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GRADUATE PORTFOLIO NATALIA CHETVERNINA 2010-2013


Natalia Chetvernina

Master of Architecture, 2013 College of Built Environment, University of Washington Contact: chetvernina.n@gmail.com www.linkedin.com/in/chetvernina/


STUDIO PROJECTS 5 UNIVERSTIY HEIGHTS HUB & CO-HOUSING COMMUNITY, U-DISTRICT, SEATTLE: FALL 2012 15 GREYHOUND BUS TERMINAL, DOWNTOWN SEATTLE: WINTER 2011 21 ADAPTIVE REUSE OF THE SUPPLY LAUNDRY BUILDING, SEATTLE: SPRING 2011 27 SAAS SCIENCE CLASSROOMS, CAPITOL HILL, SEATTLE: WINTER 2012 35 INCREMENTAL DEVELOPMENT: ADAPTIVE REUSE OF NEW HOLLAND ISLAND, ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA: WINTER 2013 39 TRAVEL SKETCHES

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CO - H O USI N G

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PR O M OT E SO CIAL I N T ER AC T I O N

IC OM ON

UN I V ER SI T Y H EI G H T S HUB Cooperative, Ecologically-sound and Socially-just community

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SHAR ED R E SO U R CE S

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SOCIAL

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ENVIRONMENTAL

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PR O M OT E SM ALL BUSI N E SSE S & LOW ER COS T O F LI V I N G

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ECONOMICS

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ECO - D IS T R I C T V ISI O NS

SOCIAL

view from alleyway towards co-housing and stairwell connection to street level


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A SSEM A SSEM BL ED BL ED C O M M CO UM N IMT U Y NHI U TY B HUB

D ISPER D ISPER SED SED

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E X IST ING E XCONDI IST INGT ION CONDI T ION 1 Miles

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UN I V ER SI T Y HEIGHTS 10

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PROJECT IN COLLABORATION WITH STUDENT NANCY CHAN

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PUBLIC PLACE PUBLIC LIFE STUDIO

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UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS HUB & COHOUSING COMMUNITY

This project focused on the block to the east of University Heights Center and the University District farmers market— two important cultural assets in U-District. The overall concept is to strengthen these assets by creating a stronger community node while establishing a robust public space network at various scales. At the block scale, three major conditions were explored: stregthening the sectional relationship of the upper alley to the street, supporting the existing small-scale businesses, and CON TCON EX TTEX T incorporating community education programs at University Heights. The proposed solutions involved re-thinking the street and its edges, configuring a cohousing scheme on the second level, and activating the alley with artisan workshops. After creating the proposal for the entire block, we chose to focus on the detailed design of the transitional zone between the public scale to the more private neighborhood scale. The area serves not just as a mid-block connection but also as a public space for a community to grow by inviting people to pause, interact and gather.

L IGHT R A IL STAT ION

45T H ST

AC T I V I T Y L E V EL H IGH

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LOW

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CON T E X T

D ISPER SED E X IST ING CONDI T ION

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0.125

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Collaborative studio with landscape architecture department and Gehl Architects. Instructors Nancy Rottle, Jim Nicholls, and Bianca Hermansen

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existing street elevation: local small businesses Under-utilized alley and rooftops

Street dominated by car traffic and parking

Community center surrounded by sea of parking

Phase 1: • •

Temorary intervention to access and activate rooftops Street and alley intervention

Pedestrian alley revitalized “Complete” street: pedestian and bike priority, transit, and cars

Phase 2: • • •

Celebrated by sea of community P-Patches

Strairway connection to alley North section of retail and co-housing units Subsidized relocation of local businesses to the North section of retail

New co-housing community

Phase 3: •

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South section of retail and co-housing units


6 7 10 7 City scale District scale Neighborhood scale B To future Light Rail Hub

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PUBLIC SPACE SCALES

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semipublic

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semipublic

private

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CONCEPT OF TRANSITION BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

1. Co-housing event space 2. Dining room 3. Kitchen 4. Workshop space/tools 5. Children area 6. Co-housing units 7. Artist lofts 8. Repaved street 9. Bioswale 10. P-patches 11. Farmers’ market

