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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

Acknowledgments

2010-2011 NBLSA Advocacy Team

2010-2011 NBLSA Social Action Committee

Ashlyn Shockley National Attorney General ag@nblsa.org

Shantia Stanley Best Practices Manual Coordinator tiajoy@msn.org

Kendra Brown National Congressional Liaison congressionalliaison@nblsa.org

Christopher Bridges bridges.c@husky.neu.edu

Germaine Austin National Director of Social Action socialaction@nblsa.org G.C. Murray National Election Specialist vote@nblsa.org

2010-2011 Graphics Coordinator Aaron Daye gorillazink@gmail.com

Jourdan Brooks jourdan.brooks@gmail.com Elisabeth Flemming flemmi10@unlv.nevada.edu Erika Glenn glenn.erika@gmail.com Elizabeth Humphrey ebeth.Humphrey@gmail.com

2010-2011 Editor

Candice Macon cnmacon@gmail.com

Sharonda Jackson National Director of Communications communications@nblsa.org

Jillian Mack jillemack@gmail.com

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

TABLE OF CONTENTS A. Advocacy & Election Protection Registration Nation............................................................................................ 5 Reclaiming the Right, Voter Restoration Clinic.............................................................. Recognize the Vote......................................................................................................... Election Protection.......................................................................................................... Poll Worker..................................................................................................................... Social Action Rally......................................................................................................... Social Justice Infomercial...............................................................................................

9 12 14 16 18 23

B. Awareness Lectures Candidates Forum................................................................................................................ 27 Déjà Vu: Cultural and Political Responses to a Disaster..................................................... 28 Movie Mayhem................................................................................................................... 30 Constance Baker Motley Lecture Series............................................................................. 32 C. Service & Education Projects 1L Resume/Interviewing Workshop.................................................................................... 35 Spirit of Service....................................................................................................................36 1L Meet and Greet................................................................................................................37 Blue Booking Seminar..........................................................................................................38 1L & Upper Level Exam Review Sessions...........................................................................39 2010 Census Education at Boys and Girls Club...................................................................40 Safe Halloween.....................................................................................................................41 Lawyers in the Classroom.....................................................................................................42 Soul Food Lunch for Disaster Relief Efforts........................................................................43. D. Networking Events Bridging the Gap...................................................................................................................47 Jazz for Justice......................................................................................................................48 Summer Minority Legal Summit..........................................................................................49 E. Fundraising Annual Soul Food Competition............................................................................................51

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

REGISTRATION NATION: Synopsis: Timeline: Varies depending on election schedule Registration Nation is a program implemented at the chapter level with support from the region. This program seeks to help traditionally underrepresented populations, minorities, and undergraduate and graduate students, by ensuring that they are registered voters. In the past, this program has substantially impacted voter turnout in local, state and national elections. Measure of Success: Success will be measured quantitatively. Students must increase voter registration by ninety percent (90%). This increase will include new voter registrations and change of registration forms. Students will contact their local state Board of Elections to find out the registration count from the previous year. PROCESS: Steps 1. Designate a team of people from your chapter and/or school that will be responsible for registering people to vote throughout the year. 2. Choose the reach of your chapter by recognizing the areas you will register to vote. These areas should include law schools, undergraduate universities and other locations in the community. 3. Contact the state Board of Elections to find out the election dates for local, state and national elections. In addition, determine the respective deadlines for voter registration. 4. Form a partnership with the Board of Elections by introducing yourself and the name of the designated person from your chapter that will turn in voter registration forms periodically. 5. Research the election laws of your state. These laws are located on the NBLSA site at www.nblsa.org. If you need additional information, conduct online research. 6. Train the team you designated in step one. Training should include, but is not be limited to, the proper completion of a voter registration form and appropriate responses to frequently asked questions from voters. These frequently asked questions may be found at your State Board of Elections website. 7. Choose the registration dates for your registration team, the same team from step one of this process. Plot these dates on a calendar. Keep in mind that you must allow enough time to collect the forms from those you register and enough time to turnover the registration forms to the Board of Elections. 8. Choose the techniques that will be most effective in registering your campus and community. 9. Create flyers to announce the dates and times your chapter will register people to vote. Contact public relations at your university and see if they can send a mass email announcing the registration dates. Choose a slogan that will get people excited about the program. Publicize the slogan on all flyers and publicity events.

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REGISTRATION TECHNIQUES: It will be more effective to choose all techniques

Registration Station

Canvassing Door to Door

Legislation Support

Create the dates and times your Create the dates and times your Contact local grassroots team will register voters. team will register voters. organizations to see if your Assign each team member state is currently supporting times and dates that they must certain initiatives that will be present at the registration increase voter registration. tables. Some examples can be found below. Have tables set up on campus Choose the dorms and public and at the law school with areas your team will register. registration forms. In addition, have pre-printed forms that will show the proper way to fill out a voter registration form.

Some states have same day voter registration laws. These laws enable citizens to register to vote and vote on the same day.

Create a document of Create a document of frequently asked questions for frequently asked questions for those who have table hours and those who have canvassing for voters to read. hours and for voters to read.

Early registration. Some states are enacting early registration laws where children under the age of 18 years old, will be able to register to vote. Once they turn 18 years old they will receive a voter registration card in the mail.

Have a designated person to collect all the forms at the end of every table session (person that formed relationship with Board of Elections). Remind this person of the deadline to turn in the voter registration forms.

If grassroots organizations need support to implement these initiatives, you may organize letter-writing campaigns or organize awareness programs to educate others on the initiatives.

Get other students and supporters involved to cover the wide range of areas. Contact Resident Directors, Resident Assistants, and campus organizations for help.

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

Registration Station

Canvassing Door to Door

Legislation Support

After the completion of the registration station, conduct an after action review. Discuss what happened, what went wrong, what went well, and ways to improve.

Organize your team in one central location on the day you chose to do door to door registration. Pick a start time, return time and return place. Make sure that everyone has each other’s contact information in case of an emergency. Also try to pair individuals into groups.

Form relationships with grass roots organizations. Contact those organizations biweekly to get an update on initiatives and new developments as well as tasks that require student support.

Prepare a memorandum or another communication to provide to the incoming executive board members.

Go over the proper ways to Please refer to the contact list register to vote and frequently of grassroots organizations. asked questions. Allow all These organizations are known participants to go to the for sponsoring legislation to respective areas they will increase voter participation and register. Have a designated improvement. The person stay at the start point in organizations on this list are case other participants show up highly recommended but late. optional. After everyone returns to the designated point place, have a designated person collect all registration forms. Then, conduct an after action review. Discuss what happened, what went wrong, what went well and ways for improvement.

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REGISTRATION NATION: GRASSROOTS ORGANIZATION CONTACTS: Organization Democracy North Carolina

Contact Information Bob Hall sprc@mindspring.com

Website Link http://www.democracy-nc.org/ info@democracy-nc.org

Molly Beacham mollybeacham@mindspring.com mollybeacham@democracy-nc.org 919-286-6000 Southern Coalition for Social Justice

Anita Earls anita@southerncoalition.org 919-323-3380 ext. 115

http://www.southerncoalition.org/

Institute for Civic Engagement Dr. Jarvis Hall and Social Change jhall@nccu.edu 919-530-7256

http://carolinajustice.typepad.com/ nccu/2008/04/jarvis-hall-dir.html

The NCCU Civic Engagement Professor Hall Task Force jhall@nccu.edu

http://carolinajustice.typepad.com/ nccu/civic_engagement_task_forc e/

Common Cause

Election Assistance Commission

919-530-6249 Bob Phillips bphillips@commoncause.org 919-836-0027 202-833-1200 (DC #)

www.commoncause.org

http://www.eac.gov/

STATE ELECTION LAWS: Please see the NBLSA website (the link should be located on the same side of this manual).

