12. Call 443-2957 for more information.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, FEB. 14, 2013

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00059

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

continued from previous page.

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS 1. Garten of the Food Network 4. Bigwig 9. “____ of God” (1985 film) 14. Boxer’s wear 16. Took the wheel 17. Drunkard 18. Target of October ads 19. What the employee said she was to her boss after hitting the lottery jackpot? 21. Hike: Abbr. 22. Roof application

49. Military branches: Abbr. 23. Play (with) 50. “____ calling?” 24. A child’s worst nightmare? 51. “Cutting to the chase ...” (or a 32. Mr. T’s TV gang hint at solving 19-, 24-, 34- or 33. Lena of “Chocolat” 34. Mediterranean relative of a star of 42-Across) 58. Make a pass at “The Sopranos”? 40. “This Is How ____ It” (1995 #1 hit) 59. Kentucky’s northern border 60. O3 41. Was sick 42. Walt Disney biopic that focuses 61. Pink Floyd’s “The Wall,” e.g. heavily on the creation of Mickey 62. “Lost” actor Jeff 63. Chases away and Minnie? 64. ____ milk 46. RR stop

DOWN 1. “Gotcha, bro” 2. “Stop! That’s totally wrong!” 3. Bureau 4. Where kroner are spent: Abbr. 5. Others, to Octavian 6. Beginning trumpeter’s sound 7. Promise 8. QB Favre and others 9. Daily or weekly 10. Mushroom 11. “Me? Impossible!” 12. Deadlocked 13. Rev.’s address 15. “Good buddy” 20. Japanese “yes” 24. Call ____ day 25. “Tutte ____ cor vi sento” (Mozart aria)

26. Industrial container 27. “Um ... er ...” 28. Washerful 29. Building annex 30. 2002 Nas hit “One ____” 31. Diciembre ends it 32. Mine, in Marseille 34. Toddler’s age 35. Publisher often seen in PJs 36. Teacher’s deg. 37. Caesar who quipped “The guy who invented the first wheel was an idiot. The guy who invented the other three, he was a genius” 38. Dutch ____ disease 39. ATM charge 43. “Yankee Doodle Dandy” Oscar winner 44. 40% of fifty?

HARD #20

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

45. Rich couple on the Titanic 46. Starts of some brawls 47. Bullfighter 48. Bad way to be lead 50. Beat to a froth 51. “____ With a ‘Z’” (1972 TV concert) 52. Texter’s “From a different viewpoint ...” 53. What the fourth little piggy had 54. “Call on me! I know the answer!” 55. Puerto ____ 56. “The Ballad of John and ____” 57. B’way signs of success 58. Cooperstown attraction: Abbr.

The following person is doing business as NORTH COAST TRANSITIONS at 335 W. Sonoma St., Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 8047, Eureka, CA 95502-8047. Daniel Joseph Griffith 335 W. Sonoma St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Daniel Joseph Griffith. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 28, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28/2013 (13-32)

1/31, 2/7, 2/14, 2/21/2013 (13-28)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00071

The following persons are doing Business as COMIX TRIP PRODUCTION COMPANY at 1267 McCallum Circle., Arcata, CA. 95521, PO Box 577, Bayside, CA 95524. Paul C. Thompson 1267 McCallum Cir. Bayside, CA. 95524 Violet Crabtree Thompson 1267 McCallum Cir. Bayside, CA. 95524 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/1/2013 /s/ Paul C. Thompson /s/ Violet Crabtree Thompson This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 31, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28/2013 (13-36)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00077

The following person is doing business as DAVE’S 76 SERVICE at 1666 Main Street, Fortuna, CA 95540. Anita L. Ansley 2020 S. Second Avenue Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Anita L. Ansley. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28/2013 (13-40)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00018

The following person is doing

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, FEB. 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

business as LOCAL WORM GUY at 39 Horse Linto Rd., Willow Creek CA 95573, PO Box 741, Willow Creek, CA 95573. Lloyd Lone Barker, IV 1054 Sun Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Stacey c. Barker 1054 Sun Rd. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/1/2010 /s/ Lloyd Lone Barker, IV This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 09, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00037

