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see what’s new!

visit our new arrivals gallery online at www.landryandarcari.com/new

Since 1938 www.landryandarcari.com

SALEM MA 63 FLINT ST. 978-744-5909 • BOSTON 333 STUART ST. 617-399-6500


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BANQUETTE, FRENCH circa 1940 INLAID GAMES TABLE, SYRIAN circa 1914 SOFA FABRIC: Savel, Inc. Pattern: Sailcloth-Seagull PILLOW FABRIC: Savel, Inc. Pattern: Pacific-311 DRAPED FABRICS: John Saladino for Savel Pattern: Lago-Celadon John Saladino for Savel Pattern: Kashmir-Azure Available at CHARLES SPADA

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE | SUITE 232 | BOSTON, MA| (617) 204-9270 | WWW.CHARLESSPADA.COM M I C H A E L J L E E P H OT O G R A P H Y

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AN AWARD WINNING FULL SERVICE RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR DESIGN FIRM Delivering Quality, Serving Clients AllValue Over and Service to New Discerning England Clientele and Beyond

PLEASE CALL US AT 617-236-2286 TO ARRANGE A CONSULTATION.

224 Clarendon Street, Suite 61 (CORNER OF NEWBURY STREET) Boston, MA 02116

224 Clarendon Street, Suite 61 Photography by Shelly Harrison

PRISM Gold Award for Best Remodeling/Restoration

www.lesliefineinteriors.com (CORNER OF NEWBURY STREET) www.lesliefineinteriors.com/blog Boston, MA 02116 www.twitter.com/lesliefineint www.leslieďŹ neinteriors.com

www.facebook.com/LeslieFineInteriors


Carson Sectional Left Arm Sofa 96”w x 38”d x 32”h and Right Arm Return Sofa 104”w x 38”d x 32”h in family-friendly dove faux suede ($5580) $3995, Dean Chair 27”w x 37”d x 33”h in calming dove white leather ($1990) $1495, Thompson Square Ottoman 38”w x 38”d x 16”h in a catchy citrine velvet ($890) $675, Foster Nesting Tables 24”w x 24”d x 23”h $995, Fritz Pull-Up Table 12”w x 14”d x 24”h in dark bronze $370, Lincoln Pull-Up Table 13.5”diameter x 16.5”h in sterling $370, Scribe Desk 58”w x 21”d x 30.25”h $1870, Scribe Chair 17”w x 20”d x 33”h in off-white leather $745, Latitude 8’ x 10’ Rug $1595, Ari Arch Floor Lamp 80.5”h in polished nickel $695, Piper Table Lamp 30”h in polished nickel $225, Bond Street Lamp 15” to 19”h in hematite $275, Saturn’s Rings 54”w x 42”h $2245


Our

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Connected with a common factor of comfort, we take a traditional approach to modern design. Silhouettes with an edge, but never edgy, bring a welcoming sense of warmth to clean and classic lines. Experience our collection for the home: well priced, in stock and ready for delivery.

BOSTON 142 Berkeley Street Boston, MA 02116 / 617.266.0075 Mon thru Fri: 10am to 8pm, Sat: 10am to 6pm, Sun: 11am to 6pm / www.mgbwboston.com NATICK 395 Worcester Street, Route 9 Natick, MA 01760 / 508.650.1400 Mon thru Fri: 10am to 8pm, Sat: 10am to 6pm, Sun: 11am to 6pm / www.mgbwnatick.com


E A C H L O O K M O R E C A P T I V A T I N G T H A N T H E N E X T. The power of Belgard® is undeniable. With the widest selection of styles, shapes, color and textures in the industry, it’s easy to see why so many are drawn to our paver and wall collections. And, with Belgard’s innovative Colorgard technology, the color is guaranteed to last a lifetime. For a free Idea Book or more information on America’s best-selling brand of durable pavers, scan the QR code or visit Belgard.biz.


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COLORGARD MAINTAINS ITS ORIGINAL COLOR, YEAR AFTER YEAR Belgard’s unique Colorgard process employs oxide pigmentation to dispense integral colors consistently throughout the composition of each and every paver. This guarantees lasting, durable color through and through.

COLORGARD HOLDS UP TO STRESSFUL WEATHER EXTREMES

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PAT I O S


From the Editor

I DON’T KNOW WHY WORKING ON THIS ISSUE

MICHAEL FEIN

in particular brought it to mind, but I’ve been musing a lot about variety. Not the blatant sort of variety that is most often hyped in our culture (“Get your 151 flavors of hand-churned ice cream here, mixed on our marble slab with your choice of 87 different toppings!”), or even the florid, eclectic kind of variety that I myself sometimes appreciate in certain collectors’ overstuffed houses. No, I’ve been thinking about a more subtle kind of variety, yet one that has far-reaching consequences. Have you ever noticed, if you travel a lot, that in places across the globe you’ll run into people who occupy, as it were, the same ecological niche? Darting across Kensington Road to reach the park, you wave a surprised hello to your bookish, salt-and-pepper-haired Boston friend— only to realize, when met by a blank stare, that this is not in fact your friend, but his London equivalent. Only then do you see that his pug is black rather than brown, and the slightly worn overcoat is a rough tweed rather than military twill. And, after making embarrassed apologies, you chat long enough to discover that this person is an art historian rather than a film scholar. So very similar to your friend overall, but in the end an utterly different individual. The same situation occurs in architecture and interior design. Consider a series of modern rooms, all starting as a simple, largely unornamented, white-plaster box. One has a floor of sandblasted, herringbone-patterned ash, another is paved with cork tiles topped by a subtly figured taupe silk rug and the third is grounded by an expanse of polished concrete. All so different, just because of that—and the same applies to the particulars of their mostly low-slung midcentury Italian furniture. One basic look, nearly infinite possibilities for distinctiveness. It’s a form, I suppose, of what the Romans referred to as multum in parvo, much from little—and it is one of the things that can make looking at home design magazines endlessly fascinating. Henry David Thoreau famously wrote that “our life is frittered away by detail.” Seen in this alternative light, though, I’d have to say that our lives—our individuality—are enriched, even defined, by detail.

The Importance of Small Differences

Kyle Hoepner, Editor-in-Chief khoepner@nehomemag.com

10 New England Home May/June 2012


(617) 542-2074 WWW.DUFFYDESIGNGROUP.COM FULL SERVICE INTERIOR DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL

JOSH KUCHINSKY PHOTOGRAPHY

520 HARRISON AVENUE BOSTON, MA 02118


BUILDER OF FINE CUSTOM HOMES

13 ELM STREET MANCHESTER, MA 01944 978.526.9410 WWW.WINDOVERLLC.COM PHOTO: SHELLY HARRISON


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ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS


Inside this Issue

106

82

FIND MORE AT NEHOMEMAG.COM: Our editorial staff and a fascinating lineup of guest bloggers share beautiful photography, design ideas and advice five days a week on the

NEW ENGLAND HOME DESIGN BLOG

Featured Homes

MAY/JUNE 2012 • VOLUME 7, NUMBER 5

82 His, Hers and Theirs A contemporary Massachusetts house joins traditional

with modern as seamlessly as the blending of the happy new family that calls it home. ARCHITECTURE: RUTH BENNETT, RBA ARCHITECTURE • INTERIOR DESIGN: SUSAN ACTON, SUSAN B. ACTON INTERIORS • LANDSCAPE DESIGN: GREGORY LOMBARDI DESIGN • PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL J. LEE • TEXT: STACY KUNSTEL

Sign up for our Design Discoveries editorial e-newsletter and get

90 Concrete Thinking A Vermont family trades a traditional house on fifteen acres

WEEKLY UPDATES ON LUXURY HOME STYLE

ARCHITECTURE: CHRISTOPHER SMITH • INTERIOR DESIGN: CHERYL BOGHOSIAN, GILBERTE

such as the latest products, upcoming events and green ideas

for an ultramodern hilltop home with knockout views of the Connecticut River. INTERIORS • LANDSCAPE DESIGN: H. KEITH WAGNER PARTNERSHIP • PHOTOGRAPHY: JIM WESTPHALEN • TEXT: LISA E. HARRISON • PRODUCED BY KARIN LIDBECK BRENT

98 All Is Calm In a tiny, tranquil town outside Boston, an old house gets a loving

makeover that reawakens the spirit of its storied past. PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN GRUEN The site also features ongoing

CONTENT UPDATES where you’ll encounter • House tours • Calendar of events • Digital editions of recent issues • Interviews and commentary from notable professionals • Before-and-after stories • Articles from our archives and other special items for lovers of great home design

• TEXT: ROB BRINKLEY • PRODUCED BY KYLE HOEPNER

106 A Higher Calling A design team’s imaginative approach unleashes the

potential in a penthouse condominium in Boston’s Back Bay for a result that’s nothing short of stunning, inside and out. ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN: HACIN + ASSOCIATES • LANDSCAPE DESIGN: GREGORY LOMBARDI DESIGN AND THE GARDEN CONCIERGE • PHOTOGRAPHY: TRENT BELL • TEXT: PAULA M. BODAH • PRODUCED BY KYLE HOEPNER

Other Features 114 Special Focus: Forward Thinking New England’s residential design experts

consider the state of the art: what’s hot, what’s new and where we are headed from here. TEXT: KYLE HOEPNER, STACY KUNSTEL, PAULA M. BODAH AND DEBBIE HAGAN On the cover: Architect Christopher Smith and designer Cheryl Boghosian thought way outside the box for this ultramodern concrete house on a Vermont hilltop. Photograph by Jim Westphalen. To see more of this home, turn to page 90. 14 New England Home May/June 2012

98


Inside this Issue

36

52

Special Marketing Sections:

DESIGN DIRECTIONS page 63

10 From the Editor

Art, Design, History, Landscape PORTFOLIO OF FINE BUILDING page 125

27 Elements: Great Outdoors Weather-resistant, good-looking things for the

porch and yard. EDITED BY CHERYL AND JEFFREY KATZ Design Destination: Restoration Resources, Boston 34 36 Interview: James Hall For the head of the Providence Preservation Society,

historic preservation is as much about the future as it is about the past. INTERVIEW BY KYLE HOEPNER • PORTRAITS BY CHRIS VACCARO

46 Artistry: Natural Inclinations Nature’s detritus becomes studies of human-

FIND MORE AT NEHOMEMAG.COM: We can connect you with the right professional for your next project—

NEW ENGLAND HOME AT YOUR SERVICE And check out our online

CALENDAR OF EVENTS for people who are passionate about design

For subscriptions call (800) 765-1225 or visit www.nehomemag.com

kind’s concerns in the work of Vermont artist Paul Bowen. BY LOUIS POSTEL 52 Past Perfect: The Old House Four generations of the John Adams family

called this Quincy, Massachusetts, house home. BY DEBBIE HAGAN • PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, ADAMS NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK

People, Places, Events, Products 134 Trade Secrets: Inquiring Minds Comings and goings (and a few surprises)

in New England’s design community. BY LOUIS POSTEL 138 Design Life Our candid camera snaps recent gatherings that celebrate

architecture and design. 144 Perspectives New England designers offer bright ideas for lighting up the home. 150 New in the Showrooms Unique, beautiful and now appearing in New

England shops and showrooms. BY DEBBIE HAGAN 154 Resources A guide to the professionals and products in this issue’s features. 166 Advertiser Index 160 Sketch Pad Cabinetmaker Ian Ingersoll’s Wooden River furniture series puts a

modern twist on 500-year-old designs. 16 New England Home May/June 2012

46


EXTREME MAKEOVER NIGHT

DesignSpring FlingEvent A night where contractors, designers, architects, hi engineers i andd homeowners h can party with today’s top manufacturers of plumbing, lighting and hardware. See the latest product lines. Network with people just like you. Ask questions. Get answers. Enjoy food and beverage. Please join us.

Thursday May 17 5-8 PM WaterSpot Natick RSVP by May 14 to 800.485.7500 or sales@water-spot.com

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HARDWARE

Natick, MA 575 Worcester Street (Rt 9W)

VISUAL COMFORT & CO.

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Somehow prime location for plates and bowls didn’t seem quite right.

There are many decisions that go into planning your new space. Not the least of which, windows and doors to help maximize your vision. Combine style, colors, hardware and more with an energy efficiency solution that’s right for your home. It’s all part of four generations of innovation and craftsmanship backed by an unwavering commitment to service and support from local retailers. Get started planning your new space today with our Online Remodeling Planner. Only at myMarvin.com/roomplanner

For a Marvin retailer near you, call 1-800-394-8800.

©2012 Marvin Windows and Doors. All rights reserved. ®Registered trademark of Marvin Windows and Doors. ENERGY STAR® and the ENERGY STAR certification mark are registered U.S. marks.


Photos by DamianosPhotography.com

Pressley Associates Landscape Architects 1035 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 617-491-5300 www.pressleyinc.com


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Kyle Hoepner khoepner@nehomemag.com HOMES EDITOR

Stacy Kunstel skunstel@nehomemag.com SENIOR EDITOR

exceptional quality custom fabrication full workroom capability

Paula M. Bodah pbodah@nehomemag.com MANAGING EDITOR

Debbie Hagan dhagan@nehomemag.com ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR

Jared Ainscough jainscough@nehomemag.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Kara Lashley klashley@nehomemag.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Cheryl and Jeffrey Katz candjkatz@nehomemag.com Karin Lidbeck Brent klidbeck@nehomemag.com Louis Postel lpostel@nehomemag.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Regina Cole, Caroline Cunningham, Megan Fulweiler, Robert Kiener, Erin Marvin, Nathaniel Reade, Christine Temin CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Trent Bell, Robert Benson, Bruce Buck, Tria Giovan, Sam Gray, John Gruen, Michael J. Lee, Laura Moss, Michael Partenio, Greg Premru, Eric Roth ••• Subscriptions To subscribe to New England Home ($19.95 for one year) or for customer service, call (800) 765-1225 or visit our website, www .nehomemag.com. Editorial and Advertising Office 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302 Boston, MA 02118 (617) 938-3991 (800) 609-5154 Editorial Submissions Designers, architects, builders and homeowners are invited to submit projects for editorial consideration. For information about submitting projects, e-mail edit @nehomemag.com.

Interior Design - Susan B. Acton Interiors, Inc. Private Residence - Nantucket, MA

Installation throughout New England, the Islands & beyond

www.colonyrug.com 800.458.4445 | facebook.com/colonyrug 20 New England Home May/June 2012

Letters to the Editor We’d love to hear from you! Write to us at the above address, fax us at (617) 663-6377 or e-mail us at letters@nehomemag.com. Upcoming Events Are you planning an event that we can feature in our Calendar of Events? E-mail information to calendar@nehome mag.com, or mail to Calendar Editor, New England Home, 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302, Boston, MA 02118. Parties We welcome photographs from designor architecture-related parties. Send highresolution photos with information about the party and the people pictured to pbodah@nehomemag.com.


PUBLISHER

Kathy Bush-Dutton kbushdutton@nehomemag.com SALES MANAGERS

JOHN DVORSACK ARCHITECT / PHOTOS BY JOHN L. MOORE

Jill Korff jkorff@nehomemag.com Roberta Thomas Mancuso rmancuso@nehomemag.com Kim Sansoucy ksansoucy@nehomemag.com Robin Schubel rschubel@nehomemag.com David Simone dsimone@nehomemag.com

C U S T O M H O M E S · R E N OVAT I O N S · A D D I T I O N S

PRODUCTION MANAGER

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Kate Koch kkoch@nehomemag.com ••• Advertising Information To receive information about advertising in New England Home, please contact us at (800) 609-5154, ext. 713 or info@nehome mag.com. Editorial and Advertising Office 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302 Boston, MA 02118 (617) 938-3991 (800) 609-5154

••• NCI Corporate Offices 2305 Newpoint Parkway Lawrenceville, GA 30043 (800) 972-0189 Homes & Lifestyles Division PRESIDENT

Adam Japko SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Stuart Christian VICE PRESIDENT, SALES & MARKETING

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Danny Bowman PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

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We love what we do.

NEWSSTAND MANAGER

Bob Moenster

PRESIDENT/CFO

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FALMOUTH–508-548-5200 • BOSTON–617-542-9800

W W W. B R O D E R I C K B U I L D I N G . C O M

Diana Young VICE PRESIDENT, INTERACTIVE

Stuart Richens GENERAL COUNSEL

Susan Deese 22 New England Home May/June 2012


31 Gloucester Street, Boston MA 02115 | lewisinteriors@msn.com | 617.367.0731


Let us ɄɑȃȣȐɕɜɑǸɜȐ your dream. For the perfect products for your kitchen or bath, stop by a Ferguson showroom. It’s where you’ll find the largest range of quality brands, a symphony of ideas, and trained product experts to help orchestrate your dream. With showrooms from coast to coast, come see why Ferguson is recommended by professional contractors and designers everywhere.

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69 Norman St.

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02149


Elements The things that make great spaces

Edited by Cheryl and Jeffrey Katz

Great Outdoors For those who subscribe to a certain Yankee sensibility, a little patina goes a long way. While weathered teak is wonderful, faded canvas charming and verdigris venerable, unless a house has been in the family for a long time, injecting a different brand of je ne sais quoi might make for smarter—or at least more attainable—design decisions. For those of us who haven’t inherited a Shingle-style house in Newport, there’s a host of materials for outdoor furnishings and finishes that will stand up to the harshest New England weather without losing their edge. Whether you’re outfitting a deck, building a patio, putting in a pool or installing a fire pit, these materials fill the bill.

