Page 83

Looming Large Fabrics have the power to keep a historically inspired home from feeling like a museum by adding balance and fun. Here’s how:

Enliven a space: Farmhouse style often features faded colors, but Oliver wanted to inject some life into this home’s palette. “Bolder colors and patterns here and there make the house look happier and not so washed-out,” she says. Mix it up: Layering traditional patterns can bring elegance to a room, but to add visual interest, consider mixing in an unexpected choice. In the master bedroom, Oliver combined traditional stripes, plaid and floral fabrics in the same muted palette, then added a more contemporary painterly polka dot “for just a touch of fun,” she says. Even it out: Fabrics can help create balance in a room. To offset the heaviness of the dining-room built-ins, Oliver made the comparably petite dining set chairs look more substantial with slipcovers, adding visual weight with the drapery’s large-scale floral.

They built the home as homes were constructed years ago, applying upgraded finishes and more detail to the public spaces and keeping the private spaces simpler, using basic, less expensive materials for the workspaces than for the entertaining spaces. The exterior of the main house, for example, is clad in traditional lap siding; the back patio features a stone fireplace and natural wood detailing in the Greek revival style. In contrast, the cottage has simple board-and-batten siding and the working horse barn features traditional shiplap with a concrete block foundation. “The farther out we went from the main house, even the roofing got simpler,” Remington says. “We went with asphalt shingles instead of the more expensive metal roof like the main house because, hey, it’s just a barn, right?” Remington worked with interior designer Lane Oliver, of Denver-based LEO Interior Design, to carry that hierarchical approach indoors, layering decorative moldings, wainscoting, wood paneling and handcrafted details into the living room and dining room, while keeping the bedrooms and even the kitchen a bit quieter. The kitchen features Shaker cabinets and interior walls finished with lap siding, while the nearby dining room has more ornate carved custom built-ins and decorative wood paneling. (opposite) With ceiling heights under nine feet throughout the house, and the homeowner’s aversion to can lights, Oliver was challenged to find lighting, like the living room’s custom chandelier, that didn’t hang too low. (this page, above) The entry sets the tone for the home’s simple, traditional elegance with a pair of Windsor chairs, wall paneling painted a muddled yellow, and the first of the house’s seven fireplaces. (left) The sunroom adjoins the kitchen and was designed to resemble a renovated closed-in porch, with large, low windows made to look as if they’d taken the place of screens, and baseboard heating. 71

Colorado Homes & Lifestyles June/July 2014  

Living with Art & Antiques

Colorado Homes & Lifestyles June/July 2014  

Living with Art & Antiques

Advertisement