Contact persons: Germaine Austin at socialaction@nblsa.org and G,C, Murray at elections@nblsa.org

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RECLAIMING THE RIGHT, VOTER RESTORATION CLINIC: Synopsis: Timeline: three weeks Reclaiming the Right is a program implemented at the local level with support from the chapter, grassroots organizations, professors, lawyers, and student volunteers. This program seeks to assist the disenfranchised in regaining their right to vote. Measure of Success: Success will be measured quantitatively. Students must decrease the rate of the disenfranchised by sixty percent (60%). Students will work with grassroots organizations and state database systems to determine the number of disenfranchised in their area. Success will also be measured through program feedback from all participants and volunteers. PROCESS: Steps 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8.

Week 1: Getting Started Access the link on the NBLSA website entitled “Project Restoration.” Access the link that focuses on the specific state you are in. Don’t forget to view the last slide for additional resources on clemency laws in your state. Solicit participation from a law professor or attorney. If you are soliciting help from a local attorney add 1-2 weeks to your timeline. This will allow time to mail/email a letter and receive a response from the attorney. Your school’s Career Services office may be of great assistance in providing the names of alumni who specialize in the areas of civil rights and criminal law. Determine how large your target population will be and how many people will attend. Select a venue for your clinic based on target population and volunteers. A location at the law school or on campus is ideal. Select the date and time for your event. Identify a contact person or committee who will answer questions.

Publicize 9. Contact local churches and ask them to make an announcement during weekly services. 10. Place an ad in the local newspaper. 11. Place flyers and bulletin boards in the local grocery store. 12. Distribute flyers in the neighborhood. 13. Distribute flyers at the local mall. A permit may be required for this type of distribution. Soliciting Student Participation 14. Host an informal session for students and faculty to sign up as volunteers. 15. Post flyers and sign up sheets in the law school so that people can sign up. 16. Set up a TWEN page for students to sign up as volunteers.

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Week 2: Prepare for your event 17. Create intake forms for clients to complete upon entry to the clinic. These forms should include the client’s name, address, phone number, email address, and the reason for the visit. 18. Create exit form for clinic visitors to complete. These forms should ask visitors to assess the usefulness of the clinic and assess their satisfaction with the help they received. 19. Make the appropriate number of copies of all forms based on your target audience. 20. Order or solicit donations for tables, chairs, and supplies (markers, pens, pencils, name tags, etc) for the event. 21. Secure parking passes for your guests, if necessary. Week of Event: 22. Publicize within law school and surrounding community one last time. 23. Confirm student, faculty and attorney participation. 24. Create signs to be posted outside and within the law school to guide clinic visitors to the clinic location. 25. Assign roles to volunteers. For example, volunteers should be designated for check in, tables, greeters, refreshments, and the question and answer session etc. 26. Host a session to review the purpose of the clinic with volunteers and disseminate any necessary information. Day of Event: 27. Arrive 1-2 hours early for event set-up. 28. All participants should have a name tag. 29. Post a signs on the exterior of the clinic location to guide guests. 30. Identify each table as a station so that guests can recognize them easily. For example, welcome table, exit table etc. 31. Allow each guest to fill out a program survey before leaving. For example, the survey should include, what they liked, what they did not like, how the program can be improved. After the Clinic: 32. Send thank you cards to all volunteers. 33. Schedule a meeting with all volunteers and planning staff to plan the next clinic.

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RECLAIMING THE RIGHT, VOTER RESTORATION CLINIC: GRASSROOTS ORGANIZATION CONTACTS Organization

Contact Information

Website Link

Justice Maryland

http://www.justicemaryland. Kimberly Haven kimberly@justicemaryl org/ and.org

Brennan Center for Justice

http://www.brennancenter.or Erika Wood woode@exchange.law. g/ nyu.edu

brennancenter@nyu.ed u

Contact Persons: Erika Glenn at glenn.erika@gmail.com; G.C. Murray at vote@nblsa.org

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

RECOGNIZE THE VOTE: Synopsis: Timeline one week process Recognize the Vote is a program implemented at the chapter level with support from the Board of Elections. This program seeks to raise social consciousness and increase voter participation. Educating voters allows them the opportunity to connect with the candidates that seek political office. Measure of Success: Success will be measured qualitatively. Students must organize sufficient materials to educate their campus and community. Students will increase the knowledge of their student body and community by improving their understanding of the job descriptions and roles of candidates running for election. PROCESS: Steps 1. Contact your local state Board of Elections. 2. Create a form that asks students questions relating to the job descriptions and positions held by candidates running for elections. 3. Determine the election schedule. 4. Make a calendar of all election dates. 5. Research the candidates. Find out who is running and what race they are running for. 6. Make a list of all candidates and the seat that they are running for. 7. Research the job description of the candidate. 8. Make a list of things each position deals with. (this is kind of vague) 9. Research the incumbent that held the seat prior to the race or is currently in the position. 10. Find out things that the official currently serving, has done. 11. Make a list of possible questions each candidate could answer. The list of questions should include, how they seek to improve the position and improve the issues that is associated with the position they seek. 12. Tailor some of the questions specifically to students. For example, how does this person’s decision influence or affect student life. 13. Create flyers announcing the next election. 14. Post pictures of each candidate, their platform, the position they seek, their contact information, biography, possible questions they could answer, voter registration dates, early voting dates, regular voting dates and ways their decision making process could influence students. 15. Encourage students to contact these candidates with questions. 16. Provide an incentive for students to contact candidates. For example, the student who asks the most questions and receives the most answers to their questions may be awarded a prize. 17. Create a second review form that asks students questions relating to the job description and positions held by candidates running for office. Review the responses from each form to gauge the increase of understanding students have about candidates and their job descriptions.

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. This program requires contact with your state Board of Elections and minimal online research. If you find a specific grassroots organization that is pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

Contact Persons: Germaine Austin at socialaction@nblsa.org; G.C. Murray at vote@nblsa.org; and Elizabeth Humphrey at ebeth.humphrey@gmail.com.

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

ELECTION PROTECTION: Synopsis: Timeline four weeks, depending on schedule of state representative from Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. Registration Nation is a program implemented on the chapter level with support from grassroots organizations. This program seeks to encourage a fair elections process locally and nationally. Encouraging a fair elections process increases voter participation and registration. Measure of Success: Success will be measured quantatatively. Each local chapter must have at least eight (8) participants that will partner with the Lawyers Committee to help with election protection issues. PROCESS: Steps 1. Contact the local board of elections for an accurate elections schedule. 2. Create an Elections Protection Calendar, do this for the local and national elections. 3. Access the election protection link and read the Elections protection Overview letter located on the NBLSA website. 4. Access the Election protection link and read the Election Protection Target States letter. 5. If you do not see your state, access the Election Protection Target States with Jurisdiction Letter, to view additional states. If you still don’t see your state, please contact the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org. 6. Contact the Election Protection Lawyers’ Committee staff member assigned to your state. 7. Inquire about Election Protection Training for the elections. 8. Choose a group of five people to go through the training that can help with election protection. 9. Make a list of those who agree to help with election protection. Make sure you get their contact information. 10. Make an email distribution group of the volunteers for election protection. 11. Make sure everyone marks their calendars for the election protection training dates and the day must perform their election protection duties. 12. Keep in contact with the election protection representative once a week, for updates. 13. Check the Election Protection section on the NBLSA website to see if there are any updates about the elections process in your state. 14. If there are any updates, print them out and use them as a resource. 15. Make sure you keep up with the dates and times for all training and elections pertaining to your state.

