At Home In Arkansas

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July 2011

AT HOME STYLE 12 Stylish Finds Eco-friendly home goods 14 Design News The Green Design 30: people, places and products for green living statewide

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28 Design New energy-efficient window options 31 Before & After An apartment complex in Fayetteville goes green and garners a LEED award

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35 In the Kitchen A Fayetteville family builds a rustic kitchen using sustainable materials

AT HOME GREEN LIVING 42 Grassroots Green A young family uses innovative materials and thrifty ideas to build a green home in Bryant 54 Traditional Green A pair of building pros in Little Rock creates an award winning Earthfriendly home

SPECIAL SECTION:

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66 Arkansas’ Best Builders

Arkansas’ Best Builders

AT HOME OUT & ABOUT 72 On the Town Fashionable finds with eco-conscious flair 74 On the Road A designer’s tips for a Conway staycation 79 What’s in Store Arkansas-made goods 80 At Home with Ecohouse architect and builder Rodney Collins

SPECIAL SECTION

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Vol. 16, No. 6 © 2011 by Network Communications Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. At Home in Arkansas™ (ISSN 1540-8914, USPS# 020-999) is published 11 times a year (January/ February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December) by Network Communications, Inc., 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 770-962-7220. Periodicals Postage Rates are Paid at Lawrenceville, GA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to At Home in Arkansas™; P.O. BOX 9002, MAPLE SHADE, NJ 08052-9652. Canada Post PM40063731. Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Station A, PO Box 54, Windsor ON N9A 6J5.

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At Home in Arkansas


A new PERSPECTIVE...

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Protect His Peepers

PUBLISHER Kelly Fraiser (ext. 11) kelly@athomearkansas.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Diane Carroll dcarroll@athomearkansas.com ART DIRECTOR Mandy Keener (ext. 12) mandy@athomearkansas.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR/ONLINE EDITOR Paulette Pearson (ext. 16) ppearson@athomearkansas.com ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR/ SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Laura Hall LaRue (ext. 14) laurah@athomearkansas.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Nancy Nolan, Rett Peek SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jennifer Hay (ext. 10) jennifer@athomearkansas.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Catherine Barron (ext. 22) catherine@athomearkansas.com Stevi Jackson (ext. 24) stevi@athomearkansas.com MARKETING COORDINATOR Megan Lindsey (ext. 15) mlindsey@athomearkansas.com PRESIDENT HOME DESIGN DIVISION Adam Japko SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Stuart Christian DIRECTOR OF PUBLISHING OPERATIONS Rick Higgins CIRCULATION MANAGER PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kurt Coey Cheryl Jock NEWSSTAND MANAGER Bob Moenster

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At Home in Arkansas

CHAIRMAN & CEO Daniel McCarthy CFO Gerry Parker GENERAL COUNSEL Susan Deese



Surprised that our cover house is green? It’s so green that it’s certified silver, in fact, through the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Green Building Program. Yes, Southern charm and traditional good looks can be environmentally friendly. That’s the point that builders Bret and Jennifer Franks set out to prove with their own home when, as a Certified Green Professional, Bret decided that practicing what he preached was the best way to show clients eco-minded living options. Their Little Rock home is even built in a green neighborhood, Woodlands Edge, the first NAHB four star certified development of its kind in the country—and it’s right here in Arkansas. That spirit of walking the talk is at the heart of this green living issue, as we found Arkansans around the state who’ve made environmentally-friendly living a daily practice. From a young family in Bryant who relocated from the West Coast and brought eco-conscious ideas with them, to a team of design pros in Fayetteville who discovered ways to make an entire apartment complex energy efficient and sustainable, Arkansans have embraced our Natural State motto and are rising to the challenge. I can attest to feeling the collective energy as we put this issue together—having been in the home design publishing business for years, I now see a clear shift in the availability, understanding and use of green living options. We’ve packed this issue with places to shop, products to use and sustainable ways to enhance your own home, plus plenty of pictures for inspiration. Find a new idea or two and let’s keep helping The Natural State live up to its name.

*July Inspiration: Recommended Reading

Visit these local web sites for green tips, ideas, events and more:

www.livegreenarkansas.com

www.greenarbytheday.com

On the cover

www.randomhouse.com

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At Home in Arkansas

The dining room in Bret and Jennifer Franks’ Little Rock home. Photographed by Nancy Nolan. See page 54.


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At Home in Arkansas


PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY NOLAN/PRODUCTION: LAURA LARUE

FETCH SOME GREEN

Shops statewide offer options for recycled, repurposed and eco-friendly goods, making going green one step easier. Let Recycled Rover, made from tightly woven and corded recycled newspaper, be your—and the planet’s—new best friend. Haus Werk, Little Rock

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Renewed Resources

At Home in Arkansas

PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY NOLAN/PRODUCTION: LAURA LARUE

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1. Mercury glass bottles converted into hanging lanterns for votive candles. Box Turtle, Little Rock 2. Baskets made from recycled men’s shirts and clothes hangers. The Green Corner Store, Little Rock 3. Tap water bottle purchases help provide safe drinking water for children, with a portion of the retail price donated to the United States Fund for UNICEF. Vesta’s, Little Rock 4. Vintage records take on a new use as bookends. The Green Corner Store, Little Rock 5. Hand-quilted textiles are made in Bengal from cotton fabric scraps. Vesta’s, Little Rock 6. Collect newspapers and magazines in a basket made of recycled ones. EcoFab, Little Rock 7. Old rope from fishing docks is upcycled into colorful doormats. EcoFab, Little Rock 8. Hand-painted Picket Fence Fish turn old fencing materials into décor. Haus Werk, Little Rock 9. The Laundress eco-chic line of specialty detergent and fabric care. V.S. Mobley’s General Store, Fayetteville 10. Reusable totes made from recycled rice and feed bags fold compactly into an attached pouch for easy access. EcoFab, Little Rock 11. Vintage doorknobs find a new life as wine stoppers. Riffraff, Fayetteville 12. Mississippi-based Still Waters Studio repurposes items into signs. Haus Werk, Little Rock 13. Cola bottles repurposed as drinking glasses. Haus Werk, Little Rock 14. When you purchase Jaheni bowls, made in South Africa from telephone wire, you’re also supporting a women’s weaving group and fair trade practices. Box Turtle, Little Rock


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Baffled by green building claims? Searching for sources of healthier household goods? If you’re looking for ways to bring Earth-friendly elements into your home, we’ve compiled your guide: A compendium of 30 ways to go green, ranging from inspiring projects to items you can pick up at local shops. Turn the page and let the eco ideas begin.

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At Home in Arkansas


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To get you inspired we’ve created more colors, textures and designs. So however you want to express yourself, with Caesarstone — you can. www.caesarstoneus.com


Rising in the Green Ranks

The Natural State lived up to its name and earned a place on the U.S. Green Building Council recently released list of the top 10 states for LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certiďŹ ed projects, ranking ninth. See the stats and learn more about LEED projects at www.usgbc-ar.org.

Green Treasure Green pioneer Orlo Stitt moved to Arkansas in the 1970s, and has spent the last four decades honing his skills through his Rogers-based family business, Stitt Energy Systems, Inc., headquartered in an energy-planned building that garnered a LEED platinum award. He’s distilled his sustainable home expertise down to 18 principles and shares them in a new book, available at www.stittenergy.com.

The Northwest Arkansas Home Builders Association includes a Green Build committee, which offers a list of CertiďŹ ed Green Professionals. www.nwabuilders.com

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Green by Design

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The U.S. Green Building Council’s Arkansas chapter includes:

92 Architects 85 Builders/contractors 10 Interior designers 10 Landscape professionals

Caesarstone, Only by Caesarstone.

www.originalquartz.com

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At Home in Arkansas

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Green your home and garden with help from the pros through the member directory at www.usgbc-ar.org.

5 Building Green Statewide

Pros around the state are boosting their green home building skills. The Arkansas Home Builders Association and the National Association of Home Builders provide links to chapters statewide, where you can ďŹ nd out more about members’ credentials. www.arkansashomebuilders.org or www.nahb.com


INNOVATIVE GREEN

In the historic Pettaway neighborhood, the nonprofit Downtown Little Rock Community Development Corporation focuses on improving quality of life and offering affordable houses. Two new projects highlight the group’s sustainability efforts.