The following person is doing business as SIDE SHOW DESIGN at 1002 Lewis Ave., Arcata CA 95521. Scott Cocking 1002 Lewis Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521        The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A /s/ Scott Cocking This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 16, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 1/31, 2/7, 2/14, 2/21/2013 (13-23)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00024

The following person is doing business as GO LIGHT at 5161 Greenwood Heights Dr., Kneeland, CA 95549.                                                                                                                            Molly Robles 5161 Greenwood Heights Dr. Kneeland , CA. 95549   The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 01/11/2013 /s/ Molly Robles This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 14, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/14/2013 (13-15)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00025

The following persons are doing business as LOTUS ACUPUNCTURE & HEALING ARTS at 825 Bayside Rd., Arcata, CA 95521. Lupine Meredith Wread

1752 Old Arcata, Rd. Bayside , CA. 95524 Sheridan Richardson Barnes 1887 Babler Rd McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Mary Teresa Leathner 999 Kingdom Rd. Trinidad, CA. 95570 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 01/22/2013 /s/ Mary T. Leuthner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 14, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/14/2013 (13-16)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00027

The following persons are doing business as LOOKING UP CLOTHING COMPANY at 2240 Fairfield St., Eureka, CA 95501. James Osburn 2240 Fairfield St. Eureka , CA. 95501 Helen Yang 2240 Fairfield St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Graham Osburn 2510 Davis Way Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 01/12/2013 /s/ James B. Osburn This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 15, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk   

1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/14/2013 (13-17)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00028

The following person is doing business as REDWOOD COAST SPREADER BARS at 1358 School Rd., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Matthew Goldsworthy 1358 School Rd. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A /s/ Matthew Goldsworthy This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 15, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/14/2013 (13-18)

 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130086 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: QUYEN SHARP TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: QUYEN SHARP


for a decree changing names as follows: Present name QUYEN SHARP to Proposed Name QUINN SHARP THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 22, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: February 01, 2013 Filed: February 01, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court

  ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE  FOR CHANGE OF NAME  CASE NO. CV130068  SUPERIOR COURT  OF CALIFORNIA,  COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT  825 FIFTH STREET  EUREKA, CA 95501

NOTICE OF PETITION  TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DAVIS W. ANSLEY  CASE NO. PR130038

PETITION OF: THOMAS JAMES MORGESE TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: THOMAS JAMES MORGESE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name THOMAS JAMES MORGESE to Proposed Name THOMAS JAMES TSUTOMU TAKAHASHI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 12, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: January 22, 2013 Filed: January 22, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court

PETITION OF: APRIL MCKINZIE TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: APRIL MCKINZIE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MIKAYLA ANN MCKINZIE to Proposed Name MIKAYLA ANN WILLIAMS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 8, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: January 14, 2013 Filed: January 14, 2013 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DAVID W. ANSLEY: DAVID WILLIAM ANSLEY, DAVID ANSLEY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ANITA ANSLEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ANITA ANSLEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 28, 2013, at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: KELLY M. WALSH S.B # 159155 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP. 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 JANUARY 31, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28/2013(13-38)

1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/14/2013 (13-21)

2/7, 2/14, 2/21/2013 (13-37)

2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 3/7/2013 (13-42)

  ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE  FOR CHANGE OF NAME  CASE NO. CV130050  SUPERIOR COURT  OF CALIFORNIA,  COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT  825 FIFTH STREET  EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: TEHAN IDREEZ WISE TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: TEHAN IDREEZ WISE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name TEHAN IDREEZ WISE to Proposed Name TEHAN IDREEZ BUEHLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 15, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: January 25, 2013 Filed: January 25, 2013 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 1/31, 2/7, 2/14, 2/21/2013 (13-31)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE  FOR CHANGE OF NAME  CASE NO. CV130023  SUPERIOR COURT  OF CALIFORNIA,  COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT  825 FIFTH STREET  EUREKA, CA 95501