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ELECTION PROTECTION: GRASSROOTS ORGANIZATION SUPPORT ORGANIZATION

CONTACT INFORMATION

LAWYERS’ COMMITTEE Marcia F. Johnson-Blanco PHONE: 202-256-2588 FOR CIVIL RIGHTS MOBILE: 202-628-2852 UNDER LAW

WEBSITE LINK http://www.lawyerscommittee.org/

Contact Person: National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

POLL WORKER: Synopsis: Timeframe 3 Weeks The Poll Worker program is a program implemented on the chapter level with support from the region. Poll workers are very important. The United States Elections Commission believes that they are needed to ensure that elections are a success. Measure of Success: Success will be measured quantatatively. Each local chapter must have at least two participants as poll workers in local, and/or state elections. PROCESS: Steps 1. Access the compendium of State Poll worker requirements from the United States Election Commission. This document should already be located on the NBLSA website to provide you with easier access. 2. Read the legal criteria for the selection of poll workers. 3. Find out if you must be a registered voter in the state. 4. Find out if there is an age requirement. 5. Find out if there is a residency requirement. 6. Find out if a political party affiliation is required. 7. Select a team of people from your chapter and/or school that will be poll workers during elections. 8. For more support, you may want to expand the opportunity to be poll workers to undergraduate students. 9. Contact your Election Office. You can obtain information on your respective office using the following link: http://www.eac.gov/voter_resources/contact_your_state.aspx Announce who you are, what organization you are with and your willingness to help as a poll worker. The Elections Office will be happy to add you to the Election Day team. 10. Review the Poll Worker quick start guide located on the NBLSA website. 11. Record all important dates for training and elections. 12. Keep in contact with the Election Office once a week for updates and changes. 13. If you have any questions, please refer to the frequently asked questions section on the United States Election Commission. This link is located in the box below. 14. If you still have questions after reviewing the frequently asked questions section, please contact your state Election Office. (AGAIN CHECK ALL FONTS AND LINKS FOR CONSISTENCY) Organization United States Election Assistance Commission

Contact Information 1866-747-1471 (toll free) Or 202-566-3100 HAVAinfo@eac.gov

Weblink (spelling?) http://www.eac.gov/

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Organization State Election Office

Contact Information

Weblink (spelling?)

1866-747-1471 (toll free) Or 202-566-3100 HAVAinfo@eac.gov

http://www.eac.gov/voter_resources/f requently_asked_questions.aspx

Frequently Asked Questions 1866-747-1471 (toll free) Or 202-566-3100 HAVAinfo@eac.gov

http://www.eac.gov/voter_resources/f requently_asked_questions.aspx

Contact Person: Germaine Austin at austingermaine@gmail.com

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SOCIAL ACTION RALLY: Synopsis: nine weeks The Social Action rally is a program implemented at the local chapter, regional, or national level. This program seeks to educate and encourage the support for a social justice initiative that fights for the civil liberties of others. The social action rally will embrace the legacy of grassroots organizations while exposing issues that concern the community. The issue must affect a large population of people. The social action rally will also push for support of legislation that will improve the issue it seeks to expose. In the past, this program started with a Unity Event and concluded with the rally. The purpose of the Unity Event is for rally supporters to eat breakfast, make signs for the rally and get acquainted before marching to the social action rally site. Two hours were allotted for the Unity Event previously. After the Unity Event, supporters assembled in a designated location with a local choir and/or band to march to the social action rally site. During the march the local choir and band would lead the crowd through a series of motivational songs, chants and beats. Measure of Success: Success will be measured quantitatively. Each local chapter must meet their target turn out rate by eighty percent (80%). PROCESS: Steps WEEK ONE: 1. Choose a two-month interval to have the rally. One month is for planning and one month to educate others about the rally topic. The rally should be right after this two-month interval. 2. The National Black Law Students Association (NBLSA) has particular initiatives that it will focus on each year. The social action rally will center around one or two of these initiatives. 3. Write down each of the National Black Law students Association’s initiative that they will focus on for the year. 4. Create a list of grassroots organizations that focus on the initiatives chosen by the National Black Law Students Association (ie. Juvenile Justice-National Institute for Juvenile Justice). 5. Choose a target turn out rate for the social action rally. Please consider the number of members in your chapter and number of undergraduate and law school students on your campus. 6. Contact each grassroots organization that was previously recorded in step four. Discuss the initiatives with each grassroots organization. 7. Write down the subtopics and major topics discussed with each grassroots organization. 8. Make a list of topics and subtopics under each NBLSA initiative. Focus on the most controversial and common topics or subtopics that appear frequently under each NBLSA initiative. 9. Conduct a reasonable amount of research on each topic or subtopic from step seven. 10. Choose a topic that appears most frequently, is controversial, is more appealing or will impact the largest population of people. 18


2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

11. Make a final list of all grassroots organizations that are focusing on the topic chosen from step nine. 12. Solicit information regarding the topic from each grassroots organization. Ask each organization if they have speakers who can educate students and the community on the topic. WEEK TWO: 13. Make a planning map. Chose a date for the social action rally. Allow a month for planning prior to the rally. This will allow you to educate the campus and student body about the topic/issue. For example, if the start date is October 15, you should start planning programs between September 15 and October 15. The rally should be around October 19. 14. The Planning map should include: a. Date of the rally b. Budget for the rally c. Three possible venues for the rally, three possible inside venues (rain locations), three possible venues for a Unity Event and dates for each venue’s confirmation. d. Each rally venue should be in close proximity to the Unity Event venue. The distance between the rally venue and each unity event venue should not exceed two miles. e. Grassroots organization that will help with speakers and publicity (contact information). f. If venues have costs associated with its use, an invoice should be prepared by each venue before confirmation. g. Explanation of the social action rally topic. h. Target audience and expected number of attendees. i. If food will be served at the Unity Event, write down four possible vendors and request an invoice from each vendor for the expected number of attendees. j. Step by step analysis for the execution of the Unity Event (record a start time, finish time, and time when everyone can get together to march to the rally site (ie. 9:30 am-start time, 9:33-welcome, 9:40-make signs and mingle, 11:00 amassemble in front of the main building and prepare to march to the rally location). k. Step by step analysis of the social action rally (ie. 11:30 am-arrive at the rally site, 11:35-introduce first speaker, 11:40 am-first speaker delivers speech). l. Vendor for rally materials (signs, markers). In the past, foam boards were perfect for making signs. You can buy foam boards from art supply stores and Home Depot. Request invoices from the possible vendors chosen for rally materials. m. Names of possible cross guards that will help rally participants cross the street during the march to the rally site. n. Designate someone to take pictures and record the event. o. Designate someone to be the host or hostess of the event (someone that will make sure the speakers have everything they need, water etc.).

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p. Designate someone to take care of A/V, podium, and microphone needs for the speakers at the rally. q. Designate a group or someone that will lead the crowd with songs and chants while everyone is marching. r. Find out if security is needed for the event and make sure you know who will provide security. s. Find parking accommodations for speakers.

15. Write down the name of each venue and the contact information for each venue (i.e. if the venue is at a Law School or University, contact facilities and inquire about the venue reservation process. You may also contact the BLSA chapter at the Law School for help and support). If the program is with a venue that is not located on a school campus, contact the venue owner. 16. Discuss the social action rally with the venue owner. Refer to the planning map for specific information. 17. Start the process to confirm all venues, make sure you stay in contact with venue coordinators twice a week once the process starts. 18. The social action rally can incorporate a local university band and a local university choir (band can play drums and instruments while marching, choir can sing at the beginning of the rally and the end). WEEK THREE: 19. Make a list of speakers that could speak at the social action rally. Most of these speakers should be recommendations from the grassroots organizations. 20. Write an invitation letter for each speaker, inviting each speaker to the social action rally. Send a letter to each speaker and ask for a confirmation by a specific date. 21. Make sure you continue to check on the confirmations for, food invoice, water, speakers, rally venue, rain venue for rally and unity event, and rally materials invoice. WEEK FOUR: 22. Plan informational programs. Pick dates between your month timeframe previously chosen for programs. 23. Get contact information for all campus organizations from Student Services or from the Student Government Association Center at your undergraduate university. Remember that you may also have to get a list of the law school organizations and their contacts from the Student Bar Association. 24. Email and call all organizations. Inform each organization and/or organization leader about the social action rally and discuss the implementation of programs that could educate and inform students. 25. Use the materials from previous research and organizations that discusses the rally topic. Contact the grassroots organizations for potential speakers who can educate students on the topic.