7 6 Modular Moves A recently completed modular home is the second project in an ongoing collaboration with the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. The 1,000-square-foot home was designed and constructed by students and transported to the site and assembled, showcasing materials and construction alternatives for energy-efficient and sustainable housing. www.dlrcdc2010.blogspot.com

9 GREEN BUILT A R K A N S A S The Home Builders Association of Greater Little Rock features Certified Green Professionals and a directory of Green Built partners. www.hbaglr.com

Container Creativity

This collaboration between Little Rock-based businesses Smart Structures Distributing and Viridian showcases the use of CorTen steel shipping containers as an affordable, durable, efficient and flexible construction method. The recently completed upcycled shipping container home features three bedrooms and two baths, and incorporates green building techniques including energy saving design, low-VOC paints, rapidly renewable bamboo flooring and water conserving fixtures. www.smartstructuresdist.com

8Touring Green

Get inspired with a tour of Heifer International’s Little Rock headquarters, showing how the organization transformed a former industrial waste site into a complex with a LEED platinum certified building and a thriving wetlands habitat. Tours are free and are available on a scheduled or walk-in basis; on the web site, click Heifer Village, guided tours for more information, or call (877) 870-COWS. Armchair travel more your style? There’s even an online video full of green building ideas. www.heifer.org

10Make a Green Move

Banish the bubble wrap and piles of cardboard with Go Green Box, a web-based store currently serving the greater Little Rock and Conway areas. Log on to order reusable packing bins, recycled packing paper and more, and the items will be delivered to your home and picked up from your new one. Owners Landon Eddleman and Jeff Byers, who also owns Fixed Rate Moving in Little Rock and Fayetteville and offers the green products to his moving clients, claim most customers net a substantial savings over purchasing standard packing materials. We call going green and saving green a win-win proposition. www.getagreenbox. com or (888) 41-REUSE www.athomearkansas.com 17


DISCOVER GREEN COMMUNITIES The Village at Hendrix

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Designed by the internationally known urban planning firm Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company, the Village brings Southern charm and neighborhood amenities to an urban setting in the heart of Conway. A community of houses and town homes, a town square with mixed-use buildings hosting restaurants, a bookshop, apartments and more, and a watershed restoration project with bridges, boardwalks, trails and native plantings, have all been recently completed as part of the first stage in this multi-phase development. www.thevillageathendrix.com

12 Vertical Modern Urban Lofts

Opt for city living in the LEED platinum certified residences near Union Station in downtown Little Rock. Combining energy-efficient design, private green space and ecologically responsible construction, the three-bedroom/three-bath homes feature amenities ranging from bamboo floors and low-e windows to rooftop decks and balconies. With phases one and two now complete, the development’s third phase is underway and includes additional homes and a community swimming pool. www.verticallofts.net

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Woodlands Edge

The nation’s first four star green neighborhood certified by the National Association of Home Builders is situated on 780 acres in West Little Rock, and also holds a Green Development of the Year award from the same group. Site planning and careful construction methods protected native Southern deciduous forestland while integrating walking and hiking trails, wildlife observation areas, preserved creeks and a fishing pond in the multi-phase development. A variety of lot sizes are offered, and referrals to certified green builders are available. www.woodlandsedge.com

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At Home in Arkansas


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GREEN HOME STORES STACK THE SHELVES STATEWIDE

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EcoFab Going green is a family affair for the Hoffers, who recognized that finding sustainable products was no easy feat. Four years ago, they began Cabot-based Cynergreen, a company that manufactures reusable water bottles, and they brought their green appeal to all-things-home last year, opening EcoFab in Little Rock’s The Promenade at Chenal as an eco-friendly shopping experience featuring sustainable products for the entire family. While Danelle heads the shop, Joe mans Cynergreen and finds time to hand-make an organic soap line. Fourteen-year-old daughter Riley followed in her parents green footsteps and created CG Kidz, a nonprofit dedicated to educating kids about environmental responsibility. www.ecofabstore.com

Natural Building Solutions Years in the building industry convinced John Allen and Sam Muffoletto that homeowners needed a source for green building products and guidance in sorting out sustainability claims. Last year, they opened Natural Building Solutions in Fayetteville as a repository of information and wares for homeowners and building pros alike, proving that for a myriad of building needs, from lumber to flooring, countertops to plumbing fixtures, there is an environmentally-friendly option available. They’re now spreading the word and the wares in Little Rock as well, with a new location opening soon. www.getnaturalusa.com

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16 The Green Corner Store

FLAT

Back in 2009, Shelley Green opened The Green Corner Store in Little Rock’s South of Main Street neighborhood to offer a one-stop locale with products “that were being made domestically and in a sustainable way by small, start-up companies,” she says. “I wanted to share the products I was finding with others in a friendly atmosphere with a general store feel.” Now, her store is a compendium of green goods, especially Arkansas-made items, and has helped draw similarly minded businesses, including the eco-friendly eateries Boulevard Bread Company and The Root café, to the area. www.thegreencornerstore.com 20

At Home in Arkansas


We’ve been green since it was just a color.

17 Mountain Air Organic Beds “We spend a third of our lives in our beds; shouldn’t they contribute to our overall health?” asks Joyce Robertson, a passionate spokesperson for green living and owner of Mountain Air Organic Beds in Fayetteville. She took that question to heart and launched her business, which is the only accredited organic mattress dealer/seller in Arkansas and also carries unique certified-organic products, ranging from mattresses, bedding and sustainable furniture to gifts. “You can banish the toxic bedding,” says Robertson, “and make a healthier choice.” www.mountainairorganicbeds.com

NATURAL STATE WEB SOURCES FOR GREEN LIVING GOODS

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Heifer International founder, Dan West

F

rom our Platinum LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)

Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council to our latest sustainable agriculture project around the world or even right here in the USA,

www.asplashofgreen.com

Heifer International is ahead of the curve. Our

for all-things-home, ranging from building products to blankets to light bulbs, from a Springdale source.

mission is to end hunger and poverty and care

www.itsallgreenandmore.com for bath, kitchen, cleaning and other wares from a Maumelle-based business.

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hannahsheirlooms.weebly.com

for the Earth, and we accomplish that with gifts of livestock and training in environmentally sound agricultural practices. We’ve been helping impoverished families around the world and right here at home since 1944, so we’re not exactly greenhorns. In fact, we were key participants in the U.N.’s recent Commission on Sustainable Development. To donate or learn more about our work, please visit our website or call toll-free (800) 422-0474.

for heirloom seeds from a Lonsdale site.

www.arnetwork.org

www.heifer.org

for the Arkansas Sustainability Network, a nonprofit resource for the entire state. www.athomearkansas.com 21


THE NATURAL STATE CREATES GREEN HOME GOODS

22 Scentations For 26 years, this Pocahontas-based business in the Ozark foothills has been creating hand-poured candles, and now includes soy-blended options in reusable terra cotta urns and glass containers. Candles are poured and produced to order, saving waste, warehousing and excess packaging. www.scentations.com

Dreamweavers

Artisans Bobby Wisdom and Warren Walker had a dream in the 1970s of creating and selling woven rugs as a means of adding texture to textiles. Four decades later, their business, Dreamweavers, is still thriving and keeping the concept current with a range of environmentally-friendly pillows, rugs and other home goods designed at their headquarters in downtown Little Rock. Upcycled items include the Executive Pen collection, made from silk scraps from a tie factory in China. Dreamweavers’ wares are sold to shops around the nation, but locals can check out the products and find great deals at an outlet sale held on the second Saturday of each month. www.dreamweaversoutlet.com

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24 BioBased Insulation

GREEN BUILDING MATERIALS

This Springdale-based company manufactures award-winning spray polyurethane products that seal and insulate in one step, forming a sealed thermal envelope that helps create a more energy efficient, durable and healthier home. The innovative product also integrates rapidly renewable ingredients as a replacement for a portion of the petroleum found in some insulation, aiding sustainability without hindering performance. www.biobased.net

Potlatch Corporation From the South Arkansas facility in Warren, Potlatch Corporation makes lumber from Southern yellow pine, which can be purchased with chain-of-custody certification under the strict standards of the Forest Stewardship Council. The company’s dimensional framing lumber in a range of sizes is available from Arkansas-based Natural Building Solutions. www.getnaturalusa.com 22

At Home in Arkansas

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Named America’s Green Development of the Year National Association of Homebuilders More than one-third of our lush 800 acre forest land will always remain protected. Plus, pool, tennis courts, playground and clubhouse. All just five minutes from west Little Rock amenities. New homes from $275,000 to over $500,000.

