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December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 1


President

Michael Crummitt Crummitt and Son Vault Company Martins Ferry, OH

President-Elect

Jerry Russell Southern Ohio Vault Company Portsmouth, OH

Secretary/Treasurer Mark Bates Norwalk Wilbert Vault Co. Bridgeport, CT

Immediate Past President

Hubert McQuestion Lake Shore Burial Vault Company Brookfield, WI

Directors

Edwin Bruns Bruns Norwalk Vault St. Louis, MO Paul Cooper Cooper Wilbert Vault Co. Barrington, NJ Steve Handley Handley Precast Systems Glendale, AZ Curt Shannon SI Funeral Services Ennis, TX Greg Tilley Ideal Burial Vault Company Depew, NY

Affiliate Directors

Dave Long Eagle Burial Vault Association Joliet, IL Blake Swinford Trigard/Greenwood Plastics Danville, IL Steve Vincent Doric Products, Inc. Marshall, IL Terry Whitlock Wilbert Funeral Services, Inc. Broadview, IL

Association Management Kimberly A. Fantaci Executive Director

Ric Kirchner Association Executive

Donald A. Mounce, APR The Bulletin Editor

Richard L. Martin Magazine Production Manager 2 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

J. Scott Calkins, Esq. Legal Counsel

National Concrete Burial Vault Association (NCBVA) 136 South Keowee Street | Dayton, OH 45402 (888) 88-NCBVA | Fax (937) 222-5794 info@ncbva.org | www.ncbva.org

Table of Contents 4 8 13 17 19 21 22

Team Building Focus

Your Team Building Exercises May Not Be Creating a Team By Kevin E. O’Connor, CSP.

Safety Focus

Handling “BOB”!

By Ron Overton, Overton Safety Training, Inc.

Pre-Convention

February 13-15, 2014 | Houston, Texas

OSHA Focus

Hazardous Communication

Association Matters Industry News NCBVA Membership

ON THE COVER

The staff of Chesapeake Burial Vault Company, in Barclay, Maryland, is committed to safety, especially when servicing vaults in the cemetery. In this photo, a Trigard® Trilogy® burial vault is lowered into place.

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December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 3


FOCUS TEAM BUILDING

Your Team-Building Exercises May Not Be Creating a Team

By Kevin E. O’Connor, CSP

Team leaders have a perennial dilemma: how a cooperative relationship that seeks to align can we educate, engage and develop our goals, minimize a judgmental response, and group in a substantial way that helps the team keep the momentum going (even during the become better? “Team-building” is often seen naturally-tough times that are bound to come). as the fun add-on to a meeting devoted to The commitment of marriage, for example, science, sales figures, and quarterly goals. is symbolized by an engagement ring. In These can include a ropes course, golf, a business, commitment is demonstrated with trip to the desert, horseback riding, softball, a signed letter or contract. In both instances, a cooking school, and the like. Were these engagement is an agreement that both parties experiences useful will move forward and toward the goal? If the seek more specific Building a team requires three basic goal is fun, distraction agreements. When or an open afternoon, people are engaged (in elements, and they are the same then these experiences both the marital and perpetual needs that all team leaders create shared memories business context), there have: engagement, education, and and are often a welcome is an interior feeling of opportunity. security that assures development…all with a twist But, the goal is each person that they rarely just to have a fun will work together. afternoon. Leaders want teams to trust better, This agreement cannot be secured in to understand at a deeper level, and certainly one event. Just as hospitals have a heart to communicate with one another in useful monitor on every patient, team leaders must ways beyond one afternoon. constantly monitor the tell-tale signs of stress, Building a team requires three basic unrest, and frustration. This involves listening elements, and they are the same perpetual to what the team says and what they don’t needs that all team leaders have: say, and, maybe, what they cannot say. engagement, education, and development…all Here is the twist: listening closely to both with a twist. the words and the feelings of your team members allows you, as the leader, and those who work for you to feel your engagement. Engagement…with a twist Sometimes it’s simple – like a handshake Paraphrasing and empathy are the perennial, – and other times it’s complex – like highly reliable skills that will help you steer securing buy-in for a high-dollar project – but clear of becoming judgmental. When you are in tune with your team engagement always involves obtaining a “yes” from the other person. This agreement begins members’ unique “heartbeats” of 4 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

TEAM BUILDING FOCUS engagement, you will know when somebody becomes an outlier. Only then can you use your other skills to bring them back aboard.