Striped, Speckled and Spectacular Durat is known for its solid-surface material made from recycled postindustrial plastic; think plastic with a punch and a conscience. The Finnish company also produces a design collection that includes the Raita bench. Resistant to humidity and moisture, it makes a great choice for garden, patio or pool seating. 63"L × 15¾"W × 18"H, $1,500; 47"L × 15¾"W × 18"H, $1,350. BY SPECIAL ORDER FROM SURFACESOURCE, (617) 799-1800, (617) 513-6339, WWW.GREENSOLUTIONS.NET

May/June 2012 New England Home 27


Elements

1

1

2

Finding Nemo There’s no missing Driade’s Nemo chair. The strong, sculptural seat is made of polyethylene monobloc and comes in seven colors, with a matte or glossy finish and a stationary or swivel base. $1,796–$5,500. THE MORSON COLLECTION, BOSTON, (617) 482-2335, WWW.THEMORSONCOLLECTION.COM

2

Staying Afloat These wireless LED lamps from Smart & Green can bob elegantly on a pool’s surface or nestle in the grass. The aptly named Flatball diffuses a variety of lighting—white, candle effect or changing colors—and adjusts by remote control to suit your mood. $208. NEENA’S LIGHTING, BOSTON, SOUTH BOSTON, BROOKLINE AND WELLESLEY, MASS., (888) 995-2677, WWW.NEENASLIGHTING.COM

3

Pin It Not to your computer’s desktop or on your bulletin board, but into the ground. The Pin Table, the brainchild of Norwegian designer Andreas Engesvik, can be planted anywhere you need a surface to hold an iced tea or a cold beer. It’s available in five high-gloss colors (yellow, pink, white, black and green). 15.5"D. $140. ROOM 68, JAMAICA PLAIN, MASS., (617) 942-7425, WWW.ROOM68ONLINE.COM

3

28 New England Home May/June 2012


(gold & glam)

46 ELLIS ROAD WEST NEWTON, MA 02465 617-527-3433 WWW.SHULMANINTERIORS.COM 29


Elements

1

1

Extreme Makeover Re-cover a chair by the pool, fashion an awning over the deck or change the seat cushions on the patio furniture with the Jardin collection, JANUS et Cie’s brightly colored, candy-striped fabrics in maxi or mini patterns. $157/YD. JANUS ET CIE, BOSTON DESIGN CENTER, (617) 737-5001, WWW.JANUSETCIE.COM

2

Do Not Disturb Swing on the hammock, dine al fresco or lie in the grass and stare at the stars while a lovely aroma wafts through the air and insects are kept at bay. Amazon Lights incense sticks from Brazil are extra long (the green sticks measure 22") and made from bamboo and Brazilian andiroba oils. They burn for two and a half hours and are available in a package of twelve. $25. WA, PROVINCETOWN, MASS.,

2

(508) 487-6355, WWW.WAHARMONY.COM

3

Endless Appeal There are so many reasons to love Fireclay Tile. For starters, the company’s crushed-glass tiles are handmade from 100 percent recycled material. Perfect for exteriors, they can be used on walls and floors and around the pool, barbeque or fire pit. Choose from forty colors with a matte or gloss finish (shown, Spearmint, Key Lime, Dandelion and Poppy in matte finish) and a host of shapes. BRICK HOUSE TILE COMPANY, KEENE, N.H., (603) 357-2884, WWW.BRICKHOUSETILES.COM

3

30 New England Home May/June 2012


Elements

1

2

1

Heavy Metal Given their metallic look, it’s hard to believe these substantial tiles are porcelain. From the Spanish company Porcelanosa, the dense tiles are fired at high temperatures, making them resistant to heavy traffic and inclement weather. 17" × 26". CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT, FERROKER, $11.29/SQ. FT., METALKER, $12.36/SQ. FT., IRONKER COBRE, $12.36/SQ. FT. TILE SHOWCASE, BOSTON DESIGN CENTER, (617) 426-6515, NATICK, MASS., (508) 655-8000, AND WATERTOWN, MASS., (617) 926-1100, WWW.TILESHOWCASE.COM

2

2

Shape Shifter This Arabesque tile may look delicate, but it’s tough enough to withstand a winter freeze and an early spring thaw. It comes in more than 100 colors and 100 sheeted patterns, as well as a multitude of loose shapes. $80.75/SQ. FT. DISCOVER TILE, BOSTON DESIGN CENTER, (617) 330-7900, WWW.DISCOVERTILE.COM

3

Classic Contemporary It’s not an oxymoron in the hands of architect Robert A.M. Stern. With his collection of cast stone planters—this one is the Olympian— Stern helps homeowners define outdoor rooms in architectural ways. 30"H × 30"W. $1,680. NEW ENGLAND GARDEN ORNAMENTS, SUDBURY, MASS., (978) 579-9500, WWW.NEGARDEN.COM

3

32 New England Home May/June 2012


We’ll make sure your journey is never scary...that’s no fairy tale. The path to your dream kitchen may seem complicated...with many choices and decisions along the way. A visit to one of our showrooms will make the journey easier, even enjoyable. Find inspiration and the information you need, with facts and live demonstrations of appliances in action. Access designers and dealers, get the names of cabinetry, countertop materials and more. Clarke is a resource center dedicated to giving discerning homeowners the information they need to create the kitchens they imagine. You won’t buy anything here, so you’ll never be pressured to make a choice you’d rather not. You may end up with a Wolf…perhaps a hood…and we promise you’ll live happily ever after. TWO AWARD-WINNING SHOWROOMS

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Elements • Design Destination

Restoration Resources, Boston By Cheryl and Jeffrey Katz

Twenty years ago Bill Raymer, the owner of Restoration Resources, set out to reclaim architectural parts from buildings that were slated to be dismantled or demolished. His goal, to repurpose the salvaged pieces, has been realized in a big way. The fruits of his labors are evident in his 7,000-square-foot showroom and warehouse in Boston’s South End, where architects, designers and the public can find all manner of architectural embellishment. Raymer calls his place “a decorator’s dream, a renovator’s paradise, a restorer’s haven,” and indeed it is with its enormous inventory of all things for the home, lovingly saved from ruin. As historic brownstones were renovated, old churches modernized and outdated buildings torn down to make

room for new ones, Raymer busily recovered columns, rescued iron gates, retrieved garden statuary. An early proponent of the ecological movement, he’d clearly hit on an idea that was sound and sensible, not to mention salable. Still, we’d like to posit that Raymer’s plan was not just astute, but romantic as well. To salvage a building’s ornamentation is to give that rescued material new life, to encourage new ways of seeing and to let the creative spirit run free. An ardent attachment to a building’s history? Sounds like an affair of the heart. OPEN 10 A.M.–4 P.M. TUES.–SAT. AND MON. BY APPOINTMENT. 1946 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, (617) 5423033, WWW.RESTORATIONRESOURCES.COM

34 New England Home May/June 2012


Cambridge . Chatham . Palm Beach

Photo: Warren Patterson

617-492-2808

www.lombardidesign.com


Interview

James Hall For fifty-six years, the Providence Preservation Society has kept its eye as much on the future as on the past, guarding the city’s architectural legacy while ushering in a new model of urban renewal. PORTRAITS BY CHRIS VACCARO

J

ames Brayton Hall has since 2010 served as executive director of one of the Northeast’s most active and successful historical preservation organizations, the Providence Preservation Society. New England Home’s Kyle Hoepner queried him recently about his past, his mission and the importance of preservation to our collective sense of self. Kyle Hoepner: How did you find yourself heading PPS? James Hall: I have degrees in both architecture and landscape architecture, so I have always been very passionate about the built environment. I spent many years at Rhode Island School 36 New England Home May/June 2012

of Design, where I was director of campus design and later assistant director of the RISD Museum. Most of RISD’s buildings are historic, and art students can be particularly tough on their surroundings. It was a great opportunity to try to be a good steward of a diverse collection of buildings, allowing them to meet the practical needs of the students as well as the symbolic needs of the college. The chance to do much the same thing for the entire city seemed too good to pass up! KH: Has your own history as a Providence native helped forge an awareness of preservation issues there?


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Interview JH: I think it certainly helped me hit the ground running in this position. It’s nearly impossible to grow up in Providence and not be aware of its architecture, especially if you are an architecture geek like me. I like to say that I know every building in Providence—a bit of an overstatement, but not much. It’s easier to make a case for preserving something if you know it well. KH: Can you give us a quick primer on PPS’s origins and history? JH: PPS was formed in 1956 by a powerful coalition of old patrician Yankee families and educated young families living on the East Side. They were responding to two threats—increasing demolitions of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century houses on College Hill by Brown University, and the looming specter of “urban renewal” funded by the federal government. PPS was one of the earliest organizations founded with the intention of preserving a neighborhood rather than an iconic structure like Mount Vernon or Monticello. Our College Hill Study of 1959 was the first time the government accepted that historic preservation could be used as a tool of urban revitalization. Until PPS changed the discussion, “renewal” meant “demolition.” KH: Are there things about the city that make it particularly suitable for preservation efforts? JH: When I took the job, a friend said, “If you’re going to be in preservation, there’s no better place than Providence, because there’s so much good stuff.” In 1900, Providence had the highest per capita income in the U.S. That wealth produced a lot of very beautiful domestic and commercial architecture. Later, as its fortunes declined, Providence was spared many of the indignities visited on other great nineteenth-century cities (Richmond, Virginia, comes to mind). We’re the right size, too, so that each building you renovate makes an immediate and substantial impact on its neighbors. KH: First seeing downtown Providence in the very early 1980s, I would never have dreamed it could look as it does today. What has been PPS’s role in the renaissance of the city’s center? JH: We’ve been cheerleader, educator, advocate, convener and, when necessary, thorn in the side of our elected officials! To be effective, we have to operate on multiple parallel tracks—in the space of one day I can be testifying before the Senate Finance Committee about the future of the lands previously occupied by Route 195, and 38 New England Home May/June 2012


L a n d s c a p e A r c h i t e c t s | D e s i g n / B u i l d | B o s t o n | Wa s h i n g t o n D C | z e n a s s o c i a t e s. c o m | 8 0 0 . 8 3 4 . 6 6 5 4


Interview

Architect: a+sl studio; Photographer: Greg Premru.

meeting with a homeowner about participating in our spring house tour (now in its thirty-third year). We do everything we can to remind people that preservation makes Providence a nicer, safer place to live in, and is also a great economic generator. KH: I know one focus for you right now is the historic Arcade building on Weybosset Street—which has already been “saved” once before . . . JH: The 1828 Arcade is America’s oldest enclosed shopping galleria, and one of our city’s greatest architectural treasures. Providence is fortunate that the developer who currently owns the building cares deeply about it. The owners have an innovative plan to reopen it with retail once again on

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40 New England Home May/June 2012

the first floor, but with tiny “micro-apartments,” aimed at students and young urban residents, on the upper levels. KH: You’ve also been working with the city on a new zoning plan? JH: Yes—it’s going to be a great plan. The very talented staff of the city Planning Department has worked hard, and we have also worked assiduously with neighborhood groups to get everything right. We still believe that the ordinance needs to have stronger language protecting our historic fabric from shortsighted demolition, and we have had lengthy discussions about the pros and cons of a public designreview process. But this new ordinance is going to shape the way the city develops for at least the next decade. KH: What about the Jewelry District and the waterfront, especially now that the “Iway” project has removed the old elevated sections of I-195?


Interview

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JH: It has been very much in the media, which is a great chance to remind people that the shaping of a city should be a deliberate act. The land where the highway was removed spans the Providence River and touches three established historic neighborhoods: Fox Point, College Hill and the Jewelry District. The real challenges are going to be getting the scale of development right and making certain that the needs of the automobile commuter don’t trample the desires of the neighbors, pedestrians and city residents who rely on the riverfront as recreational green space. KH: What do PPS’s experiences teach us about preservation efforts across New England and elsewhere? JH: One has to be like the Marines, “ever vigilant!” Preservation is never complete. Preservation reminds us of what is special and unique about the place in which we live. Our sense of ourselves as a nation and a diverse culture is made visible in our historic buildings. KH: What have been PPS’s greatest successes so far? JH: The postcard view would suggest Benefit Street, which will always be our calling card, and the Armory District and Broadway, two adjacent late nineteenth-century neighborhoods on Providence’s West Side saved in the 1970s and 1980s. But our real game changer has been the establishment of historic districts, where public design review happens. I expect we’ll see more historic districts established in Providence in the next ten years. KH: In the long run, what would you like to see as your legacy for the organization and for the city? JH: Two things. I hope we’re communicating that preservation has always been a visionary endeavor—it’s not just about Ionic columns and correct paint colors; it’s about looking ahead and trying to support the qualities of the places we live in that make our daily lives richer and more profound. I also hope that people will come to understand that preservation benefits everyone. Our historic buildings, grand and modest, remind us of who we are. Providence became a great city one building at a time, and we all have a stake in seeing to it that we value and continue to carefully curate this remarkable collection. • Editor’s note: For more information about the Providence Preservation Society and its upcoming Festival of Historic Houses, visit the PPS website at www.ppsri.org.


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Artistry

Natural Inclinations Bits and pieces of nature’s detritus become studies of humankind’s deepest concerns in the work of Vermont artist Paul Bowen. BY LOUIS POSTEL

A

t mid-career, Paul Bowen has built up a considerable fan base. His admirers like everything about him: the Welsh accent, the spark in his eye, the grin preceding a self-effacing pause and, most of all, the stubborn love he devotes to his art. He has spent decades gathering, choosing, recycling, sawing, gluing and nailing choice bits of wood and debris for his sculptures, and countless hours fishing for squid to collect its ink for his drawings. The fruit of his labors may

look like a Celtic shield, a fishhook, a dragon’s eye, a flailing arm, a distant trawler. Whatever the resemblance, it’s undeniably a Bowen. There’s a certain uncompromising quality that makes his work unique, edgy and challenging. Architects Tom Huth and Ted Danzer have a number of Bowen’s bold statements in their Provincetown vacation home. “His work is very strong. We had to design the living room around the sculptures, not the other way around,” says Huth. The department store Nordstrom has recently joined Huth and Danzer as a Bowen collector. Shoppers at the store’s Braintree, Massachusetts, location are welcomed by Drift Stack, in which a driftwood shaft steers a moon-like circle through invisible waves: a kind of rhapsodic dream. If a 46 New England Home May/June 2012

high-end department store seems an unlikely place for a sculpture created from bits and pieces of salvaged wood, Bowen has selected and put together those scraps as meticulously as the finest couturier. Unlike this year’s fashion statement, however, Bowen’s concerns are timeless. “There’s no whimsy with Paul’s work,” says Hartford, Connecticut, art dealer Kevin Garvey Rita. “While it may appear haphazard, nothing he does is Clockwise from top: Cradle accidental. It’s about making (2008), wood, 72"×92"×24", deep connections.” Pile (2007), wood and paint, His drawings of draggers 27"×46"×16" Beach Repairs disappearing in the mist, for (2003), ink on paper, 8"×10" instance, seem to carry us back to a distant time, trying to reclaim the unclaimable. They are more about fading connections than about fishing boats.


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Artistry

Knowing that the vessels’ blue-blackness comes from squid ink Bowen collected himself somehow makes them even more poignant, like a message in a bottle cast into the sea by a survivor. Certainly Bowen enjoyed his share of success before Nordstrom came calling. His work can be found in the collections of the Guggenheim in New York, the deCordova Sculpture Park in Lincoln, Massachusetts, the Cape Cod Museum of Art in Dennis and the Fogg Museum at Harvard University.

Bowen was born in 1951 and grew up in the Victorian seaside resort of Colwyn Bay in North Wales. “It was a landscape shaped by the human hand for thousands of years,” he says. He recalls exploring ancient burial chambers and castles on family outings. His father, an architect, introduced him to the art of finding elegant solutions to complex structural problems. “Working with constraints is what I do,” the son says today. “I try not to waste a thing. Say I needed a 48 New England Home May/June 2012

wedge of wood and I had it here, but it was painted red. Indeed, I could sand it off, but then a red piece I might need later on would be wasted. So I’ve got to keep looking.” A 1977 fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center brought him to another seaside resort—Provincetown—where he stayed for almost thirty years. Seven years ago, while he was the artist in residence at Dartmouth College, he and his wife, Pamela Mandell, bought a house close by a covered bridge in Williamstown, Vermont. Bowen set up one of his two studios in a backyard sugar shack. When Hurricane Irene blew by last year, she delivered huge amounts of debris along the riverbanks by Bowen’s property. Edited and sorted, some of that stockpile is destined to become works of art. “Some even stuck way up in the trees,” he recalls. “Now I probably won’t have to gather stuff for the rest of my life.” On a late-winter day, brave crocuses and snowdrops lead the way to the studio Bowen uses for his larger projects, a space on the second floor of a barn not far from his home. He Above: Drift Stack (2009), wood, 84"×94"×20" Left: inspects what appears to be a Sapper (2010), rusted wood, very ordinary piece of wood. 30"×75"×13" “I’m looking to make things that are visually dynamic,” he says. “This could be a kind of flying wedge, quasi-static but at the same time pushing off some plane or surface.” Whether the ensuing piece ends up at a mall or a museum, have no fear it will be an uncompromising work: impeccably elegant, deeply serious. • Editor’s Note To see more of Paul Bowen’s work, visit www .paulbowen.org.


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Past Perfect

The Old House Quincy, Massachusetts

BY DEBBIE HAGAN • PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, ADAMS NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK

I

t’s hard to imagine so much history packed into a house Abigail Adams once called “a wren’s nest.” Yet the Old House served not only as home to John and Abigail Adams, but to their son, John Quincy Adams, and his wife as well as to two more generations. In fact, the house and its contents remained in the family until it became a museum and part of the National Park Service in 1946. “This makes us so unique,” says Kelly Cobble, curator of the fourteen-acre Adams Historic Park. “Everything in the house belonged to the family.” That includes 6,000

Long Room Dining Room

objects on exhibit, as well as 14,000 volumes of books. The original home dates back to 1731, built by Major Leonard Vassell, a wealthy Jamaican sugar grower. The Paneled Room, with walls made of Santo Domingo mahogany, reflect this earlier period. Abigail thought them too dark and 52 New England Home May/June 2012

Study

Old House and gardens Stone Library


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Past Perfect whitewashed them. Years later a grandson restored them. Abigail added the Long Room to the “nest” in 1800, doubling the home’s size. Cobble describes this room as most intact, with wallpaper dating from around 1900 and some of the Adamses own furnishings reflecting the Adamses’ tastes. John acquired the Louis XV settee and a dozen chairs during his diplomatic service in Holland and France, and he and Abigail bought the fire screens in England, where they lived for a time. The second major addition to the house was John’s study on the second floor—a substantial upgrade from the one he’d set up in a farm outbuilding. Here, he kept his books, a collection of Chinese export porcelain and the 1775

Paneled Room President's bedroom

Abigail Adams by Jane Stuart Terrestrial globe

French secretary upon which he signed, in 1783, the Peace Treaty of Paris. The room also contains rare, matching terrestrial and celestial globes, purchased by John Quincy Adams, showing the most up-to-date discoveries as of 1799. With Abigail’s additions, the “nest” grew into what she called “The Mansion.” Later generations referred to it as the “Old House.” To John Adams, however, the bucolic farm represented tranquility. He looked around at the orchards and gardens and called them “peace fields.” • Editor’s Note Adams National Historic Park is open daily through Nov. 10, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. 135 Adams St., Quincy, Mass., (617) 773-1177, www.nps.gov/adam/. 54 New England Home May/June 2012

John Adams by Jane Stuart


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Photos by Tara Carvalho

By Invitation

Only

New England Home’s Winter Networking Event at Pressley Associates On March 8, New England Home welcomed advertisers to Pressley Associates in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for our winter networking event. An unexpected warm front brought out a great crowd to the spacious landscape architecture firm where guests were immediately in awe of the numerous project photos decorating the office. Along with ample opportunity to discuss the project photos and network, attendees enjoyed a delicious assortment of food and beverages throughout the evening.