 NOTICE OF PETITION  TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JUNE CAROLINE BERG  CASE NO. PR130032

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JUNE CAROLINE BERG A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DEANNA LESKU in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DEANNA LESKU be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 25, 2013, at 8:30 a.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Stephen G. Watson, S.B. # 112171 LAW OFFICE OF W.G WATSON, JR. 715 I STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 444-3071 JANUARY 29, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 2/7, 2/14, 2/21/2013 (13-35)

NOTICE OF PETITION  TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JAMES GEORGE SCOTHORN, aka JAMES G. SCOTHORN  & JAMES SCOTHORN  CASE NO. PR130033

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JAMES GEORGE SCOTHORN, aka JAMES G. SCOTHORN & JAMES SCOTHORN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DICK LaFORGE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DICK LaFORGE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held onMarch 7, 2013 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOSHUA R. KAUFMAN SBN# 225987 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 JANUAARY 29, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

Is my Fictitious Business Name Statement good forever

?

Y

our fictitious business name statement will expire five years from the date it was last filed with the County Clerk. You have 40 days from the expiration date to renew your FBNS with the County. A new statement does not need to be published unless there has been a change in the information required in the expired statement. If any changes occur then you must file a new FBNS and have published again. Within 30 days from the stamped refiling date, you must begin publishing the statement in the newspaper. If you publish it in the North Coast Journal for the required four weeks, on the last day of publication a “proof of publication” will be sent to the County Clerk to complete the filing process. The cost for running your ficticious business name in the North Coast Journal is a flat $50 fee.

442-1400

1/31, 2/7, 2/14/2013 (13-33)

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, FEB. 14, 2013

37


the Supervising Psychiatric Nurse

Employment

Inventory Control SpeCIalISt

POLICE RECORDS SPECIALIST I/II

$2,690 - $3,272/month + Excellent Benefits

$2,231- $2,980/ Month + Excellent Benefits

This position is responsible for ordering, maintaining, and distributing the inventory of parts, materials and supplies required to maintain the City’s vehicles and equipment; must have the ability to work independently, and to exercise initiative and judgment. Equivalent to the completion of the 12th grade and 2 years of automotive/ equipment parts purchasing and inventory experience. ASE certificates for both Automotive Parts Specialist and Medium/Heavy Truck Parts are highly desirable.

This is an entry level position within the police records department. Multitasking and general clerical and customer services duties are required. Desirable qualifications for Police Records Specialist include a combination of training and/or experience which are equivalent to a High School Diploma and 1 year related records experience. PLEASE NOTE: Any drug use or involvement or any potential criminal activity occurring within 3 years will disqualify you and will be discovered in the various screening processes you will be required to undergo. Screening will include a very extensive background investigation, lie detector examination and work habits testing performed by a psychologist.

CiTy Of EuREKA

CiTy Of EurEKA

Application packets are available on-line at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov or the Personnel office at 531 K Street, Eureka. Application deadline is 5:00 p.m. 02/22/2013. EOE

COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER

Apply on-line at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov or contact our job information line at 4441-4134 for further job opportunities. Hiring packets will also be available in the Personnel Office at 531 K Street, Eureka, CA 95501

City of EurEka

$2,991-$3,638/month + excellent benefits Would you like the opportunity to make a difference, save lives, and make our community a better place to live? our dispatchers work in a positive and professional environment that provides opportunities for growth. the City’s modern dispatch center includes 6 dispatch consoles with a user-friendly computerized dispatch system. this is an entry-level position, no experience is needed, and onthe-job training will be provided. tasks include taking 911 calls and dispatching police, fire and medical personnel following prescribed procedures, and other related duties. the ability to multi-task and work with others in a fastpaced environment is beneficial. for a complete job description and application packet: visit the Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at http://www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. application packets must be received by 5:00 pm, friday, february 22, 2013. EoE

Employment & Training Program Coordinator

County of Humboldt: $3,732 – $4,789 monthly, plus excellent benefits. Under general supervision, assign, direct, coordinate and review the work of vocational counselors and support staff; perform complex analysis and evaluation related to specialized employment training programs and oversee operations of programs. Desirable education and experience would include a four-year college degree in public administration, social services or a related field and two years of experience involving planning or operational responsibilities for an employment-training or related program. Valid California driver’s license required.

