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blue,” Frank says. “We’ve been in lovely houses decorated like that, but this house didn’t want that. We knew she’d be able to step away from that island sensibility.” The front door of the central structure opens into a light-flooded, high-ceilinged great room with views straight across the expanse and out to the backyard. Dujardin and the Antons cleverly divided the massive room into two cozy seating areas, each focused on one of the twin fireplaces, separated by a large round dining table that anchors the room and softens the angular nature of the space. A three-foot-wide circular wrought-iron chandelier hangs above the table, providing a focal point and, again, softening the angular space. The circle detail repeats in the pieces of contemporary art that flank one of the doors to the back terrace. Dujardin stuck with a warm, neutral palette, refinishing the floors with a whitewashed translucent stain, adding a seagrass rug the color of damp sand and covering sofas and chairs in shades of cream and taupe. “We wanted the furniture to be neutral so it wouldn’t compete with the architecture,” the designer explains. Hanging white pendant lights, part of Jacobsen’s original design, almost disappear against the white paneling, and the only hints of color come from the art, which includes a Wolf Kahn painting above one of the fireplaces. The space works beautifully for the Antons, who like having two seating areas for their frequent entertaining but can also often be found enjoying their alone time, each reading beside one of the fireplaces. The room’s functionality is matched only by its visual effect. “Not to be hyperbolic,” says Frank, “but it has a jaw-dropping impact on people when they enter the room.” The Jacobsen-designed kitchen needed little work other than refinishing cabinets and the floor and replacing the old countertop with its current white marble. The dark-wood island with its sturdy turned legs was installed by Jacobsen himself. Left of the front door, a long hall leads past a guest room (two others are in a separate building) through a connector space to the master suite. Like the public part of the house, the guest room is all white, cream and taupe. A subtly curved upholstered headboard creates a graceful complement to

“WE’VE BEEN IN LOVELY HOUSES WITH THE ‘NANTUCKET INTERIOR,’ BUT THIS HOUSE DIDN’T WANT THAT.”

Summer 2012 New England Home’s Cape & Islands 71

New England Home Cape & Islands  

Summer 2012

New England Home Cape & Islands  

Summer 2012

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