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At Home in Arkansas


UPCYCLED ANTIQUITIES INSPIRED ARTISANS AROUND THE STATE GIVE AGING OBJECTS A NEW LEASE ON LIFE I was a designer for years, and I began painting and refinishing as a way to revamp my clients’ furniture. So often, they had items with good lines, but the look was outdated. PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY NOLAN/STYLING: MANDY KEENER

TRACY RIVERS Angelfish Faux Finish and Artistry, Little Rock

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The highboy is made from cherry and it was a piece no one wanted because it had a formal, bedroom suite look. With the turquoise finish and the hand-painted filigree detail, it’s more versatile. The antique bench is milk painted with a charcoal stencil added, and reads,“Beauty is a form of genuis.”


I began reworking items using just paint, and then I moved to Los Angeles and didn’t have a studio, so I made things out of flea market items, which I could do in a small space. When I returned to Arkansas, I had access to a woodworking shop, giving me room to rework larger items. The decorative box is a compilation of assorted table legs, a finial and salvaged wood. The candlesticks are made from staircase spindles, and I added a base, made metal cups from ceiling tin and added crystals from a chandelier. The screen is made from a shutter, a door sidelight and a plain panel that I hand-painted and aged.

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KIRSTEN BLOWERS Riffraff, Fayetteville

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JOHN BELL Sweet Home Furnishings, Little Rock

I’ve always had a knack for painting furniture. My mom let me paint my dresser and bed as a child, which was the first time I realized a simple coat of paint can give an item a completely new look. While studying interior design at the University of Arkansas, I realized I could make a career of upcycling items and opened Riffraff. The hutch had chicken-wire doors that I removed to create open space storage. I painted it and replaced the drawer knobs with two of my favorites from Anthropologie. The dresser had chips in the detailing, so I painted and distressed it further and added assorted knobs, which to me adds more character.


During college, I painted houses. I became so good at brushwork that I began to paint cabinetry. A client asked me to paint some nightstands as well, and that launched me into reworking furniture, which I can customize to mix with the other elements in a home.

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LASUN WARREN RUSSELL Lasun’s Painting, Fayetteville

The nightstand was a hand-me-down, a piece from a 1960s oak bedroom set, and I updated it with metallic silver paint and SherwinWilliams’ Black Bean for the details. The Duncan Phyfe-style table is from Salvation Army, and the wood was very plain. I chose black and white to make it more of a statement piece.

We’re both creative and enjoy the process of taking something basic and making it more interesting and attractive. Debi learned upholstery from her father, and we use a mix of our skills in remaking items. They’re the kinds of pieces we’d put in our own homes. We purchased the antique chair at an estate sale, and it was in bad shape. Debi reupholstered it in peacock print chenille. The table came from a junk shop, where it had sat for years. We don’t paint fine antiques, but rather pieces that are worn and no one wants, which deserve a fresh update.

STEPHANIE LEBOUFF AND DEBI MCCLELLAND (left) The Paisley Place, Bentonville

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ECO OPTIONS A window of opportunity for creating a more SO MANY ENERGY-EFFICIENT OPTIONS EXIST NOW THAT HOMEOWNERS CAN ENJOY BEAUTIFUL NEW WINDOWS DESIGNED TO MATCH THEIR OLD ONES, OR CHOOSE A WHOLE NEW LOOK WITH LARGER SIZES AND EASY OPERATION. —Marvin

Marvin’s Low-E II with Argon windows reduce heat gain in summer and heat loss in winter. Barton’s, locations statewide; Butterfield Windows & Doors, Fayetteville; C.J. Horner and Company, Hot Springs; Ditta Door & Hardware, Jonesboro; Greenfield Millworks, North Little Rock; Harry G. Barr Co., Fort Smith, Springdale; Kaufman Lumber, Little Rock; Marchant Building Center, Mountain Home; Pine Creek Lumber, Hindsville; Plymouth Building Products, North Little Rock; Ridout Lumber, locations statewide; SCI Millwork, Harrison

Andersen’s double-hung windows in the Eco-Excel line of products feature an energy performance package to make tax credit easy. Ace Glass Co., Little Rock; Arrowhead Services & Products, Cabot; Caldwell Lumber, Wynne; C.J. Horner and Company, Hot Springs; Davis Cash Lumber, Clinton; El Dorado Glass and Mirror, El Dorado; F.L. Davis Builder’s Supply, Greers Ferry, Heber Springs; Heritage Window & Door, Russellville; J.T. White Hardware & Lumber, Jonesboro; Lumber One Home Center, Mayflower, Stuttgart; Meek’s, locations statewide; Pine Creek Lumber, Hindsville; Windows, Doors & More, Bryant

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At Home in Arkansas

PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY OF VENDORS

eco-friendly and energy-efficient home


Jeld-Wen’s stylish wood windows are made from reclaimed Douglas fir originally used for fencing, barns, houses and factories. Garage Door Systems, North Little Rock; Lakeside Siding Supply, Inc., Hot Springs; Lumber One Home Center, Mayflower, Stuttgart; Natural State Wholesale, Cabot; Norandex, Fort Smith, Hot Springs; Pro Millwork, Hot Springs; SCI Millwork, Harrison; Stock Building Supply, North Little Rock

TRULY ECO-FRIENDLY WINDOWS NOT ONLY SAVE YOU MONEY ON ENERGY COSTS BUT ALSO ALLOW YOU TO BE A GOOD STEWARD OF THE EARTH’S RESOURCES, SINCE THEY ARE MADE USING SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES, WITH WOOD FROM RESPONSIBLY HARVESTED FORESTS, AND ALL THE BY-PRODUCTS ARE RECYCLED. —Mike Irby of Pella of Arkansas

Pella’s Architect Series windows feature EnduraClad technology and all-wood construction, resulting in an extremely durable, energy-efficient design. Norandex, Fort Smith, Hot Springs; Pella Window and Door Showroom, North Little Rock, Springdale www.athomearkansas.com 29


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At Home in Arkansas


APARTMENT LIVING GOES GREEN

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

At Eco Modern Flats in Fayetteville, an aging apartment complex gets an Earth-friendly update, netting a LEED platinum award along the way By Diane Carroll

Built in the late 1960s, the four building apartment complex near the University of Arkansas campus in downtown Fayetteville was a testament to its time, complete with dark paneling, shaggy carpeting, closed off rooms and dank kitchens and baths. When new owners purchased the property in 2010, the 96-unit complex was in dire need of an update. Despite the condition of each apartment, the complex was structurally sound, and the downtown locale offered all the benefits of urban living, with easy access to campus and the Fayetteville trail system, as well as shops and restaurants. “There was tremendous potential here to renovate these units in an economically feasible way and create a healthy, sustainable setting,” says Jeremy Hudson, partner in MC3 Multifamily real estate management and one of the developers of the property. “We saw an opportunity to make this a truly green apartment complex and offer a style of living that didn’t exist here.” The architectural team at Modus Studio quickly concurred. “The way the complex was built lends itself to being environmentally friendly,” says principal architect Chris Baribeau. “The walls, floors and ceilings are concrete and were still in good shape, and each unit’s basic form is a box-like www.athomearkansas.com 31


rectangle. Tearing out all the internal partitions was the first step, allowing access to daylight throughout the apartment and the means of designing a more modern, open way of living.” Within the blank shell, the architectural team added elements that Baribeau says were geared toward “packing a lot of function into the form,” including an efficient kitchen sleekly tucked along one wall of the open living area. When paired with a multiuse island, the space works as a combined kitchen, living and dining room. An adjacent bedroom area was made more private through the addition of a built-in bookcase that serves as a partial room divider, and a pivoting section of the bookcase was designed to hold a television that can be turned and viewed in either space. New low-e windows, upgraded insulation, ductless heat and air mini systems, and Energy Star appliances added to the units’ efficiency. Rooftop solar panels power the majority of the units’ hot water needs, while low flow faucets and dual flush toilets reduce water consumption. Sustainable building materials and locally sourced products rounded out the green components of each space. With nearly half of the 96 apartments complete, the next step in the transformation will be the addition of roof top patios, community courtyards, a saline-treated swimming pool, native plants, a rainwater harvesting system and a green roof, all slated for this summer. “Every design decision has been made with the goal of having a light environmental footprint and consideration for the people who live here,” says Hudson, “which makes us one of the greenest apartment complexes in the country.” 32