Team-building activities don’t typically involve teaching the skills of extraordinary customer service, improv acting, fine dining or food preparation. Yet one executive used all four to teach his team of pharmaceutical scientists how to reflect on personalities, roles and goals. These field trips also resulted in a well-formed team, seriously fun engagement and a memorable experience beyond any ordinary team meeting:

Education…with a twist l A scavenger hunt focused on branding that included visits to Too many meetings Chicago’s Four Seasons hotel, Bloomingdales department are based on lectures. store, and the Disney store. This repetitive structure l At Second City, the famous improv school and theater, actors might have worked for taught techniques to ensure that the team leaned the value multiplication tables in of saying “yes” on stage. primary school, but no longer. When teaching l Advanced lessons in mealtime etiquette at fancy restaurants adults, presenters prepared the team to impress clients anywhere in the world. actually waste valuable l A master chef taught and showed the team how a first-class educative time thinking kitchen operated smoothly in the midst of chaos. that dumping data, Each activity was designed to build the team, increase spreadsheets, bullet interpersonal skills and create a useful memory. Not one of points, and manuals onto these activities was done for its own sake, just for “fun,” or to people will somehow simply fill the time. Unlike so many “team-building” events that enlighten them. can be downloaded from the Internet, each actually built the The word “education” team even after the team-building event finished. comes from the Latin word “educare,” which future, and then had the expert facilitator means “to lead out” or “draw forth from.” give a 10-12 minute reflection on each of Socrates knew this when he asked questions the concerns in order to “draw forth from” his students. l Simply have a Q&A session While this might make sense on paper, it is l The expert asked the audience questions, a more significant shift in how we can really guiding the team toward answering the envision meetings. question “What do we need to do to preWe still, by and large, run our meetings with pare for the future we want to make?” a speaker or presenter who often says, “Is it OK if I take questions later?” These people Here is the twist: when we ignore that will then read their PowerPoint aloud, droning education is really about drawing forth from on and on, while the audience pre-reads each our collective experience, we waste incredible slide and then waits for the presenter to resources already present in our teams. finish. Instead of a 60-90 minute lecture, what if… Witnessing this collective knowledge is a strong formative element for a team. This is l The presenter didn’t see this as “my time,” often what scientists experience working on a but saw “our time” as an opportunity for project during a “think tank” session, or what the team to talk with one another about the a Broadway cast feels on opening night. essence of the issues l The team divided into groups of three, brainstormed three or four concerns for the

Development…with a twist This is the most important, yet most often December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 5


TEAM BUILDING FOCUS

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ignored, element when building a team. In an effort to move forward quickly, many leaders start sharing the “takeaways” from the experience before the team has caught their breath. When team leaders say, “I hope that you realized this horseback riding taught us to better listen to one another just as we did with our horses,” they risk the team saying, “What? I thought we just learned there’s some beautiful scenery here!” Instead, team leaders should consider asking: l What did you notice when you tried to steer your horse too hard? l What did you learn about your colleagues’ lives during the ride? l For those who have never been horseback riding, what skills did you learn? l Aren’t those skills some of the same that we need in our office? Here is the twist: just as we rely on crockpots to slowly heat and mold a meal’s flavors together, we must allow the individuals to apply the lessons for themselves. Team-building…with a twist So, it is OK to take the team golfing, horseback riding or out for drinks, but don’t think that activity alone will build the team any more than a reception with fine wine and tasty cheese will foster interesting conversation at dinner. Reconsider how you educate, and how you think about education, because everyone will learn more when the collective team experience is drawn forth. Finally, understand that the act of looking back on what the team learned and experienced together is a vital part of becoming a team…and building one. n ABOUT THE AUTHOR Kevin E. O’Connor, CSP (kevin@kevinoc.com), is a facilitator, medical educator, and author. He focuses on teaching scientific and technical professionals how to influence and lead teams of their former peers. He presents and coaches over 175 times per year around the world to corporations, individuals, associations and non-profits about how to move teams from conflict to consensus. His latest book, Fearless Facilitation: The Ultimate Field Guide for Engaging (and Involving!) Your Audience, is available in bookstores now and online at www.kevinoc.com December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 7


FOCUS SAFETY

Handling “BOB”!

Whether or not you are a professional trainer/instructor/teacher, a human resource specialist for your company, or an owner of a small business, as the instructor or facilitator it is your job to accomplish the goal of imparting information. This needs to be done in a meaningful manner, ensuring that everyone who attended your class or seminar understood the topic, knowledge, rules, regulations, or curriculum taught and can demonstrate that knowledge at a later date. We wish each and every student or attendee in every class we have to teach is there to learn, pays attention, participates in a positive manner, and makes the class better for their involvement in it. But the fact is that, in the real world, that is just not going to happen each and every time you provide training for your employees. Let’s analyze the three typical types of students you’ll be faced with, and look at some strategies for dealing with each one. 1.Middle of the Road Students Classes are typically made up of a majority of this type of student—and that’s good. These are usually the backbone and core of your employees. Happy to be there, enjoy working for you, and enjoy their job. They’re typically there to learn the subject and get through the material without a lot of wasted time. They involve themselves in discussions appropriately and with very little encouragement. 2. Shy Quiet Students This type of individual sits in the back of the room and never says a word. They probably 8 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