Final Filing Date: February 25, 2013. AA/EOE Apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs or contact Human Resources at (707) 476-2349 or Humboldt County Courthouse 825 5th St, Eureka

General Manager-Media Insurance Agent Commercial and Personal Lines 3 Tree Climbers minimum 3 years experience Class B Driver/Labor Heating Tech  NATE Certified Heating Tech Outside Sales  Certified Plumber

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

CalFresh specialist

County of Humboldt $5,135 - $6,590 mo. Plans, organizes and directs day to day nursing and related functions on assigned shift in a psychiatric treatment facility, and performs other work as required. Two years experience in psychiatric nursing with some supervisory or charge experience is desired. CA RN is req. Position is open until filled. Filing deadline: February 19, 2013. Apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs or contact Human Resources at (707) 476-2349 Humboldt County Courthouse 825 5th St, Eureka AA/EOE

K’ima:w Medical Center,

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

Prevention Specialist II FT/Regular. Grant funded Methamphetamine and Suicide Prevention Initiative (MSPI) Program position. Minimum requirements: Five years administrative experience in a mental health and/or substance abuse setting; experience in Indian Health Service RPMS database; knowledge of and sensitivity to the needs of Native American community/ culture; experience in working with federal grants; and experience in event planning and community organization. Deadline to apply is 5 PM, February 28.

Child and Family Services Coordinator FT/Regular.

Coordinates, implements, and case manages activities of the Indian Child and Family Services program. Minimum Requirements: Masters degree in Social Work, Behavioral Science, Social Services or related field from an accredited university, and one year experience in case management of child welfare and adult protective services; OR, if no Masters Degree, B.A. or B.S. in Social Work, Psychology, Behavioral Science, Social Services or related field from an accredited university, and two years experience in child welfare/adult protective services field and case management services. Extended deadline to apply is 5pm, February 22.

Chief Executive Officer FT/Contractual.

Must be able to pass criminal history fingerprint clearance. Excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and paid insurance.

Salary negotiable DOE. Work involves line management and operation of a comprehensive health care delivery organization. Minimum Requirements: Bachelor’s degree (B. A.) from four-year college or university, Major study -- hospital administration, public health administration, or related fields such as business or public administration with course work in health care administration, MPH preferred; and at least Five years experience in health care administration with Native American Programs. Deadline to apply is 5 PM, February 20.

Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address by Monday, February 25th at 5 p.m. EOE

For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call (530) 625-4261 ext. 226 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Anticipated to work until 7/31/14. This position conducts office and community based activities to support the expansion of both the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) and CalFresh program; supports enrollments on CalFresh. Starts at $14.11/hr.

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTINUED ON next page

Rentals

Employment SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR

DINING MANAGER

Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Janitorial – Night Shift Laborers - $10/hour Nurse Manager  Smog Tech Master Mechanic  Caregiver HVAC Tech

HSU Dining Services, full-time, $2,779 - $3,805 per month, plus benefits.

The Dining Manager is charged with operational oversight of the Depot dining facility at HSU. This job requires the following experience: cooking and food production that includes ordering, receiving, storage and inventory in a high-volume setting; knowledge of proper food handling techniques and ServSafe certified; hiring, training and supervising employees such as cooks and cashiers; the use of cash registers; oversee floor and cooking stations; strong customer service; computer skills including Word and Excel; available all shifts, including evenings and weekends.

Deadline: February 26, 2013 To apply: Submit Cover Letter, Resume, Names & Phone Numbers of three Work-related References, and a University Center Job Application downloaded from: http://www.humboldt.edu/uc/jobVacancies.html Mail to: Hiring Committee, University Center 1 Harpst Street, Arcata, CA 95521 Or E-mail application materials to: univctrjobs@humboldt.edu

Open Door is seeking the following medical professionals:

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 1 F/T Arcata RN CLINIC COORDINATOR 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Eureka

RN CARE TEAM COORDINATOR 1F/T Eureka MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK 1 F/T McKinleyville DENTAL RECORDS CLERK 1 F/T Eureka MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Crescent City REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 P/T Crescent City Call (707) 826-8633 ext 5140 Visit www.opendoorhealth.com