At Home in Arkansas

Design Resources Architect Modus Studio, Fayetteville Construction manager The H7 Group, Springdale Developer/property manager MC3 Multifamily, Springdale General contractor Town Builders, Inc., Fayetteville Green building consultant, custom woodwork Greenovation Builders, Springdale Green lifestyle consultant A Splash of Green, Springdale Countertops 3GD Inc., Rogers Heat/air systems Kimbel Mechanical Systems, Fayetteville Plumbing fixtures Plumb Perfect, Springdale Plumbing systems Ready Rooter, Springdale Solar energy system Stellar Sun, Little Rock Tile Emser Tile, North Little Rock Window shades Accent Blinds & Shutters, Springdale


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PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK/ STYLING: DIANE CARROLL

Fayetteville designer Missi Walker uses eco-friendly ingredients to create a kitchen that pleases the palate as well as the eye By Tiffany Burgess

When Gail and Chuck Maxwell purchased a lot on Fayetteville’s Mount Sequoyah, they knew they had found the perfect place to build their dream home. They also knew they wanted the process and structure to be environmentally responsible and innovative, including the home’s open floor plan kitchen. Luckily, they already knew the right person to help carry out this mission—LEEDaccredited designer and longtime friend, Missi Walker. Working together, the trio perfected the recipe for a green kitchen.

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At Home in Arkansas


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GREEN DESIGN DETAILS

A mosaic of recycled glass accent tiles from Oceanside Tile’s Tessera line adds an iridescent shimmer while keeping with the space’s environmentally-responsible mantra.

Want a greener way to shop for household items? Visit Makin’ Room, a local web site where users can list and sell gently used furniture, appliances and more in areas such as Jonesboro, Little Rock and Northwest Arkansas. www.makinroom.com

Granite countertops provide a durable work surface that will stand the test of time, while a natural tumbled travertine backsplash blends with the room’s neutral hues.

Ergonomics also played a role in the kitchen’s design. Pullout drawers make pots and pans more easily accessible for the cook.

Design Resources Interior design Missi Walker Interiors, Fayetteville Appliances Metro Appliances & More, locations statewide Barstools Makinroom.com Cabinetry Collins Custom Cabinets, Lowell Countertop, tile New Century Countertops & Tile, Springdale Paint Sherwin-Williams, locations statewide

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At Home in Arkansas

To conserve water, Walker chose a low-flow Delta faucet. The couple also installed a Rainforest water filtration system, which provides purified water throughout the household. An ondemand water heater, which heats water only as it is needed, also reduces energy consumption.

Notches were cut in the top of all the drawers and cabinets, saving materials and money by eliminating the need for hardware. The lack of hardware also creates a natural, seamless appearance throughout the cabinet space.


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: A COUPLE RETURNS FROM SEATTLE TO BUILD THEIR HOME IN BENTON, BRINGING WITH THEM A SENSIBILITY FOR SUSTAINABLE DESIGN INTERVIEW BY: MURRYE BERNARD PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY NOLAN STYLING: MANDY KEENER

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Natural light floods Dustin and Kylie Williams’ home from more than 60 energy-efficient windows from Silver Line. Benton-based woodworker Van Turbyfill custom made all of the shelving and millwork. The houndstoothcovered chair is a flea-market find that Kylie reupholstered. The Williams’ twoyear-old daughter, Harper, has no trouble navigating the polished concrete floors, which are eco-friendly and easy to clean. Walls are covered in SherwinWilliams’ Bright White low-VOC paint.


Influenced by the color theory of artist Dale Chihuly (who created the piece on the end table), Kylie aimed to include as many colors as possible against the neutral interior backdrop. Her brother, Fayettevillebased artist Jason Neal, created the skeletal studies. “They are the oldest pieces I have, but they are also my favorite,” Kylie shares. Made from recycled materials, FLOR modular carpet tiles add a pop of color, define the living space and lend warmth to the concrete floor. Dustin reads in the lightfilled living space.

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At Home in Arkansas:

You and your husband have followed creative career paths, which led you to Seattle. What drew you back to Arkansas, where you chose to build your home?

Kylie Williams: I have a degree in art history, and in Seattle, I worked for artist Dale Chihuly. My husband, Dustin, is a web user experience and interface designer. Before we had our child, we decided to move back to Arkansas to be near family. I chose to take a couple of years off from my career, but I needed a project. AHIA: You knew from the beginning that you wanted this house to be green. KW: In Seattle, living green was not only popular but expected. We chose to build our house incorporating many of the green ideals we had seen and adopted on the West Coast. We sat down with our dear friend and intern architect, Aaron Scott, and told him we wanted to incorporate two things, amazing design and green products, wherever possible. However, that’s not exactly an easy feat right now in Arkansas. AHIA: One of the main tenants of green design is the incorporation of local materials. How did you manage that in an affordable way? KW: Once we began compiling ideas and getting quotes, we saw our building budget skyrocket. I kept thinking green might as well translate into expensive. It was hard to find local suppliers for many of the products that we wanted to use. Though we could have shipped materials in from all over the U.S., it was important to us to not only support local businesses, but to also save energy by eliminating shipping. Luckily, we were able to come up with feasible and affordable green features to incorporate into our house’s design. AHIA: The aesthetic of your home is open and modern. Were you inspired by the architecture of Seattle? KW: A lot of buildings there have been repurposed, so there is a juxtaposition between two different styles: older architecture with newer, streamlined design. We lived in a loft apartment, and I loved the industrial look of high ceilings with exposed ductwork. I wanted to bring that look to our great room, which is a large, open space that includes the living room, kitchen, dining room and office loft. I can cook dinner while watching our daughter, Harper, play in the living room, and still chat with Dustin while he’s in our office loft, all without having to walk into another room. 46

AHIA: The interior is neutral with pops of color. How did your artistic background influence the design? KW: Many people are stuck on limited color palettes, but I wanted my house to contain every color. Dale Chihuly’s color theory is amazing, and I learned a lot from him. I think that if you have a clean background, such as a neutral wall, you can use every single color of the rainbow. AHIA: Your home is also full of natural light, which is an effective passive solar design strategy. KW: After moving back from Seattle, where it was dreary for nine months out of the year, we really wanted to have a light-infused house. Smart designer that he is, Aaron positioned our house so that we take advantage of the sunlight throughout the day, which streams into every single room from more than 60 windows. I literally do not turn on a light in this house until about 7 p.m. AHIA: Have you experienced significant savings on energy bills? KW: The first energy bill we received after moving into our house floored us. We had previously rented a small, older bungalow in Little Rock and it was eye opening to realize how much energy we had expended in that house. In the new house, we have doubled our square footage yet cut our energy bill in half. AHIA: What advice would you give to homeowners who are considering building green? KW: We live better, we feel better and we are happy that we were able to keep our budget intact and build a house that has some amazing green features. I don’t think it’s necessary to cover your house with solar panels, invest in a pricey geothermal cooling system or house a water silo in your backyard when you think of renovating or building. Just be smart, do your research and find ways to incorporate green wherever you can.


“One thing that all of our friends comment about when they see our house is its openness—simply put, I don’t like walls,” admits Kylie. The family stays visually connected while in the great room, which combines living, kitchen and dining space with an open office loft above. Steel-rimmed doors from Masonite allow light to enter the living areas; exposed pine beams define the kitchen.

www.athomearkansas.com 47


Kylie paid two dollars each for these bright blue chairs from a surplus store; she also made the breakfast table from a workbench top and table legs she purchased online. Woodworker Turbyfill built the kitchen cabinets and island (painted Valspar’s Brown Cherry), which are topped with eco-friendly Silestone quartz countertops. Appliances are qualified Energy Star from GE. A print and a barstool from IKEA outfit a niche with a built-in desk. 48


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The Williams rarely need to use artificial lighting during the day, but it can sometimes be too much of a good thing. In daughter Harper’s room, left, they installed darkening shades and painted the walls SherwinWilliams’ Network and Web Gray to make it more conducive to naptime. Lacquered Asian antiques outfit the master bedroom (above left) while flea market finds dress the guest bedroom (above). In the master bathroom, Kylie painted inexpensive gold-framed mirrors black and suspended them above the vanity. A lightweight molded acrylic tub with silver feet was an online purchase and an easy-to-transport option compared to cast iron versions.