New England Home’s Kathy Bush-Dutton with Jerry Arcari of Landry & Arcari • John Day of LDa Architecture & Interiors and John Kruse of SEA-DAR Construction • Normand Mainville and Katie Rowley of Machine Age • Gregory Lombardi of Gregory Lombardi Design with New England Home’s Jill Korff, Chris Dallmus of Design Associates and Chris Magliozzi of BayPoint Builders • Bill Pressley of Pressley Associates with Laura Meyer of Meyer & Meyer Architecture & Interiors and Tim Conners of JW Construction • Jan Gleysteen of Jan Gleysteen Design LLC with Greg Premru of Greg Premru Photography and New England Home’s Kyle Hoepner • Christina Stetson, Lauren Kirkness, Pam Swallow, Antoinette Erickson, Maria Churchill of The Cottage


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Design Directions

ALL THE LATEST TRENDS IN RESIDENTIAL DESIGN HIGHLIGHTED BY THE REGION'S TOP EXPERTS

Special Advertising Section


“Over-dyeing achieves many shades of one color, making them quite desirable in modern decorating. The carpet becomes more of a backdrop of color rather than the traditional high contrast Persian carpet of centuries prior.”

~Jeff Arcari

Top: New 8' x 10' rug woven by Turkomen Ersari weavers in a late 19th century Amritzar design, then overdyed in a natural Indigo dye bath. Bottom: This 5' x 8' patchwork carpet was created using fragments from three different carpets originally woven in northern Pakistan then overdyed in a chartreuse green.

Over-Dyed Vintage Carpets VINTAGE CARPETS TAKE ON STUNNING NEW LIFE WITH OVER-DYEING AND DISTRESSING.

At one time, old carpets with bare spots and faded patterns ended up in the trash. Then someone came up with a brilliant idea: take Turkish Kilims, distress and over-dye them—and fix and even patchwork the pieces. Voilà! A whole new look in rugs entered the market. In fact, these rugs almost resemble abstract paintings…but for the floor. The first of these rugs entered the European market about eight years ago and everyone wanted one. Now these rugs are available at Landry & Arcari. They work with only the finest producers in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Turkey, assuring quality-made works created from stable dyes. Artisans shear the old rugs to even thicknesses and then strip-wash them, leaving behind only faint patterns from the original rugs. Then the entire carpets are soaked in large dye vats, infusing them with vibrant new colors. The most popular are lighter blues, all shades of green and soft reds. Artisans save damaged rugs by fixing and stabilizing the pieces and then forming patchwork designs. They cut and sew the patches by hand, creating an entirely new rug, which is then over-dyed. Sometimes the rugs are re-dyed prior to sewing so the threads contrast with the rug, be-

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coming a design element. Other times, the pieces are sewn together before dyeing so the stitches disappear. Either way, people love the random mixing of different carpets. What’s great is that no two carpets are ever alike. Patchwork rugs have become so popular that makers in India and Afghanistan are weaving new carpets to imitate them. Patchworked and over-dyed carpets are a great way to reflect on old traditions and yet introduce a strikingly modern and original look to any home.

Landry & Arcari Oriental Rugs and Carpeting 333 Stuart St, Boston MA 617-399-6500 63 Flint St, Salem MA 978-744-5909 www.landryandarcari.com


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“We have been designing chromatherapy systems as an added option for rooms such as baths, massage rooms and spas, when requested, in our lighting designs for many years. At that time it was few and far between that we had a client who was looking for this. However, we are being asked more often to design these lighting systems with colored light combinations that can provide both relaxing and energizing influences.”

~Doreen Le May Madden, LC, CLC, IES Lux Lighting Design -President

We oftentimes use fiber optic systems with our own custom light components to provide chromatherapy in spa environments. Nature’s light is always an inspiration in my designs.

Chromatherapy COLOR AND LIGHT EVOKE THE MOST RESPONSE IN DESIGN— WHEN THESE ELEMENTS ARE COMBINED THE RESULT CAN BE VERY DYNAMIC!

We create customized colors based on our knowledge of human response as well as personalized requests. At the touch of a button, our customized control systems can change from white light to another world, with the client fully bathed in colored light—a sensual experience, like a massage to the spirit and mind. Lighted scenes can also be designed for observation only in smaller areas. Chromatherapy is certainly becoming a more prevalent request. People use it as a stress reliever. Chromatherapy research is very exciting in the lighting field. People attach symbolic significance to certain colors, and colored lighting can even be used to treat disease. Hospitals are using lighting fixtures that provide chromatherapy in recovery rooms. I have always been interested in physiological and psychological lighting effects. Integrating colored light into lighting designs brings customers ongoing happiness. Cool colors, such as green, blue and indigo are thought to be calming, while red, orange and other warm colors can have energizing effects. However, these can certainly be uniquely felt by each person and, at times, contrary to standard responses. If our aim is to promote well-being

66 Special Marketing Section

and the client is not sure of the colors to use, I look to nature as a guide. For instance, what we typically think of as spa colors (blues and greens, for example) rightfully belong to the tranquil and restorative settings of the outdoors, lush meadows, cool mountain streams, the sun-warmed sea and the expansive sky. I believe that our emotional responses to certain colors stem from our experiences in the natural world, as well as other personal experiences. Each client usually will have preferences for their own chromatherapy scenes, which almost seems intuitive.


SHELLY HARRISON PHOTOGRAPHY

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“Sit down and let’s chat! I am known to say often to the curious customer who happens upon my retail studio. It has become a place where people gather- to share information, lunch or a glass of wine. I love talking about design and how what I sell- art, furniture and accessories or what I do- full service interior design, may help them improve their homes.”

~Judy O’Neil Labins The assortment of quality products at Shafer O’Neil is constantly changing. The community has come to enjoy the monthly window changes and often drop in or call to graciously give their comments.

Building Community INTERIOR DESIGNERS ARE INCREASINGLY SHOWCASING THEIR IDEAS AND CUSTOM GOODS, IN ADDITION TO BUILDING A VIBRANT DESIGNSAVVY FOLLOWING WITH STUDIO BOUTIQUES ON MAIN STREET USA.

I’m passionate about two things: people and places. My design studio is also my retail space, and it’s become a social spot for me as well. I love it when people drop in to have lunch, share a glass of wine and chat. Conversation often turns to some design issue. In that environment, we’ve got lots of things to play with--fabrics, accessories, samples of layouts--to get the creative juices flowing. My studio boutique works as a three-dimensional portfolio, where people can see, touch and actually stand in a space. Of course there are lovely, unique things to buy, but there’s also a television with scrolling images of the projects I have done. So it’s a pretty complete package. It’s easy for retail customers to become design customers as they learn more about the process and understand how I can help them realize their interior spaces. Beyond that, though, the space is great for gatherings and for cross-pollinating with other like-minded design professionals. I have a collaborative relationship with a well-known downtown Boston gallery Jules Place, and its fabulous art fills my walls and brings top-quality contemporary art to the suburbs where it might not otherwise be seen. My relationships with First Rug and French

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Antiques Direct also mean my customers benefit from access to some of the best professionals in their fields. An added bonus has been my work with other interior designers who will often come in to purchase accessories, furniture, and one-of-a-kind products for their clients. When we work together, we’re able to create some amazing things! It’s a great feeling to put down roots, sweep my front stoop, unlock the front door and welcome a broad community of clients and colleagues. It really feels like home!

Shafer O’Neil Interior Design 544 Washington Street Wellesley, MA 02482 781-235-7505 www.shaferoneil.com


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“When my clients want a ‘wow’ factor piece in their master bath, I immediately turn to a modern freestanding tub. The lines and shapes available in these tubs become a piece of art right in the middle of the bath. The design chosen creates the flow for the rest of the bath and sets the tone for an amazing retreat.”

~Danielle Jones

Kohler's new Lithocast freestanding baths offer unique shapes and style with solid material and warmth.

Freestanding Tubs MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FREESTANDING TUBS CREATE A STATEMENT IN TODAY’S STYLISH BATHROOMS.

In New England, a claw-foot tub is the essence of a traditional bathroom. While other parts of the country have favored a more modern and clean bathroom, New Englanders have kept a stronghold on their traditional roots. Clients here are slowly becoming open to more transitional and contemporary designs, and this trend is flowing out from the cities and into the suburbs as well. In the bathroom, this has led to faucetry with clean lines, impressive custom showers with digital controls and freestanding bathtubs with distinctive style. Straying from the traditional freestanding cast-iron bath-mounted on claw feet, more contemporary freestanding tubs typically sit directly on the floor. Freestanding tubs are constructed from cast iron, acrylic, limestone, marble, copper and Lithocast solid surface. These different materials allow for a tremendous variety of unique shapes and sizes not available in with a traditional claw-foot tub. Available with soft and sweeping curves, or sharp geometric angles, the tub can become a piece of art and set a design tone for the bathroom. The material chosen also gives depth and texture to the bath. Of course, the main purpose of a freestanding tub is to

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provide a luxurious soak for the homeowner and a relaxing retreat. With sloping backrests and large, deep bathing wells, a bath in a freestanding tub is a pure spa experience.

Snow and Jones 85 Accord Drive Norwell, MA 02061-1605 781-878-3312 www.snowandjones.com


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“Today many landscapes incorporate multiple-use areas that go beyond swimming pools and patios. The addition of outdoor kitchens, fireplaces and fire pits creates a destination for both small family gatherings and large parties for friends and neighbors. Fireplace designs reflect a client’s lifestyle, be it a welcoming hearth adjacent to a pool or a remote and casual gathering place away from the bustle of everyday life.”

~Scot Indermuehle

These are examples of a fireplace and a firepit both made of stone. One burns traditional firewood and the other is gas plumbed with a colored glass layer to enhance the quality of the flame.

Outdoor Fireplaces OUTDOOR FIREPLACES AND FIRE PITS EXPAND THE VERSATILITY AND SEASONS FOR OUTSIDE ENTERTAINMENT

The variety of fireplace designs has expanded greatly over the last decade. The traditional wood-burning hearth with natural stone surround and chimney stack might still be the most popular style, recalling a bygone era. Modern versions can be more versatile and sometimes simpler permitting all-around seating and conversation, reflecting more the campfires of youth. These designs can range from raised stone surrounds to a simple cutout in a terrace, reflecting a greater desire to harmonize with the landscape. Many alternative materials for constructing the fireplace are available, from stucco to cultured stone veneers to wall systems designed to match the adjacent paving and landscape finishes. Whatever construction method is used, fireplaces need adequate drainage as well as safe clearance from adjacent combustible materials. The introduction of gas-lit burner units is also popular, given the busy lifestyles of today’s families. The option of turning the flame on and off with the flip of a switch means more flexibility in using the fireplace any season. While flame and heat output is generally less than wood burning logs, clean-up and maintenance of gas burner units is

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greatly reduced. The selection of burner units in most cases is subject to state plumbing and electrical codes, so careful planning is required before purchasing and beginning gas installations. The latest trend is to incorporate fire and water into the same design. These units are generally gas fired and share a common vessel or bowl that can be incorporated into a larger pool design or fountain feature. The effects can be very dramatic and highlight a design potential that goes beyond just form and function, expressing the desire for more artistic and imaginative exterior spaces.

Sudbury Design Group 740 Boston Post Rd. Sudbury, MA 01776 978-443-3638 sudburydesign.com


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“Our clients are always searching for a modern adaptation on the New England vernacular of design. White marble has long been the foundation of New England aesthetic, and we often incorporate classic white marble into our designs. Calacatta Gold, Statuario and Bianco Carrara create timeless surfaces, while White Quartzites offer a contemporary twist on a New England tradition.”

~John Kilfoyle Partner, United Marble Fabricators

Calacatta (Italy) and Skyros Gold (Greece) marbles create timeless beauty in an understated manner.

The Whites of Stone REGARDLESS OF THE SEASON, WHITE IS ALWAYS IN FASHION WHEN IT COMES TO STONE SURFACES IN NEW ENGLAND.

United Marble Fabricators believes that the beauty of natural stone in a home is deeply rooted in the ease of use and clarity of purpose. New England homeowners routinely choose stones whose beauty will long be remembered. The surfaces they favor are designed to inspire—where the family can gather for meals and conversation, where the kids can congregate to complete homework and continue to learn and grow, where laughs can be shared and memories can be made. The true value of all stone surfaces lies in their ability to grow richer in the space and to wear well over time. All of these characteristics typically converge at a road often termed “the New England vernacular.” It is no surprise New England homeowners truly appreciate the nuance and beauty of white stone. A simple palette offers the ability for robust design elsewhere in the home. The subtle nuances and simple character outweigh the ornament, allowing the minimalism of the material to take center stage. This minimalism creates a perfect marriage for pairing white stones with other stone surfaces like soapstone—another New England favorite—honed black granite, pietre del cardosa and even

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Irish limestone. White stone can easily complement an intricate glass tile backsplash or it can harmonize with a handmade subway tile. Regardless of the pairing, the white stone always creates a light and airy atmosphere that is warm and inviting. This versatility embodies what New Englanders truly crave—a material that is industrious, adaptable to unique styles and spaces, and timeless in beauty and purpose, which is, indeed, a true representation of the New England vernacular.

United Marble Fabricators One Design Center Place – Suite 322 Boston, MA 02210 617-275-7780 www.unitedmarble.com


KRISTIN PATON PHOTOGRAPHY

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Mid-Century Coastal Design COTTAGE & BUNGALOW OFFERS A PERSONALIZED ON-LINE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE FEATURING AN ENTIRE RANGE OF DESIGN OPTIONS.

“ Our clientele wants functional design that complements a more relaxed coastal lifestyle. Color is essential. We propose carefully calculated risks in mixing ontrend pieces with traditional furnishings to inspire rooms that are intriguing and invite an “escape to the beach” environment.”

~Pamela Hawthorne

Cottage & Bungalow www.CottageandBungalow.com Toll-free 877-441-9222

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Cottage & Bungalow’s new line incorporates clean yet elegant designs that mix easily with more traditional pieces. Each piece is available in a sophisticated palette of finishes that work with wood tones as well. Shelving and display pieces offer an airy, loft-like feeling with open structural designs that work well in any space. Chests, beds, dining, seating and accent pieces are featured in a variety of sizes that are sleek and transitional with spare, modern hardware. Mix a rich Cayenne with Dusk or Azure for a bold statement of color. Snap your room into focus with Fresh, Ebony and Java or soften with Ivory. Trenddefying Malibu meets contemporary Loft style in this stunning “perfect for the coastal home” collection. Cottage & Bungalow offers design options from classic to contemporary for the exceptional coastal home. Visit www.CottageandBungalow.com


UNIQUE SURFACING PRODUCTS FROM A RELIABLE SOURCE From the outstanding performance of quartz to the beauty of granite and the ingenuity of recycled surfacing, Cosentino is a world-wide leader in the manufacturing and distribution of surfacing materials. Our internationally recognized brands are strong, unique and locally available to you.

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Cosentino Center - Northborough 508-393-9600 | 41 Lyman Street, Northborough MA 01532

NATURAL STONE

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ADVERTISMENT

DREAM KITCHENS BEAUTIFUL, SPACIOUS AND FUNCTIONAL

This award-winning firm has been featured everywhere, including Signature Kitchens, Kitchens by Professional Designers and Designer Kitchen and Baths magazines, HGTV, and NECN’s “Dream House.” Over the last twenty years, they have earned more than 135 awards for Best Value and Best Design of Kitchens from various organizations, including the New Hampshire Home Builders and Remodelers Association, the Signature Executive Network and both Kitchen Aid and Sub-Zero appliance companies. They have won awards not only for kitchen design, but for exceptional designs in baths, entertainment centers, closets and more. What sets them apart is that they promise not only beautiful designs, but pledge to find at least thirty percent more storage space in your

kitchen. They give homeowners three completely unique designs for each project, then walk clients through the pros and cons of each, offering guidance with strong client involvement. The designers pride themselves on unique design solutions for each client, and are versed in every style option from traditional to contemporary. Exotic woods are also an option. Their designs feature lots of curves and angles for visual excitement as well as functionality. Many of their layouts feature the sink facing a family room or entertainment area rather than facing out a window. This allows the cook to socialize with guests as well as keep and eye on homework progress. Kitchens have become multi-functional dining/entertaining/ homework centers.

Design is the key to make any kitchen renovation a true success.

With a dream team of five talented designers, Dream Kitchens works regionally in New Hampshire, Vermont and the greater Boston area. They work with any builder or contractor, or can suggest one if needed.

Dream Kitchens 139 Daniel Webster Highway Nashua, NH 03060 ph: (603) 891-2916 fx: (603) 891-3590 adreamkitchen.com


HIS, HERS AND THEIRS

Inspired by the classic old four-structure farms of New England, a contemporary Massachusetts house joins traditional with modern as seamlessly as the blending of the happy new family that calls it home. TEXT BY STACY KUNSTEL • PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL J. LEE • ARCHITECTURE: RUTH BENNETT, RBA ARCHITECTURE • INTERIOR DESIGN: SUSAN ACTON, SUSAN B. ACTON INTERIORS • BUILDER: THE CLASSIC GROUP • CABINETRY: KOCHMAN REIDT + HAIGH • LANDSCAPE DESIGN: GREGORY LOMBARDI DESIGN

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Two families blended their lives and their belongings in this home. Designer Susan Acton helped the new husband and wife forge a sense of togetherness by mixing favorite pieces (his chandelier and her Elizabeth Eakins rug) with new furniture and accessories. Facing page: A massive granite ďŹ replace creates a focal point for the living room.

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Architect Ruth Bennett designed a twist on the classic New England four-building farm, reinforcing the agrarian motif with a standing seam roof. Below: From the back, the house is broken into functional segments joined by glass connectors. Facing page left: A stone terrace holds an outdoor cooking area. Facing page right: A bench with a view invites quiet contemplation.

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ove has never literally built a house, but its influence on the design of this Acton, Massachusetts, home can be measured in every square foot. Architect Ruth Bennett and interior designer Susan Acton were presented with the story of two families, just one member shy of a Brady Bunch scenario, wanting a new house where they could blend their two tribes into one. The property was chosen—a bucolic spot on ten acres not far from the town’s historic downtown area—and all that was left was to plan, build, landscape and furnish the home before the kids started school nine months later. “Everything happened so fast,” says Bennett, principal of RBA Architecture. “I had a great time,” says Acton, who had worked on a previous home with the wife through her firm, Susan B. Acton Interiors. “It was wonderful. They bought the property in November and they had to be in the last week of August. We couldn’t take one minute off.” Weekly meetings were the norm, and all the important professionals— architect, designer, builder, cabinetmaker and landscape architect—kept in close touch to make sure the process went as smoothly as it did quickly. “There was no time to hesitate,” says Acton. “Plus, my clients got married in the middle of it.” The new home, which replaces a 1980s house that was torn down, comes together in four separate structures connected by a pair of glassedin breezeways. One of those structures—a red-painted barn—serves as the garage. From the garage, the family entryway leads through a mudroom to meet up with a center structure that holds the kitchen and family room on the first level and the kids’ bedrooms and a common space for hanging out or doing artwork on the second level. The third structure’s more formal entry opens to the living and dining/library areas. The master suite and an office area occupy the fourth building. From the outside, with its red barn and high-pitched gable rooflines, the home resembles a modern interpretation of the traditional “big house, little house, back house, barn” style of northern New England. “They loved the idea of farm structures of New Hampshire,” says Bennett. The glass connectors act like the ells of those old-time houses. “Each ell is eight feet wide,” says Bennett. “They have almost no furniture in them; they act like a pause. They are quiet spaces.” At the formal entry, Bennett designed an exaggerated overhang May/June 2012 New England Home 85


A custom-designed dining table disassembles to become a desk or card table. Built-in bookcases give the room a dual purpose as a library. Facing page top: The kitchen features built-ins and an island crafted by Kochman Reidt + Haigh. Facing page bottom: An assemblage of ottomans from the husband’s former home were recovered to create a large coffee table for the family room.