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26. Make constant announcements about educational programs concerning the rally topic and continue to announce the social action rally. 27. Choose the type of programs you would like to host. For example, panels, and programs that allow students to experience the issue first hand. 28. Make sure you continue to check on the confirmations for, food invoice, water, speakers, rally venue, rain venue for rally and unity event, and rally materials invoice. 29. Make flyers, Facebook group, inform school publications such as newspapers and magazines about the event. Spend time publicizing the social action rally and unity event (publicize the unity event if it was used). WEEK FIVE: 30. Help host informative programs about the social action rally topic and continue to remind everyone about the social action rally. 31. All venues should be confirmed, three possible social action rally venues and rain location, and the Unity Event venue and rain location. Invoice for food, and rally materials should be finalized and submitted to the payment process. You should know how and who will take care of the A/V needs, podium, and microphone for speakers. you should know who the cross guards are, who the hostess/host is for the speakers at the rally, who will provide security for the rally and who will help clean up the rally and unity event area. All speakers should be confirmed. You should know where speakers will park and how they will get to the rally location. In addition, you should know who will lead the crowd during the march to the rally location. 32. Make a detailed step-by-step list of last minute things that should be taken care of before the social action rally occurs. Think of worse case scenarios and a course of action if each worse case scenario occurs. WEEK SIX: 33. Publicize the social action rally. 34. Check on the venues. If all venues are confirmed send a follow up email to make sure nothing has changed. Send speakers a follow up email to make sure nothing has changed. Send emails to supporters, try to get confirmations. Figure out how many people intend to attend the event. 35. Create a spreadsheet listing confirmed guests. 36. Execute the last minute list created in step thirty one. WEEK EIGHT: 37. Hold a meeting with everyone that is participating in the social action rally. Make sure everyone knows their role and point of contact in case things happen. Make sure everyone knows how to handle certain emergencies and the time everyone will meet. 38. Make another last minute list to make sure there are no outstanding items. 39. Send a letter to all speakers to make sure they know what time to arrive, the speaking order, parking situations and talking points. 40. Designate three people that can make calls and send last minute email reminders to confirmed rally supporters.

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WEEK NINE: 41. Arrive at the event early, contact all rally helpers to make sure everyone is accounted for. 42. Have rally helpers continue contacting confirmed rally supporters by email and phone. 43. Enjoy the social action rally.

Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organization help depends on the type of initiative and topics chosen. Contact person: Germaine Austin at socialaction@nblsa.org

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SOCIAL JUSTICE INFOMERCIAL: Synopsis: Timeframe twelve weeks The Infomercial is a program implemented at the chapter level with support from the region. This program seeks to help the traditionally underrepresented populations: minorities, undergraduate, and graduate students by making sure they are registered voters. Helping others to hear the voice of one promotes the representation of many. In the past, this program has substantially improved voter turnout in local, state and national elections. Measure of Success: Success will be measured quantitatively. Students will encourage participants to view the infomercial every week. The infomercial viewing must increase by forty percent (40%) every week. Success will also be measured qualitatively through feedback from participants and viewers. PROCESS: Steps WEEKS ONE & TWO: 1. The National Black Law Students Association has particular initiatives that it will focus on each year. The infomercial will focus on a controversial issue that deals with one of the initiatives the National Black Law Students Association selects. 2. Please follow steps three through ten from the social action rally initiative (social action rally steps 3-10). 3. Create a Timeline for the Infomercial 4. Decide the budget for the infomercial. The Budget for the infomercial may vary and depends on the infomercials target audience (ie. national target, local target). 5. Decide the length of the infomercial (usually 28-30 minutes). 6. Decide the publicity channels for the infomercial (ie. youtube, Facebook, local television stations). 7. Decide where and when the infomercial will be produced 8. Create a sponsorship packet for grassroots organizations focusing on the topic chosen. These grassroots organizations were previously recorded in step ten (10) of the social action rally initiative. 9. The sponsorship packet should include: a. Infomercial topic b. Description of Infomercial c. Scene by scene analysis of infomercial d. Benefits to sponsors of infomercial (suggested benefits: name in the credits, sponsorship logo and representative seen at the end of the infomercial approving the infomercial). e. Expected Budget for Infomercial f. Explanation of how money should be raised from sponsorships and how it is used. g. Impact of infomercial on community and target audience h. When and where the infomercial will be produced 23


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8. Research production companies in the area where the infomercial will be produced. 9. Solicit an invoice from each production company. 10. If the infomercial is a nationally televised infomercial make sure each invoice includes expected fees for airtime. Make sure each invoice is detailed (explanations, prices and titles, cost associated with each task and labor). 11. Draft a letter to solicit actors for the infomercial (for greater impact, the actors should include those who have been impacted by the topic the infomercial seeks to expose). 12. Send out letters to grassroots organization seeking help to find actors. 13. Send out the infomercial sponsorship packet to grassroots seeking sponsorship funding. WEEKS THREE & FOUR: 14. Check for responses to sponsorship funding and recommended actors. 15. Check in with all grassroots you contacted previously about sponsorship funding and recommended actors for the infomercial (calls and follow up emails). 16. Follow up with all production companies after reviewing each invoice; ask for specific explanations if any is needed. WEEKS FIVE & SIX: 17. Finalize proposed invoice and a production company. Make sure the invoice is very detailed and explains the step-by-step process of how the commercial will be produced. 18. Send the invoice to your executive board for review and vote. 19. Draft a thank you letter for all actors who decided to participate in the commercial (continue to search for actors if you do not have enough to complete the infomercial). 20. Draft a sponsorship letter to all sponsors, thank them and reiterate how the infomercial will benefit them. 21. Send bi-weekly progress to all sponsors, discuss the current status of the infomercial, how funds are being used and expected completion time. 22. Do research and read stories of all recommended actors for the commercial. 23. Determine a strategic way each story should be told and how it should be told to the target audience. WEEKS SEVEN-ELEVEN: 24. Invoice should be finalized and the production company with winning contract should be notified. 25. Conduct six to seven meetings with all actors to determine parts and step by step process of each actor’s role (meetings may vary depending on number of actors, and impact of topic chosen). 26. Set up a meeting with the production company to discuss the length of the infomercial, the actors and scenes. 27. Review and edit a new timeline for the infomercial. Send the timeline to sponsors. Remember, it is very important to keep all sponsors informed and engaged in the infomercial.

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28. Set up a conference call or in person meeting with all actors and infomercial producer to discuss scenes, roles and how infomercial will be conducted. 29. Determine costume design for actors in infomercial. 30. Buy or solicit donations for costumes if necessary. WEEK TWELVE: 31. Send out a letter to all infomercial participants regarding a time to meet, meeting place and step by step process of infomercial. 32. Make sure everyone knows you are available for any questions 33. Check in with the production company and actors to make sure everyone knows their roles and has all needed materials. 34. Make sure everyone knows how they will get to the production site and the importance of showing up two hours early for rehearsal. 35. Shoot the infomercial. 36. Conduct an after action review/debriefing of how the infomercial was conducted. 37. Make sure infomercial will be shown on publicity channels previously determined in step six. 38. Send thank you notes to all actors, sponsors and production companies. Contact person: Germaine Austin at socialaction@nblsa.org The following production companies are recommendations that were considered for previous infomercials. These companies have been assessed for value, reasonable cost and quality. However, all invoice options must still be approved by your executive board and financial director. Company Name LoneWolf Generation Productions

Contact Information Sharmaine Richardson loneWolfGeneration@gmail.com Phone: (704) 575-6363

Impression House

Gerard Farrow gefarrow@gmail.com (919) 270-7191

Target Audience from Previous Infomercial Local and regional (YouTube, Facebook and other local distribution channels) vendor was never used for the creation of infomercials with airtime implications. Regional and National Use. Produces Infomercials for broadcasting use, television ready. Will also inject commercials in YouTube, Facebook and any other media channels.