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Designer Aaron Scott incorporated two-foot roof overhangs to mitigate sunlight and minimize heat gain. Inspired by new construction in Seattle, the Williams were thrilled to find that concrete fiberboard panels were available in Arkansas. The home’s exterior is decidedly modern, and Kylie believes there is a readiness for this aesthetic in Arkansas: “People want something different. They ask us who built our house, and we answer, ‘We did!’“

Design Resources Design Aaron Scott, Cromwell Architects Engineers, Little Rock Appliances Metro Appliances & More, locations statewide Concrete flooring Innovative Concrete Systems, Little Rock Countertops Daniel Jimenez, Contracting and Design Solutions LLC, Little Rock Paint Sherwin-Williams, Valspar, locations statewide Windows, doors Lewis Lumber & Supply, Benton Window treatments The Warp and Woof, Conway 52


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A Southern-style certiďŹ ed green home in Little Rock shows that living comfortably and sustainably can go hand-in-hand Interview by: Paulette Pearson Photography: Nancy Nolan Styling: Diane Carroll 54


In the dining room of Bret and Jennifer Franks’ Woodlands Edge home, paneled walls and a coffered ceiling are covered in Sherwin-Williams’ Alabaster; low-VOC paints were used throughout the house. Bret constructed the table with scrap wood, a side table is from Fabulous Finds Antiques, draperies are Pottery Barn and lighting, both here and in the foyer, is from Pro Builder Supply.

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56 At Home in Arkansas


The living room’s Americana theme marries with the home’s country cottage style. The resourceful couple had a sofa from their previous home Fiber-Seal cleaned rather than buying new, and added texture by layering rugs from Fabulous Finds Antiques and Ballard Designs. The rooster lamp belonged to Jennifer’s grandmother. Walls are Sherwin-Williams’ Birdseye Maple. Floors throughout the house are oak.

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At Home in Arkansas:

As a builder, tell us about your decision to build your own green home in Woodlands Edge, which is a sustainable neighborhood.

Jennifer Franks: It was an obvious next step for us to build a traditional Southern-style home, our favorite look, and marry that with green technology. We wanted people to see that you can live comfortably in a certified green home. We’re not extremists. You need to balance your life with all these things, but it’s doable.

Bret Franks: We learned much more by actually building it than was possible by just reading books about how to do it. AHIA: How do green building practices figure into your work? BF: We have always used sustainable products, green technologies and made our homes as energy-efficient as possible. Two years ago, we decided to take it a step further and become a Certified Green Professional. The certification—which requires courses and an exam through the National Association of Home Builders—simply furthered what we were already doing. Energy Star certification requires efficiencies in heating, air, lighting. Green building takes it to another level, including air quality, conserving water, how you clear the lot—everything involved with reducing the carbon footprint of building a home. AHIA: There are four basic levels of certification through the National Green Building Certification Program: bronze, silver, gold and emerald. How did you achieve your silver rating? BF: There are minimum standards in six different aspects of construction: lot design, resource efficiency, energy efficiency, water efficiency, indoor environmental quality and operation/maintenance. Our rating was based on the points we earned in each area. JF: It begins with how you prepare the land. Our home is positioned so that we have passive heating and cooling from the sun, with southern exposure during the winter and shade from trees during the summer. We also consulted a certified arborist to determine what trees could be saved, and we used mulch from the trees that were cut to protect their roots during construction. 58

AHIA: What other steps did you take? BF: Part of earning points is smart building. When framing the house, we had wood sized properly to reduce the amount of waste. But you can’t use every inch of wood, and there will always be excess scrap materials like shingles and cardboard boxes, which we separated and recycled. JF: A lot of our furnishings are family heirlooms, or bought from flea markets. We were going for a Southern, cottage-style theme, so we incorporated the things we already had and tweaked them to have that look. Indoor air quality was also a big aspect, so we installed the CleanEffects filtration system by Trane that removes allergens. AHIA: What does green mean to you? JF: It means respecting the environment, appreciating what it provides and using it wisely. The Earth and its resources sustain us, but we have to protect it. You don’t have to be extreme, just smart. I’m amazed at how many people don’t recycle. Think about what you can do to reduce your impact, but beyond that think about what you really need and don’t need. BF: One of the reasons we’re builders is that we love to create things, we love challenges, we don’t want to do the same things over and over again. I knew this would be a huge undertaking, but in the end I felt a sense of pride and accomplishment I haven’t felt in a long time, knowing that we did something to save nature, while building a home where we can live more comfortably and for less money in the long run.


The kitchen island’s Malibu granite countertop has the marble look Jennifer wanted but is more durable and easier to maintain. Custom cabinetry is by James Hardman. Subway tile on the backsplash is from The Little Rock Flooring Company and reflects light. Appliances are GE; faucets are Delta. Facing page: Benjamin Moore’s Palladium Blue graces the kitchen ceiling. 59


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On the back deck, which overlooks a wooded area and stream, salvaged brick features prominently around the wood burning, gas starter fireplace by Lennox. Rocking chairs are from Unpainted Furniture Center, the table was built by Bret’s grandparents and the glider is vintage. Facing page: In the breakfast room, the table is from Fabulous Find Antiques, curtains are Pottery Barn, the rug is Dash & Albert from Cobblestone & Vine, and the cabinet belonged to Jennifer’s grandmother.

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Factors helping the home earn its designation as Silver Performance Level through the National Green Building CertiďŹ cation Program include a TechShield barrier on the roof to block heat; salvaged brick on the façade; as well as minimal sod and native and drought-tolerant plants, such as spirea, crepe myrtle and burning bush. Above: Bret and Jennifer relax on the breezy front porch.

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The master bedroom features bedding created by Jennifer’s mother, incorporating a comforter from Tuesday Morning and natural materials from Cynthia East Fabrics. Walls are Sherwin-Williams’ Birdseye Maple. Facing page: Window treatments above the Maax tub are upcycled shower curtains from Pottery Barn. Discarded marble remnants form the bathroom countertops, mirrors are from Pottery Barn, and lighting is from Pro Builder Supply.

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SUSTAINABLE BUILDING Tips for green building from Bret and Jennifer Franks of Bret Franks Construction, Inc. t 5BOLMFTT XBUFS IFBUFST QSPWJEF IPU XBUFS PO EFNBOE GSPN BO FOFSHZ FGmDJFOU BOE TQBDF TBWJOH EFTJHO t 1FSGPSN B EVDU CMBTUFS UFTU PO ZPVS EVDU TZTUFN UP BDDVSBUFMZ NFBTVSF BJS MFBLBHF PG UIF EVDUXPSL t "TTVSF UIBU SFDFTTFE DBO MJHIUT BSF BJSUJHIU BOE JOTUBMM DPNQBDU nVPSFTDFOU MJHIU CVMCT JO UIF QMBDF PG JODBOEFTDFOU MJHIUJOH XIJDI VTFT NPSF FOFSHZ t " 5FDI4IJFME SPPG CBSSJFS CMPDLT IFBU GSPN FOUFSJOH UIF BUUJD MPXFSJOH FOFSHZ DPTUT BOE BEEJOH UP UIF DPNGPSU PG ZPVS IPNF t .JOJNJ[F UIF BNPVOU PG TPE PO ZPVS QSPQFSUZ BOE PQU GPS OBUJWF BOE ESPVHIU UPMFSBOU QMBOUT