By Ron Overton

have plenty to share, but are too shy to speak up. Your job as an instructor is to bring them and their expertise into discussions and extract input from them. Much of being a trainer is being a facilitator—someone who starts and encourages dialog between people. The best tactic to accomplish this is to quickly learn their name and call on them by name with a question that is fairly simple to answer. No matter what, do not embarrass them in front of the other students! There are no wrong answers—only those that are correct or partially correct. No matter what answer the person gives, you must make it into a positive or correct answer somehow. Either coach them along to get them to give the full and complete answer or acknowledge the partly correct answer and fill in the rest yourself. If you make them feel they gave a wrong answer, they will be lost for the rest of the class. 3. “Know It All” Students Handling this personality type can be tricky. This person is really disruptive (but may not be negative), comments on any and every topic you bring up, seems to have wealth of experience in everything, and potentially is ruining the training for everyone else, not to mention lengthening out the duration of the class. You have probably all seen someone like this in one of your training classes you either provided or attended over your career. For lack of a better name, we shall refer to him as “BOB.” On the one hand, it’s important that you

SAFETY FOCUS 6. He decides that he take control of the We wish each and every student or will not be squashed. class and stay on task. On the other, you don’t attendee in every class we have to teach is He talks out more becomes more want to embarrass there to learn, pays attention, participate and disruptive, or decides them in front of in a positive manner, and make the class to argue with you. the class. If you do embarrass them, better for their involvement in it. But the Won’t go down without a battle. Now the and the rest of the fact is that, in the real world, that is just entire class is lost. students feel that you What might be a not going to happen each and every time are picking on them or positive gained, from singling them out, you you provide training for your employees. utilizing this option in may lose the entire handling Bob? Maybe group. he gets under control and it works, but there I truly feel you have three options available to you when faced with a “BOB” in your class, are no guarantees. You can clearly see from the large number of potential drawbacks vs. and it won’t take long for him to make his the limited number of positives, this is not the presence felt. tact or method we should utilize. Handling “BOB” Option 1: You could squash him verbally and let him know who is in charge (after all, you are the instructor and it is your class). But what might be the drawbacks when choosing this option? 1. Certainly going to lengthen your training session and you will not make the timeline you need to adhere to. 2. May lose the rest of the class: Maybe Bob is well liked by his peers and they may identify with him. “Why is the instructor being so mean to Bob? It’s just Bob and everyone knows that’s just the way Bob is.” 3. Water cooler issues: After the class you want them talking about how great the training was, not the battle between you and Bob. 4. Human Resource issues: Not a great idea to belittle or chastise employees, may come back to haunt you later. 5. You lost the shy and quiet type: Shy people will never speak up in class now, you have lost that group of people for the facilitating input and dialog. You just crushed someone who did speak up.

Option 2: You could ignore him and hope he will stop his interruptions and disruption of your class (out of sight, out of mind so to speak). But what might be the drawbacks when choosing this option? 1. Certainly going to lengthen your training session if he does not stop, and you will not make the timeline you need to adhere to. 2. Again you may not provide a good learning environment or training for the rest of class because of his disruptions: 3. Water cooler issues: After the class you want them talking about how great the training was, not how Bob kept interrupting the teacher the entire time. 4. Human Resource issues: Not a great idea to belittle or chastise employees, may come back to haunt you later. 5. You lose the shy and quiet type: Shy people will never speak up in class now, Bob is dominating the class input. 6. Quality of your training will suffer. 7. Bob will not be relaying positive things about the class when asked by his peers later. December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 9


SAFETY FOCUS What might be a positive gained, from utilizing this option in handling Bob? Maybe you can’t think of a single thing that would be a positive. So Option 2 does not seem to be an option after all. Option 3: To effectively deal with this type of personality you must do it one-on-one, use him to your advantage, get him to cooperate and in a manner that he does not even know he is being corrected. We will “ride him like a mule, and he won’t even know he has been ridden.” First after you have identified that you have Bob in your class, take a quick break (use the temperature in the room as an issue and ask everyone to take three minutes to stretch their legs while you get it adjusted). As Bob is walking out, quietly ask him to stay a second and speak with you. Now at this point, Bob is probably expecting to be somewhat punished, spoken to or some form of corrective action performed, because he has been doing this all his life, and it is always the same discipline or correction from his teachers in school, so he is ready for you. We are not going to correct, berate him, chastise him or yell at him, as a matter of fact, we are going in the opposite direction and it will catch him totally off guard: “Hey, Bob. I can see from your involvement so far that you may be one of the most experienced operators in the class. I would like you to do me a huge favor and assist me with the class. I would really appreciate it. Would you be willing to do that”? (He will probably say, “What do I have to do”?) “All you have to do is when I come to a certain topic which you have input on with regards to operating or working safely or unsafely, you give me a signal with your finger like this, (just raise your finger off the desktop.) So then I will call on you during the class on that issue and you can explain your experience in about 30 seconds or so, and in that way help out some of the lesser experienced people.” “Can I count on you Bob, to help me with this”? (Of course, he will say yes.) Then mention “Bob, I can’t have your input on each topic, because there is not enough time, but I will need it during the really important ones. If I don’t have time for your input on that subject, I will just waive my hand like this, and let’s move along to the next topic or subject in the book so I can stay on time. That will really help the rest of the class as well.” 10 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