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CANDIDATES FORUM: Synopsis: Timeframe three weeks The program will provide law students with an opportunity to learn more about the candidates’ vision for Durham, and communicate directly with candidates about their concerns. The Forum is designed to allow students to ask questions in order to make informed votes in the upcoming election. It’s very important to remember that NBLSA has an active 501 (c)(3) status and thus CANNOT and WILL NOT endorse any candidates. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose two locations that are convenient for students and provide candidates an opportunity to visit the law school. 2. Start the process for booking at least two possible venues. 3. Choose a date that is near the final election. In the past, this event has been held a week prior to the election. 4. Choose the reach of the candidate forum, local or state election. 5. Send invitation letters to all candidates running for an elected office; include a non partisan disclaimer in the letters. 6. Send a press release to the local media. 7. Follow up with candidates with format and specifics of the event 8. Promote the event to students by making announcements in classes, posting flyers on bulletin boards, Facebook messages, emails and word of mouth 9. Develop a candidate’s guide which provides information on each candidate’s place of employment, education, website, endorsements and record of elective service. Also, include the duties each office must perform and how its relationship to students. 10. Reserve parking for the candidates and do not allow negative campaign material to be distributed by candidates about their respective opponents. 11. Select a facilitator from the chapter to keep the program moving timely. The facilitator must announce a disclaimer at the beginning of the program, “NBLSA is a non partisan organization, invitation was sent to all candidates.” 12. Designate a time frame for each segment of the forum. 13. Have each audience member submit a question for the candidates. 14. Have an assistant pre-select the questions for the facilitator. 15. Send thank you letters to each of the candidates for coming. 27


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Contact person: DeWarren Langely at dlange2@mail.nccu.edu Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. Students may solicit the help of their state Board of Elections. This program must remain non partisan.

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DEJA VU: CULTURAL AND POLITICAL RESPONSES TO DISASTER Synopsis: Timeframe three weeks This program should fall during Black History Month. It is a retrospective panel on the recent earthquake disaster in Haiti and the continuing impact of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. "Deja Vu" inspires thoughtful reflection and analysis of the impact of natural disasters on the communities where they hit. Students, faculty, and staff members will engage in a panel discussion that leads to continuing conversations. Then a fundraiser will be held in conjunction with other organizations, to support the communities that were impacted by natural disasters. The goal of this panel is to examine how quickly we mobilize, how deeply we sympathize, and how strongly these events shape legal, legislative and cultural relationships, policies, and attitudes. This program may discuss the cultural and political responses to any current disaster. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose a date that falls within the month of February in honor of Black History Month. 2. Choose a location within the school that will accommodate chairs, tables and is wired for microphones. 3. Choose panelists that are known for their advocacy and knowledge of political, international and historical issues facing the African-American community. 4. Write a letter inviting the panelists to become part of the event. Contact can also be made via phone calls, emails or paper invitations. 5. Post information about the topic on walls and in classrooms. 6. Invite other organizations to bring their members to the program. 7. Publicize via fliers, word of mouth and listservs. 8. Choose a facilitator and pre-select questions, or have the audience ask questions during the panel. 9. Send thank you notes to all panelists upon completion of the program. Contact Person: Ashley L. Banks at abanks1@tulane.edu Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations have not been used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

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MOVIE MAYHEM: Synopsis: Movie Mayhem is a local chapter program supported by school organizations. This program seeks to educate students on current events and controversial issues that affect humanity and society. Students will discuss how the issues relate to their culture, values and beliefs and will focus on ways society can be more tolerant and understanding of different cultures. This idea was inspired by the Spike Lee movie, "Do the Right Thing.", a film exploring the minor racial tensions between Asian, Black and Italian Americans living in Brooklyn, NY. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. Program coordinators may also gauge success from the quality of discussions. PROCESS: Steps 1. Make a list of the cultural organizations at your university and/or law school. For example, the Native American Law Student Organization, Black Law Students Association, and the Hispanic Law Student Association (include university groups as well). 2. Create an email distribution list of all organization leaders. 3. Email all leaders to secure a date for a conference meeting/call. 4. Organize a meeting with all organization leaders to discuss the program idea. Pitch the idea and make a list of those who support the idea. 5. Chose dates where each organization would pick a topic that has been controversial to their race, culture or beliefs, and create a YouTube video or movie slide show that discusses the controversial issue/topic. 6. Each organization, individually, will choose the venue, provide food and write discussion questions for their event or session. 7. Set up an agenda for event activities.. For example, ice breaker for 10 minutes, the movie clips or video may last 30 minutes. The discussion question section may last 30 minutes, and the recording, review and next steps discussion may last 5 minutes. 8. Create flyers to publicize the dates and events at your university. 9. After each session discuss and record the topics that were covered . Document ways society can be more tolerant and understanding towards the race and cultures affected by the issue. 10. Announce the time and place of the next session. 11. At the end of the year after all sessions are complete, create a manual that focuses on cultural toleration. For example, you may title the manual, “Cultural Tolerance in America.�

Contact Person: Tianna Mays at tmayswvu@gmail.com

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Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organization that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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CONSTANCE BAKER MOTLEY LECTURE SERIES: Synopsis: Timeframe for each series is four weeks. Synopsis: Timeframe for each series four weeks. The program seeks to increase intellectual dialogue on campus and to raise awareness of legal issues related to communities of color and disenfranchised communities. The intended audience are students. Two programs can be held, one in the fall and another in the spring. The following topics were used previously, however, the program may focus on any current controversial issue. Fall: A Program was facilitated to discuss the crisis in Darfur. Spring: A panel discussion was held to discuss the expansion of religious profiling as a new form of racial profiling. Panel guests provided their perspectives on the evolution of racial profiling, and facilitated discussions on racial profiling as a violation of the First and Fourth Amendment. Discussion topics included religious profiling as a violation of free exercise of religion and its its unreasonableness under the Fourth Amendment. Future panelists should address the legal and political considerations of the First Amendment and Fourth Amendment regarding policies enacted after 9/11, and those in reference to the War on Terror. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose a convenient date for the chapter. In the past the program was implemented once a semester to encourage continuity. 2. Choose a spacious location to host the program. In the past it was located in the Law School’s lecture hall. The program was located in a lecture hall big enough to accommodate a large audience. 3. Go through the proper reservation process to reserve the locations. 4. Identify the issues you want to discuss. 5. Contact organizations that can provide knowledgeable panelists. For example, the ACLU can provide an attorney for the racial profiling program. 6. Publicize through the listservs, and post signs around campus. 7. Identify a program facilitator and draft a program that includes all logistical information. 8. Contact the catering service at your school or choose an external source to provide food for your guests. catering to provide food or choose an outside source. Verify the setup time a week prior to the event to prevent any catering mishaps. 9. Send an official invitation letter to all speakers. 10. Send thank you notes to each panelist at the close of the program.