Design Resources #VJMEFS Bret Franks Construction, Inc., Little Rock -BOETDBQF JOTUBMMBUJPO Natural State Landscaping, Vilonia "JS mMUSBUJPO TZTUFN Chenal Heating and Air, Little Rock #BUISPPN TJOL UJMF BOE HSBOJUF The Little Rock Flooring Company, Little Rock #SJDL Antique Brick, Little Rock $VSUBJOT LJUDIFO QFOEBOU MJHIUT Pottery Barn, locations statewide $VTUPN DBCJOFUT James Hardman, North Little Rock %JOJOH DIBJST Arkansas Grand Showroom, Clinton 'BVDFUT TIPXFS IFBE Arkansas Supply, Inc., North Little Rock 'MPPSJOH McGowan Hardwood Floors, Little Rock 'VSOJTIJOHT Dillard’s, locations statewide; Fabulous Finds Antiques, Little Rock -JHIUJOH Pro Builder Supply, Little Rock 0VUEPPS GVSOJTIJOHT Unpainted Furniture Center, Little Rock 1BJOU Sherwin-Williams, Benjamin Moore, locations statewide 3VHT Cobblestone & Vine, Little Rock 8JOEPXT EPPST Whit Davis Lumber, locations statewide

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2011

Arkansas’ Best

{

}

Top 10 Builders

At Home asked readers in an online survey to recommend their favorite builders statewide. Their top picks, listed alphabetically, include:

Bret Franks Construction, Inc., Little Rock Celtic Construction, Inc., Fayetteville Chuck Hamilton Construction, Inc., Little Rock Curtis Contracting, Inc., Little Rock Davis Construction, Harrison Josh Porter, Inc., Rogers Parkinson Building Group, Little Rock Richard Harp Homes, Little Rock River Valley Builders, Inc., Little Rock Sugg Homes, Jonesboro

Cast your vote for other Arkansas’ Best professionals at www.athomearkansas.com/arkansasbest a special at home in arkansas promotion

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CELTIC CONSTRUCTION, INC. Quality and tradition combine in the work of a well-seasoned construction company known for integrity and value

Celtic’s Home Pros: 1UALITY 0LUMBING s * - 2OOlNG 6ERSER #ABINETS s "OLT %LECTRIC Pianalto Heat & Air 263-4525 National Marble & Granite 530-3487

NAME: Celtic Construction, Inc. OWNER: Lee Scarlett TRADEMARKS: Celtic Construction, Inc., is a member of the Arkansas Better Business Bureau with an A+ rating for 11 consecutive years. Celtic Construction’s accolades include being an Energy Star Builder Partner, EPA Air Quality Builder and Bank of America approved builder, and it maintains a strong relationship with most of the local banks of Northwest Arkansas. HISTORY: As the 2010 Builder of the Year, Celtic Construction has been building homes in the beautiful area of Northwest Arkansas since 1994, with projects in the area’s premier subdivisions. Celtic Construction has been a proud member of the Home Builders Association, holding the position of state director for two years. The trusted company has also earned awards in 13 consecutive Parade of Homes, chairing the event in 2008 and 2009. Its applauded work has graced the pages of publications including CitiScapes, Celebrate, as well as the cover of Builder+Architect magazine, and been featured on the morning news. Recognized by peers, Celtic was nominated for Builder of the Year for the state of Arkansas in 2007. “Like� Celtic’s Facebook page, where new images are available each month. DESIGN ADVICE: Celtic Construction advocates quality, integrity and value, and caters to homeowners by “building on the tradition of European quality.�

#ELTIC #ONSTRUCTION )NC . -ARKET 3TE s &AYETTEVILLE s s WWW CELTICCUSTOMHOMES COM

CURTIS CONTRACTING, INC. A Little Rock builder with a hands-on approach draws on vast building experience & emphasizes sustainability NAME: Curtis Contracting, Inc. OWNER: Frank Curtis TRADEMARKS: Frank Curtis, the highly regarded president of Curtis

Contracting, Inc., specializes in new home construction and remodeling projects. Curtis is known for his hands-on approach, spending ample time on job sites in order to ensure a seamless, organized building process and the highest quality work. Well-versed in sustainable building practices, he is a CertiďŹ ed Green Professional, is earning his Graduate Master Builder designation, and is a member of the Green Built council behind the green model home located in Little Rock’s Woodlands Edge neighborhood. HISTORY: A transplant from Long Island, New York, Frank has been a proud Arkansas resident for 11 years, and his career in the home building and remodeling industry spans 27 years. He draws from a variety of experiences, with exposure to kitchen/bath design, carpentry, plumbing, lot prep and more, to serve clients as a well-rounded and reliable resource of expertise. GREEN TIPS: “Whether planning a remodel or a new home, it is imperative to hire a builder that is trained in the science of building green. We can help you understand the different aspects of green from material selection to building methods to affordability.â€? Curtis Contracting, Inc. FRANK CURTISCUSTOMHOMES COM s ,ITTLE 2OCK s www.curtiscustomhomes.com www.athomearkansas.com 67


LE DAVIS CONSTRUCTION Three generations of expertise combine at a Harrison building company focused on providing quality work NAME: LE Davis Construction OWNER: Larry and Linda Davis TRADEMARKS: We’re widely known for our expertise in residential,

commercial, plumbing, electrical excavation and utilities work. W.E. Davis had been in the remodeling and homebuilding business since the 1950s when Larry joined him in 1971 to form Davis Construction. After W.E. retired in 1980, Larry continued building primarily custom homes. In 1994, Larry’s son-in-law, Scot Matlock, joined the company and Davis Construction began developing subdivisions and condominiums. Larry’s wife, Linda, serves as designer and project manager for the custom homes, spec homes and commercial projects. Larry and Linda’s daughter, Tori Matlock, manages contracts, insurance and technology. Davis construction completes all excavation, plumbing, electrical and most framing and trim in-house. DESIGN ADVICE: Manage your debt, live within your means and treat your customers like you would your mother. Focus on the work, not the money, which is what we do at LE Davis Construction. GREEN TIPS: We recycle when possible. For instance, the local waste company will place a dumpster on the jobsite for cardboard. We have adopted ecofriendly practices for years, such as assuring all holes are caulked and sealed before installing insulation. HVAC contractors have told us they size our units smaller than that of our competitors. LE Davis Construction #OY 3TREET s (ARRISON s s WWW DAVISCONSTRUCTIONINC COM HISTORY:

BRET FRANKS CONSTRUCTION A well-respected CertiďŹ ed Green Professional has a penchant for integrity, superior quality and sustainable building practices NAME: Bret Franks Construction, Inc. OWNER: Bret and Jen Franks TRADEMARKS: No matter the price point, every home has character, charm and quality that will stand the test of time. HISTORY: Bret

Franks Construction, Inc., has been building homes in central Arkansas for more than a decade, earning recognition for integrity, superior quality and attention to detail. Bret Franks began his career as an accountant, became a CertiďŹ ed Public Accountant and worked for two Fortune 500 companies, Georgia-PaciďŹ c and Alltel, before beginning his construction business. This experience brings sound ďŹ nancial sense and professionalism to each project. Franks is very active in the construction industry. He is currently president of the Home Builders Association of Greater Little Rock, a member of the board of directors to the National Association of Home Builders, and a CertiďŹ ed Green Professional. DESIGN ADVICE: When selecting a custom homebuilder, spend time researching. The price of the home is important; however, quality and service are equally critical factors. GREEN TIPS: As a CertiďŹ ed Green Professional, Bret Franks is proud to have built the ďŹ rst silver level green home in Arkansas as certiďŹ ed by the NAHB. Important aspects of green building include using what the land provides, incorporating porches, tree shading and house orientation; and also minimizing construction material waste through proper planning and recycling. Bret Franks Construction ,ITTLE 2OCK s s WWW BRETFRANKS COM 68

At Home in Arkansas


RICHARD HARP CONSTRUCTION The difference is in the details with Richard Harp, whose unique design-build process makes building or remodeling your dream home a pleasant experience NAME: Richard Harp Construction OWNER: Richard Harp TRADEMARKS: Richard works very closely with his clients while offer-

ing exceptional service during and after the project. His education in ďŹ nance brings a solid perspective to the estimating, cost analysis and budgeting phase of his unique design-build process. With impeccable honesty and undeniable fairness, Richard takes great pride in high quality craftsmanship, cost-conscious construction and solid structural integrity. Blending energy efďŹ cient architectural design, advanced project management and his signature quality construction, he ensures the creation of your special home. Achieving your vision while exceeding your expectations is his forte. HISTORY: Richard holds a Bachelors degree in Finance and an M.B.A from the University of Arkansas. He is a professional member of the Home Builder’s Association having served as President of both the Greater Little Rock and the State Associations. In 2010, Richard was a co-builder of the ďŹ rst Arkansas home built with the Gold designation of the National Green Building Standard. Richard holds both the Graduate Master Builder and the CertiďŹ ed Green Professional designations along with 17 years construction management experience. DESIGN ADVICE: Richard guides his clients through the GreenBuilt process to create a home that ensures energy efďŹ ciency, water and resource conservation, indoor environmental quality and site design in addition to providing homeowner education. Richard Harp Construction #HENAL 0ARKWAY 3TE s ,ITTLE 2OCK s CELL s WWW RICHARDHARPHOMES COM

