Page 1

FLEET AND INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CENTER

Thank you

to the volunteers who made this program

possible.

April 28, 2011 FISC Bldg 116-32ND Street 0930 – 1030

Special Thanks to our Commanding Officer, Capt David R. Pimpo, Executive Officer Cdr Brian G. Schorn and CMDSEL Jun Crucillo who encourages and supports events such as these in order to promote our Diversity Committee’s mission: “To facilitate and educate, while promoting understanding, awareness, and tolerance of the diverse cultures and ethnic groups within the command.” Very Respectfully, Tulimalefoi M. Sarvis, PS1(AW), Chairman

This month, the Diversity Committee looks back at the Holocaust.

This year’s Theme is: “Justice and Accountability in the Face of Genocide: What Have We Learned?"


My name is Livia Krancberg. I was born Livia Szabo on October 13, 1919, in Petrova, Romania. I attended Liceu Domnita Ileana high school in Szghet, Romania. I received 18 free credits from Rutgers University in NJ for subjects I took in high school, subjects that are offered here on the university level. I also took a playwriting course and a fiction course at The New School in NY. From the time I was 10-years-old, I wanted to be a writer, but Hitler had other plans for me. On May 14, 1944, I was deported to Auschwitz, Poland with my family, but for my father who immigrated to the United States of America in 1938. Thanks to my sister, Rose, I survived Auschwitz and married Sigmund Kranceberg, an intellectual. Due to life priorities like raising two beautiful and talented daughters: Shelly and Beth, and working to the ripe age of 73, helping my husband make ends meet while he was studying for his doctorate in Political Science, I put my dream of writing on the back burner for 60 years, just to pick it up again at the age of 78. Since then I wrote four plays, three of which were staged at the Community Actors Theatre in San Diego, CA. Here are my unpublished writings: my Memoir entitled, From the Shtetl to Auschwitz to the United States of America; a children’s book entitled, A Tale of Universal Harmony and a children’s play entitled, We should not accept that Children are Still Hungry. I was in Auschwitz from the minute the German soldiers planted me there until the camp closed on January 19, 1945. I was in the Death March that followed the closing of the camp. While in Auschwitz, my sister, Rose and I were assigned to Lager C also known as the lager of the “rejects” – waiting for room in the gas chambers. Dr. Mengele visited our camp on a weekly basis to make his “selections”. What’s a selection? The process by which Dr. Mengele determined which women, how many women and when these women should be gassed was called selection. I have a visual aid, a rough drawing, to show how a selection took place .

PROGRAM OPENING REMARKS:

CDR BRIAN G. SCHORN, XO

WELCOME REMARKS:

SH1 Hunter

MC:

PS1 Sarvis

GUEST SPEAKER:

LIVIA KRANCBERG

CLOSING REMARKS:

CAPT DAVID R. PIMPO, CO

FISC Holocaust Remembrance  

event, diversity team