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400

Seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home and help an adult with developmental disabilities lead an integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and receive a competitive monthly stipend, ongoing training & 24 hour support. Contact Jamie (707) 442-4500 ext. 14 or jamie.mcgovern@ thementornetwork.com

AIRLINE CAREERS. Begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial assistance available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214 (E-0214) RESOURCE SPECIALIST, EUREKA OFFICE. Senior Information and Assistance Program. Part-time position (28 hours/week). Provide information, referral, advocacy and follow up to older persons, their caregivers and service providers by phone, walk-in and written request, enter all client information into database, provide outreach presentations and long-term care consultation. Must have excellent written and oral communication skills. Demonstrate an ability to analyse problems and present options. Must have strong skills in office management, priority setting and time management. Knowledge of senior and caregiver support programs and services desired. Degree with major course work in social work or psychology and one year of related experience in a community planning, health or human services agency is preferred. Equivalent experience in a direct-service position in a community planning, health or human service agency may be considered in lieu of a degree. Successful candidate must pass a background check. For an application and job description visit website http:// www.a1aa.org, or Area 1 Agency on Aging, 434 7th St., Eureka. For information call Jeanie Ren (707) 442-3763 ext. 209. Position opened until filled. (E-0221)

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS Gift Shop (Candy Cart) Deli Worker Vault Attendant Cage Cashier Server/Busser/Host, 2 Sunset Restaurant Busser/Host Seascape Restaurant Host/Cashier/Busser Prep Cook/Cook Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

PROFESSIONAL COOK. Accepting resumes now for Jambalaya in Arcata. 822-4766. (E-0214) ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. For First Presbyterian Church, a positive, dynamic and warm work environment. Benefits offered once probationary period is successfully completed. Position will remain open until filled. Please e-mail resumes to Personnel Chair Liz Smith, lsmith@bgcredwoods. org. (E-0214) PART-TIME MANAGER. Dream Quest seeking Part-Time Manager for Thrift Store. Must have management skills, a positive attitude and professional standards. Dream Quest a non-profit organization providing opportunities for local youth in Willow Creek. (530) 6293564. (E-0214) PRE-AWARD SPECIALIST (JOB #13-06) F/T position in Sponsored Programs Foundation. Review: 2/18/13. For more info visit: www. humboldt.edu/jobs or call (707) 826-3626. HSU is an ADA/Title IX/ EOE (E-0214) HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.howtowork-fromhome.com (E-0214)

LIVE LIKE A ROCKSTAR. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Shawn 800-716-0048 (AAN CAN) (E-0214) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN) (E-0228) MERCHANDISING SPECIALIST, PT EUREKA. Channel Partners is looking for a Part Time Merchandising Specialist. Contact: Thanh Phan, 877-747-4071 ext.1248. Thanh.Phan@channelpartners. com To apply go to http://bit. ly/11vbJsw (E-0307) CALIFORNIA MENTOR. Is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home and help an adult with developmental disabilities lead an integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and receive a competitive monthly stipend, ongoing training & 24 hour support. Contact Jamie (707) 442-4500 ext. 14 or jamie. mcgovern@thementornetwork. com (E-1226) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. (AAN CAN) (E-0214) HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.mailing-usa.com (AAN CAN) (E-0228) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com (AAN CAN) (E-0321) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1226)

Rentals ARCATA REMODELED 2BD/2BA SPLIT LEVEL APT. 425 Bayside Ct. #B. W/S/G Pd., w/c cat Rent $1130, Vac. Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0214) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1033 B St. Garbage Pd. Shared yard. Carport. Rent $550. Vac 02/11. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0214)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 ARCATA 4BD/2BA HOUSE. 1674 27th St. Remodeled. Newer range, refrige, dw, washer/dryer included, lg yard. Rent $1875, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0214) EUREKA STUDIO APARTMENT. 914 M St. W/S/G Pd. Private patio. Rent $535 Vac 02/17. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0214) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 230 Wabash Ave. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. Cat OK. Rent $650 Vac 01/06. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0214) CUTTEN 3BRM, 1-3/4 BA. 5849 Christopher Dr., spacious clean secure home, attached 2 car garage with opener, separate bonus room, RV parking, large fenced yard, newer appliances, 1 pet on approval, No smoking, No grow. $1600 mo./deposit $2400. Please phone before 7pm. (707) 445-8427 (R-0214) EUREKA ROOM FOR RENT. Clean & Sober only. Call Dan for details (707) 442-4737 (R-0228) SMALL HOUSE IN ARCATA. 2 room house with loft, garden. $975 includes utilities. Please call (707) 822-2175 (R-0228) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-0620)