SAFETY FOCUS “Okay, be ready when I ask for your input. Thanks for your help, Bob. I really appreciate it”! This tactic reins the personality type in, and creates a sense of inclusion that will likely quiet them down as they wait for their big chance. So, be sure to give them a few opportunities to briefly share their specific experiences during class and thank them for their input (throw him a bone or two). Now they are less likely to be disruptive, are looking forward in your training book for topics he can assist with, and is more likely to learn! What might be the drawbacks when choosing this option? Water cooler issues--After the class, Bob may take credit for teaching the class, but do you really care? As long as the class and training were a success, if he wants to think he was the reason, let him! What might be a positive gained, from utilizing this option in handling Bob? 1. You stayed on track and on time. 2. You were able to involve everyone, from shy types, to middle of road to Bob. 3. You gave a good class and everyone participated and learned. 4. Maybe when asked about the class, Bob says positive things, because he had a good experience. Remember, you are the person who will leave the lasting impression on the students, not the curriculum and not the topics. A good instructor can make a poor program or curriculum very effective, and a poor instructor can allow a great program and curriculum to be ineffective. Take care and work safely! n ABOUT THE AUTHOR Ron Overton, a NCCCO Certified Mobile Crane Operator and Accredited Practical Examiner, is the President, Owner, and an Instructor for OVERTON Safety Training, Inc. of Beaverton, Oregon. OVERTON Safety Training has been providing professional services and materials for the safe operation of forklifts, heavy equipment, aerial/scissor lifts, rigging and signaling, personnel lifts, loaders, and cranes on a worldwide basis since 1991. For additional information, contact Ron at (866) 531-0403 or ron@overtonsafety.com, or visit the company website at www.overtonsafety.com. These insights are the opinions of the author, and not necessarily those of the NCBVA. December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 11


The NCBVA 2014 Convention is February 13 – 16 at the Convention Crowne Plaza in Houston, Texas. The proposed schedule of events is listed on page 15. Please visit the NCBVA website to learn more and to view any subsequent changes or additions: www.ncbva.org

12 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 13


Proposed Schedule The NCBVA Convention will be held in Houston, Texas just following the NPCA’s Precast Show. Thursday, February 13, 2014 1:15 PM – 2:15 PM .....................................................................................Burial Vault Forum (NPCA) 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM........................................................................................Pre-Cast Exhibits (NPCA) Friday, February 14, 2014 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM ..........................................................................................................Plant Tour 9:30 AM – 6:00 PM .......................................................................................Pre-Cast Exhibits (NPCA) 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM ........................................ NCBVA Board of Directors Meeting (with working lunch) Saturday, February 15, 2013 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM ........................................................................................ Breakfast with Vendors 9:30 AM – 12:00 PM .................................................................... Educational Workshop (2 programs) 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM ................................................................................................Pre-Cast Exhibits 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM ...................................................Safety Training Workshop (separate fee/optional) 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM .......................................................................................... Networking Reception

OVERTON Safety Training, Inc.

Providing professional operator safety training, qualification and certification services since 1991.

National Certification Prep Training & Testing Rigging & Signaling Classes Courses meet WA & national requirements 7 accredited NCCCO examiners Specializing in the Burial Vault and Precast industries

Sunday, February 16, 2013 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM ........................................................................................ Breakfast with Vendors 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM ........................................................ Annual Business Meeting/Memorial Service 10:30 AM - Noon .............................................................................................................................. Educational Workshops (1 program) 2:00 PM – 4:30 PM .................................................................... Educational Workshops (2 programs) 6:00 PM – 9:30 PM ..................................................Dinner at the National Museum of Funeral History Rates Early Bird Later Member ........................................................................................ $550.00 $600.00 Additional from Company................................................................ $250.00 $300.00 Spouse/Guest............................................................................... $225.00 $275.00 Child............................................................................................. $100.00 $125.00 Non-Member.................................................................................. $700.00 $750.00

OPERATOR AND TRAINER PROGRAMS FOR:

Mobile Cranes • Tower Cranes • Overhead Cranes Rigging & Signaling • Forklift Trucks • Vault Carts Loaders • Personnel Lifts • NCCCO Preparatory Training TRAININg & CeRTIfICATIoN AVAIlABle ThRough: On-site Classes Open-Enrollment Classes Materials for In-House Training

P.O. Box 6297 Aloha, OR 97007-0297 (503) 356-0403 • Fax (503) 356-0401 • Toll Free (866) 531-0403 www.overtonsafety.com

14 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

Vendor (Member) ......................................................................... $1000.00 $1100.00 Vendor (Non-Member) .................................................................. $1150.00 $1250.00 * Exhibitor registration includes one registration. * Spouse/Guest registration includes the Plant Tour, Welcome Reception, two Breakfasts and Dinner.