RIVER VALLEY BUILDERS, INC. Helmed by a CertiďŹ ed Green Professional, River Valley Builders prides itself on customer satisfaction while saving energy and protecting the environment NAME: River Valley Builders, Inc. OWNER: Nathan Cooper, CertiďŹ ed Green Professional as designated by the National Association of Home Builders TRADEMARKS: We pride ourselves on building lasting relationships based on quality, integrity, value and customer satisfaction. This is accomplished through one on one interaction beginning at the plan design and cost estimation and continues through the warranty period. HISTORY: Cooper graduated from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock with a bachelor’s degree in construction management in 2003. After serving as vice president of Woodhaven Homes in Sherwood from 2004 - 2010, he founded River Valley Builders, Inc. DESIGN ADVICE: You don’t have to spend a lot of money to incorporate “greenâ€? items into your house. There are several things that will save you money on a monthly basis and reduce your utility bills with little impact on the overall cost. GREEN TIPS: Our environmentally-friendly measures include tankless hot water heaters, vinyl Energy Star tilt sash windows with low-E Argon gas glass and high-efďŹ ciency variable speed cooling systems. Any of these green aspects will deďŹ nitely make a positive impact on your home and the environment. River Valley Builders, Inc. 7HITE /AK ,ANE s ,ITTLE 2OCK s s RIVERVALLEYBUILDERSINC GMAIL COM www.athomearkansas.com 69


PARKINSON BUILDING GROUP, INC. Skilled professionals focus on client satisfaction throughout the building process, incorporating ecofriendly practices along the way NAME: Parkinson Building Group, Inc. OWNER: Bill Parkinson TRADEMARKS: At Parkinson Building Group, our goals are to

create the best possible building experience for our clients and to make the journey as smooth and enjoyable as possible. No two homes are the same, and no two clients will follow the same path to reach their ďŹ nal objective. HISTORY: Founded in 1999, Parkinson Building Group is comprised of four employees, recently adding Dan Parkinson as vice president of operations. A small staff allows a continuation of the philosophy to always be client centric, working closely with clients from the identiďŹ cation of the lot, to development and pricing of the plan, to the building and creation of the vision. DESIGN ADVICE: When choosing your builder, do your homework and make informed decisions. Your home is a big investment, and there is a difference. GREEN TIPS: While we have always used eco-friendly materials in our projects, we are deďŹ nitely seeing more of our clients than ever before incorporating large green initiatives. A few of the green building aspects we are using include ICF walls, geothermal products, green insulation packages, low volatility products, as well as assessing the total carbon footprint of homes through the responsible sourcing of our materials. Parkinson Building Group, Inc. 0 / "OX s ,ITTLE 2OCK s s WWW BLOG PARKINSONBUILDINGGROUP COM

2011

Arkansas’ Best

{Go online & vote!} Cast your vote for other Arkansas’ Best professionals and give your preferred resources the credit they deserve.

www.athomearkansas.com/arkansasbest

Online now:

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Arkansas’ Best Realtors Arkansas’ Best Interior Designers


PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY NOLAN/STYLING: MANDY KEENER

GOING GREEN

Greener living is a shopping trip away, thanks to a slew of local designers and eco-conscious businesses, including a few Conway favorites. Look for antique and vintage finds, sustainable materials and upcycled products to fill your home and wardrobe with character while lessening the environmental impact. Men’s

apparel shirt bag. Haus Werk, Little Rock; Alternative Earth shirt, Glass Acorn by Chris Boyd zipper brooch, Sypria by Tara Fletcher dryer balls. The Green Corner Store, Little Rock www.athomearkansas.com 71


ECO-FRIENDLY FASHION Natural + Vintage

SILK JACKET Winter Kate. Lola Boutique, Fayetteville

Local + Vintage

VINTAGE NECKLACE Grey Dog, Fayetteville

BLOUSE A.L.C. Lola Boutique, Fayetteville

MAXI DRESS Nouvelle by Esque. Lola Boutique, Fayetteville

WHITE LACE FEATHER EARRINGS Jeweliany. Lola Boutique, Fayetteville

SEA TURTLE EYE PALETTE Chantecaille. Glo Limited, Little Rock

TROUSER PANTS Agave Denim. Lola Boutique, Fayetteville

BANGLES Jeweliany. Lola Boutique, Fayetteville

PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY NOLAN/PRODUCED BY: PAULETTE PEARSON

Rethink your wardrobe with vintage, natural or locally designed styles

VINTAGE BAG Grey Dog, Fayetteville

MINERAL HAND CREAM Ahava. Glo Limited, Little Rock

SANDALS Dolce Vita. Beyond Cotton II, Little Rock NAIL POLISH Aruba Blue by Essie. Glo Limited, Little Rock 72

At Home in Arkansas

NAIL POLISH Coral Reef by Essie. Glo Limited, Little Rock HEELS Dolce Vita. Lola Boutique, Fayetteville


Natural + Local + Vintage

Joyous & Free • Big Buddha • Flax Brighton • Tribal • Lynn Ritchie VINTAGE CUFF B Aston. Beyond Cotton I, Little Rock

TANK DRESS Flax. Beyond Cotton I, Little Rock

2020 Central Avenue • Hot Springs

501-321-9168

ZIPPER BROOCH Glass Acorn by Chris Boyd. The Green Corner Store, Little Rock

NECKLACE AND STRAW HAT Beyond Cotton I, Little Rock

The Promenade at Chenal (next to Bravo) Inspirational Green Living Boutique Organic Kitchen | Home Décor Non-Toxic Kids Products VALE Soaps and Scrubs | Custom Jewelry Designer Totes and Bags

Community. Conservation. Commitment. LIP GLOSS Bare Escentuals. Glo Limited, Little Rock SANDALS Dolce Vita. Beyond Cotton II, Little Rock

Follow Us on Facebook & Twitter: EcoFabStoreLR

www.ecofabstore.com

501.821.3171 Book your next fundraiser or shopping party with us!

www.athomearkansas.com 73


THE GREEN SCENE By Paulette Pearson

In the heart of The Natural State, the Conway community is embracing what it means to be environmentally friendly

PHOTOGRAPHY: LAURA LARUE

Conway designer Helen Lockhart of Red Chaise Designs

The Village at Hendrix

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At Home in Arkansas

At Home accompanied Conway designer Helen Lockhart of Red Chaise Designs on a morning visit to her favorite hometown haunts, many of which delighted us with their eco-friendly practices. With a decade-long career in interior design— new home construction, renovations and home staging—Lockhart is supportive of her community. Using local businesses as her venue, she hosts a design seminar series, discussing the interior design process and “hopefully empowering people to take on the design challenges in their home confidently,” she says. (For information, 501-908-9388, helen@redchaise.com, www.redchaise.com) First stop? THE VILLAGE AT HENDRIX (1600 Washington Ave., 501-764-1109, www. thevillageathendrix.com), where we toured the model home Lockhart designed to have a comfortable, modern cottage feel. The walkable community combines residences, commercial amenities, parks and trails with a commitment to green building principles. Another example of an eco-minded business within The Village is ZAZA FINE SALAD AND WOOD OVEN PIZZA CO. (1050 Ellis Ave., 501-3369292, www.zazapizzaandsalad.com), where salads and pizza are chock full of local ingredients and served using biodegradable and compostable plates, utensils and to-go bags.


COME SEE WHAT DOWNTOWN CONWAY HAS IN STORE FOR YOU!

RENEWED & REVIVED

estate jewelry t custom upholstery one-of-a-kind pieces restored solid mahogany furniture BOBBIE’S ANTIQUES 1015 Oak Street t Downtown Conway 501-327-7125

A little something FOR YOU

RECEIVE A PANDORA LARIAT WITH PURCHASE

'IFT 7ITH 0URCHASE p &OR THE -ONTH OF *ULY Receive a PANDORA Lariat with sterling silver ends (a $25 US retail value) with your purchase of $50 or more of PANDORA jewelry.* *Charms shown on lariat are sold separately. Good while supplies last, limit one per customer.