Contact Person: Kellsie Barton at kellsie.barton@gmail.com 32


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Organization American Civil Liberties Union

Contact Information General Contact

Website Link http://www.aclu.org/contact-us

212-549-2500

Note: if you have suggestions for other grassroots organizations that were instrumental to the success of this program, please send an email to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

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1L RESUME/INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP Synopsis: Timeframe six weeks This program is geared toward 1L students who are unfamiliar with the legal job search process. The program, however, is not limited to 1Ls and encourages 2L and 3L students to participate. The program begins with a resume collection sometime in early October. The resumes (3 per participant) are then given to members of a hiring committee at a local law firm for review. The resumes are returned in early December. At that time, resumes are reviewed, critiqued, and a program is held where advice is given for successful resumes. The program also covers interviewing skills and learning how to make your interview compliment your resume. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. Success may also be measured qualitatively through feedback from the participants. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose a convenient date that allows 1Ls to begin their summer internship application process. Note: The ABA indicates that 1Ls are NOT allowed to begin applying for summer jobs until after December 1. 2. Send emails in November asking for the 1Ls to send in drafts of their resumes to be a part of the review process. 3. Utilize Career Services to locate alumni at local law firms that would be willing to review the resumes. 4. Choose a location that allows for the most 1Ls to attend given that December is at the end of the semester and students don't desire to waste valuable outlining/studying time traveling to a program. A classroom setting is recommended. 5. Publicize the event by sending a 'save the date' email, a 'grand announcement' email, and then a reminder email the day before the event. 6. Purchase snacks for the program. Keep things light as heavy foods may distract from the program. 7. Put together a presentation with interview tips, common errors and expected resume content. 8. Incorporate mock practice interviews with time for peer critiques into the presentation. 9. Make photocopies of the presentation for the presenters and the attendees. Contact Person: Dwight A. Bailey at DBailey@law.villanova.edu Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. Program coordinators can partner with local firms and their school’s career services center. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org 35


2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

SPIRIT OF SERVICE (SOS) Synopsis: Timeframe two weeks SOS is an awards banquet recognizing people on campus that have helped and impacted others lives greatly. Nominations and voting are done by students. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose a date that gives the students time to recognize those who achieved success before finals. Spring semester works best as the students have interacted throughout the school year. 2. Choose a venue that is classy, will hold the target number of attendees and falls within the budget. 3. Produce a nomination packet or application. 4. Send out two months in advance of the event asking for nominations. 5. Publicize via emails, flyers, posting on digital screens, placements in the internal school newsletter and class announcements. 6. Secure catering for the event. 7. Once nominations are complete for each category, table during peak hours and collect votes. This is your time to be creative. Utilize electronic polling, pennies in a jar, etc. to collect the votes. 8. Send special invitations to the nominees to attend the event. 9. Draft a program for the event. 10. Purchase awards or print and frame certificates for the nominees and the winners. 11. Arrive at the venue two hours before the event to check the microphones, catering and table set ups. 12. HAVE FUN! Contact Person: FAMU BLSA at famu@nblsa.org Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

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1L MEET AND GREET: Synopsis: Timeframe four weeks The purpose of the event is to give incoming minority students the opportunity to meet one another, upperclassmen and alumni. It is a good idea to get the students together to meet one another to promote diversity. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose a location on campus that the 1Ls may be familiar with like the meeting place or social area of the Law School. 2. Contact your school to provide catering or utilize an outside source. 3. Send Evites to the incoming 1L law students. 4. Prepare goody bags for the attendees with tips and FAQs for making it through the year. 5. Purchase name tags and sharpies for the attendees to fill out. 6. Pull together a few ice breakers to get the students socializing. A good idea is Human Bingo where the students are given a bingo card and have to find as many students that match the characteristics as possible. For example, one of the squares might say “find someone who is from the South. 7. Designate a question and answer session after the ice breakers. 8. Follow-up with the 1Ls with emails throughout the year. Contact Person: Ashton Simmons at ashton.simmons@gmail.com Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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BLUE BOOKING SEMINAR: Synopsis: Timeframe three weeks This seminar targets 1Ls and is meant to focus on the common topics of the Blue Book that are used in legal writing. It is meant to supplement what is taught in the Legal Writing courses. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. PROCESS: Steps 1. Email upperclassmen to ask if there were any topics in the Blue Book that they used at summer internships. 2. Also ask if there are any topics that they struggle within the Blue Book. 3. Choose a date that falls before the 1Ls first major Blue Book assignment. 4. Secure a classroom within the Law School that is available for at least an hour. 5. Choose a time where the 1Ls have an hour or more break between classes. 6. Ask members of the Law Review to select several topics to discuss with the incoming 1Ls. 7. Ask the Legal Writing course professors to announce the event to their classes. 8. Promote the event on the school website and on social networking sites. 9. Provide tabs and highlighters to the 1Ls to assist in identifying key topics. 10. Follow-up by hosting another review session after the first assignment grades come back to discuss any questions or confusion regarding certain aspects of the Blue Book. Contact Person: Karen Best at bestkn@gmail.com Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. This program requires contact with Legal Writing professors and Law Firms that demand blue booking experience. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

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1L & UPPER LEVEL EXAM REVIEW SESSION Synopsis: Timeframe four weeks The 1L Exam Review Session is a local chapter program with support from law professors, academic support professors and bar review educators. This program seeks to improve the retention rate of first year students and improve the learning experience of upper level students. Students will review materials in classroom instruction, group settings and take mock exams. Measure of Success: A survey emailed to participants who attended the event can be used to measure the effectiveness, success, and areas of improvement of the review session. Additionally, a survey sent at the conclusion of the semester can evaluate whether the participants felt the review sessions adequately equipped them for their exams. PROCESS: Steps 1. Make a list of all contacts. Contacts should include well known professors, Bar Review educators, academic advisors, student tutors. All contacts should be knowledgeable of first year and upper level courses with the ability to teach the course to others in a easy, and efficient way. 2. Make a list of all the courses you seek to cover. It would be more beneficial for you to focus the list on first year courses and upper level courses that give students the most difficulty. 3. Depending on expertise, assign each contact a course that they will review or instruct during the review session. Create a contact email database with the email address of all contacts. 4. Create a student poll, manually or electronically, discussing topics students are having the most trouble with. Break the polls into courses. Then break the courses into topics. 5. Synthesize the polls into courses and topics that receive the most response according to difficulty. The courses and topics that receive the most responses according to difficulty are the courses and topics that should be reviewed. 6. Chose dates to hold the first year review session and the upper class review sessions. You may have to choose numerous dates depending on the difficulty of the subjects and the resources. 7. Create a special invitation to the contacts. Make the invitation formal. It would make more of an impact if the invitations were hard copy invitations. 8. Create an electronic invitation as a follow up invitation. This electronic invitation will go to all participants once they accept the offer to help with the exam review program. 9. Create the format for the Exam Review Sessions. Break sessions into First Year Review and Upper Class Review sessions. Each review session should be broken up. For example, reserve a day for exam review on special topics that give students the most difficulty. Then, reserve a day for the actual exam. Organize the format around a time frame. For example, the review session may be 1 1/2 hours and the exam may last 2 hours. 39


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10. Deliver all invitations to those on your contact list (bar preparation educators, professors, etc). 11. Send out the electronic invitations three days later. 12. Make a list of those who support the program. 13. Organize a meeting with each instructor that will help with the exam review. 14. In each meeting go over the format of the exam review and construct an exam that the professor will more than likely give on exam day. You may work with this professor to alter a previous year’s exam. 15. Designate a tutor that can work closely with this professor to write explanations for the exam questions. 16. Publicize the exam review sessions in the law school. Make sure the publicity appeals to all students. Also make it known that this event is a benefit of being a member of the Black Law Students Association. 17. Create a registration system for students who would like to participate in the exam review and the mock exam. Make sure students know that it’s a first come first serve event they must register for. Pick the window for registration, an opening day and a date registration will end. Make sure the close date is at least four days before the actual exam. 18. On exam review day, have snacks and sign in sheets for those that registered. Divide each table alphabetically and create lines for individuals to check in. Check off names as guests arrive. Have instructors lecture on the topics previously selected. You may have professors lecture at different times. For example, from 9:00 am - 11:00 am the focus can be Torts. Professor John Doe can conduct an exam review on intentional torts from 9:00 am-9:45 am and Professor Jane Doe will focus on unintentional torts (negligence) from 10:00 am - 11:00 am. 19. On Exam days, conduct the same sign in process as the exam review days. Designate someone to proctor the exam. Make sure this person is great at keeping track of time. After the exam, go through the questions and answers. Have a tutor (preferably the person who worked with the professor to go over the explanations) work through over the answers and explanations after the exam. You may want to have food at the exam and exam review events. 20. Solicit feedback from the students who participated. 21. Conduct an after action review on how to improve the exam review sessions.