Registration fees include a complimentary exhibitor only pass to the NPCA Precast Show being held at the Convention Center. For more information about the Convention or hotel reservations, visit www.ncbva.org or call (888) 88-NCBVA. December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 15


FOCUS OSHA

Hazardous Communication “Exposure to hazardous chemicals is one of the most serious threats facing American workers today,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. “Revising OSHA’s Hazard Communication standard will improve the quality and consistency of hazard information, making it safer for workers to do their jobs and easier for employers to stay competitive.” The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) is now aligned with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). This update to the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) will provide a common and coherent approach to classifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets.

Once implemented, the revised standard will improve the quality and consistency of hazard information in the workplace, making it safer for workers by providing easily understandable information on appropriate handling and safe use of hazardous chemicals. This update will also help reduce trade barriers and result in productivity improvements for American businesses that regularly handle, store, and use hazardous chemicals while providing cost savings for American businesses that periodically update safety data sheets and labels for chemicals covered under the hazard communication standard. n

Hazard Communication Standard

In order to ensure chemical safety in the workplace, information about the identities and hazards of the chemicals must be available and understandable to workers. OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires the development and dissemination of such information:

l Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to evaluate the hazards of the chemicals they produce or import, and prepare labels and safety data sheets to convey the hazard information to their downstream customers; l All employers with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces must have labels and safety data sheets for their exposed workers, and train them to handle the chemicals appropriately.

Major changes to the Hazard Communication Standard l Hazard classification: Provides specific criteria for classification of health and physical hazards, as well as classification of mixtures. l Labels: Chemical manufacturers and importers will be required to provide a label that includes a harmonized signal word, pictogram, and hazard statement for each hazard class and category. Precautionary statements must also be provided. l Safety Data Sheets: Will now have a specified 16-section format. l Information and training: Employers are required to train workers by December 1, 2013 on the new labels elements and safety data sheets format to facilitate recognition and understanding. 16 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 17


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18 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

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Cemex Callaway R/M Precast Lake Worth, FL

Doric Of Northeast Arkansas Jonesboro, AR

Huntingburg Vault Company Huntingburg, IN

American Concrete Industries Bangor, ME

Central Burial Vaults, Inc. Oklahoma City, OK

Doric Of Tennessee, Inc. Nashville, TN

Ideal Burial Vault Company, Inc. Depew, NY

American Vault Company Cleveland, OH

Central Burial Vaults, Inc. Tulsa, OK

Doric Vault Co. Of Central GA Griffin, GA

James Co., Inc. Waycross, GA

American Wilbert Company Bridgeview, IL

Century Burial Vault Oxford, MA

Jefferson Concrete Watertown, NY

Arnold-Wilbert Company Goldsboro, NC

Charleston Wilbert Vault Co. Summerville, SC

Doric Vault Of Eastern New York, Inc. Hudson, NY

Arrow Vault Company Lafayette, IN

Cheboygan Cement Products Cheboygan, MI

Doric Vault Of Western New York, Inc. Buffalo, NY

Chesapeake Burial Vault Company Barclay, MD

Esterly Burial Vault Company West Reading, PA

Christy Vault Co. Daly City, CA

Evans Eagle Burial Vaults Leola, PA

Baumgardner Products Company Akron, OH

Concrete Vaults, Inc. Newton, KS

Everlasting Vault Company Randallstown, MD

Baxter Burial Vault Service, Inc. Cincinnati, OH

Cooper Wilbert Vault Company Barrington, NJ

Fond Du Lac Wilbert Vault Co. Fond Du Lac, WI

Baxter Vault Company Baxter Springs, KS

Cordeiro Vault Co., Inc. Vallejo, CA

Beck Vault Company Rome, NY

Creter Vault Corporation Flemington, NJ

Forsyth Brothers Concrete Products Fithian, IL

Bell Vault & Monument Inc. Miamisburg, OH

Crummitt & Son Vault Corp. Martins Ferry, OH

Brewster Vault And Monuments Millville, NJ

D of K Vaults, Inc./Gray Brothers Iola, KS

Bruns-Doric Vault Company Saint Louis, MO

D. G. Robertson, Inc. Williston,VT

Brutsche Concrete Products, Inc. Battle Creek, MI

Dardanelle Vault & Monument Co. Dardanelle, AR

Brutsche Concrete Products, Inc. Benton Harbor, MI

Deihl Vault & Precast Company Orangeville, PA

Buckeye Vault Service Mansfield, OH

Detroit Wilbert Vault Corp. Detroit, MI

C & M Precast Kerrville, TX

Doody Burial Vaults, Inc. Winchendon, MA

Carolina Doric, Inc. Florence, SC

Doric Manufacturing Company Boaz , AL

Atlas Vault Company Orlando, FL Badger Burial Vault Co. Eau Claire, WI

3000# Winch Capacity Towable over the road

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Gettysburg Burial Vault, Inc. Gettysburg, PA Golden Eagle Vault Services, LLC Rocky Mount,VA Grable Burial Vault Service Logansport, IN Gross Vault & Monument Thomasville, GA Hairfield Vault Company Morganton, NC Hardy Doric, Inc. Chelmsford, MA Harn Vault Co Massillon, OH Harris Precast, Inc La Porte, IN Hicks Industries, Inc. Mulberry, FL