Business Rentals DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1226)

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb 14, 2013

39


the

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Buy/Sell/Trade

Real Estate

NEW

LO

in ION CAT

Old

Services

PUBLIC AUCTION

n Tow

THURS. FEB. 14TH 5:45 PM REDUCED ! WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1226) EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 4434811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE-0228) 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/ surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN) (RE-0214) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1226)

Lodging/Travel EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountian Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986-7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L-0502)

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017

Auto 1992 34 FT. AIRSTREAM EXCELLA 1000 TRAVEL TRAILER. Good condition. Lots of extras. $15,5000 OBO. (707) 407-7312. (A-0221) CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-0606)

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Buy/Sell/Trade

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE njoy aa holiday winter hide-a-way njoy hide-a-way in in charming cabins nestled beneath the Trinity Alps. Perfect for snowshoeing, crosscountry skiing or just relax in peaceful seclusion.

KITS • $7 310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

Come on in!

Swains Flat OUtpost Garden Center General Store 707-777-3385

TEMPUR-PEDIC FOR SALE. California King Tempur-Pedic mattress and box springs. This is the BellaSonna model and is about two years old. Entire set is in like new condition. This mattress is medium to firm support. Originally sold for approx. $5,000, selling for $2,000. Injuries from a recent accident are forcing us into a softer mattress. Text message to 845-4698 only. Available to view in the evenings. (BST-1226) IT’S FIREWOOD TIME! Alder, Douglas Fir, Juniper, Madrone (sometimes), Oak, Pepperwood, & Kindling. Call for current availability. We can deliver. Almquist Lumber Company, Boyd Road, Arcata. Open 7 days a week. Stop by or call; (707) 825-8880 (BST-0328)

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

FLASHBACK

Vintage Clothing & Secondhand

Estate Furniture & Household Misc. + Additions

Pets

BOOKS & MUSIC 1/2 PRICE! Blue Tagged Clothing 25¢. Feb. 12-16. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek: Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. (BST-0214) PAPER CRAFT SWAP MEET. Sat., Feb. 16, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Scrapper’s Edge Classroom, 728 4th St., Eureka. Scrapbook supplies, rubberstamps, collage and more. (BST-0214)

SALE: SELECT BLACK & ASIAN STYLES

Info & Pictures at

WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on ADVANCE NOTICE: NEXT AUCTION THURS. FEB. 28TH 5:45 PM

Garden Center 707-777-3513

State Hwy 36 • Milemarker 19.5 • Carlotta • Open 9-6

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Sun &Tues.

Art Deco chairs, leather recliner, wicker, large lot of glass incl. amber and milk glass, guitars, pr. snowshoes, bikes, 8-track tapes and MORE!

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629-3540. krchase@yahoo. com. (BST-1226) TOO MANY TUBAS, OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE in the Marketplace at www.northcoastjournal.com. 442-1400 VISA/MC.