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above the front door. “I spent time driving through the back roads of New Hampshire, where you’ll see these overhangs,” says Bennett. “There are no columns underneath so you see the modernity of the structure.” Adjacent to the entry hall, which has an open view to the backyard, are the living room and library/dining room. Wrapped on three sides by windows, the living room feels like an open pavilion with landscape views around the room. A floor-to-ceiling granite fireplace dominates one wall. Throughout the house Acton repurposed numerous pieces from the couple’s past lives, giving them a sense of continuity as they transitioned from one house to the next. In the living room, for example, Acton introduced a customdesigned, linen-wrapped coffee table but also made use of a chandelier from the husband’s previous home and an Elizabeth Eakins rug from the wife’s last master bedroom. “The most important thing was getting the scale right,” Acton says. “All their furniture had to fit. That’s the hardest thing when people move into a new space with their existing furniture. In this case it looks like the house was planned with their furniture.” “Both had wonderful houses before,” Acton adds. “They both had beautiful antique pieces, but they wanted to tone it down. More than anything, they really wanted this house to be livable and to use every inch of it.” In trying to make the most of the space they had, the couple became concerned about the dining room, a twentyfour-by-sixteen-foot space that would perhaps “More than anything, they wanted this house not get as much use as they would want it to. to be livable and to use every inch of it.” “They felt strongly about the dining room not being a room that would be used just once a year,” says Bennett. “Plus, there were other dining areas in the house on the porch and in the kitchen,” adds Acton. The solution was to make the room multifunctional. Bookcases along May/June 2012 New England Home 87


Quietude and comfort mix in the husband’s office. Facing page clockwise from top: The master bedroom is a passionate blend of the couple’s wedding colors of aubergine and hydrangea. A screened porch sits at the back of the house. An undulating wall of tile behind the tub in the master bath mimics rippling water.

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one wall let the room serve as a library, and Acton designed a dining table that can be assembled to seat sixteen people for a dinner party or broken apart to become a desk and a smaller, round table the other 90 percent of the time. Acton also added a pair of Donghia wingback chairs, giving the room a distinct seating area. “So now it’s a library that can transform into a dining room when needed,” says the designer. In the center structure, where the kitchen and family room make up the heart of the home, Bennett collaborated with cabinetmakers Kochman, Reidt + Haigh on the design, a mix of painted, glass-front and open shelving. Black granite covers most of countertops, with the exception of the raised shelf in the center island and the long floor-to-ceiling buffet, which are clad in zinc. A cherry peninsula extends from the island for inkitchen seating. The family room with its large leather sectional sofa abuts the kitchen and is a hangout area for the whole family. The ottoman in the center is actually a collection of storage cubes that were scattered about the husband’s previous house. Acton re-covered them and gathered them together to form one large ottoman. Much like the other spaces in the house, the family room has a neutral feel with its white walls and earthy tones. That’s why the master bedroom comes as such a surprise at first glance. Acton had chosen a geometric patterned rug of green and deep purple from Colony Rug. When she showed it to her clients, they pulled out their recent wedding photos. The wife had worn an aubergine gown and held a bouquet of green hydrangeas; the color combination was exactly the same. Acton continued the theme by Compared to the rest of the home’s neutral choosing an asparagus green for the walls and tones, the master bedroom is a surprise. covering the sofa and headboard in the same bold purple hue as the dress and rug, reinforcing the memory of the couple’s special day. “They were starting over,” says Acton. “It was very happy.” • Resources For more information about this home, see page 154. May/June 2012 New England Home 89


CONCRETE THINKING

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A Vermont family trades a traditional house on a fifteen-acre farm for an ultramodern hilltop home with knockout views of the Connecticut River. TEXT BY LISA E. HARRISON • PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM WESTPHALEN • ARCHITECTURE: CHRISTOPHER SMITH • INTERIOR DESIGN: CHERYL BOGHOSIAN, GILBERTE INTERIORS • BUILDER: ESTES & GALLUP • LANDSCAPE DESIGN: KEITH WAGNER AND JEFF HODGSON, H. KEITH WAGNER PARTNERSHIP • PRODUCED BY KARIN LIDBECK BRENT

Modern furnishings and a neutral palette sync beautifully with the vast concrete canvas. Top left: A cantilevered balcony off the second-story living room creates a seamless transition between outdoors and in. Bottom left: Architect Christopher Smith designed custom glass rails on the balconies so as not to impede the view.

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Floor-to-ceiling windows allow natural light to ood the stacked living rooms. Geometric grasses and plantings add texture in keeping with the modern aesthetic. Below left: A pool, ďŹ re pit and kitchen primed for entertaining make the terrace a popular summer gathering spot. Below right: Given the prevalence of glass, designer Cheryl Boghosian made a point to coordinate the furnishings inside and out.

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hen it comes to wanting a change of surroundings, there’s a sliding scale. For some, it’s as simple as a splash of new paint. Others up the ante with a kitchen rehab or an add-on to the master suite. And then there are those who scrap it all and start fresh. New site. New build. And an entirely new aesthetic. In the case of Loretta and David Leatherwood, the only thing their new house and old share is a Norwich, Vermont, zip code—a neighborly town of 3,800 (complete with a general store and village green) that hugs the Connecticut River and eyes Hanover, New Hampshire, across the banks. Their previous home was a traditional farmhouse on fifteen acres. “We had horses, chickens, sheep, pigs,” says Loretta. “We’d go out and get eggs every morning.” With their four kids approaching or in their teens, the Leatherwoods decided to switch things up. “The novelty of winter and animals wore off, and I wanted a change,” she says. “I wanted to be on the water, and I wanted to build a house that would always be in our family, so when the kids are older they can bring their families and meet together.” Credit goes to Norwich-based architect and friend Christopher Smith for spotting the spectacular site, a knob of land perched eighty feet above the Connecticut River and boasting a 180-degree vantage. The original vision of the project, though, was all Loretta, an art history major and creative force with a keen eye. “She said, ‘I like concrete and I like glass,’ ” remembers Smith. Her inspiration came in part from paging through books and magazines, where she discovered a concrete house by renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando. “Simple, clean lines, modern—that’s the look I wanted,” she says. The execution, however, fell to Smith. And designing a 9,700-square-foot house entirely from concrete (he likens it to an ice cream sandwich with six inches of concrete on each side and four inches of insulation in between) requires precision and patience. Lots of both. It took ten mock-ups—eight-footby-eight-foot slabs of concrete stacked Stonehenge-style in the yard—to settle on the perfect finish and color. Given the sheer volume, it was critical to get the look just right: not too porous, not too drab, with a smooth, plastery feel. While concrete is championed for being low-maintenance, dealing with it is anything but. A year of planning went into the project before the builders, Estes & Gallup, broke ground. “We had one shot to get it right,” says Smith. Every door, window, recessed light fixture and sink mount had to be finalized before the concrete was poured. And so began a massive coordination effort with electricians, plumbers and builders. “It

“I LIKE CONCRETE AND I LIKE GLASS.”

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was not easy by any means,” he says. “It was slow going, but we made it through.” Captivated by the views and Loretta’s appeal to merge indoors and out, the clever architect decided to flip a traditional floor plan and position the main living quarters on the second floor. He pitched the idea to the Leatherwoods early on by piling them onto the bed of his pickup truck to scope out the scenery; if a four-foot elevation made a difference, imagine a whole story? They were sold. The ground level contains the kids’ rooms, fashioned dorm-style off a central corridor. An all-glass living room occupies the center space and, to the right, sits a stairwell, half-bath, mudroom and three-car garage. A small kitchen used primarily for entertaining serves the pool and patio

THE OVERALL LAYOUT IS BREEZY AND OPEN.

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The spacious kitchen welcomes a crowd. An L-shaped island anchors the space and provides storage. Reflective cabinets stylishly conceal the fridge, freezer and pantry. Below left: The breakfast nook is punched up with a bold patterned rug. Below right: Rooms flow, delineated primarily by furnishings and fabrics, in the open floor plan. Facing page: Smith designed the twelve-footlong dining room table of ebonized ash.

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Simple and serene, the master suite is anchored with a bed from Poliform. A private balcony shielded by trees is primed for relaxation with twin chairs (they look like concrete but are actually plastic) by Quinze & Milan. Facing page top: The interior view from the master suite. Facing page bottom: Neutral hues and clean lines dominate the master bath.

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area. Upstairs, the master suite is stacked above the children’s quarters, and a more formal living room shares the same footprint as the family-focused one below (albeit with sixteen-foot ceilings and even more dramatic views). To the right, a stunning kitchen and dining room, with balconies jutting off both, take center stage. In keeping with the ultramodern feel of the project, clutter was banned. “I told the kids: pack your clothes and don’t bring anything else,” says Loretta. Interior designer and good friend Cheryl Boghosian of Gilberte Interiors, whose expertise Loretta enlisted once construction was complete, credits the owner with sticking to her guns; not even a favorite chair or prized painting made the ten-mile journey from old house to new. The overall layout is breezy and open. “You really feel like nature flows through the house,” says Boghosian. Keeping this notion in mind, the duo sought ways to delineate rooms without disrupting the fluidity. Custom-woven rugs, says the designer, were a key part of this strategy— a way to subtly ground and define spaces while adding texture. A neutral palette of grays and whites provides a serene backdrop and doesn’t compete with the real star: the great outdoors. Given the prevalence of glass, natural light acts as a design element, too. Not only does it give the concrete a shimmery silver patina, but reflections in the house change daily based on time and season, lending a welcoming warmth to a strong space. When it came to furnishings, Loretta went minimalist. “I chose five basic big pieces I wanted in the house,” she says. Most came from Montage in Boston, though Smith fabricated the dining room table out of ash with ebony stain. Her main motive? “I didn’t want anything to obstruct the view.” High-backed chairs and low-hanging chandeliers were banished. And clever design elements (in the kitchen, note the white glass cabinets that reflect the outdoors, and the pull-down, see-through sun screen) were added to celebrate the natural surroundings. The only artwork was crafted by Loretta, whose studio sits on the second floor of a 1,600-square-foot outbuilding: a sculpture made of raw-silk fabric that hangs on the upstairs living room wall. Inspired by the rushing river below, the piece appropriately bridges indoors and out. Loretta admits, though, that the art is likely only temporary. After all, for this family, there’s nothing wrong with mixing things up every once in a while. •

BASED ON TIME AND SEASON.

Resources For more information about this home, see page 154. May/June 2012 New England Home 97


La Bastille and its signature white fence, which fronts the storied house’s twenty-acre parcel. Right, top to bottom: Elegant period details abound, including a doorknocker homeowner Malcolm Rogers found in a junk shop.

All is Calm

In a tiny, tranquil town outside Boston, an old house gets a loving makeover that reawakens the spirit of its storied past. Text by Rob Brinkley • Photography by John Gruen • Produced by Kyle Hoepner

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A plaster relief by English sculptor James Sherwood Westmacott hangs above the living room fireplace. Facing page, clockwise from top left: Rogers removed added-on railings and a collapsing porch to take the house to a simpler 1920s feel. On the stairs, Victorian carpet balls, once used for indoor bowling. In the main hall, a painting of John Flaxman, an English sculptor, by society portraitist James Lonsdale.

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“When the light catches their wings,” says Malcolm Rogers, referring to some energetic little creatures that flit about his two-story, white-clapboard home, “it’s as if you can see them moving.” Rogers, the director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, isn’t speaking of hummingbirds or fireflies, though thousands of the latter converge each summer to dart and glint against the night sky above the lawns around his house. Instead, he is waxing rhapsodic about the bees—hundreds of them—printed on a particular Arts and Crafts wallpaper in a particular bedroom of his house. These aren’t just any bees: this colony sports silvered wings that catch the gauzy light streaming through the room’s

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amply scaled windows. And, for the record, this isn’t just any bedroom: it was occupied for several summers in the 1940s by a certain widowed empress, forced to flee her beloved Europe. (One has to imagine that she was lulled into comfort by the fireflies in the night sky. The bees? Those were installed by Rogers less than a decade ago.) This storied house, which has stood for almost 200 years along a pastoral common in the tiny Massachusetts town of Royalston, has countless chapters to go. Built in 1819, it was first a parsonage house for Royalston, a tranquil spot northwest of Boston with views of nearby Tully Mountain and a population today of just barely more than 1,200. Rogers’s house “acts as a keystone to the entry


Rather than fully rewind the Georgianstyle house to its original 1819 incarnation, Rogers nudged the house back to the 1920s.

to the Common,” he says, a green space around which sit a dozen or so houses, plus the town hall and the library. Rogers likes the trapped-in-time feeling. “It’s very quiet, very remote and hidden in the woods,” he says of the town. “It’s what in England would be called a hamlet.” That aura is what most attracted the British-born Rogers, who, looking for a weekend getaway, found the house in 2003. It was, he says, “a rescue project,” unoccupied since the 1950s except by wasps, which had moved into almost every room. (Elegant illustrated bees are one thing; real stinging wasps, quite another.) An added twostory sleeping porch was about to collapse, and the house’s granite foundation and steps needed shoring and straightMay/June 2012 New England Home 101


This sitting room’s wall color was intended to be buff, but turned out “rather pink,” says Rogers, who embraced the happy accident. The contemporary chaise is a sleek foil to the period antiques and details. Facing page, top: The dining room, wrapped in chinoiserie fabric, employs no electric light; Rogers uses candles in the chandelier and the German crystal sconces. Facing page, bottom: Just some of the crystal and cut glass that Rogers has “managed to pile everywhere.”

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ening. “I took pity on it,” Rogers says. The inherently Georgian house had been “upgraded,” Rogers likes to say, facetiously, by a Boston architect in the 1930s who, he says, “Federal-ized it, making it a bit more elaborate.” Rather than fully rewind to its original 1819 incarnation, Rogers nudged the house back to the 1920s, when Royalston was a summer getaway for the well-to-do. An incongruous Chinese Chippendale balustrade that once bordered a rooftop was let go. The sleeping porch came down, replaced by a single-story version that graciously wraps one corner. The myriad tweaks and clarifications took two years, and, in the end, Rogers had a calmer, quieter house, its inherent attractions fully intact. “There is a lovely harmony to the place,” he says, “in the rooms’ proportions, and the relationships of the rooms to their windows.” And then there’s that pedigree. The house’s most illustrious residents thus far have been Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Bullock, Jr., he a financier and scion of a prominent Royalston family. It was Calvin Bullock who is purported to have given many of the homes around the Common their nicknames: “The Columns,” “Lightning Rods” and, in the case of this house, “La Bastille.” “Nobody knows why,” Rogers says, laughing. But everybody in town knows La Bastille, especially for its most famous guest, the aforementioned Empress Zita, the last empress of Austria, the last queen of Hungary and the last queen of Bohemia. She was the widow of Emperor Karl, the ruler of the AustroHungarian Empire Rogers dragged in finds from 1916 to his abdifrom hither and yon, not from cation in 1918, who vaunted antiques dealers, but died in 1922 in exile in Portugal. Zita was a from thrift shops. friend of the Bullocks, who hosted her and seven of her eight children for several summers at La Bastille after they fled their adopted Belgium in 1940 following a Nazi invasion. Zita and her brood were “Europe’s most distinguished refugees,” said Life magazine in December 1940. “But up in Royalston, Massachusetts,” said the South Amboy Citizen newspaper that same month, “only a low white fence of wooden palings separates the last of the great Hapsburg families from the world.” May/June 2012 New England Home 103


A white fence still fronts the Bastille today, a gateway to its twenty idyllic acres, part of which had been an eighteen-hole course designed by influential golfer Donald Ross. (“It’s now,” says Rogers, “rather a blueberry patch.”) Once Rogers had the house sorted out, out-of-control blueberries notwithstanding, he turned to its interior decoration. Like the pace in Royalston, there was no hurry—at all. “It was a blank canvas,” he says, “furnished over time.” Rogers dragged in finds from hither and yon, not from vaunted antiques dealers or important sources, but from junk shops and thrift shops. “At the Museum of Fine Arts,” he says, “we’re used to collecting and displaying masterpieces. At home? I have a budget.” He does, though, admit to a double curse: “I’m an enthusiastic antiquer and a packrat.” His collections include eighteenth- and nineteenth-century prints (“They are everywhere,” he says) and patterned Victorian carpet balls, once used for indoor bowling games and which now march up the center hall’s staircase. As in renovating the house, Rogers hasn’t stuck slavishly to one look or feel with its furnishings, though he did, as he puts it, try to “dramatize” certain rooms. The bedroom believed to be Empress Zita’s (“Tradition has it,” said the Royalston Community Newsletter in 2006, “she always slept in the room closest to Vienna”) is now Rogers’s interpretation of what an Arts and Crafts room of the 1920s may have been, down to the aforementioned bee wallpaper, designed in 1881 by forward-thinking designer Candace Wheeler. Another room brims with sporting prints. “I thought a country house should Everybody knows La Bastille, have a room full of those,” Rogers says. especially for its most In a sitting room, infamous guest, Empress Zita, stead of fussy settees or period sofas, a pair of conthe last empress of Austria. temporary chaise lounges cut any potential seriousness down a notch. All in all, it’s a comfortable, cozy refuge, not just for exiled empresses but also for Rogers, who comes out on the weekends for healthy doses of sheer quiet. “There’s a quality of audible stillness,” he says. “No cars, no street life to speak of.” And, of course, there is the calming effect of gentle flickers of light—from the wood fires he builds and the candles he ignites, and from all those bees’ wings and fireflies, too. • Resources For more information about this home, see page 154. 104 New England Home May/June 2012


In the bedroom thought to be Empress Zita’s, honeybee-themed wallpaper designed in 1881 by Candace Wheeler. Facing page, top: Under the house’s various rugs and contemporary sisal mats are plank floors, mostly original. Facing page, bottom: Cascading flowers make themselves at home along the elegant fence.

May/June 2012 New England Home 105


A sculptural staircase of stainless steel, walnut and Concordia stone separates a long, low space into distinct living room and dining areas. Facing page top: The same elements used in the staircase make their ďŹ rst appearance in the foyer. The hallway, lit by skylight, leads past guestrooms to the master suite.