Lake Shore Burial Vault Company Brookfield, WI Master Grave Service, Inc. Bogart, GA McDowell Vault Co. Fletcher, NC Memphis Vault Company Memphis, TN Mercer Vault Company Fredericksburg,VA Minchew Sand & Concrete Products Waycross, GA Minnick Services, Inc. Fort Wayne, IN Montgomery Vault Rockville, MD Neher Burial Vault Springfield, OH Nor-Don Vault Company, Inc. Strafford, MO Northern Precast Hudson Falls, NY Odon Vault Company, Inc. Odon, IN Omaha Wilbert Vault Omaha, NE Ostwalt Vault Company Concord, NC Palm Vault Co. Ada, OK

December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 19


Sunnycrest Inc Saline Vault Company West Plains Vault & Mfg. Panhandle Vaults – Amarillo SweetCertified Springs, MO Vault Manufacturing Auburn, NY Amarillo, TX NCBVA PlantsCompany Pomona, MO Superior Vault Company Sam Green Vault Company Patriot Vault & Precast

Lynchburg,VA

Park Hills, MO

(Continued)

Saline Vault Co. Pennsylvania Concrete Vault Co. Santeiu Vaults, Inc. Pennsylvania Concrete Vault Sweet Springs, MO Greensburg, PA MI Company SanteiuLivonia, Vaults Inc. Perfection Vault Livonia,Vault MI Co. Johnstown, PA Woodson, IL Sheldon Sexton Wilbert Corporation Phenix Vault Sheldon, IA Perfection Concrete Bloomington, IN Phenix City, AL Vandalia, IL Shore Vault Precast Company Sheldon Vault&Co. Pioneer Vault, Inc. Sheldon, IA VA Doylestown, PA Exmore, Phenix Vault Shore Vault & Precast Co. PoplarPhenix Bluff Doric City,Vaults, AL Inc. SiExmore, FuneralVA Services Poplar Bluff, MO Ennis, TX Products, Inc. Piedmont Precast Simerly Concrete Precast Concrete Products, Inc. Atlanta, Bristol, TN Blissfield, MIGA Si Funeral Services Simerly Vaults, Inc. Precision Precast Inc.Inc. Fairport, NY Pioneer Vault Co., Knoxville, TN Pittsfield, MA Doylestown, PA Simerly Ohio Concrete Inc. Southern Vault Products, Co. Quality Burial Vault Co. Portsmouth, Houston, TX Bristol,OH TN Precast Concrete Products, Inc. Southern Vault Service Rex Vault ServiceMI Blissfield, Simerly Blakely,Vault, GA Inc. Newton, IL TN Precision PrecastMonument/Vault Inc. Spoerr Knoxville, Precast Concrete Rocky Mountain Pittsfield, MA Sandusky,Ohio OH Vault Company Sandy, UT Southern Services OH Roland-Wilbert Vault Co.Service, Inc. SI Funeral Portsmouth, Rex Vault & Mausoleum Cedar Hill, TX Clinton, IA Newton, IL Vault Services, Inc. SISouthern Funeral Services Roland-Wilbert Vault Co. Gerard, PA GA Blakely, Roland Vault Co., Inc Marion,Wilbert IA SI Funeral Services Saginaw WilbertIAVault Corp. Marion, Spoerr Precast Concrete, Inc. Parsons, KS Saginaw, MI Sandusky, OH Saginaw SI Funeral Services Sam Green Vault Corp. Saginaw, San Antonio, TX Lynchburg, VAMI St. Louis Wilbert Vault Company Sunnycrest, Inc. MO St. Louis Wilbert Vault Co. St. Louis, Auburn, NY St. Louis, MO

Bryantown, MD

Superior Burial Vaults, Inc. Superior Company, Salt Vault Lake City, UT Ltd. Superior Vault Co. Mississauga, ON, CAN Bryantown, MD Temple Vault – Central City Superior Vault Co. Central City,INAR Charlestown, Superior Co., Ltd. Turner VaultVault Company Mississauga, Northwood,Ont., OH Canada Swan’s Concrete Products Vanden BoomenME Burial Vaults Inc. Westbrook, Kronenwetter, WI Turner Vault Company Toledo, OH J.P. Vincent & Sons Inc. Vanden Boomen Burial Vaults Inc. Galena, ILWI Appleton, Vanden Boomen Burial Vaults Inc. Warga Concrete Products Wausau, WI IN Fort Wayne, Vincent & Son, Inc. Washington Wilbert Galena, IL Vault Works, Inc. Laurel, MD Washington Wilbert Vault Works Inc. Watts Vault & Monument Laurel, MD Company Warga Concrete Products Inc. Des Wayne, Moines,INIA Fort Watts VaultVault & Monument Co. Wayne Burial Company Des Moines, IA Indianapolis, IN Wayne Burial Vault Co., Inc. Welte Indianapolis, Vault Company, IN Inc. Welte Vault Co. Danbury, IA Danbury, IA West Plains Vault & Mfg. Co. Pomona, MO