• Grooming & Boarding by Linn • Gentle Professional Grooming Since 1989

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • groomingbyLinn.com • 826-0903

Services HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. $195/hr. www. redwoodcoasthelicopters.com (S-0627) PIERCE’S COMPLETE ORCHARD CARE. Professional fruit tree pruning and orchard maintenance. Andrew Pierce (707) 672-4398. (S-0228) STITCHES -N-BRITCHES IN MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502-5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches-n-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com (S-0502)

real estate

this week

YOUR IDEAL EMPLOYEE may be a Journal reader. 442-1400 VISA/ MC. Place your ad onlinle at www. northcoastjournal.com

Check out the listings on page 43

real estate

this week

or online @ www.northcoastjournal.com

real estate

this week


▼ Services

Community

Music

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT:

DALLAS CAPITAL FINANCIAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL TAX SERVICE FD1963

Fees range from $30 - $80

STOP PAYING TOO MUCH TO FILE YOUR TAXES We offer: No out of pocket fees, Direct Deposit

Walk-ins Welcome 350 E St., Suite 207 (4th and E St.) Eureka • (707) 832-4292

File, and make appointment at dallascapital.net

do you have a project or idea you would like to build? contact peter portugal (707) 599-2158 over 48 years professional experience in invention design - engineering - art - and fabrication in metal wood - fiberglass - plastic

let’s make something great together

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

(707) 443-1104 No membership required.

Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976 1026 Third Street Eureka

(707) 445-9666

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating-$300 Federal Tax Credit-CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail. com, (707) 502-1289 (S-0214) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call. Contact 2guysandatrucksmk777@gmail. com, (707) 845-3087. (S-0221) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1226) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0606)

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-0228) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707822-7819. (S-0606) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-0606) WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev. com. (S-1226)

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

Legal Services

Music BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old Rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. 832-7419. (M-0509) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-0606) TOO MANY TUBAS? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Need some help home & garde around the

Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

humboldtcremation.com

MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0221) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-0606)

Community SENIOR ACTION COALITION. Use your knowledge and experience to take action on pressing issues affecting older adults. Seniors, boomers welcome. Grassroots, non-partisan, current focus health care. Meetings held third Wed. of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Jefferson School, 1000 B St. For more information, e-mail psa@a1aa. org or call (707) 442-3763. (C-0214) THE ART OF LISTENING. Discover practical tools for connecting deeply with others at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., Feb. 17, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek. org for more info. (C-0214) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice,*Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN) (C-0221) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1226) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-1226)

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

house?

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

servi

home &

rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

home & garde

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

garden

servicece servi didirrectory ectory

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

see page 18

444-2273

Looking for a romantic getaway? The Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt & online at

northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB 14, 2013

41


body, mind

&Spirit

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY

Come find your happy place.

Weekend Massage Clinic Special

transformation consciousness expansion to enhance overall well-being ~energy work~

½ hour $20 1 hour $35

Marny Friedman

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

HAS MOVED! Jessica Baker, Licensed Acupuncturist, Herbalist & Instructor has a new office at 607 F Street in Arcata

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating. Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

Services include Acupuncture, Facial Rejuvenation, Nutritional/Herbal Consultations and Classes

707-839-5910

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

(707) 822-4300

www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

TAI CHI FOR EVERYONE EARTHRITE MASSAGE. CMT with excellent local references. Now practicing at home (Arcata) after working at Mendocino Hot Springs. Offering Introductory Special. $45/hour! Call Rick: (707) 499-6033. You will float away…. (MB-0404) KICK BUTTS! Stop smoking now with clinical hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. (707) 845-3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com. (MB-0214) NEUROTHERAPY SOLUTIONS. For stress releif and wellness. Optimize your brain! Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Field Therapy State-of-the-art brain mapping and EEG biofeedback. 854 10th St Suite 202B, Arcata visit: www. neurotherapysolutions.com or Call Stan Vanella, MS (707) 599-5763 (MB-0228) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-0606) GET WIRED FOR JOY! Learn simple, practical, neurosciencebased tools in a small, supportive group. Rewire stress circuits for better self-regulation, promoting vitality and joy, with Nancy Borge-Riis, LMFT, Certified Emotional Brain Trainer. 707.839.7920 and borgeriis@ sbcglobal.net (MB-0418)

with Glenda Hesseltine

268-3936

www.taichiforeveryone.net

BRE ATHE LOVE IN YOUR RELATIONSHIPS. EXPLORE AND DEEPEN CONNECTIONS. With subtle body energy work and astrology. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 845-1450. www.sacredenergyspace.com (MB-0307) STRAIGHTEN UP! Structural Integration Bodywork Series. Relieves chronic pain, eases movement, frees emotion. Good posture can be natural! 31 years experience, Cecilie Hooper, 677-3969. (MB-0214) CERTIFIED ROLFER. Angela Hart. Ten Series, Tune ups, injuries. (707) 616-3096. (MB-0228)

Energy Life Center HEAT THERAPY

+

ENERGY MEDICINE Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1226) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-0606) do TERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.californiadoterra. com, maureen@californiadoterra. com (MB-0214) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-1226)

GIT YER VALSSAGE! Swedish, Deep Tissue

& Therapeutic Massage.