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64

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128 ft

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SITE PLAN

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Year-round farmer’s market

Educational classes

Community p-patch

High density of small local businesses

Rooftop access from alley

Residential entrances connections to alley EXISTING CONDITIONS

E X IST ING E -W SEC T ION

UPPER A L L E Y

UN I V ER SI T Y HEIGHTS

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UN I V ER S I T Y WAY

EXISTING STREET SECTION


U P P E R A L LE Y

U - HE IGH TS COM M U NIT Y C E N TE R

UN IVERS IT Y WAY 0

Street and P-patches

Street retail

Inner courtyard

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8 ft

Alley between artists lofts and existing residences

NEW EDGE CONDITIONS

UPPER ALLEY

SECTION A U - HE IG HTS COM M U NIT Y C E N T ER

UN IVERS IT Y AVENU E 0

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8 ft

City scale District scale Neighborhood scale

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FARMER S MARKE T VISI TOR S

CO - HOUSING RE SIDEN T S

NIGH T L IFE CROWD

HOMEL E S S

USERS

U P P E R A L LE Y

SECTION B U - H E IGH TS COM M U N IT Y C E N TE R

UN IVERS IT Y WAY 0

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view to the midblock stair connection

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COLLABORATIVE PROCESS This studio was a unique experience. It started with a two week trip to Copenhagen, Denmark - a city which turned itself around from being automobile-dominated to creating successful urban developments supporting public life, pedestrians and cyclists, and rejuvinating life on the streets at all scales. Guided study and observation of the city practices through Gehl Architects office was a major part of the program. Upon return to Seattle, similar analysis and criticism was conducted in the U-District neighborhood, working collectively as a class to form a proposal for an overall vision of the U-District area. A specific project then was undertaken as a collaborative effort with another landscape student, Nancy Chan, from the initial conceptual development to the final presentation. Always working in a team of two, the process and culmination of the project was extremely rewarding and educational.

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main elevation on Boren Avenue


SEATTLE GREYHOUND BUS TERMINAL

TECTONICS STUDIO

This project strives to achieve two aspects for downtown Seattle: bringing a celebratory arrival for travelers and creating a vibrant public streetscape for the neighborhood. The bus waiting zone and the pedestrian street zone are integrated under a main steel structure and the roof canopy it supports. Within this structure different types of activities are hosted (“plug-ins”) : benches for seating, food vendors, technological plug-ins, newspaper stands, ticketing counters, etc. The main Greyhound station program is also “plugged-in” under the main structure and hosts administration and support spaces. Stretched out along the entire city block, the structure aims to create a busy city life by bringing and mixing the people on the street with Greyhound Terminal activity. It is at once a bus stop, a public market, a street, and an icon for the city.

tectonic studio with Rick Mohler, winter2011

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Howell Street

Stewart Street

Terminal Plug-ins

Boren Avenue

Street Plug-ins

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ATM

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site plan


Boren Avenue street view

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Boren Avenue

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concourse

sidewalk

food vendors ticket counters seating a swing advertising ATM

waiting arrivals/departures baggage storage drivers’ services administration

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1. typical structural bays 2. street plug-in prototype: counter 3. terminal plug-in prototype: bench

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bus loading

bus alley


TECTONIC EXPLORATION

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A repeated moment frame and a ‘kit of parts’ of steel components make up the structural bays. The canopy is attached to the main A-frame by cables support. In most cases, the frame is unconditioned open street space and is covered by a rain enclosure of polycarbonate panels in a shingle-type construction.

Adaptive components modeled in Revit based on certain parameters. Each piece is an example of a street-front “plug-in” type , a bench and a counter types.

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STREET VIEWS AND SECTION construction details: typical bays

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outdoor public space: between the old and the new


ADAPTIVE REUSE OF HISTORIC SUPPLY LAUNDRY BUILDING

SUSTAINABILITY STUDIO

The neighborhood in this part of Seattle has been growing in the number of apartment complexes and residences. The project to reuse an existing historic laundry facility focuses on bringing new elements: a food market and restaurant, co-op offices, community room, and a community theater. Inspired by Carlo Scarpa’s projects such as the Castelvecchio in Verona, as well as his design process, this project is a series of new interventions as careful incisions within the existing building structure. Creating a vibrant public space for the new residents in the neighborhood was also one of the focuses in this project. Embodied energy analysis was performed as part of the sustainable studio, as well as daylighting and ventilation considerations.