A Higher Calling A design team’s imaginative approach unleashes the potential in a penthouse condominium in Boston’s Back Bay for a result that’s nothing short of stunning, inside and out. Text by Paula M. Bodah • Photography by Trent Bell • Architecture and Interior Design: Hacin + Associates • Builder: Sea-Dar Construction • Millwork: Kochman Reidt + Haigh • Landscape Design: Gregory Lombardi Design and The Garden Concierge • Produced by Kyle Hoepner

May/June 2012 New England Home 107


ohn Lennon once sang, “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.” The man who shares this Back Bay condominium with his wife can probably relate to that sentiment. He was a bachelor when he bought the three-level penthouse space in a 1920s high-rise that was being converted to condos. Hoping to take the unit from the traditional look the developer was planning to something that suited his more contemporary tastes, he got together with architects David Hacin and Aaron Weinert of the Boston firm Hacin + Associates. “It was a fantastic space,” Hacin recalls, “but the ceilings weren’t overly high and the organization of the apartment wasn’t quite right.” The master bedroom, for example, faced the city skyline—a magnificent vista, certainly, but the new owner liked 108 New England Home May/June 2012

the idea of waking up to a view of the Charles River, so the bedroom would have to move to the unit’s other side. The living/dining area was one long, low room, a layout that emphasized the horizontal planes with the dual effect of detracting from the views and limiting natural light. “We came up with the idea of celebrating the vertical circulation a bit more, creating a better connection from one floor to another,” Hacin says. The architects found both challenges and opportunities as they played with various schemes to bring a sense of unity to the three levels. The biggest challenge? All the mechanicals for the apartments on the lower floors made their way through the walls and ceilings of this highest unit in the building. “We had to carefully map out all of the existing mechanicals and create a floor plan that felt like it was flowing naturally around these things,” Hacin explains. The most welcome opportunity? Nearly half the sec-


Matte and glossy surfaces play against each other in the tailored, contemporary living room area. Left: A coffered ceiling adds a sense of height to the dining room. Below left: A favorite piece of art that suggests the skyline outside hangs in the dining room. Below right: The designers chose a palette of creams and grays to complement the warmth of the wood.


Luce de luna quartzite with a high polish tops the walnut cabinetry of the kitchen island. Far left top and bottom: The second-level rooftop terrace comprises several seating areas. Left bottom: The breakfast area chandelier is actually five separate fixtures hung at different heights.

ond level is an outdoor roof terrace, which inspired the architects to bring the natural light of the terrace into the main living area below via skylight. (The third level is a considerably smaller space that looks out over the roof terrace below and holds a fitness room with panoramic views all round.) Back on the first level, the main elevator opens to a foyer that offers a preview of the clever work throughout by the architects along with interior designers Kate Kelley and Christine Rankin, also of Hacin + Associates. The ma-

guest rooms, through a set of doors with translucent window panes and into the master suite. The light that floods the hall and the master suite comes from the long skylight Hacin and Weinert installed in the roof terrace above. “The long corridor was very dark,” Hacin says. “With the skylight, the frosted glass and the reflective stone, we brought a lot of light in.” To the left, a sleek staircase of walnut, Concordia stone and stainless steel divides the long, low living and dining space. “By locating the staircase as a sculptural element

“We came up with the idea of celebrating the vertical circulation a bit more.” terials here—honed and polished Concordia stone, walnut wood and stainless steel—find their way into the rest of the home, bringing unity to the space. To the right of the foyer, a long hallway leads past two

between the living and dining areas, we were able to change the scale of the room,” Hacin says. “We created two spaces that are intimate and distinct, but that borrow from each other.” May/June 2012 New England Home 111


The homeowners can luxuriate in the master bath, high above the urban bustle. Right: Custom-designed and vintage pieces keep company in the master bedroom. The designers created the art above the bed by custom framing strips of hide. Below: A modern, colorful wall sculpture complements the stainless steel staircase to the fitness room.

The living room’s fireplace is crafted of honed and polished Concordia stone with a mantel of walnut and a narrow accent band of stainless steel at the top. In the dining room, the mix of gloss and matte is repeated in the chairs of leather and chrome that surround the highly varnished rosewood table with its base and insets of gleaming chrome. In both rooms, notes Kelley, recessed ceiling coffers and window moldings that extend down to meet the floor fool the senses into thinking the space is taller than it really is. “We also used Venetian plaster, which adds reflectivity and lifts the ceiling,” she says. Aiming for a sophisticated palette that would play off the warmth of the stone and wood, the design team outfitted the space in shades of steel gray and slate blue. The living room’s contemporary chairs, sofa and coffee table have a low profile, another clever move that makes the space feel taller. “We kept things very clean and tailored,” 112 New England Home May/June 2012


Kelley says, “but we included a lot of beautiful details.” There’s no break in continuity when it comes to the kitchen, where walnut cabinets are trimmed with stainless steel, stone and wood lie side by side on the floor, and frosted glass cabinet fronts echo the doors leading to the master suite. The unit’s second level is all about fun, holding game and media rooms with views of the city skyline and the river, as well as a second kitchen to make entertaining easy. All rooms open onto the spacious terrace, where several seating

Hacin notes. “It’s really a whole other living space.” Now, back to John Lennon’s observation about life. While the homeowner and his design team were busy planning his perfect space, he and Kelley made a buying trip to New York City, where they found a circa-1960s sculpture by Marsha Blank. The name of the piece? Man and Woman. Not long after, the homeowner met and married the woman who now shares his life and his home. If his purchase of the sculpture seems to involve a bit of prophecy, the same might be said of the work Hacin and

“We kept things very clean and tailored but included a lot of beautiful details.” areas, a dining area with a grill and a “living room” complete with a TV are delineated by a series of gardens that bloom in a profusion of color come the warmer months. “The terrace was designed to be a series of outdoor rooms,”

his team did. As clean, contemporary and handsome as this space is, it’s also warm and inviting, functional and flexible—a mix that makes for a happy union, indeed. • Resources For more information about this home, see page 154. May/June 2012 New England Home 113


Forward Thinking New England’s residential design experts consider the state of the art: what’s hot, what’s

Residential Architecture

TEXT BY KYLE HOEPNER

T

he nature of the product—buildings often take years to make, then stay around for decades or centuries of use—dictates that trends in architecture don’t flow with the same speed as trends on the fashion runway. Still, notions of style and preferred ways of living do evolve over time, and wise architects learn to anticipate these changes. What are the trending topics for New England’s residential architects today? ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Jeremiah Eck, of Boston’s Eck | Mac-

Neely Architects, holds that saving energy, although hardly a sexy design theme, will continue to gain in importance. Despite the proliferation of codes and rating systems such as HERS, LEED and Energy Star, Eck says, “so far, most builders and even some architects only pay lip service to this goal.” The future will require more than just attention to standards. A greater emphasis on age-old techniques like good siting and designing buildings suited to a region’s climate is important as well. Portland, Maine, architect Richard Renner concurs. “When clients are interested,” he says, “it’s possible to make huge gains in efficiency and quality.” He, too, stresses the need for more than just efficient insulation and energy-saving appliances (valuable as these are). “This means re-thinking the modernist desire for lots of

glass everywhere. Instead, we try to deploy windows more carefully to balance view, light, ventilation, heat gain and heat loss.” RETHINKING THE PLAN

Eck observes that “all of us lead markedly different lives than we did just a few decades ago. Married couples make up only 48 percent of households and many of us are living alone, yet we continue to treat house plans the same way, with the same rooms: living rooms, dining rooms, bedrooms and baths.” He suggests that a rethinking of plans is imminent, combining spaces in ways that have more to do with how we actually live. “Do we really need a formal living room or a formal entry anymore? Should all bedrooms be seen as multiple-use spaces?” Asking these questions may pave the way to a smaller, more efficient plan that is more in tune with our day-to-day needs. One such change is already common: what Eck calls the “Liv-

ARCHITECT JEREMIAH ECK ADVOCATES A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO ENERGY EFFICIENCY, INCLUDING NEGLECTED TRADITIONAL ARTS LIKE PROPER SITING.

114 New England Home May/June 2012

ing Hall,” a single space for relaxing, cooking and dining that has increasingly found a place at the heart of many home plans. For Renner, this central “social interaction” space makes it equally important to supply a few private “away” spaces as a counterpoint. “These could be semi-private alcoves off the living-dining-kitchen space, a sitting area in a bedroom, or even a stair landing large enough for a window seat or a reading chair,” he says. With more and more families migrating to smaller quarters in the city, it’s not just a question of interiors. The more crowded confines of urban areas offer the challenge of finding ways to provide access to the outdoors. “We always look for opportuni-


Special Focus • Trends and Trendmakers

new and where we are headed from here.

ties to use the roof,” Renner says, “And inside, with less space to work with, we try to create openness and long views without compromising privacy.” UNIVERSAL DESIGN AND AGING IN PLACE

“The concept of ‘aging in place’ has been around for some time,” says architect Josh Safdie of Boston’s Institute for Human Centered Design, “but it has only begun to attract major attention in the last several years.” He ties this growing popularity to the aging of the Baby Boomer generation. A key concept, for Safdie, is Universal Design: creating spaces tailored to today while

keeping in mind the inevitable changes in mobility and lifestyle that will occur over time. Richard Renner, for example, notes that in most houses and apartments, “elevators are still the exception. So we almost always design for future single-floor living.” The goal is a residential experience that evolves along with changes in abilities and life patterns. “We will need homes where grandparents and grandchildren can coexist, where the benefits of multi-generational living can be fully enjoyed,” says Safdie. None of these trends is related to any

JAMES R. SALOMON

RICHARD RENNER’S OWN LOFT IN PORTLAND, MAINE, MAKES EFFICIENT USE OF EVERY BIT OF OUTDOOR SPACE, INCLUDING THE ROOF.

specific aesthetic, modernist or historical. Yet all can make important contributions to what Jeremiah Eck foresees as “a new American house that is equivalent to the iPad or the Hybrid car, combining the best available technology with the most inspiring and useful design.”

A MULTI-USE “LIVING HALL” FORMS THE CORE OF THIS HOME BY ECK | MACNEELY ARCHITECTS.

May/June 2012 New England Home 115


Special Focus • Trends and Trendmakers

Interior Design

TEXT BY STACY KUNSTEL

HOME AWAY FROM HOME

The look of your next favorite hotel will likely be created by an interior designer with more residential cred than commercial experience. As hoteliers look to make their lobbies and rooms more personal and plush using fabrics, finishes and furnishings designed for residential use, they’re also hiring designers who specialize in turning house into home. “We want the same layered look in the inn that we strive for with our residential work,” says Providence-based interior designer Nancy Taylor of her first hotel project, the Weekapaug Inn in Watch Hill, Rhode

Island. “In residential work a designer is always aware that the client will be living with their furnishings for many years,” she says. “In hospitality the guest wants to experience something unique, apart from the everyday. The challenge is to provide that experience and do it tastefully.” Boston-based interior designer Rachel Reider wraps up her third and fourth hotel projects for Lark Hotels, in Newport and Nantucket, this summer. “While we love residential design, hospitality allows us more freedom to push the design envelope a bit,” she explains. “Guests are more open to and often appre-

THIS DESIGN BY RACHEL REIDER FOR NEWPORT’S ATTWATER HOTEL FOCUSES ON BOLD. HIGHLY INDIVIDUAL PIECES.

RARE BRICK

I

nterior design and designers are as fickle as film critics, easily lauding something on its way in and quickly eschewing it as it’s on its way out. Still, we found a few trends that have staying power.

ciate a bolder aesthetic than they might have in their own home because it is part of the novelty of the travel experience.” THE PERSONAL TOUCH

Homeowners want that one-of-a-kind look and they like the sense of discovery that comes from finding a piece that’s not only perfect, but is made locally and has a story behind it. “I believe the ability to source unique pieces is one of the strongest assets an interior designer brings to a project,” says Reider. “Clients want to feel their home is a representation of them, and the more personal touches we can incorporate into the interiors the better.”

RARE BRICK

A BEDROOM DESIGNED BY RACHEL REIDER FOR THE CAPTAIN FAIRFIELD INN IN KENNBUNKPORT, MAINE, HAS A DISTINCTLY RESIDENTIAL FEEL.

116 New England Home May/June 2012


UNIQUE CAN ALSO MEAN ARTISAN-MADE, SUCH AS THIS TABLE BY JEFF SODERBERGH INCORPORATING WOOD FROM THE VANDERBILT FAMILY STABLE IN PORTSMOUTH, RHODE ISLAND.

NANCY TAYLOR’S WORK FOR THE WEEKAPAUG INN DREW HEAVILY FROM RESIDENTIAL FABRIC RESOURCES.

of context in order to keep balance,” he says. “For example, a Victorian house makes a very strong statement. So I would shy away from Victorian furnishings to avoid the feeling of a museum. Furnishings are best when paired with a complement. This is especially true when dealing with a midcentury house. I think people tend to want to fill it with midcentury furniture. One needs counterbalance to make a twenty-first-century statement rather than recreate a stage set from Mad Men.”

Natalie Carpenter, who owns Lekker in Boston’s South End, would agree. She works with a Belgium-based furniture company, called Marie’s Corner, that manufactures its customized pieces in the United States. “It gives the consumer the design choice, better service and higher quality they are looking for with the comfort of knowing it’s made right here in the U.S.A.,” Carpenter says. ECLECTICISM

SAM GRAY

Complete period houses have gone the way of period styles. It’s not happening. Period. Today’s clients are more likely than ever to blend eras, trends and looks. “My favorite trend is that there is so much to choose from that almost every style has a place,” says Portland, Maine–based interior designer and store owner Linda Banks. “You can express yourself with crusty barn board and rustic reclaimed factory furniture or reinvent your style as high-gloss white furniture with a twist of Asian, flanked by a batik sofa and orange gourd lamps.” Mixing styles helps avoid a contrived feeling, notes Phillip Jude Miller of America Dural, a Cambridge, Massachusetts, firm. “It’s important to be conscious

A ROOM DESIGNED BY AMERICA DURAL COVERS CLEAN, MODERN FURNITURE IN LUSH TRADITIONAL FABRICS AND MIXES ANTIQUES WITH MODERN ART. May/June 2012 New England Home 117


Special Focus • Trends and Trendmakers

Walls, Floors and Finishes

TEXT BY PAULA M. BODAH

S

mooth surfaces and a sea of pale neutrals will always have their place in beautiful homes, but the look and feel that designers and their clients want today is moving into deeper, richer, glossier and more tactile territory.

TEXTURE

“People are looking for more than flat wall coverings or a painted wall,” says Peter Webster, vice president of Webster & Company in the Boston Design Center. Phillip Jeffries grasscloths in a rainbow of colors are hugely popular, Webster says, including a new collection called Rivets, a raffia covering sprinkled with raised resin dots. Sally Wilson, of Salem, Massachusetts–based Wilson Kelsey Design, confirms the penchant for texture. She recently outfitted a powder room in black crocodile-embossed recycled leather from Eco Domo. “Leather is a nice, material that people can relate to,” she says. And

what’s not to love about using recycled material? Boston designer Eric Roseff has found a whole new world of texture in Venetian plaster since he discovered the work of Pietra Viva, a Boston and Milan, Italy– based company. “They do Venetian plaster like you’ve never seen it. They take it to a whole new level,” Roseff says. A prime example of their work is the glossy, crocodile-look surface they gave to a foyer in a house Roseff designed. Hides are gaining in popularity, too, for both both walls and floors, according to Roseff. He gave a master bedroom handsome distinction by covering one wall in Kyle Bunting’s hide strips of various widths, colors and textures. In general, Wilson says, wallpaper is enjoying a renaissance. One of her favorite

new wallpapering techniques is the photographic mural. “Digital photography is moving us to do things we couldn’t do twenty years ago,” she says. Mark Christofi, of Reading, Massachusetts, gave a room stunning impact when he covered a wall with a huge photo of fireworks. Texture is welcome underfoot, too. “I’m seeing a lot in terms of leather floors,” Wilson notes. And Webster says, when it comes to carpet, felt is big. “Holland and Sherry has a new line of felt carpets that we’re really excited about,” he says. “They’re customized for color and size, and the sky’s the limit.”

CROCODILE-PATTERNED VENETIAN PLASTER ADORNS A FOYER BY DESIGNER ERIC ROSEFF.

118 New England Home May/June 2012

MICHAEL J. LEE

TEXTURE, AS IN THESE GRASSCLOTHS FROM PHILLIP JEFFRIES, GIVES WALLS NEW INTEREST.


A PHOTO MURAL BY ERIC ROTH PROVIDES LITERAL FIREWORKS IN THIS BEDROOM BY MARK CHRISTOFI IN THE RESIDENCES AT W BOSTON.

ERIC ROTH

REFLECTIVE SURFACES, LIKE GLASSOS CRYSTALLIZED WHITE GLASS TILE, OFFER A GLOSSY CHANGE OF PACE.

And there’s no need to limit one’s toes to a single texture. “I’m seeing a lot of layering,” Roseff says, “things like a large seagrass rug topped with a beautiful Tibetan.” REFLECTIVE SURFACES

People are loving a bit of bling these days—a bit of gloss to add spark to their interiors. The highly polished Venetian plaster Roseff talks about, or the hint of shine in the Rivets wallcovering from Phillip Jeffries are two examples. “Reflective surfaces are a great way to play with light,” Roseff says. “It’s about adding depth.” His recent projects have included a floor made up of polished white glass tiles. “I’m also using a lot of lacquered furniture lately,” he adds. COLOR

Pastels and neutrals will never vanish, but all the pros agree that color is back in a big way.

“We’re seeing a surge in teals, oranges and violets,” Webster says. Courtney Fadness, a designer with Mark Hutker Architects in Falmouth, Massachusetts, is using all those colors at once. “I’m working on a project on Martha’s Vineyard, and I just presented a color palette to the client that uses turquoise, blue, orange and lavender,” she says. Fadness sees this new focus on color as a sign of hope and joy. “I think people react to what goes on in the world politically, economically and socially,” she says. “We’re coming out of the recession, getting out of the doldrums. There’s new hope, and I think people are showing that by craving vibrancy and energy and joy in their surroundings again.”

RICH COLOR, LIKE THE AMETHYST OF LIKE THIS COMPANY C RUG, IS FINDING ITS WAY INTO THE STYLISH HOME.


Special Focus • Trends and Trendmakers

Furniture, Fixtures and Accessories TEXT BY DEBBIE HAGAN

W

hile designers can’t point to a single trend driving furniture and home accessories today, they spot a number of small changes that bring buyers back for a closer look.

LUCITE

Take the use of Lucite—an eighty-year-old product. Combine it with leather, velvet and even heavier materials, and it turns into something fresh and contemporary. According to Ken Dietz, designer and owner of online retailer Market 27, great examples include Grace & Blake’s X Bench and X Stool with their upholstered seats and Lucite cross legs. As well, the company creates a sweet Bella Bench and Bella Cube, both made entirely of clear, smooth Lucite, but juxtaposed with rough-textured rope handles. “Lucite is a great way to break up finishes,” says designer Rachel Reider of

Boston. “It has a light and airy quality, especially when used in small spaces, because it creates no visual boundaries.” She points to nesting tables from Ted Boerner, offered in groups of three— an eye-catching blend of opposites with the transparency of plastic matched with the solidity of lacquered wood. TAILORING

Tailored and button-down styling, influenced by the Mad Men television series, has brought the use of men’s suit fabrics (or at least their suggestion) onto furniture upholstery. Pin stripes, light grays, flannels, tartans and plaids in lamb’s wool are finding their way onto sofas and chairs, sey Reider and Dietz. Reider is especially fond of the Cooper Chair from Dwell Studio. Even though it recalls the classic wingback, its stylized shape gives it a contemporary edginess that appeals to today’s homeowners. Designer Robin Bergland, who owns Trillium in Nantucket, recently fell in love with Black & Blum’s Loop candelabras, with their big swirling bases. They’re contemporary, yet hark back to the 1940s and ’50s.