PARK PLAZA MALL 501.663.9800

Sterling Silver charms from $25

www.athomearkansas.com 75


Rose Cottage

EM Jeans

Along Oak Street, the hub of Conway’s shopping and dining, we ventured to EM JEANS (1100 Oak St., 501-329-6253, www.emjeans.com), a locally owned and popular destination for men and women’s clothing with attitude, as well as uber-stylish accessories, jewelry and shoes. If you have a weakness for jewelry, PIZZAZZ (1120 Oak St., 501-329-2922) is also a Lockhart-recommended stop in the area. With a penchant for home design, we made our next destination ROSE COTTAGE (1101 Oak St., 501-3274111), where being greeted by home accessories of every shape, size and style, including locally made Miller’s Mud Mill pottery, satiated our appetite for house wares. We also checked out nearby JENIFER’S ANTIQUES (1003 Oak St., 501-764-1311), which reaffirmed our belief that vintage and antique finds are not just easier on the environment, but also more unique. “I found an old, beautifully hand-carved claw foot table, which I had repaired and stained,” Lockhart says. “It adds more character than a brand new piece.” Within Jenifer’s Antiques, we

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Hambuchen Home Furnishings Jenifer’s Antiques

Cross Creek Sandwich Shop

GREEN GETAWAY

Pictures Et Cetera Fine Art Gallery

Pondering your next vacation? Lockhart suggests an escape to Petit Jean Mountain’s Cadron Settlement Park. Located on a bluff next to the Arkansas River, it’s where she and her family go to savor the great outdoors, and it’s a great local alternative to a longdistance trip that will increase your carbon footprint.


MORE } { THERE’S ONLINE...

More than a Kitchen Store!

THE KITCHEN STORE ,OCUST 3T s #ONWAY s 501-327-2182 -ONDAY 3ATURDAY A M P M

#OMPLIMENTARY 'IFT 7RAP s 0ERSONAL #USTOMER 3ERVICE

#HECK US OUT ON &ACEBOOK

Photo: Warren Prairie Š The Nature Conservancy

Don’t Just Go Green. (SAVE SOME, TOO!)

Blog blog.athomearkansas.com

Facebook /athomeinarkansasmagazine

Twitter @athomearkansas

Since its founding in 1951, The Nature Conservancy has conserved more than 119 million acres around the globe, including more than 280,000 acres in Arkansas.

Make a difference. Help keep Arkansas the “Natural State.� Learn how you can join thousands of others in supporting The Nature Conservancy’s work in Arkansas.

Nature.org/Arkansas 501.663.6699

www.athomearkansas.com Like us on Facebook!

The Nature Conservancy of Arkansas www.athomearkansas.com 77


{ Restaurants } The margaritas at CACTUS JACK’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT (755 Club Ln., 501-730-0022) are a main draw for Lockhart.

ZaZa Fine Salad and Wood Oven Pizza Co.

A favorite for a girls’ night out, MICHELANGELO’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE (1117 Oak St., 501-329-7278, www. michelangelosconway.com) is ideal for chatting over pasta, fresh salads and brick-oven pizzas. The New Orleans-inspired atmosphere at MIKE’S PLACE (808 Front St., 501-269-6453, www.mikesplaceconway. com), serving seafood, steak and more, makes for an enchanting dinner date destination. OAK STREET BISTRO (800 4th Ave., 501-450-9908, www. oakstreetbistro.net) uses the freshest ingredients, sustainable seafood and all natural, no-antibiotic added chicken.

The Kitchen Store

An Arkansas original since 1980, STOBY’S (805 Donaghey Ave., 501-327-5447, www.stobys.com) is famous for its original cheese dip, but the breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert offerings are also widely loved. A family-friendly favorite is U.S. PIZZA CO. (710 Front St., 501-450-9700, www.uspizzaconway.net), serving pizzas, sandwiches and salads. You haven’t lived until you’ve tried the house dressing.

succumbed to CROSS CREEK SANDWICH SHOP’S (1003 Oak St., 501-764-1811) homemade sweet treats, including its famous strawberry cake and cookies. Continuing our quest for home furnishings, we made our way to renowned HAMBUCHEN HOME FURNISHINGS (Harkrider & 2nd St., 501-327-6523, www.hambuchens. com), zigzagging through its array of offerings— Henredon, a new European collection and more—in a range of prices and styles. Lockhart also recommends perusing the selection at family-owned CAJUN BROTHERS (627 Front St., 501-336-9497, www.cajunbrothersfurniture. com). And when it comes time to deck the walls, be sure to check out PICTURES ET CETERA FINE ART GALLERY (572 Chestnut St., 501-327-8278, www.picturesetcetera.com), showcasing an expertly curated selection of art, featuring local works by Arden Boyce, Barry Thomas, Jason Huselton and Gloria Garrison.

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{

}

At Home in Arkansas Design Favorites

BOBBIE’S ANTIQUES (1015 Oak St., 501-327-7125) is where to turn for one-of-a-kind pieces, including furnishings owner Bobbie Rogers revives and reupholsters with expert skill. Keep an eye out for estate jewelry as well. Truly, it doesn’t get much better than THE KITCHEN STORE (704 Locust St., 501-3272182), especially if you have an affinity for cooking, baking and entertaining. Stylish tableware, cookware, cookbooks and more line the vast open shelves, making for a fun and inspiring shopping experience. The At Home team never misses an opportunity to visit SOMETHING BLUE PAPERIE (1014 Oak St., 501327-4258), whether we’re on the hunt for stationery, party items or gifts, such as Vera Bradley goods with pretty patterns.


ARKANSAS MADE 1. INTERIOR TAILOR Imagine your own monogram on this elegantly crafted ottoman, available in several styles and fabrics. It’s the attention to detail that makes great design. Available at Interior Tailor, Little Rock. (501) 224-2300 2. WILKERSON JEWELERS Style meets function in this Rich-n-Tone acrylic duck call with custom made 14-karat gold band—a thoughtful gift for the outdoorsman in your life to keep and to cherish. $975. Available at Wilkerson Jewelers, Stuttgart. (870) 673-4441 3. MILLER’S MUD MILL Hand-crafted pottery is Gail Miller’s forte, and her latest collection, Shabby Chic, is no exception. Be sure to get your hands on a few of these beautiful and unique pieces before they’re snatched up. Available at Miller’s Mud Mill, Dumas. (870) 382-5277

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4. SCENTATIONS What better way to add ambiance to your home décor than with candles, choose from ten exclusive fragrances, hand-poured into beautiful terracotta urns. A perfect gift for any occasion or enjoy around the house everyday. Available at Park Hill Home, Little Rock or scentations.com

a special at home in arkansas promotion

www.athomearkansas.com 79


At Home with Rodney Collins OCCUPATION: Architect and owner of Ecohouse Architecture and Construction. I’m a LEED-accredited professional and a pledged Energy Star partner. BEST KNOWN FOR: Being interested in the ecology of architecture long before green standards came around. My buildings work for my clients’ lifestyles, aesthetics and their landscapes. I spend a lot of time with my clients figuring out how they use their home and how we can make it efficient. LIVES IN: A 1920s Craftsman bungalow in a neighborhood with plenty of fellow gardeners. We’re restoring our home—as an architect, I’m constantly remodeling. MY FAVORITE PART OF MY HOUSE: I actually have two. One is my front yard. It’s all vegetables and flowers; I removed the grass. The other is our library. It’s at the center of the house, and it was a utility room you had to go through to get to the kitchen. Now it has bookcases and two archways, which is much more appealing to walk through to get to other parts of the house. I’M MOST AT HOME: Painting with watercolors or making a computer model or gardening. I get lost in the process while I’m doing anything creative.

Photography: Nancy Nolan 80


The Keifer Room Group and Charlotte Chair

THE RECLINERS WERE ONLY THE BEGINNING.

Little Rock la-z-boy.com/littlerock 501-224-4624

Springdale la-z-boy.com/springdale 479-725-0777

Š2011 La-Z-Boy Incorporated