Western Michigan Burial Vault Whitman VaultMI Co. Muskegon, Whitman, MA Wicomico Vault Company, Wicomico Vault Co., Inc. Inc. Salisbury, MD MD Wieser Precast Wieser Doric Vault Co. Stewartville, MN La Crescent, MNCo. Wieser Doric Vault LaCrescent, MN Wieser Precast Wilbert Burial Vault Stewartville, MN Co. Atlanta, GA Wilbert Burial Vault Co. Wilbert Burial Vault Co. Traverse City, Waycross, GA MI Wilbert Burial Vault Co. Wilbert Of North Texas Muskegon, MI Grapevine, Wilbert BurialTX Vault Co. Traverse MI Wilbert VaultsCity, Of Houston, Inc. Wilbert Services Houston, TX Lancaster, NY Willbee Concrete Vaults, LLC Wilbert Vaults of Houston, Inc. Jackson, Houston, MI TX Willbee Concrete Products Williams Vault Company Jackson, MI Emporia,VA Williams Wilbert Des Moines, IA Wimmer Manufacturing Williams Vault Company New Castle, IN Emporia, VA Youngstown Burial Vault Willmar Precast Co. Youngstown, Willmar, MN OH Zeiser Wilbert Vault Co. Elmira, NY

National Concrete Burial Vault Association, Inc. Member Application for Plant Inspection

Name of Plant ___________________________________________________________________________ Plant Mailing Address______________________________________________________________________ Plant Street Address_______________________________________________________________________ Plant Telephone_________________

Fax Number_______________________________________

Owner’s Name_____________________________ Evening Phone______________________________ Plant Manager/Contact Person__________________ Evening Phone_______________________________ Types of Outer Burial Receptacles Produced  Top Seals  Air Domes  Sectionals Other________________________________________________ Please return this application with full payment to: The National Concrete Burial Vault Association, Inc. P.O. Box 917525 136 South Keowee Street Longwood, FL 32791 Dayton, OH 45402 (888) 88-NCBVA (888)88-NCBVA Fax (407) 774-6751 Fax (937) 222-5794

20 NCBVA.ORG l| December 20 NCBVA.ORG December2012 2013

For a NCBVA member in good standing, the Plant Certification Inspection fee is $1295.

NEWS

INDUSTRY

Doric Products Announces 2013-2014 Board of Directors Doric Products, Inc., reelected all members to its Board of Directors for the coming year. They will remain: Joe Brewster (Brewster Vaults, Millville, NJ); Michael Crummitt (Crummitt & Son Vault, Martins Ferry, OH); Charles “Chuck” Foskey (Wicomico Vault, Salisbury, MD); Gerald Hardy (Hardy Doric, Inc., Chelmsford, MA); Hubert McQuestion (Lake Shore Burial Vault, Brookfield, WI); Adair Payment (Atlas Concrete Products, Orlando, FL); Bobby Smith (Eagle Burial Vault, Ruston, LA); Steven Vincent (J.P. Vincent and Sons, Galena, IL); and, Jim Wiens (CVI Funeral Supply, Newton, KS). Steve Vincent will continue to serve as President, Jim Wiens as Vice President of Finance and Treasurer, Mike Crummitt as Vice President of Manufacturing, and Gerald Hardy as Secretary. The Executive Committee consists of Mike Crummitt, Hubert McQuestion, Steve Vincent and Jim Wiens.

NCBVA Members:

If you have successfully completed your most recent plant inspection during 2012 or so far in 2013 and have not yet received your certification letter and plaque, please contact us at the National office at 888-866-2282, or by e-mail at info@ncbva.org, and we’ll get the items to you immediately and identify why you didn’t receive them. Thank you!

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December 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 21


National Concrete Burial Vault Association “Serving the death care industry with the very best”

Dues Schedule

APPLICATION FOR National Concrete Burial VaultMEMBERSHIP Association

 Manufacturer Member Dues are based on total units sold at Dues Schedule this location.

Key Contact____________________________________Nickname_____________

    

 Manufacturer Member level: Please check appropriate Dues are based on total units sold at 1-999 Units .........$225 this location. 1000 - 1999 .........$350 Please check appropriate level: 2000 - 3499 .........$430  1-999 Units .........$225 3500 - 4999 .........$580  1000 - 1999 .........$350 5000 and more ....$700

 2000 - 3499 .........$430  3500 - 4999 .........$580  Associate Member.....$300  5000 and more ....$700

 Franchise .......$1000 AssociateGroup Member .....$300  Franchise Group .......$1000 Payment Information

Include payment with this completed Payment Information form. We accept Visa, MasterCard and Include payment American Express with this completed form. We accept Visa, MasterCard and American Express

 Check is enclosed

 Check is enclosed

Please charge my Please charge my  Visa MasterCard  Visa MasterCard

 American Express Account #_____________________ Expiration _________________ Accountdate #_____________________ Expiration date _________________