THE X STOOL BY GRACE & BLAKE

EDELMAN’S SULKY LINE OF LEATHERS: TEXTURED COMFORT IN EYE-POPPING COLORS

120 New England Home May/June 2012

INDIVIDUALITY

Everyone searches for standout, individually crafted pieces. Manufacturers are going the extra mile to add specialty accents and finishes that create more of a studio furniture look. Iron, gold (brushed and aged brass), lacquer, grasscloth, faux leathers with embossing, mother-of-pearl, shell, horn and even antler are just some of the eye-catching add-ons. Just as reflective surfaces are becoming popular for walls, furniture and accessories are adopting a glossy new look too. Reider likes Oly Studio’s Adeline cocktail table, which offers a shim-


CHANDI’S BORAH CHANDELIER: CLASSIC SILHOUETTE, EDGY EXECUTION

BLACK AND BLUM’S LOOP CANDELABRA

mery silver resin finish, as well as the Ichibad square side table with an antiqued gold base and a top of dark shell. Dietz sees faux leather making a strong comeback. Not to worry, this isn’t your mother’s pleather. “Manufacturers have changed the hand on them,” he says. “Now the material is soft and feels like kidskin gloves.” Choices in finishes and colors are almost limitless and include metallics, pearlized python and pink opalescent crocodile. “You’d never find it on an animal, but someone will have it on a bench,” says Dietz. The new faux leathers are great for families, offering durability and easy clean-up, especially on heavy-use objects such as ottomans and banquettes. Even real leather has opened up a rainbow of possibilities. Edelman’s Sulky line offers the texturing and the worn feel of an old-fashioned doctor’s bag, but comes in bright pinks and greens in addition to more traditional shades.

RETRO

“Midcentury modern has been happening over the last ten years, but that encompasses a lot of styles,” says Dietz, whose online collection includes vintage lamps. He’s also seeing more simple hand-blown glass that might remind one of functional, bygone fixtures—like those used in barns or hospitals—but cleaned up now and updated with colored finishes, as with the Effervescent pendant series by Niche Modern. Recycled and repurposed materials are showing up increasingly in new lighting fixtures. Dietz is particularly drawn to the Borah chandelier manufactured by Chandi. Though it sports a rather classic shape, bicycle chains give it a distinctive steam-punk vibe—past, yet clearly modern. Trends can be cyclic— here today, gone tomorrow—yet the big trend tends to be livable interiors that reflect the homeowner’s distinctive style and personal aesthetics. •

THE ADELINE TABLE FROM OLY STUDIO ADDS A BIT OF CONTEMPORARY SHIMMER TO A ROOM.

Resources For information about the professionals and products featured here, see page 154.

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Trade Secrets Who’s doing what, when, where and how in the New England design business

MICHAEL FEIN

BY LOUIS POSTEL

Inquiring Minds HOW TO MAKE A BUCK? THAT’S ONE OF THE LESSONS EVEN

the most elite design schools tend to skip. Of course, even if there were such a course as How to Make a Buck, or Sales and Marketing 101 for Designers and Architects, there’s nothing to say it would make the grade in today’s world. Rob Hartz is a sales and leadership consultant for biggies such as Teradyne, Fidelity and Harvard. “The traditional way to teach sales is to approach it as purely a numbers game,” says the Littleton, Massachusetts–based consultant. “Think of sales as pouring thousands of prospects into a funnel. Chances are, X percent of those leads are going to come out the other end as qualified. The focus is on quantity, with commensurately huge outlays in time and energy.” A growing number of the most successful designers and architects are abandoning the funnel approach, finding it exhausting, unproductive and demoralizing. They’re tired of chasing down every commission, attending every industry cocktail party, friending every friend of a friend on Facebook. Instead they’re selling using a technique Hartz calls Deep Inquiry. “Deep Inquiry has a great deal of integrity built into it,” he says. “It’s about asking a lot of questions to determine whether there’s a fit in the first place. After some Deep Inquiry, a designer may say to a prospective client something like, ‘I’d prefer to sell you my services rather than have you choose someone else, but I would feel horrible if this project became something you didn’t want or need. Let’s 134 New England Home May/June 2012

find out if we really should work together. And if we should, what can we do to create something truly wonderful?’” • • • Designer Tracy Winthrop of Blue Hill, Maine, tries to “show more and tell less.” Big “wow” presentations are less important than an ongoing exchange. Right now she’s working with a client in Seattle via Skype. “My client has fabric samples there to touch and feel, numbered for where we are proposing them to go in the floor plan. We can take a walk through while I listen to her responses, and it spares the expense of my going out there again.” If she’s selling, it’s of the Deep Inquiry variety. • • • Eileen Marcuvitz of Newport prefers showing ideas on her iPad. “The photos and renderings come out in much sharper focus than color copies; they’re almost three-dimensional,” she says. “We’re also using a program called Dropbox, which allows us to put all our photos in the cloud or right on the iPad. We can pull up all the different pieces of a project instantly. It’s very interactive that way with clients and po- Eileen Marcuvitz tential clients. They can see everything, provide feedback, as well as get a better idea of all that we have been doing so far.” • • • Chris Drake of Bierly-Drake in Boston emphasizes the importance of having the key players at presentations. “It’s so important that everyone feels ownership,” the designer says. “We engender that sense of ownership by making people feel excited; it’s a form of theater. After all, they are coming to our office expecting to be wowed. We don’t show boards, which is now more a function of commercial work. Soft things look fresher and less static on a table or wall. And with houses so much more lived in than before, those textures have simply become more important.” • • • Like Drake, designer Judy Schneider of Portland, Maine, is in favor of presenting large fabric samples, as well as paint samples. “In fact,” she says, “I always felt the old-fashioned finish boards were a little misleading because the samples were so small. I have found that I really need to present my ideas visually and accurately at every stage. If I am just talking, the clients and prospects are very Judy Schneider likely to come up with something in their own minds that’s very different. That’s why it’s such an important skill to be able to do a little perspective drawing right on the spot.” • • • Speaking of little perspective drawings on the spot . . . be careful when interviewing for a job at Meyer & Meyer’s


Sunlight Solar Energy Concerned with the size of your carbon footprint? Going solar is a step in the right direcƟon. Sunlight Solar Energy—with oĸces in Waltham, MassachuseƩs and Milford, ConnecƟcut—has been in the sustainability business since its founding in 1988. With hundreds of installaƟons all over New England, Sunlight Solar has the experience necessary to provide its customers with highly eĸcient solar electric and hot water systems. “We’re just thrilled. Everybody from Sunlight Solar was knowledgeable, friendly, and enthusiasƟc about the project. Exactly what I expected,” says Bob Arnold, a customer in Sturbridge, MassachuseƩs. “We’ve been delighted,” he says about Sunlight Solar’s professionalism and the overall experience of converƟng his home to solar. New leasing opƟons, including zero-down, means it’s easier to make the switch. Beginning the process is as simple as calling to schedule a site survey— done by Sunlight Solar free of charge. Like us Facebook

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Acton 978.263.7268 Boston 617.778.0887 Cambridge 617.876.3988 Danvers 978.777.2690 Framingham 508.875.0707 Pembroke 781.826.2728


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Trade Secrets bustling Boston office. “When prospective employees sit down, I ask them to draw me by hand while we talk,â€? says John Meyer. “That’s because we look for people capable of going back and forth from high-tech to traditional forms of presentation. We have been using ArchiCAD 3-D software for years, but it’s mainly for ourselves, not to sell clients on an idea. Color and detail represent at least half of what a space ends up looking like. CAD by itself is just too generic, so we add the detail and color by hand.â€? • • • William Hodgins gave Jeanne Finnerty a little drafting quiz when she applied to the famed designer’s Back Bay office for a much sought-after job back in 1990. She passed with flying colors, spending the next five years with Hodgins. Now she’s flourishing in her own Charlestown, Massachusetts–based business, and recently became the new president of ASID’s New England chapter. • • • Deep Inquiry as opposed to the numbers game has its risks, of course, including the possibility of seeing a finished project that looks uncannily like the design one proposed—executed by someone else! But that shouldn’t dampen the designer’s willingness to ask: “Should we work together? And if so, how can we create something truly wonderful?â€? • Keep in Touch Help us keep our fingers on the pulse of New England’s design community. Send your news to lpostel@nehomemag.com.

New and Noteworthy Shoe leather worn thin from shopping? Check Boston designer Ken Dietz’s new online boutique, www.market27 .com, for well-edited, gorgeous stuff, like a pair of mirrored armoires with silver- and gold-leaf accents, a Donghia commode inspired by Palladio in satin-finished teak or a Murano glass horse. “The site brings to life my vision of making elusive treasures accessible to everyone,� says Dietz.

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Or take the limo to Source at Reconstructure in Providence. Designer Lisa Foster’s “cabinet of design curiosity� sits near the RISD Museum of Art and holds a plethora of furnishings and accessories both new and vintage. Mahmud Jafri remains a charismatic figure in Dover, Massachusetts, where his family started out in the rug business years


ago. Now thanks to his latest showroom, Jafri and friends and colleagues can work, shop and play all in a single 30,000-square-foot location. The new Dover Rug & Home, in Natick, includes a squash and fitness club. One of the genius strokes of Höweler + Yoon Architecture’s new waterfront headquarters for the Boston Society of Architects is that it draws people off the street even though most of its space is on the building’s second floor. The design for the space, in the Atlantic Wharf building, centers around a vivid green bent-steel staircase with glass risers—a can’t-miss-it element for anyone walking past the glass windows. Not only does it stop passersby in their tracks, we daresay the ultra-contemporary design makes a bold statement about where the BSA sees the profession heading in the future. United Marble Fabricators just opened a brand-new space in the Boston Design Center, 1,700 square feet to show off the natural stone choices, cutting-edge engineered stone materials and custom edgework and artisan craftsmanship the company has been known for over the past twenty-five years.

Happy anniversary to Thos. Moser, which is celebrating forty years of creating fine handcrafted furniture by opening two new showrooms—in Greenwich, Connecticut, and Philadelphia—and debuting its Ellipse and Vintage collections of furniture. The newest place to indulge your passion for beautiful things is designer Kristin Paton’s place on Mount Auburn Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Paton, who returned to the area recently after ten years or so in London, offers hand-picked art, antiques and furniture at the aptly named Kristin Paton Home. Joining her as her manager is Peter Griglik, the talented fellow who was responsible for getting Jonathan Adler’s store on Newbury Street up and running.

May/June 2012 New England Home 137


Design Life Out and about in celebration of design and architecture in New England

IT’S BEEN A BUSY SPRING, BEGINNING WITH THE NEW ENG-

BEN GEBO

land School of Art & Design’s party, at Montage in Boston, to celebrate the special recognition the program earned from DesignIntelligence. The magazine named NESAD among America’s top interior design schools for 2012 and listed co-director Karen Clarke among its most-admired design educators of the year. The beautiful photographs that fill the pages of magazines like ours don’t happen by accident. The Design Industry Vendors of New England (DIVNE) offered a glimpse into the art behind great architectural photography with a presentation at 60nobscot Home Furnishings, in Sudbury, Massachusetts, by photographer Michael J. Lee. Some 200 people celebrated the opening of DOVER RUG & HOME’s new showroom and fitness center in Natick, Massachusetts. Wonder if guests burned off the calories from the hors d’oeuvres and cocktails with a rousing game of squash? The annual AD 20/21 show at Boston’s Cyclorama just gets bigger and better Should your party be every year. The 2012 gala preview, here? Send photographs which raised money for the Boston or high-resolution images, Architectural College, honored with information about the event and the people in the design superstar Vicente Wolf with photos, to New England Home, a lifetime achievement award. 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302, Fans of designer Kristin Drohan Boston, MA 02118, or e-mail images and information to can now shop for her furniture at pbodah@nehome TWELVE CHAIRS. The Boston shop mag.com. made a pretty setting for a party to launch the collection in New England. Boston’s Intercontinental provided an appropriately elegant backdrop for ASID NEW ENGLAND’s 2012 Awards Gala, honoring a handful of the region’s designers. And the BOSTON SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTS’ new space buzzed with more than 400 guests who turned out to celebrate the opening of the society’s jazzy waterfront digs. BOSTON SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTS DIVNE From left to right: Lauren Maggio, Cheryl Savit, Jodi Swartz and Ana Donohue • Ray Bachand and Kris Shaffer • Karen Davison and Carolann Burke • Jody Trail and Karl Ivester

138 New England Home May/June 2012

From top to bottom: Mark Pasnik, Trevor Smith and Juliette Fristch • Aisha Densmore-Bey and Peter Kuttner • Nicole Fichera and Stephen Chung


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Design Life

DOVER RUG & HOME From left to right: Michael Ferzoco, Stacy Grimes and Doug Hanna• Marilyn MacLeod • Tacey Luongo, Kris Shaffer and Rebecca Wilson

TWELVE CHAIRS

MOLLY AKIN/SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY

From top to bottom: Yvonne Blacker and Kristin Drohan • Rosanne Palazola and Katherine Hawkins • Michael Partenio, Stacy Kunstel of New England Home and Linda Merrill • Sarah Devaney-O’Neil, Barbara Elza Hirsch and Elizabeth Wilcox

COURTESY OF YVONNE BLACKER

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140 New England Home May/June 2012

From left to right, top to bottom: Kate Springfield, Inga Leonova and Anna Gitelman • Sean Solley and Senofer Mendoza • Kristen McGrath and Michael Moeller • Angela Raciti, Esther Nunes, Elizabeth Lo and Sarah Long • Karen Clarke, Elaine Soohoo and Eric Bates


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Design Life

ASID NEW ENGLAND

NATHAN FRIED-LIPSKI, NATE PHOTOGRAPHY

From left to right, top to bottom: George Lellios, Matt Remeika and Budd Kelley • Greg Sweeney and New England Home’s Kathy Bush-Dutton • Stephanie Rossi and Jane Hassan • Kim Elliott and Nina Hayes • Susan Orpin, Jeanne Kopacz, Christina Oliver and Stephanie Rossi • Barbara Bradlee, Jane Hassan and Mary Beth Haggerty • Mark Thompson and Shalini Sookar

AD 20/21 Clockwise from top: Julie Wilson, John Wilson, Martha Richardson and James Stroud • Michael Lisi and John Axelrod • Ben Arcari Cook and Jerry Arcari • Crandon Gustafson, New England Home’s Kyle Hoepner, Vicente Wolf and Ted Landsmark • Somers Killian, Tony Fusco, Normand Mainville and Katie Rowley

142 New England Home May/June 2012


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Martha’s Vineyard • Nantucket 508-693-3344 Cape Cod 508-540-0048 hutkerarchitects.com


Perspectives Fresh outlooks on design and resources

• New England designers offer bright ideas for lighting up the home

Lighting: Table Lamps

CYNDIE SEELY

Antique Tole Lamp “This bouillotte lamp is a classic, still being made by many lighting companies. I found this one, a nineteenthcentury French bronze and tole version, at Brimfield.” THROUGH C.J. DESIGNS

KRISTINE MULLANEY

Veronica Lamp from Matthew Studios “Lately I’ve been using quartz as an accessory; the texture and the natural sparkle are always unexpected. This lamp would be lovely in a study or office, or maybe even on a large makeup vanity.” WEBSTER & COMPANY, BOSTON DESIGN CENTER, (617) 2619660, WWW.WEBSTERCOMPANY.COM

CYNTHIA MASON HERNANDEZ

Salgado Saucier’s Niven Table Lamp “I would use this lamp, with its delightfully Gaudí-esque style, to add a dose of whimsy to a traditional living room.” THE BRIGHT For Cynthia Mason Hernandez, the process of collaborating with clients to create a home alive with meaning and emotion is as fulfilling as the result. CYNTHIA MASON INTERIORS, FARMINGTON, CONN., (860) 8381919, WWW.EXUBERANTHOME.COM

144 New England Home May/June 2012

GROUP, BOSTON DESIGN CENTER, (617) 345-8017, WWW.THEBRIGHTGROUP.COM


“When I go into a good garden, I think, if it were mine, I should never go out of it.� ~ RalphWaldo Emerson, Concord Walks

a garden tour

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in historic concord, massachusetts 23rd Annual Garden Tour organized by the Guild of Volunteers of the Concord Museum www.concordmuseum.org 2012 Media Sponsor

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Perspectives

Floor Lamps

CYNTHIA MASON HERNANDEZ

Currey & Company’s Chatham Floor Lamp “This quietly stylish floor lamp would be equally at home in a traditional setting or a more modern home. It’s the perfect companion piece that attracts the eye without yelling, ‘Look at me!’ ” THROUGH CYNTHIA MASON INTERIORS

KRISTINE MULLANEY

Mattaliano’s Poillerat Oval Floor Lamp “I love the simple elegance of this lamp. It’s very chic!” WEBSTER & COMPANY

CYNDIE SEELY

Antique Brass Floor Lamp “Estate sales are a great way to pick up unique, wonderful old pieces for the home, like this brass floor lamp I bought at a sale in Nantucket, Massachusetts. It would suit either a traditional or transitional room.” THROUGH C.J. DESIGNS

Designer Kristine Mullaney is drawn to furnishings that are ultra-sophisticated but approachable. Her favorite spaces have a sense of luxury and include pieces from a variety of time periods. KRISTINE MULLANEY DESIGN, BOSTON, (617) 721-2683, WWW.KRISTINEMULLANEYDESIGN.COM

146 New England Home May/June 2012


ARCHITECTURE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE INTERIOR DESIGN

WA LT E R J A C O B A R C H I T E C T S Marblehead | 781.631.7440 WWW.ARCHITECTWAJ.COM


Perspectives CYNDIE SEELY

Terrarium Light Fixture “I’ve made all sorts of things into hanging light fixtures, including this piece, a lantern I crafted out of a glass terrarium I found at an antique store.” THROUGH C.J. DESIGNS

Hanging Lamps

CYNTHIA MASON HERNANDEZ

Sputnik Chandelier “This 1950s fixture is one of my favorites, updated with a mix of brass and chrome arms. I can see it hanging in a small foyer over an antique pedestal table for a vibrant counterpoint.” IRWIN FELD DESIGN, STAMFORD, CONN., (203) 588-0567, WWW.IRWINFELDDESIGN.COM

KRISTINE MULLANEY

Chambord Chandelier by Dennis & Leen “If there’s one room to add some drama to, it’s the dining room. I love a big, dripping chandelier and beautiful wallpaper in the right dining room. It’s so glamorous!” WEBSTER & COMPANY