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1.food market 2. market outdoor terrace 3. restaurant 4. community room 5. lobby to theater 6. cafe 7. outdoor public space 8. loading 9. restrooms

256 85 Reusing existing structure: tonnes CO2 equivalent studio with Kathryn Merlino and David Strauss, Spring 2011

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1. market spill-over terrace 2. public space 3. cafe rooftop 4. residential rooftop

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shadow range: summer day

co-op offices

food market

shadow range: winter day existing coal chute adapted for air intake

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development of outdoor spaces: daylighting studies


cross section A

cross section B

longitudinal section 1

plan:street level

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existing condition: boiler room

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building’s character development: new interventions within existing


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main entrance: view looking from E Spring Street


COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

comprehensive studio with David Miller, Winter 2012

13TH AVENUE

12TH AVENUE

SEATTLE ART AND SCIENCE ACADEMY SCIENCE CLASSROOMS

SAAS stands out as different kind of high school in that it encourages students’ curiousity, collaboration, and performance. The programmatic response focused on creating a common space which would act as a performance stage, a main lobby for this part of campus and main circulation. Display and transparency to the rest of the school as well as the street was also important to SAAS. A connection “bridge” is made between the arts part of the school; off the main circulation, a porchlike space is created as a workshop/fabrication space which would be used by both science and arts students. The four science classrooms are in an interlocking “L”s configuration, which allows for a shared outdoor space, interior atrium space for ventilation and light, and a shared prep area.

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E SPRING STREET 1. existing gym 2. existing arts building 3. new science building 4. new connection: fabrication porch/bridge

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classrooms/labs prep area

13th Ave

common space/lobby

Final scheme

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E Spring Street

program and massing development

fabrication shop faculty office seminar room projects rooms


section A: Arts Building to 13th Avenue

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wc bioswale natural systems

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rain water collection system


fresh air

steel and wood structural system

exhaust

mechanical systems: ventilation for labs

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level 2

1 lobby view

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3 level 1

13th Avenue

2 approach from arts building

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E Spring Street

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street level

Daylighting was considered as a significant part in the design process. After initial schematic design, the typical classroom was studied more closely. Several interations are shown here with false color images rendered in Radiance to show how the design evolved. The challenge was to achieve a well-lit (400 lux minimum) space with uniform light and reduced glare.


3 typical classroom

Original design. May 21 Sunny afternoon

Clear skylight and overhang. May 21 Sunny afternoon

Translucent skylight and light shelf. May 21 Sunny afternoon

Translucent skylight and light shelf. May 21 Rendered image

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section view through historic warehouse bay


INCREMENTAL DEVELOPMENT: NEW HOLLAND ISLAND IN ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA

THESIS PROJECT

There is a large amount of deteriorated and abandoned fabric in St. Petersburg - almost ruins, experienced in a non-museum setting. The thesis argued that these types of ‘quiet’ places are just as important in the city center as the busy commercial and cultural attractions. Deteriorated and largely underused, they have certain qualities of silence and mystery and serve as a counterbalance to the hectic display and presentation of the city’s commercial and cultural assets. How can these abandoned places be redeveloped for contemporary life in a way that is sensitive to their character? The thesis project proposed a different kind of approach from what is typical today: a framework for incremental development within historic buildings, which sets up an infrastructure to support future uses, where inhabitants can appropriate the historic fabric and make use of it with small scale interventions accreting over time. New Holland Island, a deteriorated military naval site in the city center, was selected as the thesis site. The thesis included analysis of the island, a discussion of a theoretical framework for an incremental approach to intervention and a design proposal that demonstrates the framework.

existing bridges proposed connections and interior path proposed exterior path area of detailed focus

thesis committe: David Strauss and Jeffrey Ochsner, Spring 2013

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Exterior views: approach to the site

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Conceptual diagram: horizontal and vertical circulation to support new users over time

Structural system for inserting new infrastructure within historic masonry bays

Material details of new insertions: concrete bridge, steel system, roof

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Italy: Rome


TRAVEL SKETCHES

ROME VERONA BARCELONA

University of Washington quarter in Rome program: 2011

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Barcelona, Verona


Natalia Chetvernina

Master of Architecture, 2013 College of Built Environment, University of Washington Contact: chetvernina.n@gmail.com www.linkedin.com/in/chetvernina/

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