Contact Persons: Celina Fletcher at cfletch9@eagles.nccu.edu; Germaine Austin at socialaction@nblsa.org; and local Indiana BLSA chapters.

Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

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2010 CENSUS EDUCATION AT BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB: Synopsis: Timeframe four weeks This program is geared towards informing children and their parents about the importance of completing the 2010 Census. This program will also illustrated how the information gathered from the census will be collected and utilized throughout the community. In the past, BLSA members visited a local Boys and Girls Club with nearly 40-50 children (majority AfricanAmerican) within the K-5 age range. Children were encouraged to inform their parents or guardians by distributing handouts containing the information to them. In efforts to demonstrate how the Census would be used, members developed a sample child-friendly census which allowed the children to become engaged with the information they were learning. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The success of the program may also be measured qualitatively. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. Program coordinators should ask students specific questions after the program, to gauge their understanding of topic. PROCESS: Steps 1. Identify the target Boys and Girls Club and contact the administration 2. Choose a date with a high availability of your membership (an option would be to choose a date around your local “community service” week) 3. Make announcements at the BLSA membership meetings of the upcoming programs. 4. Review the NBLSA Census materials 5. Modify the materials as needed to make them child friendly 6. Develop a fact sheet for the parents of the children 7. Buy goodies to encourage participation (i.e. when a child participates or answers, he or she gets a small treat. 8. Engage the children in a discussion on the importance of the Census. Incorporate ice breakers and “counting persons” games. 9. Distribute the fact sheet and instruct the children to share it with their parents. 10.Send a thank you note to the administration of the Boys and Girls Club. Contact Person: Brandon Allen-Santos at allen.santos06@gmail.com Organization United States Census Bureau

Contact Information

Website Link

Contact persons are different http://www.census.gov/ state by state, locate your state on the website and call your representative

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SAFE HALLOWEEN Synopsis: Timeframe two weeks The purpose of this event is to provide a safe environment for the children of your community to experience trick or treating, games, and other fun on Halloween night. There are safety issues that prevent many families from providing their children with a Halloween experience, and we seek to alleviate that concern for the parents and children who attend our program. The implementing chapter will host elementary age children from local schools and house a variety of game stations including musical chairs, face painting, and relay races. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. Program coordinators should ask parents for feedback on the event’s success. PROCESS: Steps 1. Partner with other graduate and undergraduate student organizations to man the game stations and to decorate rooms in the Campus Center that serve as candy distribution points for “trick or treat�. 2. Choose a location that is large enough to accommodate the amount of children expected. 3. Choose a date as close to Halloween as possible. 4. Send solicitation letters to local businesses to have food, beverages, and candy donated or supplied at discount prices for our event. 5. Issue a press release to the local newspapers to inform them of the program as well. 6. Ask the administration to publicize the event to their students and parents. 7. Send personal letters to each of the principals of the area elementary. 8. Create a system to track each of the children that will enter the Campus Center (color coded bracelets & registration table) 9. Ensure that you have enough volunteers to monitor the expected amount of children. 10. Ensure that all volunteers attend a planning meeting where they will be notified of their stations and some pointers on interacting with the children. 11. Check all games to ensure they are organized to provide enough space for the children to play safely. 12. Pre-stuffed so that we can increase the flow of traffic at the event. Contact Person: Wali Rushdan II at wp99b@aol.com Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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LAWYERS IN THE CLASSROOM Synopsis: Timeframe four weeks This program seeks to improve the understanding of legal concepts among young black students, and involves speaking and implementing exercises at local elementary and middle schools. This program incentivizes children to excel in school by interacting with academically gifted and successful young black professionals. Additionally, their interest in pursuing a legal career may increase significantly. During the program, several BLSA members will travel to a local school and teach students how to analyze and apply different rules. For example, students will be presented with a general rule "No Weapons Allowed on school grounds". The students will then b given different scenarios in which they are to apply the rule. One scenario would involve the proper procedure students should follow if they see a gun right outside of school grounds. In this situation students should be encouraged to tell a teacher or administrator immediately instead of bringing the gun to an administrator or teacher. Through this exercise, the kids will begin to see how rules are applied to facts while allowing them to engage in their own analysis, with constructive feedback provided. Measure of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. The professionals involved in the program should come from various educational backgrounds. PROCESS: Steps 1. Contact school administration for the targeted schools. 2. Request the gymnasium or auditorium in order to reach all of the students at once. If this is not an option, attempt to put on the program during targeted class times. 3. Utilize internet resources to outline a lesson plan. Make sure it is interactive and incorporates child participation and skits. 4. Review the lesson plan with the school administration. 5. Recruit “teachers� from the BLSA chapter to lead the program. 6. Meet to rehearse the lesson plan. 7. Carpool to the targeted schools. 8. Send a thank you letter to the school administration. Contact Person: Chris Rothwell at BLSA@kentlaw.edu Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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SOUL FOOD LUNCH FOR DISASTER RELIEF EFFORTS Synopsis: Timeframe six weeks This program sought to impact the relief efforts in Haiti after 2010’s devastating earthquake. In the past, BLSA collaborated with other University of Michigan student organizations to raise money, and awareness in the hopes that the University of Michigan community would develop a continued interest in lending aid to Haiti.. The events consisted of a Soul Food Luncheon and screening of “Failing Haiti” (a documentary on Haiti), clothing and school supply drive, and a party.. BLSA members prepared and donated food for the Soul Food Lunch. “Failing Haiti” provides a brief history of Haiti, followed by events of 2004-2005. The film follows the violent events leading to the departure of President Aristide, and the everyday realities of Haitians.-The efforts yielded over $1300 and collected over 2,000 items from the clothing and supply drive. The supplies were shipped to Port-Au-Prince Haiti, and the money was donated to the relief efforts, via the Clinton-Bush Haiti Fund. This program may be implemented to provide disaster relief for any current event. Measure of Success: The planning committee needs to set targets for: (1) the number of general law students and community members in attendance; (2) the amount of money raised at the luncheon and party; and (3) number of donated articles of clothing. The program’s success is measured by the amount of participants at each program or social event and amount of money raised. The respective goals are: 70% local BLSA chapter attendance; 90% of general target audience; 90% of target fundraising from both the luncheon and the party; and 75% of clothing target. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose a date for the program with a high volume of students and faculty in the law school, 2. Choose a location that will accommodate programs serving food and showing films. A lunch area or main area that can fit multiple tables and chairs is optimal. 3. Start the venue reservation process. 4. Purchase or rent a copy of the documentary, “Failing Haiti.” [see comment below] 5. Decorate several large boxes for the clothing drive. . 6. Check out a projector and screen from your school’s library or technology department. 7. Secure catering from a well known soul food venue near campus or ask members of BLSA to prepare dishes. 8. Set very competitive ticket prices for the luncheon. 9. Publicize the event through school email, flyers, Facebook, Twitter, and advertisements in the school calendar. 10. Encourage other surrounding school organizations to advertise the event on their campuses as well.