“I never order from catalogs,” confesses Cyndie Seely. Instead, she shops antique stores and estate sales looking for the old and unique, often making her own light fixtures from her finds. C.J. DESIGNS, PROVIDENCE, (401) 621-8500, WWW.CYNDIESEELY.COM

148 New England Home May/June 2012


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New in the Showrooms Unique, beautiful and now appearing in New England’s shops and showrooms BY DEBBIE HAGAN

1 Encore Performance This legendary sofa, created by Swiss maker de Sede, now enjoys a second life at M2L. Its twenty-two modular pieces can be zipped together in a variety of ways or stretched out to create the longest sofa we’ve ever seen. BOSTON, (617) 338-0002, WWW.M2L.COM

2 Exotic Beauties

1

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Clarke & Clarke traveled back to ancient Persia to find inspiration for the vibrant Bukhara collection of embroidered linens, coordinated stripes and jacquard fabrics, available at DesignSourceCT. HARTFORD, CONN., (860) 951-3145, WWW .DESIGN SOURCECT.COM

3 Earthly Splendor Not your average Parsons table, the Calvin from Arhaus sports a stop-in-your-tracks top made of petrified wood. And should you tire of that, flip it over to find an ebony surface. NATICK, MASS., (508) 655-9050, AND BURLINGTON, MASS., (781) 2732800, WWW.ARHAUS.COM

4 Delicate Balance

3

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Artists Lisa Spinella and Paulo DeLima of Studio Bel Vetro create hand-blown glass and turn it into dreamy lighting fixtures, such as the Reticello two-tiered chandelier. It comes in a three-tiered version, too. BROCKTON, MASS., (617) 686-4194, WWW.STUDIOBELVETRO.COM

5 Opposites Attract What happens when quiet curves and soft upholstery meet the architectural zebrawood planes on Theo’s new Baldwin club chair? It’s a match. Find it at Studio 534. BOSTON DESIGN CENTER, (617) 345-9900, WWW.S5BOSTON.COM

6 Practically Speaking Poliform’s new Dart table is sleek, versatile and tough, with an anti-scratch lacquer that’s ready to put up a fight against little warriors. The table and matching chairs can be found at Showroom. BOSTON, (617)

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150 New England Home May/June 2012


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Providence Preservation Society presents the 2012

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Saturday June 2, 2012 1 1 am – 5 pm Elmgrove neighborhood in historic College Hill

Sunday June 3, 2012 1 1 am – 3 pm Jewelry District Tickets for each day are $35 in advance; $40 day-of For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.ppsri.org/festival


Resources A guide to the products and professionals in this issue’s featured homes

HIS, HERS AND THEIRS PAGES 82–89

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Architect: Ruth Bennett, Ruth Bennett Associates, Belmont, Mass., (781) 354-0055, www.ruthbennettassociates.com Interior designer: Susan Acton, Susan B. Acton Interiors, Concord, Mass., (781) 383-1820, www.susanbactoninteriors.com Landscape designer: Gregory Lombardi Design, Cambridge, Mass., (617) 492-2808, www.lombardidesign.com Builder: The Classic Group, Lexington, Mass., (781) 761-1200 Cabinetmaker: Kochman Reidt + Haigh, Stoughton, Mass., (781) 573-1500, www.cabinet makers.com Pages 82–83: Custom coffee table by Susan B. Acton Interiors; rug by Elizabeth Eakins, www.elizabetheakins.com; art over mantel by Lynette Shaw, www.lynetteshaw.com; sculpture in corner from BG Galleries, www.bggalleries .com; drapery fabric from Henry Calvin, www .calvinfabrics.com; sofas and lounge chairs from A. Rudin, www.arudin.com; sofa and throw pillow fabric from Rogers & Goffigon, Greenwich, Conn., (203) 532-8068. Pages 84–85: Custom windows by Marvin, www.marvin.com. Page 86: Dining table by Susan B. Acton Interiors; dining chair fabric by Donghia, www .donghia.com; rug by Elizabeth Eakins; curtain fabric by Delaney & Long, www.delanyandlong .com; chandelier by Paul Ferrante, www.pau lferrante.com. Page 87: Family room sofa by Roche Bobois, www.roche-bobois.com; ottoman fabric by Old World Weavers through Stark Carpet, www .starkcarpet.com; chandelier by Gregorius Pineo, www.gregoriuspineo.com; slipper chair fabric by Kravet, www.kravet.com; paintings on right by Lynette Shaw; paintings on left from Renjeau Galleries, www.renjeau.com; tray and pots from The Barn at 17 Antiques, www.thebarnat17.com; kitchen cabinetry by Kochman Reidt + Haigh; chandelier by Gregorius Pineo; barstools from Roche Bobois. Page 88: Chaise from The Barn at 17 Antiques; Enigma hanging light through Chimera Lighting and Design, www.chimeralightingdesign.com. Page 89: Sweet Daphne wall color and Sesame ceiling color from Benjamin Moore, www .benjaminmoore.com; sofa from A. Rudin covered in fabric by Bergamo, www.bergamo fabrics.com; St. James Bed by Donghia; drapery fabric from Bart Halpern, www.bart halpern.com; wall lamps from Holly Hunt, www .hollyhunt.com; rug from Colony Rug, www .colonyrug.com; painting from Renjeau Galleries; nightstands custom by Susan Acton Interiors; screened porch furniture and fabric by JANUS et Cie, www.janusetcie.com.

CONCRETE THINKING PAGES 90–97

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154 New England Home May/June 2012

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Architect: Christopher Smith, Norwich, Vt., (802) 649-1681, www.csmitharchitect.com


ALL IS CALM PAGES 98–105

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Interior designer: Cheryl Boghosian, Gilberte Interiors, Hanover, N.H., (603) 643-3727, www .gilberteinteriors.com Builder: Estes & Gallup, Lyme, N.H., (603) 7954400, www.estes-gallup.com Concrete contractor: RG Gosselin, Derby, Vt., (802) 766-8815, www.rggosselininc.com Landscape designers: Keith Wagner and Jeff Hodgson, H. Keith Wagner Partnership, Burlington, Vt., (802) 864-0010, www.hkw-p.com Pages 90–91: Sofa, chairs, metal side table and glass table from B&B Italia, www.bebitalia.it; custom rug by Gilberte Interiors from Carter International, www.cartercarpets.com; chaise by Leolux, www.leolux.com; floor lamp from Ligne Roset, www.ligne-roset-usa.com; curtains and fabric from Creation Baumann, www.creation baumann.com, fabricated by Gilberte Interiors; custom bench, oval bowl and pillows by Gilberte Interiors; wall-mounted speakers from Infinity, www.infinitysystems.com; interior door by Lualdi, www.lualdiporte.it; outdoor tables and chairs from Brown Jordan, www.brownjordan.com; cushions by Perennials Fabrics, www.perennials fabrics.com; custom glass rail with C.R. Laurence Co. hardware, www.crlaurence.com. Pages 92–93: Patio tables and chairs from Unopiu, www.unopiu.com; balcony tables and chairs from Brown Jordan, www.brownjordan .com; door handles from Reguitti, www.reguitti.it. Page 94: Chairs by Ligne Roset; custom rug by Gilberte Interiors from Lapchi Rug, www.lapchi .com, dining table custom built by Christopher Smith; wall light fixture from Delta Light, www.deltalight.com; sunscreen blinds from Hunter Douglas, www.hunterdouglas.com. Page 95: Kitchen cabinets/shelves from Alno, www.alno.com; light fixtures from Delta Light; stainless counters by Brooks Custom, www .brookscustom.com; hood from Faber, www .faberonline.com; faucet from Dornbracht, www.dornbracht.com; silver woven bowl from Aram, www.michaelaram.com; breakfast nook chairs from Stua, www.stua.com; custom rug by Gilberte Interiors from The Rug Company, www.therugcompany.com, table from Knoll, www.knoll.com; light fixture from Foscarini, www.foscarini.com; pitcher and bowl from Gilberte Interiors. Pages 96–97: Bed from Poliform, www .poliform.it; lamp from Flos, www.flosusa.com; curtains/fabric from Creation Baumann, fabricated by Gilberte Interiors; outdoor furniture from Quinze & Milan, www.quinzeandmilan.tv; pillow and throw by Gilberte Interiors; rug designed by Gilberte Interiors from Glen Eden, www.glen-eden.com; living room chair from B&B Italia; side table from Zanotta, www .zanotta.it; bathroom tub and sink from Duravit, www.duravit.com; faucets from Hansgrohe, www.hansgrohe-usa.com; medicine cabinet and mirror from Robern, www.robern.com; light fixture from Delta Light; custom rug from Carter International, www.cartercarpets.com; towels from Gilberte Interiors.

Boston Craftsmen Corporation Where time-honored craftsmanship converges with modern living www.bostoncraftsmen.com | 617-592-1018

Contractor: Stephen Chase, Stephen Chase May/June 2012 New England Home 155


Resources Contracting, Royalston, Mass., (978) 249-4860 Page 105: Candace Wheeler wallpaper from J.R. Burrows & Company, www.burrows.com.

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156 New England Home May/June 2012

Best Furniture, Vintage

A HIGHER CALLING PAGES 106–113 Architects: David Hacin and Aaron Weinert, Hacin + Associates, Boston, (617) 426-0077, www.hacin.com Interior designers: Kate Kelley and Christine Rankin, Hacin + Associates Builder: Sea-Dar Construction, Boston, (617) 423-0870, www.seadar.com Landscape designers: Gregory Lombardi Design, Cambridge, Mass., (617) 492-2808, www.lombardidesign.com, and the Garden Concierge, Sudbury, Mass., (781) 261-5192, www.thegardenconcierge.com Photo styling assistance: Jennifer Clapp, Hacin + Associates Home automation and electronics: Maverick Integration, Waltham, Mass., (781) 890-1177, www.maverickintegration.com Pages 106–107: Stool from Addo Novo, www .addonovo.com; Concordia stone on stairs and honed and polished stone in foyer and throughout home from Stone Source, www .stonesource.com. Pages 108–109: Milo Baughman vintage chairs from Center 44, www.center44.com; Paul Evans vintage table from Modern Times Chicago, www.moderntimeschicago.com; chandelier from Lindsey Adelman, www.lindseyadelman .com; rug from Fort Street Studio, www.fort streetstudio.com; living room chairs from Holly Hunt, www.hollyhunt.com; side table from B&B Italia, www.bebitalia.it; coffee table from ABC Carpet and Home, www.abchome.com; rug from Fort Street Studio; sofa from Poltrona Frau, www.frauusa.com; striped pillow by Karen Karlstrom, www.kkarlstrom.com; geometric pillow by Charlene Mullen through Addo Novo; throw by Eleanor Pritchard through Lekker Home, www.lekkerhome.com; floor lamp from Hudson Furniture, www.hudsonfurnitureinc .com; silver-leaf painting by Raphael JaimesBranger, www.raphaeljaimesbranger.com. Pages 110–111: Terrace dining table and chairs by Richard Schultz, www.richardschultz.com; candles from Lekker Home; coffee table from Arktura, www.arktura.com; sofa from Jane Hamley Wells, www.janehamleywells.com; pillows from Addo Novo; Luce de Luna kitchen counter from Stone Source; breakfast area pendant lights from blankblank, www.blank blank.net; Acacia plates from Lekker Home; Saarinen Tulip chairs from Office Resources, www.ori.com, with fabric from Larsen, www .larsenfabrics.com. Pages 112–113: Master bath tub from Waterworks, www.waterworks.com; stool from Roost, www.roostco.com; master bedroom rug from Steven King, www.stevenkinginc .com; credenza from BDDW, www.bddw.com; custom bed from Dune, www.dune-ny.com; custom artwork with hides from Kyle Bunting; sconces from Serge Mouille Lighting, www .sergemouilleusa.com; toss pillows by Charlene Mullen through Addo Novo.


SPECIAL FOCUS: FORWARD THINKING PAGES 114–121 Pages 114-115: Jeremiah Eck, Eck | MacNeely Architects, Boston, (617) 367-9696, www .eckmacneely.com; Richard Renner, Richard Renner Architects, Portland, Maine, (203) 7739699, and Sherborn, Mass., (508) 651-2385, www.rrennerarchitects.com; Josh Safdie, Institute for Human Centered Design, Boston, (617) 259-1777, www.humancentereddesign.org. Pages 116–117: Nancy Taylor, Taylor Interior Design, Providence, (401) 274-1232, www.taylor interiordesign.com; Rachel Reider, Rachel Reider Interiors, Boston, (617) 942-2460, www .rachelreider.com; Linda Banks, Banks Design Associates and Simply Home, Falmouth, Maine, (207) 781-5651, www.banksdesignassociates .com; Natalie Carpenter, Lekker Home, Boston, (877) 753-5537, www.lekkerhome.com; Phillip Jude Miller, America Dural, Cambridge, Mass., (617) 661-4100, www.americadural.com; table by Jeff Soderbergh, Reflect Art, www.reflect art.com, Newport, (401) 845-9087. Pages 118–119: Peter Webster, Webster & Company, Boston Design Center, (617) 261-9660, www.webstercompany.com; Sally Wilson, Wilson Kelsey Design, Boston, (617) 292-3380, and Salem, Mass., (978) 741-4234, www.wilson

VIOLA

A SSO C I AT ES, I nc .

SPRINKLERS

POOLS

LIGHTING

kelseydesign.com; Eric Roseff, Eric Roseff Designs, Boston, (617) 282-9728, www.eric roseffdesigns.com; Mark Christofi, Mark Christofi Interiors, Reading, Mass., (781) 9445667, www.christofiinteriors.com; Courtney Fadness, Hutker Architects, Falmouth, Mass., (508) 540-0048, www.hutkerarchitects.com; Glam grasscloth from Phillip Jeffries through Webster & Company; Venetian plaster by

Embrace Spring

Pietra Viva, Boston, (617) 875-2066, www .pietravivaitaly.com; Glass Thassos tile from Allstone, Boston Design Center, (617) 737-2200, www.allstone.net; Spectrum carpet in amethyst from Company C, Design SourceCT, Hartford, Conn., (860) 951.3145, www.designsourcect .com, www.companyc.com. Pages 120–121: Ken Dietz, Market 27, Boston, (855) 494-1091, www.market27.com; Rachel Reider, Rachel Reider Interiors, Boston, (617) 942-2460, www.rachelreider.com; Robin Bergland, Trillium, Nantucket, (508) 228-4450, www.trilliumnantucket.com; Kristin Paton, Kristin Paton Home, Cambridge, (617) 491-7100, www.kristinpatonhome.com; Loop candelabra by Black and Blum, available at Trillium; Lucite and velvet X Stool by Grace & Blake, www .graceandblake.net; Sulky collection of textured leathers, Edelman, www.edelmanleather.com; silver resin-finished Adeline cocktail table from Oly Studio, olystudio.com; flannel upholstered

BRADFORD

DESIGN, INC. A BUILDING & DESIGN COMPANY

sofa with leather piping, The Myles, Kristin Paton Home; chandelier made of recycled bicycle parts, Borah by Chandi Lighting, www .chandilighting.com.

401-231-0099 | WWW.BR ADF OR DDE SIGNR I.COM

• May/June 2012 New England Home 157


raveis.com

“The Best Website in Real Estate” 3 00,000+ L i s ti ngs • Sol d Propert i es • A l l Local Housing Da ta & Gr aphs • All MLS Ope n House s For more information on these and other luxury homes or to speak to an Exceptional Properties Specialist, call 877.298.2780.

Visit raveis.com & type in MLS# for multiple photos/detailed descriptions on these homes

Old Greenwich, CT $7,695,000 MLS#80424, Jean Ruggiero, 203.912.1284

Brookline, MA $5,495,000 MLS#71339663, Robb Silva, 617.312.3509

Walpole, MA $3,900,000 MLS#71335380, Jim Duffy, 508.816.9165

Portsmouth, RI $2,995,000 MLS#1012487, Arthur Chapman, 401.640.0807

New Canaan, CT $2,849,000 MLS#98510851, Anthony Ardino, 203.249.9833

Canton, CT $2,800,000 MLS#G608497, Carol Cole, 860.212.0687

Chatham, MA $2,495,000 MLS#21201357, Harry Cutts, 508.237.9558

Clinton, CT $2,475,000 MLS#M9131827, Ona Nejdl, 860.227.5027

Wilton, CT $2,099,000 MLS#98527189, Lyn Marchellos, 203.952.9888

Fairfield, CT $2,045,000 MLS#98499379, Edie Baum, 203.659.1624

Chatham, MA $1,949,000 MLS#21201211, Phyllis Power, 508.237.1406

Provincetown, MA $1,895,000 MLS#21110615, Mona Anderson, 508.274.6251

Brewster, MA $1,850,000 MLS#21201600, Amy Brady, 508.221.5071

Sudbury, MA $1,850,000 MLS#71324239, Jan Pitzi, 508.380.1519

Bristol, RI $1,839,000 MLS#1010552, Barbara Hannah, 401.499.1776

Southport, CT $1,725,000 MLS#98529816, Al Filippone Associates, 203.339.1277

Brewster, MA $1,599,000 MLS#21007334, Georgette Swan, 508.237.7854

Wilton, CT $1,599,000 MLS#98504662, Karina Andre, 203.581.0053

Stonington, CT $1,590,000 MLS#E255472, Ed Hillyer, 860.235.3424

Cotuit, MA $1,545,000 MLS#21101833, Jonathan Matel, 508.221.1770

I N T E R N A T I O N A L


raveis.com

“The Best Website in Real Estate” 3 00,000+ L i s ti ngs • Sol d Propert i es • A l l Local Housing Da ta & Gr aphs • All MLS Ope n House s For more information on these and other luxury homes or to speak to an Exceptional Properties Specialist, call 877.298.2780.