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB 14, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1226) YOUR next client may be a Journal reader. Offer your health services here in the Marketplace. 442-1400.

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1226)

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

www.northcoastjournal.com

739 12th St., Fortuna

Your fortune... ies y bell . Happ ait you aw


■ Mckinleyville

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

real estate

this week

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

YOu Get elBOw ROOm wIth thIS neweR hOme On a quIet cORneR lOt. Lots of natural light, open floor plan, vaulted ceiling in family room. Native landscaping, access to backyard for RV/boat storage. Close to Hiller Park and Hammond Trail. MLS#235587 $284,500

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com $425,000

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

this week

4 bed, 2 bath, 2,608 sq ft custom Azalea Hill home, passive solar design, south facing living room, panoramic views of bay, pasture, & ocean, extensive garden, 250 varieties of Rhododendrons

$229,900

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,425 sq ft nice Cutten home, remodeled kitchen, nicely landscaped, covered patio off of dining and living rooms, newer fence, storage shed, newer roof, bonus room behind garage

$225,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,388 sq ft Humboldt Hill home with a peek of the ocean from the back deck, big remodeled kitchen/dining room combo, granite counters, breakfast bar, pantry, fireplace, newer roof

real estate

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

“WE WORK FOR YOU.”

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Our Real Estate Loan Rates

neW

InG!

Bald Hills Land/Property +/-40 acres approximately 23 miles from

LISt

Funded through C.U. Members Mortgages 30 Year Fixed Rate

15 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 3.625%  APR - 3.807%

Rate - 2.875%  APR - 3.196%

10 Year Fixed Rate

5 Year Adjustable Rate

Rate - 2.750%  APR - 3.217%

Rate - 2.625%  APR - 5.093%

F.H.A

FHA 30 Year Rate

V.A.

Federal VA 30 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 3.500%  APR - 3.883% *These rates are subject to change daily. Subject to C.U. Members Mortgage Disclaimers. Up to $417,000.00

Rate - 3.375%  APR - 4.408%

1270 GIUNTOLI LANE, ARCATA or 707-822-5902 northernredwoodfcu.org

orick on Bald Hills Road. Year round access via county road, cleared building sites, new roads, year round creek, scattered timber. owner will carry.

$230,000

Weitchpec Land/Property Beautiful +/-123 acres with mettah Creek

neW

LISt

InG!

running through the property. property boasts open flats, timber, year round water, amazing views and plenty of privacy. Call today!

$269,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 2013

43


YOUR NORTH COAST HOT SPOT!!! 8-BALL & 9-BALL TOURNAMENTS/ FREE POOL NIGHTS/ KARAOKE/ DJ NIGHTS/ LIVE BANDS/ HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS DAILY/ GAME KINGS WITH CARDS & KENO/ THE FIREWATER VIP SECTION & SO MUCH MORE!!!

TABLE BONUSES

BINGO BONUSES

BLACKJACK TOURNAMENTS EVERY FRI. NIGHT IN FEBRUARY. STARTING AT ?PM ON FRIDAYS/ THE HOUSE WILL ADD $500 TO THE POT. BE HERE TO TEST YOUR METTLE AND GET YOUR SHOT AT THE PRIZE!

GO/ GO/ GO ... BINGO 7 DAYS A WEEK! SUNDAYS IN FEBRUARY KINGS & QUEENS GET THE ROYALTY BONUS; FIND THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH WITH YOUNG AT HEARTS MONDAYS; AND BE SURE NOT TO MISS OUR THURSDAY SILVER ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL


North Coast Journal 02-14-13 Edition