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Please note: Be sure to budget appropriately for the cost of shipping the clothing materials. Shipping overseas can be quite costly if not planned for properly.[Include as much information about the film: the writer, director, or producer to make it easier to search for] Contact Persons: Stacey McClurkin at smcclurk@umich.edu; University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy (Dorothy Pirtle, 323-513-6276, pirtldor@umich.edu). Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. Program coordinators may partner with local businesses and restaurants. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

BRIDGING THE GAP Synopsis: Timeframe four weeks This program is a panel discussion, bringing young professionals from all fields together to discuss social problems facing the community. There are four main objectives: 1) to define the major issues facing African Americans in the community; 2) to provide concrete ways for young professionals to address these issues; 3) to provide a forum for young professionals to discuss these issues and network with each other and the distinguished panelists; and 4) to recognize the prominent individuals in our community. Measures of Success: (1) number of BLSA members, general law students, and community members in attendance; (2) number of panelists; (3) span of panelists’ backgrounds; and (4) civic leaders and professional organizations in attendance. Goals include: 90% of local BLSA chapter attendance; 90% of general target audience attendance; eight (8) panelists from a wide span of social, legal, business and political backgrounds (with no two panelists coming from the same background); and four (4) civic leaders and/or professional organizations in attendance. PROCESS: Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Choose the target discussion topics. Choose a timely and convenient date for the program. Reserve a location that is central and familiar to the law students. Reserve microphones, speakers, tables, chairs, and light refreshments (if applicable). Choose the target panelists and send personal invitations. In the past, eight panelists from government, business, consulting, and public relations attended the discussion. 6. Utilize various Congressional offices and professional organizations to recruit the panelists. 7. Publicize through email blasts, flyers, signs on campus and work of mouth. 8. Make name tags and name plates for the panelists. 9. Purchase and gift wrap small gifts for the panelists.Set up tables in the location and check microphones and projector screens as necessary. 10. Choose a facilitator from the chapter. 11. Pre-draft conversation topics or take questions from the attendees. 12. Honor the panelists during the program with a small gift within budget. 13. Send thank you notes to the panelists after the program. Contact Person: Britni Rillera at britni.paige@gmail.com Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

JAZZ FOR JUSTICE Synopsis: Timeframe six weeks This program is intended to provide a need-based scholarship for law students. The event targets minority law students, alumni, and the surrounding community, creating an opportunity to meet other African-Americans in the legal field. This is generally a four to five hour event featuring a jazz band. During this program, there is the option of also honoring past alumnae and past BLSA members who have had distinguished careers. Measures of Success: (1) Attendance from local BLSA chapter; (2) attendance from general law school; (2) alumni attendance; (3) number of scholarships given; and (4) amount of scholarship(s). Goals are: 90% of local BLSA membership attendance; 75% of target from general law school; 75% of alumni attendance; and one scholarship awarded of at least $1,000. PROCESS: Steps 1. Introduce the program at your general body meeting. 2. Invite alumni and keep a list of all who RSVP. 3. Follow up with phone calls to those who have not responded within two weeks of the event. [Do you mean two weeks before the event? Consider calling two weeks after the initial invitation, or two weeks before the publicized RSVP date. 4. Choose a location that is most convenient and affordable for the chapter. In the past, the venue was a local hotel ballroom. 5. Determine if the location will provide light catering, if not, seek catering from an outside business if within the budget. 6. Start the process to confirm the location of the program. 7. Recruit a jazz band and negotiate an affordable hourly rate. Select student speakers affected by Hurricane Katrina or September 11th. 8. Determine the honorees for the event and purchase small tokens of appreciation 9. Develop the program for your event making sure it flows smoothly and without error. 10. Print up cheap tickets for the event and determine a selling price. 11. Begin tabling for the event ticket sales and advertising in well-traveled areas of the law school. 12. Arrive at the location to set up any decorations. 13. Send a thank you note to each speaker and honoree at the close of the event. Contact Person: DeVoia Stewart at stewartd@pegasus.rutgers.edu Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. If you find specific grassroots organizations that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

SUMMER MINORITY LEGAL SUMMIT Synopsis: Timeframe seven weeks The program was created as a pipeline to increase diversity in the legal profession by forming connections between undergraduate minorities, current law students, attorneys, and judges. This program is open to high school and undergraduate students interested in attending law school in the near future. There can also be an application information session as well as a law student panel and an attorney panel. The students at the summit are allowed to stop and ask questions at any point. Added bonuses would be a resume workshop and a tour of the Law School. Measures of Success: Success may be measured quantitatively. The program coordinators should set a target attendance rate. The program should achieve 90% of the suggested attendance rate. Success can also be measured qualitatively. Program coordinators should also create a form to solicit feedback from participants. PROCESS: Steps 1. Choose a convenient date. In the past the program was held in the summer so it would not interfere with school and work obligations. 2. Choose a convenient location. This program was recently implemented in a new student center in the Law School. This student center has great meeting sites and conference rooms that are free to student organizations. 3. Contact the person in charge of making the reservations before the end of the school year and reserve a room that would seat your goal number of attendees. 4. Collaborate wherever possible. This program was a joint effort with the Latino Law Student Association and the Office of Admissions. 5. Create flyers and distribute them on campus and in the community. 6. Send out a mass email to surrounding universities, community colleges and high schools. 7. Contact the local newspapers, the campus newspaper, and television stations and issue a full press release. 8. Compose a PowerPoint presentation that includes information on the C.L.E.O. program. One of the members can briefly run through the PowerPoint. 9. Identify a keynote speaker and put together a program for the event. Select a facilitator as necessary. 10. Contact discoverlaw.org for funding and sponsorship possibilities. 11. Contact your school’s SBA office to offer legal pads, pens, etc. for the attendees. Contact Person: Brandy N. Jackson at BrandyJackson@creighton.edu Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. This program requires collaboration from minority groups in the community, at the undergraduate, university and law school. If you find specific grassroots organization that are

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pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org.

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2010-2011 NBLSA BEST PRACTICES MANUAL

ANNUAL SOUL FOOD COMPETITION:

Synopsis: The Annual Soul Food Competition should be an annual fund raising program that combines extraordinary culture with exquisite taste. Support for this program comes from professors, restaurants and small businesses. Please check to see if your school allows outside vendors. Some schools do not allow outside vendors because of liability reasons for food poisoning and allergies. Measures of Success: Success may be measured qualitatively, through a after action review process by the program coordinators and by a satisfaction poll taken from student participants. The program coordinators may ask the participants to give their feedback through email, word of mouth, or through written form. If feedback is given through word of mouth, it must be recorded by a program coordinator. PROCESS: Steps 1. Create a list of places of well-known and unknown foods. For example, Chinese, Japanese, American (South), Mediterranean, Jamaican, West Indian, Brazilian, European, Canadian, African etc. 2. Check with school, to avoid possible liability: Check with your school to make sure it’s permissible for students and professors to bring food for others to eat. Some schools may not allow this because of unintentional food poisoning or food allergies. 3. Create an incentive to participate in the competition. For example, raffles or prize giveaways. 4. If your school allows professors and students to participate in such a competition, create flyers to promote an interest meeting for the event. 5. At the interest meeting discuss the purpose and idea of the program and start a sign up registration process. Mention the disclaimer that BLSA does not accept any liability for the food that is prepared. Mention the incentive for participating in the competition. 6. Set a date, time and venue for the competition. 7. Make sure you choose a venue that has enough table space for the food and can seat a large crowd. 8. Make a list of people, the culture they will represent, the name of the food, and how many servings they will bring. 9. Make place cards with the name of the food, and the culture it represents. If you school does not allow professors and students to participate in food events OR for another way of conducting the program: 10. Create a list of businesses and restaurants that would like to donate or partner with you. If the restaurant/business partners with your organization make a deal with them. For example, the deal may be, if you supply us with the food and supplies we need for this event, we would like half of the proceeds. Some businesses may be more willing to donate since this may be a good way to real in customers.

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11. Create a list of confirmed businesses, the type of food they will present and the culture the food represents. 12. Choose a venue, date, and time for the event. 13. Email reminders once a week to the businesses/restaurants to confirm date, time, understanding and venue. 14. Continue to publicize the event during the week(s). 15. Note: It may be beneficial to hold the event during a time when everyone eats lunch. Contact person: Madeleine Roberts at roberts2@hawaii.edu Grassroots Organizations: Grassroots organizations were not used for this program in the past. The program coordinator may seek support from local businesses and restaurants for donations and food service. The benefit to the business is the possibility of increasing customers. If you find specific grassroots organization that are pivotal to the success of this program please send a friendly amendment to the National Director of Social Action at socialaction@nblsa.org

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Best Practice's Manual  

Best Practice's Manual