Visit raveis.com & type in MLS# for multiple photos/detailed descriptions on these homes

Bethlehem, CT $1,500,000 MLS#W1064246, Sharisse Steiner, 203.650.1956

Needham, MA $1,499,000 MLS#71316525, Jim Duffy, 508.816.9165

Pocasset, MA $1,399,000 MLS#21202224, Cheryl Ferrara, 774.313.9336

Swampscott, MA $1,397,500 MLS#71347525, Steve White, 781.690.6433

Marstons Mills, MA $1,395,000 MLS#21200600, Ryan McGinn Team, 508.207.5868

Tiverton, RI $1,350,000 MLS#1005959, Jackie Cranwell, 401.742.6393

Farmington, CT $1,275,000 MLS#G615906, Joan McCormick, 860.985.7663

Westport, MA $1,270,000 MLS#71348931, Kathy Santos, 508.889.2517

Clinton, CT $1,247,000 MLS#M9132423, Ona Nejdl, 860.227.5027

Provincetown, MA $1,199,000 MLS#21102613, Cindy Blum, 404.405.4305

Natick, MA $1,199,000 MLS#71349234, Ellen Curran, 617.803.8439

Orleans, MA $1,195,000 MLS#21201515, Jorie Fleming, 508.246.3721

Woodbury, CT $1,154,000 MLS#W1064057, Magda Ballaro, 203.889.8284

Stonington, CT $1,100,000 MLS#E254956, Ed Hillyer, 860.235.3424

Newburyport, MA $1,050,000 MLS#71336750, Dolores Person, 978.660.0967

East Orleans, MA $995,000 MLS#21201737, Jeffrey Karlson, 508.237.5505

Bourne, MA $999,000 MLS#21202222, Dane Kimmerle, 508.495.0056

Stratford, CT $990,000 MLS#98524166, Deborah Loban, 203.923.7006

Newtown, CT $959,000 MLS#98527191, David Everson, 203.246.7150

North Haven, CT $895,000 MLS#M9131859, Florence Michaud, 203.641.0633

I N T E R N A T I O N A L


coldwellbankerpreviews.com

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS One of Weston’s great homes, this captivating six-bedroom Georgian-Revival on 4.63 acres is the epitome of balance and harmony. Built to a level of excellence rarely experienced. $19,500,000

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Exquisite townhouse on waterside Beacon St. Extravagant grand proportions with lovely architectural features, expansive windows, panoramic views, elevator, central air, roof deck, patio, 4 garage parking spaces & 1 outside space. $10,500,000

Paige Yates & Kathryn Richlen | T. 781.894.5555

Sam Kidder | T. 617.247.2909

GILFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE Craftsman-style home with 188 feet of lake frontage and stunning views. Beautifully-appointed with central, four-sided fireplace, first-floor master, multiple decks and patios, sandy beach, dock with jetty and large lawn. $4,395,000

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS Contemporary Colonial privately sited offering 5,000+ square feet of elegant yet comfortable living spaces with superb craftsmanship overlooking the greens of the Brookline Country Club. $3,600,000

Susan C. Bradley | T. 603.581.2810

Deborah M. Gordon & Jayne Bennett Friedberg | T. 617.731.2447

MOULTONBOROUGH, NEW HAMPSHIRE New construction by Skiffington Homes on a sun-filled lot with picturesque mountain views. Designed with elegance and flair, this five-bedroom home will have a U-shaped dock and inviting beachfront. $3,495,000

WEST NEWTON HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 1869 Victorian with Italianate and French Second Empire influences set on 1.16 landscaped acres. Renovated, 6,339-square-foot family home with five bedrooms, 4.5 baths, modern systems, two-car garage. $3,250,000

Susan C. Bradley | T. 603.581.2810

Deborah M. Gordon & Jonathan P. Radford | T. 617.731.2447, 617.335.1010

KNOWLEDGE IS THE DIFFERENCE The Coldwell Banker Previews International ® network spans the globe. With sales associates in 50 countries, this elite global network stands ready to connect buyers to a portfolio of homes selected to meet the requirements of your lifestyle — wherever they may be located. Be it a bespoke waterfront castle, a mountain top manor or equestrian estate situated among rolling hills, your next dream home awaits.

© 2012 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. A Realogy Company. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Coldwell Banker ®, the Coldwell Banker Logo and Coldwell Banker Previews International®, the Previews’ Logo, and “We Never Stop Moving®” and “Dedicated to Luxury Real EstateSM” are registered and unregistered service marks licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS Magnificent 7-bedroom Fiske-Field Estate on 2+ acres located in center of Weston. Formal living and dining rooms, handsome library and eat-in gourmet kitchen. Lovely gardens with pool, clay tennis court and separate guest suite. $3,250,000

MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS 6+ bedroom classic Peach’s Point home – sweeping water views from every room. Exceptionally renovated with the highest-quality finishes & amenities, designed for grand entertaining. Use of association dock & nearby town moorings. $2,995,000

Priscilla Hindmarsh & Deena Powell | T. 781.894.5555

Mary Stewart & Rita Havens | T. 781.631.9511

CONCORD, MASSACHUSETTS Historic Concord Center landmark home with sweeping river views. Period moldings, built-ins and carved marble fireplaces. Finished carriage house with garage. Level .96 acre with river frontage. $2,795,000

LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS Gracious Georgian Revival set on 7.6 acres. Elegant room sizes, authentic period details, recently updated kitchen and baths and a charming carriage house. Views to terraced garden, gentle groves, and pool. $2,795,000

Brigitte Senkler | T. 978.505.2652

Karen A. Paradies & Barbara Lynn Davis | T. 781.259.1100

CONCORD, MASSACHUSETTS Distinguished Nashawtuc Hill Colonial with generous rooms, new kitchen, stunning master suite, guest apartment, and finished lower-evel exercise and pub rooms. One acre abutting conservation land. Near Center. $2,575,000

MILTON, MASSACHUSETTS Expansive Shingle-style manor home atop Milton Hill designed by William Ralph Emerson with superb updates, period details, a three-room master suite and gourmet kitchen. $1,895,000

Brigitte Senkler | T. 978.505.2652

Matt Freeman & Dan Walsh | T. 617.515.4717

Africa North America Central America South America Asia Australia Caribbean Europe Middle East South Pacific

COLDWELLBANKERPREVIEWS.COM


LANCASTER, MA. Renowned 28,000sf Thayer Mansion amidst 217 totally private acres includes distant 6600sf Staff House. Mansion has 60 rooms plus 20 baths. Surrounded with historic horticultural gardens, small pond, sweeping lawns, and woodlands. Present educational/medical/residential uses. $16,000,000

HARVARD, MA. Off historic town center, walk to schools, beach at Bare Hill Pond, events on the commons, remarkable 1914 sprawling country home with European flair, in-ground pool, 3 car garage with prior butler quarters, amidst 28 private acres with 4-5 additional house lots in process. $2,200,000

PAXTON, MA Extravagant country estate, breathtaking 60 acres with 2,000’ waterfront. Exquisite detail, spacious and elegant, loaded with amenities, 10 fireplaces, apartment, elevator. Entertainment sized rooms. Tennis court, in-ground pool, gym, 3 story barn, patios, landscaped gardens- views! $4,500,000

BOLTON, MA. Custom designed estate with timeless appeal, Creston and Lite-touch systems, superior interior layout, expensive amenities, high ceilings, hardwood floors, gas fireplaces, exquisite detail. High end media room. Oversized 3 car garage. $1,275,000 or with 2 additional lots $1,800,000

HARVARD, MA Winding drive to this spectacular 16 acre hilltop with views south over Bare Hill Pond and west to the mountains, expansive Manor exemplifies timeless colonial architecture, a historical palette, sprawling façade. Attached barn/garage, surrounded with gardens, pool, tennis court $1,890,000

PRINCETON, MA “Bryn Coron”, gracious, privately sited, 32+ acre country estate. Elegant 1912 Colonial offers period detail throughout, high ceilings, fireplaces, French doors. Enjoy the authentic tavern, library, guest suites. 6 car garages, pond, old stonewalls & sweeping views. $2,400,000

LANCASTER, MA Beautiful Waterfront Expansive Colonial with Contemporary Flair design, quiet cul-de-sac, stunning open floor plan, picturesque landscaped grounds, several patios, gardens, koi pond, and lawns. Features a 2nd full kitchen. Finished walk-out lower level. 3 car garage, tile floor. $779,000

RUTLAND, MA. DEMOND POND, 1218 ft. waterfront on 23 hilltop acres with water views. Sweet, spacious cottage with floor to ceiling fieldstone fireplace, area for banquet size entertaining, sitting area overlooks pond. 6 bedrooms, 21x24 screened porch, garage, boathouse and dock. Prime or 2nd home $850,000

WEST BOYLSTON, MA. Welcome to Four Winds, set on 23 acres, two residences, multi-barn, and stable estate exemplifies rural sophistication. Bright and spacious interior delivers timeless appeal with modern updates. Magnificent views, and various uses make this a truly extraordinary property. $1,299,000

HARVARD Postcard Town Center setting, opposite schools, new library, walk to beach at Bare Hill Pond and festivities on the Commons. Spacious 5 bedroom Victorian, many beautiful updates, luxury master bath, finished rooms on 4 levels. Large window bays, attached oversized 2 car garage. 3 porches $715,000

WESTMINSTER, MA Executive Waterfront lodge by builder/owner on Crocker Pond, sited on 7.3 acres. Maple lodge features 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, family room w/stone fireplace, gourmet kitchen. Designed to take advantage of the breathtaking views. 400 amp electric, heated 3 car garages. Picturesque grounds

HARVARD, MA New England Cape with quality appointments, brimming with pride of ownership. Delightful details throughout this welcoming home beautifully sited. A “designer” interior boasts generously proportioned rooms. 2 staircases. Deck and porch overlook beautiful grounds. $689,000

160 Ayer Road, Harvard, MA

978-456-3307

www.harvardareahomes.com


NOT ALL HOMES ARE THE SAME. NEITHER ARE OUR MORTGAGE PRODUCTS. At Citizens Bank, we’re for homes. We’re for helping more people be successful homeowners. Our Loan Officers can help you navigate the process, from finding the right mortgage through closing. Talk to a Citizens Bank Loan Officer about the variety of financing options available to you: • Fixed-rate mortgages

• Interest-only payment mortgages

• Jumbo loans

• Construction-to-permanent financing

• Adjustable-rate mortgages

• 85%* combined loan to value on loan

• Tandem loans

amounts up to $2 million

Meet STEPHEN OLSEN (NMLS ID# 697253) Citizens Bank Loan Officer (617) 725-5657 stephen.olsen@citizensbank.com

*Combines a first mortgage with a home equity line of credit. Transaction and market restrictions apply. Mortgages are offered and originated by RBS Citizens, N.A. Citizens Bank is a brand name of RBS Citizens, N.A. (NMLS ID# 433960) and Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania (NMLS ID# 522615). RBS Citizens, N.A. and Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania are affiliates. All loans are subject to approval. Equal Housing Lender. 1117


Wareham Marion AntiqueWaterfront With Waterviews Contemporary

CORNICE REALTY, LLC

NARRAGANSETT, RI YOU ARE HERE!!!

This Contemporary home, set on over 13 acres in

Located in the heart Marionwaterviews Village, just steps Point from Bay the East Wareham, offers of gorgeous of Shell Beverly Yacht Club marsh. and Sippican Harbor, this3,250 newly renovated and surrounding Built in 1989, its square feet home blends the charm an antique with the modern 3-1/2 amenities include first floor masterofsuite, 3 additional bedrooms, baths, of laundry new construction. Builtdining in 1806, this antique home served room, formal room, den with gas once fireplace, as Marion’s first room post office. After an extensive renovation, this and large living with gas fireplace and spectacular views. home now comfortably itself to year-round or summerovens, livModern kitchen includeslends granite countertops, Thermador andFirst Sub-Zero refrigerator. Also complete with large finished ing. floor has an open floor plan that leads to bluestone patio walk-out patio, and 3 carand garage and privatebasement, grounds. wrap-around Second floor deck, has three bedrooms two withbaths, unfinished above. Alarm system, generator, custom while rooms third floor boasts a large master suite with central vacuum,Take outdoor shower, workshop. gorgeous waterviews. in views of and Sippican Harbor and Professional landscaping Buzzard’s Bay from the roofadds deck.to this private, serene home.

Exclusively listed at $1,600,000 Exclusively listed at $1,695,000

Breathtaking ocean views from this luxury 4-bedroom dream home, under construction with 600 feet direct ocean access, views of Point Judith Refuge and Block Island. Walk to Roger Wheeler Beach! Choose your colors and designer details! Enjoy a beautiful sunset from your own piece of paradise! Exclusively offered for sale by Cornice Realty MLS #997782

Tel: 508-748-0020 Fax: 508-748-2337

401-354-4720 | Cornice@ureach.com

STONE MEADOW FARM West Windsor, Vermont

Constructed of the finest materials in 2008 to take advantage of its elevated site looking over swimming pond, 24+/- acres of rolling fields, and then to Mt. Ascutney beyond, this spacious country home (13 rooms, 4 BR, 4 Full and 2 Half Baths) provides luxury and fine comfort creating a wonderful lifestyle. Easily accessible and located in the quiet rural town of West Windsor nearby to Woodstock Village and Hanover, New Hampshire for dining, shopping, cultural events and world class medical facilities. $3,490,000.

www.robertwallacerealestate.com 5 Central St./Box 630 Woodstock, VT 05091 802/457-2244 877/227-0242

NEWPORT

$4,900,000 {{ÎÊ iiÛÕiÊÛi˜ÕiÊUÊfx]Óää]äää Historic Swanhurst Manor built in £nx£]ʜ˜iʜvÊ̅iʜÀˆ}ˆ˜>Ê£Óʓ>˜Ãˆœ˜ÃÊ œ˜Ê iÜ«œÀ̽ÃÊ v>“i`Ê iiÛÕiÊ Ûi°Ê

œ“«iÌiÞÊ ÀiÃ̜Ài`Ê ÜˆÌ…Ê ÃÌ՘˜ˆ˜}Ê `iÌ>ˆÃÊ œ˜Ê £°xÊ >VÀiÃÊ œvÊ Ã«iVÌ>VՏ>ÀÊ “>ÌÕÀiʏ>˜`ÃV>«i`Ê}>À`i˜Ã°Ê Lynn Creighton 401.345.6886

William Raveis CHAPMAN ENSTONE REAL ESTATE t MORTGAGE t RENTALS

RAVEIS.COM

65 Bellevue Ave • Newport, RI • 401.846.3800 {™Ê iiÛÕiÊÛiÊUÊ iÜ«œÀÌ]Ê,ÊUÊ{䣰n{È°Înää lynn.creighton@raveis.com lynn.creighton@raveis.com


0DQFKHVWHU0DJQL¿FHQWHVWDWH with stunning ocean views. $3,875,000

Magnolia-Oceanfront Villa ZLWK7XVFDQLQÀXHQFHV $3,350,000

Annisquam-Newly constructed KRPHZLWKHQHUJ\HI¿FLHQW features. $1,390,000

Boxford-Pristine Colonial on 6 acres with stable and paddocks. $1,395,000

SPECIALISTS IN REALTY SERVICES

Gloucester-Custom home with ocean views and deeded water rights. $799,000

Beverly Farms-Renovated Carriage House with in-ground pool. $1,295,000

Rockport-Renovated Contemporary with peaceful ocean views. $799,000

Manchester-Stately Colonial built in 2008 on a lovely knoll. $1,175,000

www.jbarrettrealty.com Manchester-by-the-Sea, MA (978) 526-8555 Beverly Farms, MA (978) 922-2700 Gloucester, MA (978) 282-1315 Ipswich, MA (978) 356-3444 7RSV¿HOG&XVWRP3ODQWDWLRQ Cape with a 2.82 acre buildable lot. $1,100,000

Gloucester-Tudor Residence on 24 private acres with ocean views. $3,600,000

Essex-Lakeview Contemporary sited on 10+ private acres. $1,125,000

Hamilton-Spacious Colonial with modern amenities on 1+ acre. $1,175,000

Ipswich-Great Neck Contemporary with wonderful ocean views. $675,000

Magnolia-Luxury Townhomes with fabulous ocean views. $850,000-$1,750,000


Advertiser Index cl a s s i c ch a ra c te r

t i m e l e s s d e ta i l

e x c e ptional qualit y

A helpful resource for finding the advertisers featured in this issue

A. Tesa Architecture 166 A.J. Rose Carpets 43 Ardente Supply Company 17 Back Bay Shutter Co., Inc. Back Cover BayPoint Builders 126–127 Belgard 8–9 Bensonwood Homes 61 Boston Art, Inc. 137 Boston Craftsmen Corporation 155 Bradford Design, Inc. 157 Broderick Building & Remodeling 22 California Closets 51 Charles Spada Interiors 1 Circle Furniture 135 Citizen’s Bank 163 Clarke Distributors 33 Classic Kitchens & Interiors 141 Coldwell Banker Previews International 160–161

Ne w p o r t , R h o d e I s l a n d

401.608.2286

w w w. Ate s aA rc hitecture.com

Spring Consignment Auction Presenting rare and vintage fine art & objects from the Provincetown art colony and beyond.

Robert Van Neumann, Sailors Playing Cards

Saturday, June 16, 7pm Provincetown Art Association and Museum 166 New England Home May/June 2012

460 Commercial Street Provincetown, MA 02657 (508) 487-1750 www.paam.org

Colony Rug Company 20 Concord Museum 145 The Converse Company Realtors 164 Cornice Realty 164 Cosentino North America 79, 152 The Cottage 123 Cottage & Bungalow 78 Cumar, Inc. 26 Cutting Edge Systems 45 Davio’s 122 Davis Frame Company 147 db Landscaping 50 Dover Rug 37 Doyle Herman Design Associates 141 Dream Kitchens 81 Duffy Design Group 11 Ecoshel 143 FBN Construction Co., Inc. Inside back cover Ferguson 24 First Rugs, Inc. 49 Floors To The Trade 154 Furniture Consignment.com 153 Gloster Furniture 25 The Granite Group 60 Gregory Lombardi Design 35 Hope’s Windows 15 Howell Custom Building Group 2–3 Hudson 38 Hutker Architects 143 J & K Cabinets 123 J Barrett & Company Real Estate 165 J. Todd Galleries 42 Jeff Soderbergh 139 Judd Brown Designs 153 JW Construction, Inc. 128–129 Kitchen Views/National Lumber 21 LaBarge Custom Home Building 151 The Lagasse Group 130–131 Landry & Arcari Inside front cover, 64–65 LDa Architects & Interiors 13 League of N.H. Craftsmen 149


Sketch Pad

PAUL ROCHELEAU

Design ideas in the making

MY EARLY FASCINATION was to build something original. And yet every time I found a new design in my own

consciousness, I soon found evidence that others had visited my ideas long before. I once left off the traditional crown moldings on a piece in an effort to appear modern, only to eventually discover pieces created in the 1400s with the same detail. Many more attempts followed. This current work is yet another try at continuing the development of a long line of cabinets on stands dating back at least to the 1500s. The Raging River cabinet is part of a series called Wooden River, in which I find “landscapes� in the wood grain. (Another inspiration was looking at old Japanese screens that end up being hung on the wall as art.) It contains the free-flowing patterns of nature within the austerity of rigid rectangular lines, intending to capture the feeling of life in the modern world. IAN INGERSOLL, IAN INGERSOLL CABINETMAKERS, WEST CORNWALL, CONN., (860) 672-6334, WWW.IANINGERSOLL.COM

168

New England Home May/June 2012


We don’t build them like you’re used to.

Many companies talk about customer service and team work. FBN Construction stands for both. We get it. We’re proud of our relationships and share in our successes. 617.333.6800 | www.fbnconstruction.com


If Your Windows Could

TALK , They ’d Probably Say, “Call Back Bay Shutter Co.” 

(Hey, Did You Hear Something? )

BACK BAY S HUTTER C O. I NC . totally passionate about shutters® (and shades too!) 78i.22i.0i00 www.backbayshutter.com Geographically flexible.



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