Mailing Mailing Information

Information NCBVA

136 South Keowee Street NCBVA P.O. Box 917525 P.O. Box 917525 Dayton, OH 45402 Longwood, FL 32791 Longwood, FL 32791 (888)88-NCBVA (888) 88-NCBVA (888) 88-NCBVA Fax (937) 222-5794 Fax: (407) Fax: (407)774-6751 774-6751

www.ncbva.org www.ncbva.org

CODE OF ETHICS

“Serving the death care industry with the very best”

APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP Title ______________________________________________________________

Company Name _____________________________________________________ Key Contact____________________________________Nickname_____________ Street Address _______________________________________________________ Title City______________________________________________________________ _____________________ State _______________ Zip __________________ Company Name _____________________________________________________

Phone ___________________________ Fax ______________________________

Street Address _______________________________________________________

E-mail ____________________________________________________________

City _____________________ State _______________ Zip __________________

Company Web Site ___________________________________________________

Phone ___________________________ Fax ______________________________ E-mail ____________________________________________________________

Company Web Site ___________________________________________________

 Check here if you prefer to have your mail sent to your home.

Home street Address _________________________________________ _____________________ Statemail ______________ City Check here if you prefer to have your sent to your home.Zip ___________ Home Phone _________________ Home Fax ______________________ Home street Address _________________________________________ City _____________________ State ______________ Zip ___________ Home Phone _________________ Home Fax ______________________

COMPANY INFORMATION  Burial Vault Manufacturer  Funeral Director COMPANY INFORMATION  Crematory  Cemetery  Burial Vault Manufacturer  Funeral Director

 Crematory

 Cemetery

 Doric  Wilbert  Eagle  Trigard Doric Trigard Services Con-O-lite  Wilbert  Other  Eagle Provide  Graveside  Con-O-lite

 Other

Provide Graveside Services

Metal Vaults  Plastic Vaults  Fiberglass Vaults

Metal Vaults  Plastic Vaults  Fiberglass Vaults  Adults  Oversize Offer sizes for  Children Offer sizes for  Children  Adults  Oversize Associate Member: 25 words lessyour about your product/services Associate Member: Tell Tell us inus 25 in words or less or about product/services

Please Please enroll in NCBVA today!  enroll meme in NCBVA today!

Signature indicates thatthat you you have have read and abidetobyabide NCBVA’s Code of Ethics Signature indicates readagree andtoagree by NCBVA’s Code of Ethics and the rules that govern the National Concrete Burial Vault Association. Signature and the rules that govern the National Concrete Burial Vault Association.isSignature is required before thisthis application can becan processed. required before application be processed. _________________________________________ _________________________________________ (Signature)

(Signature)

___________ (Date) ___________

(Date)

CODE OF ETHICS We believe that concrete is an ideal material for the construction of burial vaults for the interment of human remains and that

properlythat constructed burial vault is for worthy acceptance by public. Our for salesthe andinterment advertising We abelieve concreteconcrete is an ideal material the of construction ofthe burial vaults ofpolicies humanwill remains and that be governed by standards acceptable by the public and the funeral profession and by principles advocated by the National a properly constructed concrete burial vault is worthy of acceptance by the public. Our sales and advertising policies will Concrete Burial Vault Association, Inc. We pledge fair trade practices to our competitor, whose product we will not disparbe governed by standards the business public and the funeral profession by principles advocated by thefor National age. We shall conduct ouracceptable business onby sound principles, striving to build a and relationship of respect and confidence Concrete Burial Vault Association, Inc. We pledge fair trade practices to our competitor, whose product we will not the burial vault industry with the public, with the funeral director and with the cemetery’s management. We will abide by the disparage.rules We shall conduct our business sound Burial business principles, striving to build a relationship of respect and confidence for and regulations of the Nationalon Concrete Vault Association, Inc., thereby contributing to a stronger and greater the burial industry with the public, with the funeral director and with the cemetery’s management. We will abide by the nationalvault industry. rules and regulations of the National Concrete Burial Vault Association, Inc., thereby contributing to a stronger and greater national industry.

18

NCBVA.ORG l December 2012

22 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

August 2013 | NCBVA.ORG 23


NCBVA|136 South Keowee Street|Dayton, OH 45402-2241

Mark Your Calendars and Make Plans Now to Attend the 2014 NCBVA National Convention! This year’s conference will feature:

• Pre-Cast exhibits with the NPCA

(National Pre-Cast Concrete Association)

• Optional Safety Training Workshops • Visits with Our Vendors • An offsite Vault Plant tour • Our Closing Dinner at the National Museum of

Funeral History We’re also planning a wide range of valuable educational sessions and special social activities for our attendees! Please visit the NCBVA website for the most current information! www.ncbva.org • (888) 886-2282  

24 NCBVA.ORG | December 2013

Bulletin 2013 December  

This is the December 2013 edition of the National Burial Vault Association member publication

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